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St Peters Church Richmond. NSW

AT A PUBLIC MEETING of the Inhabitants of Richmond,
held at the School House, on the 23d October, 1835,
the Rev. Samuel Marsden in the Chair,
It was proposed by Mr. Cox, sen.; seconded by
the Rev. H. T. Stiles ; and resolved unanimously ---
1st.... That it is expedient to erect a Church in
this Town, for the celebration of Divine Worship,
according to the Form of the Protestant Episcopal
Church of England, on the Ground at the end of
George-street, originally set apart for that purpose.
Proposed by Mr. W. Cox, jun.; seconded by Mr.
G. Bowman ; and resolved unanimously ---
2nd.... That, to carry this object into effect, a Committee
be formed, consisting ot the following Members, of whom any
seven be competent to despatch business : ---
Mr. Cox, sen., Fairfield,
Mr. Cox, jun., Hobartville,
Mr. Bell, Belmont,
Mr. George Bowman,
Mr. William Bowman,
Mr. Faithful,
Rev. H. T. Stiles,
Mr. Martin, sen.,
Mr. C. Palmer,
Mr. Dight,
Mr. C. Powell,
Mr. Parnell,
Mr. G. P. Wood.
Proposed by Mr. William Bowman ; seconded by
Mr. Faithful ; and resolved unanimously
3rd..... That, to forward the object of this Meeting,
Funds be immediately raised by voluntary Subscription ---
that the Members of the Committee do agree to use their best
exertions to this end ---
that Subscription Lists be opened at the several Banks ---
and that an Appeal be made to the Public through the medium
of the following Newspapers :---
Sydney Herald, Monitor, Colonist, Australian, and Sydney Gazette,
to be inserted three times in each Newspaper.
Proposed by Mr Martin ; seconded by Mr. William Bowman ;
and resolved unaminously ---
4th.... That William Cox senior, Esq., be requested to take the
office of Treasurer, and the Rev. H. T. Stiles that of Secretary.

THE Protestant Population of Richmond and its Neighbourhood, as shewn by
the last Census, is upwards of 1300. The present Building used as a
Church will barely accommodate one hundred Persons : and as the other
engagements of the Chaplain prevent him from having more than one service
on the Sunday, it is obvious that out of every thirteen Inhabitants who
may wish to participate in the ordinance of Divine Worship, twelve
must be deprived of that privilege, because there is no room for them.
This simple fact constitutes, in itself, a strong appeal to the
liberality of the Residents, not of Richmond only, but of the Colony
generally. It is earnestly hoped that the individual, domestic, and
social advantages to be derived from a due observance of the Public
Worship of Almighty God, will be so appreciated by the Colonists
universally, as to produce a corresponding willingness to contribute,
when, as at present, an opportunity is offered them towards an object
so fraught with benefits to our adopted country, our families, and ourselves.

Contributions will be thankfully received by William Cox, Esq., Hobartville ;
by the Rev. H. T. Stiles, Windsor; by the Rev. S. Marsden, Parramatta;
by the Members of the Committee ; and at either of the Banks in Sydney.

Subscriptions already promised :—
£. s. d.

The Archdeacon....... ...........200 0 0
Mr. Cox, senior, Fairfield.........35 0 0
Mr. Cox, junior..... .....................25 0 0
Mr. George Bowman ..............20 0 0
Mr. William Bowman .... ......... 20 0 0
Mr. Faithful .... ............. .......... 20 0 0
Mr. John Town, junior.......... ..20 0 0
Rev. H.T. Stiles............... ..10 0 0
Mr. Onus.... .................. ..........10 0 0
Mr. John Town, senior. ...........10 0 0
Mr. Martin..... .... ......................6 0 0
Mr. Martin, junior. ... ............ ......6 0 0
Mr. Seymour... ..... ... ..... .........5 0 0
Mr. Cross .... .............. .... .......5 0 0
Mr. Hughes...... . ......... ... .........5 0 0
Mr. Dight ..... ........... ....... .... ....5 0 0
Mr. George Pitt. ..... .......... ..... ..5 0 0
Mr. Robert Williams. ..... .... .....5 0 0
Mr. Price ...... ..... .............. .. ....5 0 0
Mr. G. P. Wood . .... ..... ..... ......2 0 0
Mr. J. Markwell ... ..... ......... ....1 0 0
Mr. Robert Aull ...... ..................1 0 0
Mr. William Farlow..... .............1 0 0
Mr. C. Palmer ...... ...................1 0 0
Mr. Benjamin Cawer.... ...........1 0 0
Mr. George Mortimer..... .........1 0 0
Mrs. Crawley. ... ..... ... ............1 0 0
Mr. John Brown. .... ..... ..........3 0 0
Mr. Thomas Eather..... ... .......2 0 0
Mr. P. M'Alpin...... ... ...............2 0 0

Collected by the Rev. S. Marsden.

Rev. Richard Hill.... ....... .....2 0 0
Mr. R. Jones, M C...... ...... .6 0 0
Mr. R. Smith. ... ..... .......... ..2 0 0
Mr. Thomas Marsden......... .2 0 0
Mr. Caleb Wilson..... ...........2 0 0
Mr. Richard Fitzgerald. &
Mr. Robert Fitzgerald ..... ...5 0 0
Mr. James Chisholm. ... .....5 0 0
Mr. Samuel Terry.... ..........10 0 0
Mr. Edward Terry..... ............2 0 0
Mr. John Terry.... .. ... ...........2 0 9
Mr. P. W. Flower...... ...........2 0 0
Mr. C. S. Marsden. .... .........1 0 0
Mr. John Connell...... .... .......2 0 0
Mr. William Walker...... .......3 0 0
Mr. Thomas Walker..... .......2 0 0

Source:-
The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser
Saturday 21 November 1835
Page 1
Transcription, janilye 2014.

Historical notes: The site of St Peter's church was nominated in Governor Lachlan Macquarie's planned layout for Richmond. He intended to have the church, schoolhouse and burial ground on a very beautiful elevated block immediately above Pugh's Lagoon, a fine basin of fresh water. The burial ground, then 1 hectare, was surveyed by James Meehan and consecrated by the Rev Samuel Marsden and fenced by William Cox. The first burial was George Rouse and contains the headstones of many early Hawkesbury settlers The first school/church opened in 1810. It played an important part in the early life of Richmond. It was situated in Francis Street near the northern corner of the cemetery. The lower floor was the residence of the schoolmaster whilst the upper room was used for school and church purposes.

This building soon became too small to meet the ever increasing congregation and at a meeting chaired by the Reverend Samuel Marsden on 26 November 1835 the inhabitants of Richmond resolved to erect a church for the celebration of divine worship. A notice calling for tenders to erect the church appeared in The Australian on 18 October 1836. The committee formed to forward the project included Mr Cox, Sen,"Fairfield', Mr Cox, Jnr 'Hobartville', Mr Bell, 'Belmont', Mr George Bowman, Mr William Bowman. Mr. Faithful, Rev H.T.Styles, Mr Martin, Snr., Mr. G Palmer, Mr. Digit, Mr C Powell, Mr Parnell and Mr CP Wood. By 1833 the sum of 570 pounds had been subscribed and 200 pounds had been donated by the English Church Society. Tenders were called for the erection of the church in 'The Australian' on October 1836.

Built as a result of the establishment of the Church Act of 1840 St Peter's church was one of four churches consecrated in 1841. The church was built on a site overlooking Ham Common and the Hawkesbury River flats. It was agreed 162 hectares of the common would be given as Glebe land for the church. It was opened by Bishop Broughton on 15 July and designed by Francis Clark and built by James Atkinson who also built St Bartholomew's, Prospect and St Thomas, Mulgoa at the same time. It was designed in the Georgian style in contrast to most of the other churches, except St Batholomew's, which have Gothic style detailing. Clarke was responsible for a number of Sydney houses and the church of St Mary Magdalene at St Marys. A simple rectangular building with a square tower topped with a timber spire the original layout of the pews was to face inwards to the centre of the church. In 1850 a porch designed by E Blackett was added to the northern side and not long after, in 1857, a chancel was added. Once the chancel had been added the internal pew layout was altered to face the chancel. William Woolls, a prominent late nineteenth century writer on the botany and flora of Australia was incumbent at St Peter's from 1873 and from 1877 to 1883, Rural Dean of Richmond. . In the churchyard a small obelisk was built of bricks from the old school church building. THE CEMETERY is older than the church and contains the graves of many early pioneers including John Bowman, Thomas Matcham Pitt and Lt Thomas Hobby of the NSW Corps. Chief Officer at Hawkesbury in 1800 and a supporter of Maquarie. It was the second cemetery dedicated in the Hawkesbury district, around 1814, four years after St Matthews. THE RECTORY was designed by Francis Clarke and completed in 1847 and is said to have been a copy of an English rectory known to Bishop Broughton in the mid 19th century vogue for picturesque rectories. It was added to in 1863 by Edmund Blacket. Later alterations have changed its quality.
Reference: http://www.environment.nsw.gov.au/heritageapp/ViewHeritageItemDetails.aspx?ID=3880010


Some Ups and Downs of an old Richmondite (june 1910)

Mr Alfred Smith.
Chronicled by Robert Farlow.
[For the Gazette:]
"As we have spoken of Hobartville,
will pick up the track there and go along
the Yarramundi road, where I knew
several old hands of the good old type.
Where Mr Matthew Nowland is living
was, in my earliest days, occupied by the
Dight family. The old Mr Dight I don't
remember, but his wife was living there
with the family when I first recollect it.
I knew three of the boys before they were
married Sam, George and Arthur.
There were two more, John and Charles.
It was a flour mill worked by horses when
I was a lad, and I used to go there with
Mr James to get flour, and often saw the
mill at work. Mr and Mrs Douglas,
parents of George, James, Robert, &c,
lived there for a long time. When they
left they went to live where they resided
for so many years, and where George,
Robert and Mary died. Mr Bowman
Douglas still occupies the home where
they died. While the Douglas family
were living in Dight's old home Mr. Nowland
purchased the property, and after they left
went there to live and has been
there ever since. The place has been
known for many years as 'Mountain View.' The
hill hard by the front which leads to the lowlands
has been known as Dight's Hill many years, and the
lane along the lowlands in that spot known as Dight's lane.
While Mr and Mrs Douglas were living there I often put
sheep in the little orchard alongside, in which there
used to be good grass.
Not far from the front of 'Mountain View' is a piece
of land bounded on one side by the late Albert Cornwell's
old home, now occupied by Mr Nathan Mitchell, and on the
other by a piece of land belonging to Mr Nowland, and
the front faces the reserve.
There was a house there many years ago, and Daniel Eaton
lived in it for many years. He rented Bowman's farm down
under the hill, and was a big farmer. He also had a
station property on the Big river. Mentioning Mr Dan Eaton
and his station reminds'me of one trip I made from there.
I was on the station this trip for about a fortnight.
Most of the family were there, and as they were homely people,
it was a pleasant time. I remember Johnny, George, Tom, Billy,
and Mrs James William's were there.
Aiex. Gough, father of Johnny Gough, fattened the sheep I
brought down that trip. I went, to school with the Eaton boys;
also with Jane, the eldest girl. The old house above-mentioned
near Nowland's I don't remember anyone else living in after
old Mr. Dan Eaton, and it has gone the way of old places, many years.
Where the Douglas home is still to be found belonged to Mr William Small,
father of Ben, the wheelwright, and Bill, the blacksmith, who carried
on together a wheel wrighting business in Lennox-street, Richmond, for
a very fair lifetime; father also of Susan, who now lives in Richmond in
the skillion on the site of the old business. He sold the property to
one of the Bowmans, and it passed on to the Douglas family.
The piece between the last named and Albert Cornwell's old
home belonged to Thomas Small, who managed to stick to his
little lump of land. On this property his son, Ned,
lives, near the reserve. Ned married a Miss Baldwin, sister
to George, Dick, Janey and Betsy. Mrs Ned Small used
to be a great raiser of geese and when I would be crossing the
old common with stock you could see her feathered stock
about in all directions. Arthur, Charley and Ada still live
in the old home, handed down to them by their father and mother.
Where 'Cracker' Cornwell's (as he was nearly always known) old home
is I remember when there was no house on it. The original house
was built by Mr Isaac Cornwell, who purchased the property
from one of the Small family we have been speaking about.
Mr Isaac Cornwell had the house built and went there to live
after he left the shop in Richmond.
Albert Cornwell's old home has also been occupied by such men
as the late Mr Cleeve, at one time stock inspector, the
late Edward Robinson ; and the present squire of Hobartville
put in a few years there.
Farther along the Yarramundi road we have the home of the
Faithful family on our right, standing some considerable distance
back from the road. The old home seems to be tumbling to
pieces and looks much the worse for wear.
The first I knew living at 'Lakeville' were Mr Faithful and
his first wife. She died there. I remember Jane, a daughter
of the first wife, who married a Mr Wilshire. Mr George Faithful,
a son, was a tall, nice young fellow' and I knew him very well;
but another son, William, I didn't know much about, although I have
often seen him. I knew old Mr Faithful's second wife, who was
Miss Maria Bell, of 'Belmont.' She died at 'Lakeville' also, and
Mr Faithful ended his days here.
I remember a little accident Mr. Faithful had out on the former
common, close to the old top entrance gate of the Hobartville big paddock.
Mr James and I were coming home from the bush at Londonderry with a load
of wood and when we got about where I have stated he was out of his gig
and gigs were aristocratic turnouts, in those days. James made enquiries
and Mr Faithful told him he had lost one of the lynch pins out of
the axle and the wheel came off.' Mr Faithful wanted to go to Sydney
urgently couldn't catch three trains a day. from Richmond then and
was in a great way about the pin. Without a pin he couldn't go on, and
he couldn't find it. His servant, who we knew as 'Red Bill,' was
with him so he came in to our place and managed to get one to fit the axle.
This was really the first time I got
to know Mr Faithful. Miss Jane was a good living young woman, and one
Sunday going home there happened to be a row on at the old 'pub' at the
corner of Bosworth and March streets. There were no police watching
the pubs on Sundays in those times. On this occasion there
was an extra big row aboard. Miss Faithful came up at night
to make a complaint to George James, then a constable, about the noise
and row. Mr James went down and soon settled the disturbance.
Going along towards Yarramundi we have old 'Bronte' the home of the
Pitts. The old house still stands, but years ago a fine modern cottage
was built for Mr Edwin Pitt, and he removed into it. Since then the
old home has been occupied at different times by men who have worked on
the place. Old Mr George Pitt was the first I remember at 'Bronte.' I
knew him very well and a grand old man he was. He was my boss
for three years at the punt, and during that time I always found it
a pleasure to have anything to do with him. He once stood for Parliament
against the late Hon. William Walker, for Windsor and Richmond, and was
only beaten by some eight or ten votes.
But about 'Bronte.' Dan Carter could tell a lot more
than most of us, as he lived with old Mr. Pitt for a long while,
and Mr Pitt thought there was no one like Dan.
In the corner of Bronte estate at the junction of Crowley's lane
and the main Yarramundi road, there was a house which has only been
pulled down a few months, and the first person I remember living in it
was Bob Johnson, or, as he was generally called, 'Hominy Bob.' He was
a poultry dealer.
Then I knew and remember Ned Harper, who was a blacksmith living
in this house and had his shop there for many years. The late
John Madden had a wheelwright shop there, and lived in a
little three roomed place with a kitchen which stood between
Harpur's house and Pitt's gate, where the men's house stands.
He also lived in the house where Mr. Charles Davis lived, and
which is still occupied by Miss Eliza Davis and her brother Ted.
At the time John Madden lived in it, it was owned by John Markwell.
I will content myself with mentioning some of the-Old hands of Yarramundi
who come to my mind. Among them were my old friend John Crowiey ;
Mr Isaac Pearce, who lived for years in a house just inside the
road fence, and near the entrance gate ; Thomas Kirk, where
William Pearce lived ; Bill Paris, Andy Farrel, who married the widow
of Bill Paris; Greenhalgh, who kept a pub;
Krochnert and Low, who kept shop ;
Robert Aull kept the 'Governer Darling' hotel, and
John Wheeler's father kept the pub later on ; Dan Dickens, kept a pub
there and Tom Kirk also ; Johnny Tindale, William Heath, William Farlow,
who kept the 'Waggon and Four Horses' in the old two storey place ;
Tom Hornery and his wife. Poor old Tom was drowned in the lagoon, and
I have heard them say old Mr Pitt gave Ben Mortimer 5 for finding his body;
Gilbey the well sinker ; Cross lived near the lagoon in Crowley's paddock.
I remember there used to be great fights there. Some of
the battles fought there were between Ben Mortimer and Tom Saunders, a
Windsor chap ; and Joe Windred and Ben Mortimer.
I remember hearing Mr James talk about a fatal fight out there
somewhere about the waterhole just down from the Presbyterian church,
and I remember him telling me he arrested a man for it. But all these
old hands are gone the way of all flesh, and after all they
were friendly and good natured people. That was my experience, anyhow.
Yarramundi can claim to be the home of some people who have lived to
be great ages. Among them can be reckoned the Timmins family of the
older generations. I knew 'Granny'Timmins, as she was known in later years,
and her husband very well. I think she was over ioo years
old when she died. Mr and Mrs Timmins used to come round the back
bushtrack to Richmond no H.A. College, or thought of such in those days,
and cail at Mr James and take the old lady James into Windsor to attend
service in the Roman Catholic Church there on Sunday mornings. We had no
churches then so handy to up, yet the old hands thought nothing of going
miles to attend service. My wife has often walked to Penrith to attend
the Roman Catholic Church and thought nothing of it. But coming back to
this old couple Timmins. They had several children, some of whom lived
to be great ages.
I went to school with 'Betsy'Timmins, who married the late Mr. George Mortimer,
also with Agnes who became Mrs George Pearce. Betsy lived to be a very old
woman, and Agnes was an old woman when she died.
Then in my early days old Mr Markwell was living down on the flats on the
farm, which, I think was bought by Mr Klein, where he settled down
after leaving off school teaching, and now belongs to his daughter
Mrs Albert Smith.
I went to Mr Hogsflesh's school with Thomas Markwell, and
John, his brother. John was found dead in the bush near where
Sam Wood used to live at one time. He went out for a load of wood and had
it on, and made a pot of tea. He must have dropped dead,
or passed away very easily, for I believe he was found next morning resting
with his head on his arms near his billy. His horses were standing there with
the load on the dray, and must have had a rough time standing all that time.
Old Mr. Markwell had a man working for him I remember well. He used to bring
vegetables, mostly cabbage, turnips, and melons, to Richmond for sale. He had
an old white horse with one 'bumble' front foot and was much attached to the
old animal. The old man went by the name of Cheshire.
Then I knew old Mr William Stinson. He it was who married
the widow of Mr Wheeler, who kept a pub in Yarramundi.
I remember old Mr George Mortimer living out there. I remember George, Ben,
William, Alf, Tom and James of the boys. Among the girls I knew Annie,
who married John Lord, and another whose name I think was Sarah.
Then I can remember the founders of the Williams family out that way,
Mr Robert Williams and his wife lived where Wellington Freeman is
living. I remember old Mr Williams dying and being buried on a Sunday.
His widow married William Maloney.
Then I knew Mr Williams' son, Thomas, both before he was married and
after, when he lived in a weatherboard house which stood off the present
main road where Mr John Devlin is living.
I knew Thomas Howell who had the 'flour mills out there.
George Wood also had a house along the lane going down to the
present falls. His first wife was Miss Caroline Aston, and his second
Mary Collins. I went to school with Caroline Aston, and her sister,
the widow of the late John Wood, of the Grose, Annie Crowley,
sister of the late Mr John Crowley of 'Crowley Park,' was another schoolmate
of mine from out that way.
As 1 have I said, I went to school with John Markwell, and I remember
the sad accident which happened him many years before he died. I put
him over the river in the punt, one moonlight night about 9 o'clock
and when he got up on the bill after leaving the river he started
galloping the grey mare he was riding. When he got about in front of
where Mr Bowman Douglas lives there was a large stump along the track,
and he came to grief against the stump. The mare was killed, and he
was rendered unconscious, and was found very early next morning by
Joe Fletcher, who was going to work at Dight's. John was unconscious
for several days, and though he pulled through, it used to come against
him at times.
On the farm where Mr John Riley lives, I remember the old Mr.
Shields of all living. He would be grandfather of the present
Mr.George Shields, senr., of Bosworth-street Richmond. Old
Mr. Shields was a little man, but a worker.
On the adjoining farm I remember old Mr George Pearce living for
a great number of years. He had several sons and a daughter, Clarissa.
Among his sons with us to-day we have Sam, who has suffered two losses
with fire at the hands of some malicious persons; Edwin, who was for
many years working a part of 'Bronte' farm and now lives at
Agnes Banks, and William. The sister I belive still lives at the
old home on the farm.
One time I was talking to old Mr Pearce about the price of corn
and telling him I knew old Mick Gavin to bring Mr James 25 bushels from
Little Kurrajong, as it was then known, at 9d a bushel
He told me he knew it to be sold for 8d a bushel.
Mr George Pearce had a brother Charlie who lived down the lane
going to the river falls. He was a boot maker by trade, I
think. His wife was a great nurse. They reared a large family
of boys and girls. Some of the boys are still in the district.
George lives in Richmond. Edward in the old home, and works
for Mr P. Charley, of Belmont Park ; and Arthur also works for
Mr Charley, and looks after the Clarendon property
Among the daughters of Mr Charles Pearce we have with us
Mrs. John Riley, of Yarramundi, Mrs William Parker,
Agnes Banks, and Charlotte, who lives at North Richmond with
the Pitt's, of 'Sunnyside,' I think.
While speaking of Mr and Mrs Pearce living down the
lane near the falls, reminds me that behind Mr Howell's place
near the river old Jack Timmins lived a long time while he
was droving.
Old Mr. William Scott lived on the property where old
Mr.Michael Waters is living, only nearer the river.
Many a time I have been on the farm when Mr Scott lived there.
Mr James and I used to go down, generally on Saturday, and get
a bag or two of chaff for the horse, and some marsh mallows
and wild mustard out of the wheat for the cows. The wild
mustard was very plentiful in those times. I went to school
with two of Mr Scott's children John, who died in Kurrajong I
think, and Betsey, who married Jack Timmins. There were two other girls.
Fred Thomson had the next farm to Scott's before he took the
farm near Parnell's.
The adjoining farm to this I remember the late Peter Hough
occupying for some time.
Somewhere about there a man named 'Jacky' Green owned a farm and
lived on it for many years. I remember Fred Thomson had a farm near
Parnell's old place. Parnell's was a weatherboard piace and I have
heard them speak about him keeping a pub there. I knew the Parnell
family very well. There was Edward, who died only a short time ago,
William, Thomas, Charles, John and Matthew. The eldest
girl, Mary, married a Mr Joseph Cope, of Windsor, and I believe
the solicitor of the name in Sydney is a son of his;
Elizabeth' married a Mr Baker ; and Sarah, Mr. Theo Cooper. Agnes was
unmarried and there were two more younger ones I knew very well, but
I forget their names, as the time I speak of is so long ago.
Thomas Parnell, the father of the children mentioned, and wife, and
some of the family, after leaving this district, went to
live on the Hunter River, somewhere near Maitland, and Mrs Parnell
told me they gave 8,000 for the place. William married and stayed
at the Hawkesbury river, and it was for him I worked at the punt.
I shall never forget Mrs Parnell's kindness to me while at the river.
Mr. Parnell always made it a practice to give me a pound every Christmas,
as he used to say, "for your kindness to the daughters by obliging
them with the boat at different times." In the old place on the
opposite side, of the road to Parnell's and it is a ruin now I knew
a boy and girl by the name of Sam and Mary Glasseye when they lived there
and came to Hogsflesh's school. I have heard their father kept a pub there,
but have no recollection of it.
After them came two brothers, William and Edward Jeffrey.
William was married, but Edward wasn't. I remember them keeping a pub,
and it was these men Mr. Ben Richards bought out when he left the
house in March street, Richmond, where Mr. C. S. Guest has his saleyards
now. Mr Richards kept a pub there for some time, and lived in
this place for about 18 years. It was while he was living here he started
butchering at Blackwattle Swamp,Sydney.
Not far away from here, on the corner of Dight's lane and the lane which
runs along the farms to the river end of Crowley's lane, there was a slab
house of four rooms and a verandah. The first I remember living there was
John Edwards. Jerry Hansell lived in it for a long time, but this old house,
too, has been a thing of the past many years.
While Jerry Hansell was living there I put a man named Samuel Wickham
over the river in the punt one morning with his two horses and a load
of corn and potatoes. When he got about opposite Jerry's house there
was a big mud hole, and while trying to steer the horses to miss it they
slewed and jammed him between the dray and the fence and killed him on
the spot. He married a widow, Elliot, grandmother to our present Jack,
and had his stepson, Simon, with him at the time.
And before I leave what we might call the Yarramundi block I must mention
that Andy Farrell lived on the farm adjoining
Mr Markwell's, and the late Abe Eather married his only daughter,
Ellen, while he was living there. Going down the river from where
Mr B. Richards kept the pub,
I'll say a little about some old hands I knew, and as near in the
order they came as my memory has them, which I think will not be far out.
The farm next to the old pub at Richmond bridge was owned by one of the
Rouses. I remember old Mr. and Mrs. Dempsey living on it for a long time.
I remember the three sons, James, Joseph, and George ; also two girls.
Liza married Henry Mills, and Betsy was single at this time and often
stayed with the Mills when they lived in Lennox street, Richmond, where
Harry Fong lives. This old place plays a big part in the early history
of Richmond. I believe Betsy Dempsey married after the family
left here. Mr. and Mrs. Rigney lived on the farm for a long time.
Mrs. Seymour bought this farm afterwards for 1350.
Mr. Guest, Charley's father, was the auctioneer and put it up for
sale at old Mr. John Town's while he was keeping pub over the river.
Mr Richard Watts (father of George, James and Henry
Watts, three well-known farmers and horsebreeders over North Richmond way
for many years) was empowered by Mrs. Seymour to bid for the property on
her behalf, and he managed to secure it for her. George Watts has passed
away. He was a wonderful man. Although he had lost his sight completely
he was a splendid judge of a horse, and a hard man to deceive in this respect.
His brother, Henry has also passed away. He, too,
was a good judge of horses, and can be reckoned among the Hawkesburyites
who have helped to make the district notable for good horses. Harry was
living at the time of his death at Yarramundi, but died, I believe, in one
of the hospitals in Sydney after an operation. James, the other brother, is,
I think, still alive.
The next farm belonged to Mrs Seymour, and Mr Richard Watts mentioned
lived there many years, and both he and his wife died there. Thus it
will be easily under stood how it was Mr Watts was empowered by Mrs Seymour
to purchase the adjoining place for her.
The next farm belonged to Mr Sam Thorley. Old Mr Thorley died there, and
his widow lived there for some time after. While Mr Thorley had it
Mr Edward Allen and his wife (parents of the late Charles Allen,
of North Richmond) lived near Thorley's house on a little piece of the
farm for a long time, and died there. Then I remember a man who had only
the use of one arm living on a part of Thorley's farm. This old man was a great
gardener, and grew a lot of peas. He used to bring them up to Richmond on
his shoulders in bags and sell them about the town. Then William Thorley's farm
came next, and on it he lived a long time.
Afterwards Mr Ben Richards got it from Thorley. William Thorley had one son,
a saddler, and the last time I saw him was at Narrabri, where he was in
business.
On what was William Thorley's farm I remember Mr Mills (father of old
Mrs Thomas Collison, who has not long left Windsor) keeping a school in a
weatherboard place. Afterwards Mr. Mills kept a school at Grose Vale somewhere
about the present post office.
Then we have the farm on which Mr Edward Inall (the present Albert's grandfather)
lived for many years, and I think he died there. At the time of his death he was
what can truly be called a very old man. Mrs Edward Inall, who was a sister, I
have heard, to William Scott, died down there. Some of Mr Inall's children
I remember, John, and another's name I am not certain of just now. There were
some daughters, but I knew very little about them.
Somewhere here Mr. William Ives lived. I think it was between Stevenson's farm
and the one owned by Edward Lewis. I remember some of the family. The
present Mrs. John Pearce, of Agnes Banks and she must be getting on in years now
was one of the girls. Then we have the farm on which Mr Edward Lewis lived for very
many years, and died there. I knew some of his family very well. The two
boys, Jack and Ned, I went to school with, and the daughters I can reckon
among my schoolmates were Mary Ann, the present Mrs William Tomkinson, of
Richmond, and another one who married Mr Henry Whitney. There were others
in the family. We come along to the old farm owned by Mr Thomas Griffiths,
father of the present Tom, senr., of Richmond, and our Tom is getting on
in years now. The old Mr Griffiths was the first I remember living there,
and was a big farmer. He kept a pub, 'The Richmond Inn' in York-street, Sydney,
at one time, and the wife and myself, have stayed there while he was keeping it.
Among his family I knew our present
Tom, Bob, of Penrith, Jack, who was a saddler, Jim, the great old-time foot
runner, and Bill, who was a great man among music. Mrs John Gough. who
was so well-known and popular in Windsor, was one of the daughters.
The old Mr Griffiths was a great horseman and could ride a buckjumper in
good style; also a good all round sport. He had two brothers who used to
stay with him down there, but went up country Richard and Jonathan.
The next farm was owned by the late Mr Edward Powell. I knew
him and his wife, and many bags of corn husks for the milking cows we brought
from there. Among Mr Powell's family were Edward, Richard, George, Sydney,
and Henry. Emma was the only girl I remember, and she married old Mr Joseph
Onus. I went to school with Richard, George, Sydney and Henry.
Then some where handy old Mr Joseph Stubbs, a great farmer, lived for many
years, and died there. The first wife died there.
Mr Stubbs married a second time - Paddy Kenny married his widow. Paddy died
there.
Then on the farm which belonged to Mr Ben Richards, and now occupied
by the H. A College, old ' Granny 'Hough lived for many years. It was she
who laid Mr Richards on to buy it and he secured it at 1200. He often told me
that was the price he gave for it. And speaking of 'Granny' Hough reminds
me I was speaking to the present Joseph Onus, of Richmond, a little while ago,
and Margaret Catchpole's name cropped up.
Mr Onus' mother was Annie Hough, and a sister to the late Peter, John and George,
sons of 'Granny' Hough. He says he has heard 'Granny' speak of Margaret,
and that she was buried in that portion of the cemetery running parallel with the
present Sunday School ground.
Then old Mr James Huxley, who put in so many years on the Grose farm,
rented it from Mr Richards for many years. Afterwards Pat Casey lived
there a long, while, also Mr Hill, father of Jack, formerly of
Richmond, and our present Herb Hill.
Then we have the farm which was occupied by old Mr John Hough for a fair
lifetime, so to speak. He reared a large family there, and both he and his
wife died there he dying first.
Then there was a farm where Mr George Hough lived for so many years. The
first man I remember living on this farm was George Wilson, who, as I have
stated, lived at one time where Tom Miles lives in Lennox street. Richmond,
and had some fine stallions. While down there he was farming.
I went to school with Wilson's two sons George and William, and his
his daughter, Betsy. They used to come in a spring cart to school. Between
where George Wilson lived and the next place old Mr Pearson, father of Albert,
the elder, of Richmond Bottoms, lived for a good while. This farm then belonged
to Mr Thomas Tebbutt. I remember the two sons, Albert and Charley, pretty well,
also two girls who became Mrs M. Phillips, junr., and the late Mrs John Gosper,
of Windsor. I knew old Mr Pearson fairly well. He bought both bundle and
sheet stringy bark from me when I was at the punt. On another occasion while
I was at the punt he bought a hundred slabs from me. He told me one day it
was a wonder I didn't trade in this sort of things, and I told him I hadn't been asked
for any such, so he told me he wanted a hundred and they must be good and not
above the price he stated. I got the slabs and made twopence each on the deal,
which paid me well, as I had no trouble with them in the handling. Then came
Mr William Smith, who was a big farmer and lived there for many years.
I remember three of the boys James, William and Joseph, when they were young.
He also had some daughters. Later on in life I got to know them, among them
being the present Mrs Duncombe, of Richmond, the late Mrs Alf. Bailey,
Mrs. John Bailey, of Richmond Bottoms, and the late Mrs Charles Westall.
Mrs. Smith was a sister to the Mrs Bailey who died at Clarendon some time ago at
an advanced age, and also a sister to Mrs Single, mother of the late Joseph Single,
who was a prominent man in the Hawkesbury Race Club and Agricultural Association
for so many years.
The next farm to Mr William Smith's belonged to Mr. Thomas Bailey, who was also
a big farmer in those days. I knew his boys, John, William and Alfred. I have often
bought oaten hay and oats off Mr Bailey for the racehorses while I kept the pub on
the road at Clarendon.
Then adjoining each other were the three brothers, George, William and Thomas Eather,
who suffered so disastrously in the big flood of June, '67. Old Mr John Single of all
owned a farm near the Eather brothers on which Mr Charles Eather, father of the boys
mentioned, lived for many years in a big brick house. I knew Mr. John Hand,
who lived on a farm adjoining Charley Eather's. He was a farmer and had a run,
I am told, out in Long Wheeney.
Further along there were James Upton and "Grandfather" Hoskisson, who lived
there and owned farms George Freeman, though living in Windsor, worked a farm
down there.
We will take an imaginary walk back to the old crossing at the punt.
David Brown lived somewhere near the farm occupied by Charley Eather.
One time I met Mr Brown, who happened to see a good chance of making
a little money, but he hadn't any cash on him at the time. He asked
me to lend him some and I gave him what he wanted, and in
'no time' he returned me my money and some for interest.
Back at the punt again we will record a few little incidents I have
thought of since I started. There had been a fair flood and is was
the first day the punt got to work. Charley Eather was keeping
the pub at the time, and a flock of cattle came down. They were put into
the river to swim over, except one which they couldn't get into the water,
as he was very contrary. After a deal of galloping about they got him in
and be began to ring about and wouldn't steer for the other side.
The owner called out for me to bring the boat down and steer him over.
I had a lively half hour of it and nearly got capsized more than once.
The owner of the cattle and five or six others went up to
the pub to have drinks, and when they came back I was back at the
North Richmond side. They got into the punt to go over. When we
were nearly over, the man who owned the cattle put two coins into my hand
and closed it on them so as the others would not see what they were. I
didn't look at what they were just at the time as I was busy with the punt.
When they were all off the punt except a man namsd Davis, he said to
me 'Half a sovereign, Alf, I suppose.' I opened my hand and
showed him what the coins were six pence for the owner and his horse
coming over in the punt, and sixpence for my half hour's hard work
after his bullock in the river ! I took good care to let that
man do the best he could with his bullocks in the river after that.
Then I put Mr. James Martin he wasn't Sir James then
and "Grandfather" Hoskisson over two days when they were electioneering
the other side of the river the first time James Martin was
elected to Parliament. Mr Hoskisson took great interest in that contest,
and worked hard to get Mr Martin in.
Another day I had a lady overboard. I was putting her over on horseback
in the punt, and when about half way over and there was 18 or 20 feet of
water at the spot the horse began to plunge and wanted to make back to the
other side, with the result he got overboard, lady and all. The horse struck
out for the shore, and the woman stuck to him and managed to get out safely.
A young man once brought some horses to the punt one wet day and was putting
them in to swim them over to take them to Kurrajong. When the horse he was
riding got into the water he began to play up and unseated his rider. I happened
to be handy with the boat and pulled over to him quickly and he grabbed the
side and nearly swamped the boat. He begged me to lift him in, but as he had a
big overcoat on, and was a big chap, I hadn't a hope of getting him into the
boat. However, he clung to the side till I got over. He often remarked that
only for me he would have been drowned.
Thomas Carnell also nearly met his death in the river, while I was there. He had
been over to the races at the old course, near Charley Eather's pub, and I was
putting him across in the punt. When we got the best part of the way over he
wanted me to pull faster and I told him I couldn't. He was a little annoyed about
it, and said he wouldn't wait. He put his spurs into the horse and made him
jump off the flaps of the punt, and in he and horse went, and under they went.
When he came up the horse was plunging about and soon unseated him. I had the boat
alongside and went to his assistance. I wasn't strong enough to lift him into the
boat, so he clung to the side of it till I got ashore with him.
I had another experience, and a case of nearly drowning
-- a woman this time. An old lady had been to Richmond with her basket
of eggs 2/- a dozen then and I was putting her
back over the river in the boat. I cautioned her not to stand up as she
might overbalance, but she wouldn't take the advice and into the water she went.
I couldn't get her into the boat, so I had to hold her with one hand to help her
keep a good hold of the side of the boat, and work the oar with the other till I got
her over safely.
Mrs John Town was living in the cottage where Mr John Pitt
lives, and as the old lady I had saved knew Mrs Town very well,
she went up to her and got a change of clothes.
Mr Lockrey was a farmer up Kurrajong and was going into Windsor for loading for
Mr John Lamrock, senr., with his four bullocks and dray. When he got to the
river, and I was going to put him over in the punt, I could see the bullocks were
thirsty and I advised him to water them before he got on to the punt,' as there was
a good watering place there. He said he would water them when he got over to the
other side. When we got, over I wanted him to take them out for safety, but be
reckoned he could manage them alright and wouldn't take them out. When he
put them in they were very thirsty and began swimming about and tried to make
back to the other side. He soon found out he couldn't manage them, and saw
they stood a good chance of being drowned. I saw there was trouble and
got the boat and went to their assistance. I tried my best to get the pin out of the
pole. After a deal of trouble I got it out and managed to save one beast. The
poor old man was in a great way about losing three of his bullock, and reckoned
he was ruined. Another old friend of mine was going to Kurrajong and as I
was putting him over in the punt, and the river was rising very fast, I asked him to
be sure and get back very soon as we expected to be compelled to take the punt
off before very long. He was fond of a little drop and stayed away longer than
he should have. When he came back we had taken the punt off about an hour,
and had no chance of getting it on again. He wanted me to put the
punt on and put him over, but I told him it was impossible,
and offered to put him over in the boat. He said he wouldn't wait for the boat, and
would swim his horse over. I saw how he was and begged him not to attempt
such a thing. He put his horse into the water in spite of my pleadings.
The piebald horse he was riding was a great swimmer and struck out for the
other side. I expected something would happen to him going over, so I followed him
up in the boat. When he got about half way the horse began plunging and put
him off. He was no sooner off the horse in the water than he grabbed the horse's
tail and hung on for all he was worth. I wanted him to come to the boat but he
wouldn't, preferring to stick to the horse's tail, and the animal took him safely over
and landed him about where the cattle used to land. He got a change of clothes
at a friend's place up on the bank and a drop of something to warm him inside.
Another day I put Thomas Onus over in the punt about two o'clock as he was
going up to Freeman's, on the Comleroy Road, to, have a look at a lot of cattle
which had to be there that day. When I was putting him over the river was rising
and I wanted him to get back as soon as possible. After he left the river began to
rise very rapidly and we had to take the punt off. When he came back, well after
dark, and found the punt off he came and told me he had to get to Sydney next
morning the train was only running to Blacktown then and begged me to put
him over in the boat. It was very dark and the timber was coming down and I
didn't care about facing it. I explained to him the danger I was running, and that
I couldn't swim. He then asked whether, if he got Jim Merrick to come with me
with a lantern and keep the timber off the boat, I would put him over. He told
me he would give me a pound and Merrick ten shillings. After some persuasion
I agreed, but told him I was frightened of the job and that it was not
for the sake of the money I was doing it. Merrick came up and we chanced it, and
on our way over he pushed five or six lots of timber off the boat with a pole about
six feet long. When we got over I wanted to go up and stay at Parnell's, but
Merrick wasn't a bit afraid and persuaded me to come on back. On the way back
he pushed off several lots of timber.
That pitch dark night and dangerous trip I have never forgotten.
Dr. White, of Windsor, used to ride a fine black horse
and when he went to Kurrajong I always put him over in the punt. No matter
what late hour, or how cold the winter night might be when he was returning
and I had to put him over, he would never have the punt. I always had to use
the boat for him and swim his horse behind. When we got over I always had
an iron hoop scraper which I kept for the purpose, and gave his horse a good scrape
down and rub over. The old doctor used to say it was as good as a feed of corn to
the horse. Dr. White married a Kurrajong girl by the name of Miss Townsend, who
lived about opposite the old Church of England at the foot of the Big Hill.
I have heard it said he was a very clever doctor.
He always treated me well for the trouble I took with him
and his horse.
I had a mishap there one day. I was bringing a lot of sheep over for
Mr. Ben Richards. Old Mr Joseph Onus got his horse on to the flap of the punt just as we
were going to start and he didn't think it was safe and jumped off again. When
we got about half way over I had Harry Gibbs helping me that day the sheep
got fidgeting about and on top of one another in one corner, which knocked our
punt out of balance. The water began to flow in rapidly, and down it went in quick
sticks. When we saw she was sinking we got the sheep out. and were lucky
enough to lose none. We got Bill Carverdown he was a good hand at the work
to help us get the punt up, and it took us nearly two days to get it right. As a
rule we bad tbe boat with us, but this day we didn't, and it taught us never to
be without it in the future. As the river was up it meant a great inconvenience to
the people as they couldn't get over the Yarramundi falls. There were two lots of
sheep to come over and they meant easy earned money for us. I had got paid
beforehand for them and we got the first lot over and when the sheep on the other
side saw them feeding along the banks in they rushed and swam over. In one lot
one sheep was drowned, and in the other lot none were lost. I shall never forget
one little incident that happened while I was down there. Mrs Parker, who lived
in the house on the hill where Johnson Pay and William Fuller lived, used to
come over and work for Mrs Parnell. She was over there one Christmas eve, and
when she was going home they gave her a sucking pig for her Christmas dinner.
She put it in a bag and I put her over in the boat, and home she went delighted
to think they would have such a fine Christmas dinner ; but that night the pig
got out. Next morning Mr Parker was hunting all round among the neighbours
to see if they had seen the pig, but could not find any trace of it. A little
later he was telling me about their misfortune. I happened to be talking to
Mr Parnell and told him about Parker's pig being lost
when he 'told me the pig was up with its mother. I saw Parker and told him what
Parnell had said, but he could hardly believe the pig would swim the river, and
thought I was having a lark with him. He made up his mind to go and have a
look for himself, and when he got up it was there right enough. He bagged it
again and had the pleasure of tasting it for Christmas dinner after all.
Jack Turner was coming over from the other side and we had a stage outside of the
punt on the side the rope worked, and Jack set to work to help me over to make
it easier for me. It was a bit windy and made the punt lurch about a little and
the rope happened to come off the roller, and into the water Jack
went backwards and got a fine ducking. He was a jolly natured
fellow and took it in good part I shall always think of poor old Dr.
Wittaker as he was coming back from Kurrajong and over in the punt.
William Parnell and I were out on the stage pulling. It was windy and the rope came
off the roller on the end Parnell was working and in he went. We were about 40
yards from the shore when it happened and Parnell had to swim. As soon as he
went in I saw he made for the flap of the punt and got underneath it, and began
singing out he was drowning and for the doctor to catch hold of his hand. The old
doctor was in a great state of mind about William, as he used to call him, and
wanted me to catch hold of his hand. I told him William wanted his hand, not
mine, but the old doctor wouldn't catch hold of it. I didn't bother, as
I knew well enough Parnell was a good swimmer and that he could get out safely.
Mr. Parnell told me after he was on for a lark with the old doctor, and what
he wanted was to get hold of his hand so that he could pull him in and give him a ducking.

SOURCE:
Windsor and Richmond Gazette
Saturday 4 June 1910
Saturday 11 June 1910
Saturday 18 June 1910
Saturday 25 June 1910
Page 14
transcription, janilye 2012

Peter Hough 1776-1833

My 3rd Great Grandfather was Peter HOUGH, born in Paris, France 1776 and died in Richmond, New South Wales on the 17 March 1833. He was buried at St Peter's Church of England Cemetery Richmond, on the 19 March 1833.

Peter Hough was indicted for burglary, 16th September 1795 and tried at the Old Bailey For steeling money and silver from St.Paul's Coffee Shop in London. For this charge he was found Not Guilty

On the 17 February 1797 Peter Hough was again before the courts. This time in Middlesex and charged with Petty Larceny. He was charged with "that on 8 February 1797 with force and arms that he did steal one Red Morocco Pocket Book of the value of 10 pence from James Daniell. Found guilty and committed to Newgate Prison until the sentence of 7 years Transportation could be carried out. Between 12 October 1797 and 31 December 1797 at Woolwich; England, Peter Hough was imprisoned on board the hulk Prudentia. On 2 January 1798 at Woolwich it was noted he had been ill but was recovering from venereal disease.

Peter HOUGH was named on the Hillsborough ships list as Peter HUFF sailed to New South Wales on the Hillsborough taking 218 days. The captain was William Hingston. She left England on 23 November 1798 and arrived in Sydney Cove on 26 July 1799. As well as convicts, free settlers were also also onboard. 95 died on the voyage.

The convicts were ironed two together and were accommodated on the lowest deck where conditions were extremely grim, there being no direct access to outside light or air. Each man was given a wooden plank two feet wide as a bunk and a blanket and a pillow. The weight of the irons was 11 lbs.

The Hillsborough was one of a convoy of about 15 ships and there was some delay in their sailing because of storms. During the trip typhoid struck and 100 convicts died. The typhoid began on 12 November. The disease was carried by lice and, due to the lack of hygiene, it spread rapidly through the ship.

The convicts were given only 13 pints of water each to last them for a week. This was to be their ration throughout the journey despite the fact that their provisions were salt meat and they had to sail through the tropics in appalling heat. The journey began with a gale and one can only imagine the conditions as the convicts were locked below and many were seasick.

The convicts were deeply rebellious and the Captain and crew responded with dreadful cruelty. A number of the convicts had found ways to remove their irons, but this was reported to the captain by an informer amongst the convicts. They were thereupon all ordered on deck, had their irons examined and, if these had been interfered with, the convicts were punished by between 12 and 72 lashes. The Captain further threatened to hang any more convicts found interfering with their chains.

By March the ship arrived in Table Bay, now the site of Capetown in South Africa, where they stayed for some considerable time as a number of convicts were dying from typhoid and the ship had to be cleaned and provisioned. Conditions on the shore were also very poor, the convicts being forced to dig graves for their dead comrades whilst shackled together.

The Captain finally realised that the treatment he was meting out would interfere with the payment he was to receive for the delivery of live convicts, and conditions began to improve toward the end of May with liberty to go on deck at will if one was sick, as much water as was wanted, but by now the death toll had risen to 63 of the original 300.

The ship sailed down the "roaring forties" going through a number of terrible storms and arrived off Van Diemans Land (now re-named Tasmania) on 4 July. Fighting their way up the east coast of Australia, they arrived off Sydney Heads at 4 am on 26 July. At daylight the ship sailed up the Harbour and the convicts were finally unloaded on 29 July.

Only 205 of the 300 original convicts were landed in Australia, and of these 6 more died in the first few days. The Hillsborough had been one of the worst convict ships ever to bring a load to Australia, and Governor Hunter wrote to the Secretary of the Colonies, the Duke of Portland, acquainting him with the situation and describing the convicts on the Hillsborough as \"a cargo of the most miserable and wretched convicts I ever beheld". The reason for this was a difference in the payment method. Whereas previously the Government had paid 23 per head for every convict transported to Botany Bay, James Duncan owner and contractor of the Hillsborough was to receive only 18 per head with an extra 4/10/6 for every live convict arriving in Australia.

Source; William Noah 1754-1827


In July 1801 Peter appears on the census at Parramatta with Susannah Tillet 1780-1846 convict arrived on the 'Speedy' in 1800
No marriage. They had 2 Children
Peter 1801-xxxx
Henry 1803-1880 m Cordelia TOOTH 1828-1885 in 1848

Spouse Catherine Rigby 1782-xxxx died in Windsor. Convict arrived on the 'Nile' 1801, Catherine Rigby, sailed back to England after gaining her freedom, leaving Louisa in the care of her father.
No marriage
Children Louisa 1805-1881 m. John CUPITT 1799-1937 in 1819

Spouse Mary WOOD 1793-1880 The daughter of John WOOD 1768-1845 and Ann MATTHEWS 1762-1819. Peter married Mary at St.Phillips C of E Sydney, New South Wales on the 19 September 1809.

The children of this marriage were:-
1.Sophia 1810-1885m. Timothy LACY 1806-1887 in 1827
2.John 1812-1896 m. Margaret MAGUIRE 1812-1904 in 1837
3.George 1813-1878 m. Mary BANNISTER 1820-1875 in 1838
4.Peter Joseph 1817-1888 m. Jane Sharp LOVELL 1823-1894 in 1840
5.Mary 1821-1904 m.William CORNWELL 1827-1906 in 1850
6.Ann 1822-1889 m. William ONUS 1822-1855 in 1842 and William REID 1833-xxxx in 1857
7.Eliza 1825-1870 m. Charles EATHER 1827-1891 in 1848
8.Elizabeth 1830-1909 m. James Edward MARSDEN 1830-1887 in 1850
9.Sarah 1833-1878 m. William BENSON 1830-1923 in 1855

He was Publican of a hotel opposite the Toll Gate on the Sydney Road in Parramatta from 1825 till the end of 1828.

On 4 November 1826 at Parramatta, Peter Hough and Timothy KELLY were committed for trial at the Quarter Sessions, for assault and battery of John Hall of Evan forcibly taking his horse and cart from him on the high road, but the trial did not proceed.

janilye

Below is the Toll Gate on Sydney Road. On the Sydney side of Parramatta.


John Wood 1768-1845

My 4th great grandfather was John WOOD, he was born in 1768 at Ealing, Middlesex, England.
John had been a coachman in England to the commissary General - John Palmer.
John Wood , along with a man named John Jennings were accused of highway robbery on the 2nd March 1789.
Tried on the 27th April 1789 and sentenced to death. In June 1789 the sentence was commuted to transportation for Life then in 1790 reduced again at Somerset assizes to 7 years transportation.
John Wood remained in Newgate prison until 24 February 1791 when he was transferred per "Venus" for the "Albermarle" at Portsmouth from there on the 27 March 1791, he departed, arriving in Sydney on the 13th October 1791
John WOOD arrived in Australia on board the Albemarle on the 13 October 1791.
In the 1828 census, John was working for his son in law, Peter Hough 1776-1833.
John's headstone at St Peter's Cemetery Richmond, stated he was 94 years old when he died. He was actually 77, indeed someone made a blue. His headstone is beside his daughter Mary and her husband Peter Hough.

John partnered Ann Matthews around 1792-3. No marriage has been found. Ann had been born at Enfield in London on the 11 April 1762. The third of seven children born to of Matthew MATTHEWS 1730 and Ann SMITH 1735.

[ANN MATTHEWS was indicted for burglariously and feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling house of John Lewis Andre, about the hour of two in the night of the 7th of October, and burglariously stealing therein, eight silver table spoons, value 40s. four silver desert spoons, value 16s. four tea spoons, value 8s. five cruet tops, value 20s. two silver salt spoons, value 2s. a diaper table cloth, value 2s. and a linen towel, value 8d. his property.]

Ann was tried at Middlesex and found guilty on the 17 October 1791, then sent to the hulks to await transportation
She departed on the Kitty on 31 March 1792 and arrived in New South Wales on 18th November, 1792.
Ann died on the 21 December 1819 at age 57 and was buried 3 days later from St Phillips's Church Sydney. Her grave is most likley to be under the Sydney Town Hall.

The children of John WOOD and Ann, nee MATTHEWS were:-
1.Mary Matthews WOOD 1793 1880 m. Peter HOUGH 1776-1833 at St.Phillips C of E Sydney, New South Wales on the 18 September 1809.
This couple had 9 children;
Sophia Hough 1810 1885 m. Timothy LACY 1806-1887
John Hough 1812 1896 m. Margaret MAGUIRE 1812-1904
George Hough 1813 1878 m. Mary BANNISTER 1820-1875
Peter Joseph Hough 1817 1888 m. Jane Sharp LOVELL 1823-1894
Mary Hough 1821 1904 m. William CORNWELL 1827-1906
Ann Hough 1822 1889 m. 1.William ONUS 1822-1855 2. William REID 1833-xxxx
Eliza HOUGH 1825 1870 m. Charles HOUGH 1827-1891
Elizabeth Hough 1830 1909 m. James Edward MARSDEN 1830-1887
Sarah Hough 1833 1878 m. William BENSON 1830-1923

2.Ann Wood 1796 1831 m. Daniel PEGG 1791-1860 at St.Phillips C of E Sydney, New South Wales on the 4 April 1820. Daniel was the son of Samuel PEGG 1750-xxxx and Mary TAYLOR 1753-xxxx Daniel died in Victoria and Ann in Tasmania.
This couple had 7 children:-
Eliza Pegg 1817 1875 m. William WHITEHOUSE 1813-1891
Mary Ann Pegg 1821 xxxx m. Thomas GORDON 1810-1887
William Pegg 1822
George Pegg 1824 1870 m.1. Winifred EGAN 1820-1857 2. Ann HEFFERNAN 1825-xxxx
John Pegg 1826 1827
Jane Pegg 1828 1829
James Pegg 1829 1896 committed suicide on 15 September 1896 at Heidelburg, Victoria

3.John Wood 1798 1883 m. Mary Ann DALEY 1811-1894 the daughter of Charles Daley 1775-1831 and Susannah Alderson 1780-1854at St.Matthews C of E Windsor, New South Waleson the 28 December 1829. Both John and Mary Ann died in Windsor.
The children of this marriage were:-
Elizabeth Wood 1830 1901 m. William Thomas GOSPER 1740-1908
Sophia Wood 1832 1837
John Wood 1834 1915 m. Lucina Ann DORSET 1857-1885
George Wood 1836 1889
James Wood 1839 1913 m. Emma SIMMS 1840-1916
William Wood 1841 1920 m. Amelia NORRIS 1840-1927
Mary S Wood 1843
Emma Wood 1845 1916
Henry Charles Wood 1847 1893
Sarah Ann Wood 1849 1850
Thomas Wood 1852 1892

4.George Wood 1807 1881 m. Jane CROSS 1818-1888 the daughter of Thomas CROSS 1775-1843 and Martha Eaton Bryant 1798-1839 at St.Peters C of E Richmond, New South Wales on the 29 April 1834. Both died in Windsor.
The children of this marriage were:-
Thomas Wood 18351881 m. Elizabeth HOSKISSON 1836-1925 in 1855
William Wood 18361924 m. Sarah CUPITT 1837-1923 in 1859
John Wood 18381913 m. Mary RICHARDSON 1841-1912 in 1862
George Wood 1840 1840
Robert Wood 1841 1844
Edward Wood 18431910 m. Margaret LYONS 1841-1902 in 1864
Ann Wood 18451938 m. 1.John Frederick COBCROFT 1838-1875 2.Richard Matthew REYNOLDS 1856-1928 see photo
James Wood 18471931 m. Elizabeth Grace SHAPTON 1845-1908 in 1872
Martha Wood 18491921 m. William Ephraim WILLIAMS 1846-1919 in 1868
George Wood 1851 1851
Henry Wood 1853 1853
Albert Wood 1855
Jane Sophia Wood 18571941 m. Frederick Allan Liddell 1861-1935 in 1889
Andrew Wood 1859 1948
Charles Alfred Wood 1861 - 1902



janilye

The photograph is Ann Wood 1845-1938 submitted by Kylie G Carter


Windsor, Richmond, Kurrajong, NSW.

A LIST OF SUBSCRIPTIONS for the purpose of erecting a Presbyterian Church in
Windsor, and School House in Richmond and Kurryjong.

WINDSOR ......................................... s. d.

John Harris, Esq., J P., Shanes Park ........50 0 0

John Harris, Jun., Esq., Shanes Park ........50 0 0

Sir John Jamison, M. C. Regentville .........15 0 0

Mrs. Panton, Windsor.............................10 0 0

John Panton, Esq., Windsor .....................10 0 0

John Betts, Esq., Sydney.........................10 0 0

Richard Fitzgerald, Esq. Windsor .............10 0 0

Mr. Robert Smith, Windsor ........................18 18 0

Thomas Cadell, Esq., Windsor..................10 0 0

H. Graham, Esq., Surgeon, Windsor...............5 0 0

Mr. Patrick Anderson, Windsor........ ..........5 0 0

Mr. Peter Adamson, Windsor .....................5 0 0

Mr. William White, Windsor......................5 0 0

Mr. George Knight, Windsor......................6 0 0

Mr. George Walker, Windsor .....................5 0 0

Mr. Peter Alexander, Windsor ...................5 0 0

Captain Moffatt, Parramatta ..................3 3 0

Mr. Richard Bell, Wilberforce ................3 3 0

Samuel North, Esq., P. M .....................1 1 0

Mr. J. Teale, Windsor ........................2 2 0

Mr. John Barker, Windsor......................1 0 0

Mrs. M'Keller, Windsor .......................1 1 0

Messrs. J and J. Tebbutt, Windsor ............2 2 0

Mr. A. M'lntosh, Windsor......................2 2 0

Mr. Robert Stewart, Windsor...................2 2 0

Mr. James Cazalet, Windsor ...................0 10 0

Mr. William Heath, Windsor ....................1 0 0

Mr. Joseph Clegg, Windsor ....................0 5 0

Mr. George Watson, Windsor ...................1 1 0

Dr. White, Windsor ............................2 2 0

A Friend .....................................0 5 0

Mr. A. Baldwin, Freeman's Reach...............0 10 0

A Friend .....................................1 1 0

Mr. George Hall, Junior.......................1 1 0

Mr. P. Byrnes.................................1 0 0

Mr. Charles Gaudry ...........................1 0 0

Mr. John Bullivant............................1 0 0

Mr. G. Seymore ...............................0 10 0

Mr. C. Summer ................................1 0 0

Mr. John Suffolk .............................1 1 0

Mr. John Walden, Wilberforce..................1 0 0

Mr. Reuben Green, Wilberforce.................0 5 0

Mr. John Hogan................................0 10 0

Mr. Israel Lett, Wilberforce .................0 10 0

Mr. Charles Martin ...........................0 5 0

Mr. Thomas Lynn ..............................0 10 0

Mr. J. Scarf .................................0 5 0

Mr. John Masking . ...........................0 10 0

Mr. Isaac Gorrick, Junior ....................1 0 0

Mr. John Yoeman ...............................1 0 0

Mr. Thomas Graham..............................1 0 0

Mr. M. Power...................................0 10 0

Mr. Joshua Rose................................0 5 0

Mrs. Ann Season................................0 10 0

Mr. P. Bushell ................................1 0 0

Mrs. Mary Cunningham.. ........................0 10 0

Mr. W. Nowland ................................1 0 0

John Odell, Esq................................2 2 0

Mr. J. Malony .................................0 10 0

Mr. John Wood ..................................1 0 0

A Friend.......................................0 5 0

Captain Maughan .......... ....................1 0 0

Mr. Williim Cross ............ ................2 2 0

Mr. John Primrose .............................1 1 0

Mr. William Walker ............................1 0 0

Miss Ellen Ferguson ...........................1 0 0

Mr. Joseph Flemming............................1 1 0

Mr. Walter Howell, Penrith ....................0 10 0

Mr. John Gardener..............................1 0 0

Mr. William Walker, Cornwallis ................0 10 0

Mr. J. Frazier.................................0 5 0

Mr. Jessie Upton...............................1 0 0

Mr. Andrew Frazer..............................0 5 0

F. Beddeck, Esq. ..............................1 1 0

Mr. William Salone ............................2 2 0

Rev. J. Fullerton ............................50 0 0

IN RICHMOND AND KURRYJONG

George Bowman, Esq ...... ... ................25 0 0

William Bowman, Esq...........................20 0 0

Mr. John Burns ...............................20 0 0

Thomas Cadell, Junior, Esq.....................1 0 0

Mr. Faithful ..................................5 0 0

Mr. Robert Aull................................2 0 0

Mr. William Farlow ............................1 0 0

Mr. Howell ............. ......................2 0 0

Mr. G. Crosse....... ..........................2 0 0

Mr. Edward Powell..............................1 0 0

Mr. Thomas Markwell............................2 0 0

Mr. John Stevenson ............................5 0 0

Mrs. Hough.....................................1 0 0

Mr. Joseph Stubbs .............................1 0 0

Mr. Robert Wilson .............................3 0 0

Mr. P. M'Alpin .....,..........................5 0 0

Mrs. S. Eather.................................2 0 0

Mr. Samuel Pane ...............................1 0 0

Mr. Wm. M'Alpin................................5 0 0

Mrs. Wm. M'Alpin ..............................2 10 0

Mr. Wm.Sharpe..................................5 0 0

Mr. Thomas Onus ...............................5 0 0

Mr. Joseph Onus ...............................5 0 0

Mr. Daniel Hearskin ...........................1 0 0

Mr. Paul Develin ..............................1 0 0

Dr. Seymour ...................................1 0 0

Mr. W. E. Brew.................................1 0 0

Mr. A. Cornwall....................... ........1 0 0

John Robinson .................................0 10 0

Mrs. Harrington................................0 2 6

Mr. Robert Martin, Senior. ............. ......2 0 0

Mr. R, Martin, Junior..........................2 10 0

Mrs. M.Martin .................................2 10 0

Mr. John Town ...................................1 0 0

Mrs. Town....................... ..............1 0 0

Mr. W. Price ......... ........................1 0 0

Mr. John Henderson ............................5 0 0

Mrs. Mortimer..................................1 0 0

Mrs. J, Wilshire ............................. 2 2 0

Mr. Douglass .............................. ...3 0 0

Mr. Rollinston.................................0 10 0

Mr. John.......................................1 0 0

Mr. John, Junior...............................1 0 0

Mr. Malpass ...................................1 0 0

Mr. Walsh .....................................1 10 0

A Friend ......................................1 10 0

481 2 6

More than two hundred pounds of the above subscriptions have been already received, and the Trustees respectfully inform the Subscribers that John Panton, Esq, is Treasurer for the district of Windsor; and George Bowman, Esq., is the Treasurer for that of Richmond, Subscriptions will be thankfully received and acknowledged by these gentlemen.

Source; The Colonist (Sydney, NSW : 1835 - 1840)
Saturday 14 July 1838


Work was started on the building situated in Drummond St, South Windsor in 1839 and completed some time in 1842. The church was officially opened in 1843.
The first minister was Rev. Mathew Adam 1811-1863, who had emigrated from Scotland in 1837 on the Portland and conducted a school. He remained there till his death in 1863.

The last service was on March 12, 1966. The church was then demolished due to termites and damp.
Since then regular services have been held in the hall in the church grounds.

Source: Source: W & R Gazette (from 1888 to December 1982)
Reference: 23 October 1968, p 1

Theresa LOVELEE 1865-1898

My great grandmother Theresa LOVELEE was born at 'Mollee', Wee Waa, on the banks of the Namoi in New South Wales in 1865 the eldest of nine children to Thomas LOVELEE 1840-1941 who also owned the Narrabri Meat Works and his wife Margaret, nee MCNAMARA 1842-1904 Margaret was a shcool teacher at the first school in Narrabri.

Alfred McAlpin EATHER,commonly known as 'Mack' a Stock and Station Agent from Narrabri,was instantly attracted to Theresa's sultry beauty and after a courtship of only two months he and Theresa LOVELEE married on the 25 December 1891.

Mack had been born at 'Henriendi' on the Namoi,the youngest son of ten children to Charles EATHER 1827-1891 and Eliza HOUGH 1825-1870, the daughter of Peter HOUGH 1776-1833 and Mary, nee WOOD the daughter of John WOOD 1765-1845

The children of the marriage Between Theresa and Mack were:-
1. Alfred Charles EATHER 1892 1892

2. Colin Charles EATHER 1894 1966 married Sarah Josephine MCKEE 1894-1937, the daughter of Edward William MCKEE 1855-1930 and Sarah Mary HALL 1862-1938 Daughter of Patrick William Hall1821-1900

3. Kenneth Thomas McAlpin EATHER 1896 1898
4. Ernest Herbert Edward EATHER 1898 1898
5. Infant twin Stillborn EATHER 1898 1898

After the difficult birth of the twins Theresa died on the 1 April 1898. She is buried at the Narrabri Old General Cemetery.
After the funeral Mack walked away, that day, never to be heard of again.

My grandfather Colin Charles EATHER, the only surviving child was raised by his step grandmother, the second wife of Charles EATHER 1827-1891, Martha Mary RIDGE 1843-1920 the daughter of John Ridge 1850-1867 and Charlotte Margaret COBCROFT 1820-1906

1 comment(s), latest 1 year, 10 months ago

Charles Eather 1827-1891

Charles EATHER, My second great grandfather was the third child and second son of Thomas EATHER 1800-1885 and Sarah nee McALPIN, was born at Bulga 24 October 1827. In 1884 his parents moved back to Richmond, and it is there he grew up. He may have attended the little school in Francis Street, and used to help out on his father's farm near Richmond.
In 1840 he was an apprentice and apparently he absented himself from work on some occasions.
On 17 October 1840 he was charged in the court at Windsor with "having absconded himself". The case was settled. The trade in which he was apprenticed is not known and it is very doubtful that he completed it. His interests seem to have been associated with the land, and in his later teens he undoubtedly would have visited the family property "Henriendi", his father's station on the Namoi River, and there gained further valuable skills in grazing cattle and sheep and some knowledge of station management.
On 30 August 1848, shortly before he turned twenty-one, Charles married Eliza HOUGH, age twenty-two, the daughter of the late Peter HOUGH 1776-1833 and his wife Mary (nee WOOD) of Richmond. Eliza was the seventh of the nine children of Peter and Mary and had been born at Richmond. She and Charles had known each other since childhood. Her father had been born at Paris in France in 1776, but at the age of 19 years had been charged with stealing money and silverware from St Paul's Coffee Shop in London, where he had been employed. He was acquitted of this charge, but in 1797 he had been sentenced to transportation after a second offence, and arrived at Sydney on the ship "Hillsborough" in July 1799. He had married Mary WOOD, daughter of John WOOD 1768-1845 and Ann MATTHEWS, and all except the last of their children had been born at Richmond. Peter HOUGH had died in March 1833 when Eliza was seven. Her sister Ann was married to Charles's cousin, William ONUS. For about twelve years after-their marriage Charles and Eliza seem to have resided on the Hawkesbury, and then they went to live at "Henriendi" on the Liverpool Plains. Their first eight children were born in the Hawkesbury district, mostly at Richmond. The first to have been born on the Liverpool Plains was their ninth child, born in 1863.
Altogether during the first seventeen years of their marriage, ten children were born to them and all except one son survived infancy and lived to marry and have children in the next generation of EATHERS.
During the 1850's Charles probably assisted his father in his farming pursuits at Richmond and undoubtedly journeyed from time to time to "Henriendi". The size of that station increased over the years. In 1849 it was 15 square miles, but by 1853 it had been extended to an area of 25 square miles. In 1854 it was grazing 1,000 cattle. The annual rental at that time was 15/0/0.
In the late 1850's Charles's brother William Eather 1832-1915 and his wife Ann took up residence there.
On the 14 September at Richmond, another son and eighth child, Joseph Hiorns Rutter Eather was born, named after his uncle Joseph Hiorns RUTTER the son of Dr. Robert Champley RUTTER of Parramatta. 1861 Charles was given the station by his father.
It was just after the birth of Joseph that Charles moved his household to the Liverpool Plains.
On the 30 June 1863 Eliza gave birth to Alfred McAlpin at 'Henriendi'.
In 1865 at 'Henriendi' the tenth and last child of Charles and Eliza, Minnie was born, she was only five years old when her mother died. At age thirty she married Methodist minister Walter J WALKER 1868-1936 at Richmond in 1895 they moved to Bourke where their first child Gladys was born and then to Cowra where their second daughter Jessie was born. In 1908 Walter J WALKER was transferred to South Australia. Minni Hilton WALKER, nee EATHER died on the 3 May 1955 in South Australia.
The births of the last two children were registered at Tamworth, which was probably at that time the nearest centre on the Liverpool Plains where births, deaths and marriages could be registered. The births took place at "Henriendi".
The 1860's were important years for Charles, when he expanded his grazing interests. Settlement extended out beyond Bourke on the Darling River and runs were being taken up on the Warrego, Paroo and Bulloo Rivers in the south-west of the new colony of Queensland.
In 1864 the township of Cunnamulla. sprang into being on the Warrego River. By 1866 Charles EATHER had several runs on the Warrego. They included "Gumanally," "Back Bullinbillian" and "Back Moongonoo." In addition he held the lease of "Pinegolba," a run next door to "Henriendi" on Cox's Creek. Charles was well-known on the Liverpool Plains and had the nickname of "King of the Namoi".
In 1867, James EATHER, uncle of Charles and youngest brother of his father, then in his mid-fifties, left the Hawkesbury district and moved with his wife and some members of his family to the Liverpool Plains and obtained a part-interest in "Henriendi". About the same time, another of Charles's brothers, John Roland, who was age 24 years and still single, joined them on the station. Also living on the run or near by was yet another brother, Peter. With him were his wife and children. In 1868 there were no fewer than eight other men employed on the station. By then times were becoming hard for the graziers. Charles was grazing a large flock of sheep on "Henriendi" in addition to his large herd of cattle. Severe droughts persisted and pastoralists were faced with mounting problems, especially when the prices of wool and sheep slumped sharply. James EATHER's connection with "Henriendi" was short-lived.
By 1870 he had moved to land that he had purchased at Maine's Creek, a tributary of the Namoi River a few miles away to the north.

In the midst of these financial problems, tragedy struck Charles. He had taken Eliza down to Richmond for a holiday over the Christmas period and they were staying with Charles's parents at the "Union Inn". According to oral family history, on New Years Eve 1870, Eliza was reading a telegram when she died suddenly. She was only 45 years of age. Charles was left with nine children ranging in ages from twenty-one to five. He was faced with the unpleasant task of notifying Eliza's 77 year-old mother that her daughter had passed away. His affairs were about to crash and William Thomas Price, the undertaker who provided her with an expensive funeral, was one of the disappointed creditors still awaiting payment of their accounts months later.

Back at "Henriendi" in 1871, Charles was joined there by yet another relative. He was Samuel EATHER Junior, a second cousin of Charles and his brothers. Then in his mid-thirties, Samuel had grown up in the Hunter Valley near Warkworth. In that year 1871 Charles was pasturing 6,000 sheep, 500 head of cattle and 150 horses on the run, which was then a station of 32,000 acres (12,800 hectares), but before the year was out financial problems caught up with him and he became bankrupt. His eldest son, Henry Charles, was placed in charge of "Henriendi", "Pinegolba" and "Gumanally." There is a family legend that Charles's eldest brother Thomas, whose home was at Bulga, soon took over the responsibility of "Henriendi". If this was so, it was a situation which lasted only a few years, as by 1876 "Henriendi" was in the hands of one John Kerr CLARK, who was also the leaseholder of another run, "Gullenddaddy" (or "Ghoolindaadi") which adjoined the southern boundary of "Henriendi". By then "Henriendi" had been reduced in area to 11,920 acres (4,768 hectares) and was grazing 2,000 sheep.

The EATHER family had lost the historic station some forty-odd years after Thomas EATHER had established it in 1832. After 1870/71 the name of Charles EATHER no longer appeared amongst the "Henriendi" names on the Electoral Roll. His sons Henry Charles and Edwin had, by 1876, taken out the lease of another Liverpool Plains run "Norfolk", which had an area of 40,000 acres (16,000 hectares) and established themselves there. At some stage prior to 1882 the Liverpool Plains was divided into parishes and "Henriendi" became part of the Parish of Baan Baa. Parish maps record the names of the original purchasers of freehold portions in the respective parishes. That of the Parish of Baan Baa reveals that at some time in the 1860's Charles EATHER had bought a block of 135 acres (54 hectares) upon which the "Henriendi" homestead stood. He had also purchased an adjoining block of 137 acres 2 roods (55 hectares). Both blocks had frontage to the Namoi River. This had been a very wise move on Charles EATHER's part. Holding "Henriendi" as a Crown Land Pastoral Lease, he faced the ongoing fear that he might lose part of the run to "free selectors". By purchasing the blocks as freehold land he had been protecting himself from losing valuable river frontage. When the Parish of Baan Baa was surveyed into portions, the two blocks which Charles had bought became Portions 1 and 2 in the parish. Most of the remainder of "Henriendi" was surveyed into 24 rectangular portions of varying areas, and allocated the numbers 20 to 43 inclusive. John Kerr CLARK had purchased much of the station during the period that he had held the lease from 1876. The parish map records his name on no fewer than 17 of the other 24 portions that had been the "Henriendi" run. He had also purchased two other portions further north in the Pariah. Charles EATHER would have had his two freehold blocks taken away from him by the bankruptcy administrators in 1871, and it is likely that John Ken CLARK purchased them too.

In the years following the loss of his station in 1871, Charles EATHER had a number of occupations and probably spent more time in the Richmond district.
On 4 January 1876, at the age of 48, he remarried. His bride on this occasion was Martha Mary RIDGE 1843-1920, age 32 years, the daughter of John RIDGE 1815-1867 and his wife Charlotte Margaret, nee COBCROFT 1820-1906. Martha had been born in Wilberforce and had lived in the Hawkesbury district for many years The wedding was held at Windeyer.

Charles entered into a new occupation in 1878 when his younger sister Sarah 1834-1926 who married William EATON 1828-1906, decided to relinquish the licence of "Eaton's Hotel" at Muswellbrook. Charles took out a publican's licence and became the new licensee of the hotel, which had been owned by Thomas COOK since 1872. Hard times seem to have continued for Charles during the period that he was the proprietor of "Eaton's Hotel", and he sometimes found it difficult to pay his bills on time. 1n 1879 he made out a promissory note in favour of one D EVANS for the sum of 80/16/- ($161.60), but the Commercial Bank at Muswellbrook, where he had an account, dishonoured it because of lack of funds in his account. Over two years later the sum of approximately 22 ($44) of the amount was still outstanding and Sarah EATON received a letter dated 15 February 1882 from a Muswellbrook solicitor, notifying her that, if the sum was not paid within seven days, proceedings would be taken against her. Apparently she settled the debt on behalf of her brother.

While Charles and Martha were running the hotel at Muswellbrook, a son was born to them in 1880. He was named Donald. At the end of that year Charles relinquished his publican's licence and evidently he took Martha and their baby son to the Narrabri district. There in 1883 a daughter, Emily Matilda, was born. They were still residing in the same district when their infant daughter died in 1885.

In his later years Charles lived with Martha and their children in the Narrabri district. Charles was a very popular figure in the developing town, where he was a supporter of local activities, especially those related to the Namoi Jockey Club. By then he was referred to as "old Charley EATHER", the name a household word. A sportsman of the old school, At one time he was an untiring habitue of racecourses, but advancing years made his expeditions somewhat circumscribed, and he was contented with doing a little handicapping and the mild excitement to be derived on country convincing grounds. The old man had the reputation of being one of the best starters in Australia.

Following his death on 2 November 1891 at the age of 65 years, Charles was buried in the Narrabri Cemetery where his friends erected an imposing monument on his grave in Narrabri Cemetery, adding to the usual details the sanguine remark;

"Praises on tombstones are idly spent, His good name is a monument"

Death of Mr. Charles Eather.
Obituary fron the Narrabri Herald, 4 November 1891


On Monday evening last, about 6 p.m., after a long and painful illness, there passed over to the great majority one of the pioneers of the Namoi, a man who for upwards of forty years had made the north-west his home, and seen many changes and vicissitudes.
One who at one time was owner of vast tracts of country with every promise of an old age passed in ease and affluence, and one who had endeared himself to all who had the privilege of his acquaintance-better still, of his friendship. Such an one was Charles Eather, who passed quietly away at the age of 64 years, on Monday evening. Tended to the last by loving and kind friends, his slightest wish was anticipated; and surrounded by his relatives and a host of friends, he "passed to the bourne whence there is no returning." Many a good and earnest man may yet make a name for himself on the Namoi, but out of the limits of the present generation the memory of the true sterling friend who has just left us will never depart.
The funeral, which left the deceased's late residence at 4 p.m. yesterday afternoon, was the most largely attended yet seen in Narrabri, the cortege measurirg fully a third of a mile in length, and was composed of all the principal people of the town and district. The pall-bearers, all old and tried friends of the deceased, were Messrs. J. Moseley, J. M McDonald, W. H. Gordon, James Ward, sen., R. Spencer, and E. Poole. The coffin, which was of beautifully polished cedar, was almost covered with flowers.
The whole of the business places in town were closed during the progress of the procession through the streets, and at the grave the burial service was very impressively read by the Rev. W. J. Walker.



His widow Martha survived him by many years In 1898 she took in Colin Charles Eather the 4 year old son of her stepson Alfred McAlpin EATHER and Theresa nee LOVELEE and raised him as her own after Theresa died and Alfred left the district. Martha known as May died at Boggabri in 1920.

The children of Charles EATHER and Eliza, nee HOUGH were:_

1.Henry Charles EATHER 1849 1942
married Lucina Sarah J RIDGE 1857-1936 at Gunnedah on the 23 May 1877
The children of this matrriage were:-
Frederick Charles Eather 1878 1917 m. Nellie PONT 1880-1953
Bertram Henry Thomas Eather 1881 1965 m. Sarah May Damaris FRATER 1887-1979
Leslie Gordon Eather 1884 1969 m. Ivy Josephine KELLY 1889-1971
Royston Clark Eather 1888 1891
Olive Eather 1890 1978 m. Victor S HUGO
Elsie May Eather 1899 1964 m Wilfred Rupert TAYLOR
Eric Vaughan Eather 1901 1930 m. Amy Edwards

2.Peter Thomas EATHER 1850 1851

3.Edwin EATHER 1852 1890
married Catherine Agnes TURNER 1855-1933 at Gunnedah on the 14 April 1877.
The children of this marriage were:-
William Charles EATHER 1878 1878
Vera Eliza EATHER 1879 1940 married Thomas BURT 1875-1950
Alexander Munro EATHER 1880 1965 m. Ethel May MILLS 1890-1953
Blanche Marion EATHER 1883 1940 m. Albert Edward HEAGNEY 1881-1912
Emily Gertrude EATHER 1885 1967 m. Francis John THUELL 1893-1077
Joseph Mark Eather 1887 1971 m. Dorothy Maude HOLBOROW 1897-1944
Edwin Royce EATHER 1889 1945 m. Mabel Isabel JONES 1901-1971


4.Mary Ann EATHER 1854 1943
married James Thomas BRACKENREG 1852-1922 at Muswellbrook on the 29 April 1879.
The children of this marriage were:-
James Carrington Brackenreg 1880 1957 m. Helen Jane PERFREMENT 1883-1964
Linda Pearle Brackenreg 1881 1965 m. Alexander EATHER 1878-1942

5.Susannah Elizabeth EATHER 1856 1937
married Percy Charles CORNWELL 1853-1909 at Richmond on the 15 December 1875.
The children of this marriage were:-
Ila Eliza Cornwell 1876
Frederick Charles Cornwell 1878 1878
Alfred Abraham Cornwell 1879 1953 Blanche Stella CORNWELL 1881-1968
Frank Eather Cornwell 1881 1884
Theo Ernest Cornwell 1883 1947 m. Mabel Georgina ROONEY 1885-1961
Joseph Athol Cornwell 1886 1966 m. Ruby Ethel HUDSON 1892-1978

6.Matilda Sarah EATHER 1858 1941
married Alexander Munro COUSINS 1854-1923 at Muswellbrook on the 23 November 1888.
The children of this marriage were:-
Glencairn Munro Cousins 1883 1941 m. Ruby Ada Beryl DUNSTAN
Royston C Cousins 1885 1885
Alexander Munro Cousins 1887 1946 m. Marjorie Agnes R TOWNSEND
Ardersier M Cousins 1889 1963 m. Gladys Elvina DENNE 1892-1961

7.Eliza EATHER 1860 1944
married Lieut.Col. Walter BAXTER 1862-1928 at Patricks Plain on the 15 July 1886.
The children of this marriaGE were:-
Minna Baxter 1887 1928 m. Arnold Chambers McKIBBIN 1885-1951
Beatrice Eliza Baxter 1889 1974 m. Harold John MOORE
Victoria Baxter 1891
Thelma Merle Baxter 1904 1954 m. Alfred Ernest Herbert LANE

8.Joseph Hiorns Rutter EATHER 1861 1884
married Clara RIDGE 1860-1941 at Richmond on the 6 October 1861.
The children of this marriage were:-
Frank Hilton Eather 1883 1917 r. Blanche M MORTIMER 1878-1913
Martha Ridge Eather 1885 1970

9.Alfred McAlpin EATHER 1863 1915
married Theresa LOVELEE 1865-1898 at Narrabri on the 25 December 1891.
The children of this marriage were:-
Alfred Charles EATHER 1892 1892
Colin Charles EATHER 1894 1966 m. Sarah Josephine McKEE 1894-1937
Kenneth Thomas McAlpin EATHER 1896 1898
Ernest Herbert Edward EATHER 1898 1898
Infant twin Stillborn EATHER 1898 1898

10.Minnie Hilton EATHER 1865 1955
married Rev. Walter John WALKER 1868-1936 at Richmond in 1895.
The children of this marriage were:-
Gladys Eileen Walker 1896 1934 in Adelaide the result of a car accident
Jessie Winifred Walker 1898 1988 m. Hurtle Peter ROWE 1897-1983 at Ashfield, nsw in 1923.


The children of Charles EATHER and Martha Mary, nee Ridge were:-

1.Donald EATHER 1880 1954
married Gertrude Mary Eliza McGRATH 1886-1953 at Boggabri on the 23 February 1910.
The children of this marriage were:-
John Ridge Eather 1910 1976 m. Marjorie Lydia Bateman FORRESTER 1913-1982
Percival Thomas Eather 1915 1975 m. Marjorie Ethel BRETT

2.Emily Matilda EATHER 1883 1885

I wish to acknowledge The Eather Family History Committee and in particular,
John St.Pierre for the early research and history, which enabled me to compile the above.
I have changed very little, apart from a few minor corrections and additions - having been, in the past, elusive; particularly surrounding the genealogy. I have discovered several facts previously unknown and
for that I wish to thank technology and my ancestors for passing down to me, "Tenacity" - janilye



The photograph below of Charles EATHER taken about 1885
was donated to the Eather Family History Committee
by Jan Yelland


Eather Family History - Thomas Eather 1764-1827

The Voyage
When the first HEATHER's had settled at Chislehurst, the civil war had been raging in England, with Charles I and the Royalists battling against Cromwell and the Roundheads. By the time the fourth Robert Heather died in 1780, a hundred and forty years had passed. The Commonwealth had come and gone. The restoration which followed had seen the return of the Stuarts who in turn gave way to the House of Hanover. Wars had been fought in Europe and America and the American war of independence was currently in progress. Times had changed and people tended to travel more.

Thomas HEATHER reached adulthood and found employment as a labourer at Chilsehurst, the birthplace of three of his forefathers.

We do not know when or where Robert & Thomas's mother Elizabeth died, but if she was alive in 1787 she must have been appalled by the events which overtook the family. Younger son Thomas, then twenty three years of age and working at Chislehurst, was arrested in October 1787 & held in goal to answer a charge of having robbed a man of money and possessions. Five months later, on 17 March 1788, when the home circuit held it's next sitting at Maidstone, Thomas HEATHER appeared before the judge & jury. He defended himself as well as he was able without the assistance of any legal adviser, but was found guilty of the charges of having robbed one George COTTON of a silver watch and fifty shillings in a field near the Kings highway. He was sentenced to be hanged. On 18 April 1788 the Justices of the Assizes at Whitehall in London reviewed the sentences of the Home Circuit, and Thomas HEATHER was one of those who had their death sentences commuted to fourteen years transportation to a penal settlement beyond the seas.

Thomas spent the first two years of his sentence in goals in England. The first 14 months were probably spent in goal at Maidstone, where most Kent convicts were confined.

In May 1789, Thomas was moved from Maidstone goal to one of the hulks on the Thames river near Gravesend. These hulks were derelict ships tied up in the river to house prisoners who toiled in the nearby dockyards. About mid November, he was transferred to the ship NEPTUNE , the transport ship aboard which he was to make the voyage to New South Wales.

The ship "Neptune" was a vessel of 792 tons which had been built on the Thames in 1779. It was a three-masted, square rigged wooden ship, and was twice as large as any previous convict transport. On 14 November 1789, it left it's anchorage at Longreach and moved down the Thames to Gravesend. Three days later, with it's consignment of convicts on board it sailed for The Downs, the roadstead about five miles North-East of Dover. The part of the ship set up as the Convict's prison was the Orlop deck, the lowest on the vessel, well below waterline, so they had no portholes, no view of the outside world, and very poor ventilation.

There were four rows of one-storey high cabins, each about four feet square, two rows being on each side of the ship from the mainmast forwards, and two shorter rows amidships. Into these cabins no fewer than 424 male and 78 female convicts were crowded.

The appalling conditions under which these convicts were forced to live can be better appreciated when it is remembered that, immediately they had come on board, all convicts had been placed in leg-irons and these were not removed throughout the entire voyage. Into each of these tiny cabins were crowded four to six persons, chained in pairs.

Chained below, Thomas HEATHER would not have been able to take in the scenery as the ship "Neptune" had moved out of the Thames and come to anchor at The Downs, there to spend four days while stores and equipment were taken of board. Then anchors were weighed and the vessel left for Plymouth, a slow voyage which took six days after the ship overshot that port and the error wasn't detected until she was off The Lizard, from where a retreat was made back up The Channel. At Plymouth a series of disputes arose, involving the military, the contractors and the captain of the ship "Neptune". Amongst the military was Captain John MACARTHUR who was on his way out to the Colony for duty there. Accompanying him was his wife, Elizabeth, who kept a diary of events during the voyage. A feature of the dispute was a formal duel between MACARTHUR and Captain GILBERT of the ship "Neptune". As a result of the duel Captain GILBERT was replaced by Captain TRAILL, of whom Mrs MACARTHUR wrote prophetically that "His character was of a much blacker dye than was even in Mr GILBERT's nature to exhibit".

The ship "Neptune" stayed at Plymouth until 10 December and then sailed back along the coast to Portsmouth where it anchored in Stoke's Bay on the 13th. There she met up with two other vessels of the Second Fleet, the "Surprize" and the "Scarborough". The convicts endured the cold weather for twenty-four days before the West winds abated and allowed her to sail on 5 January 1790. She anchored at Spithead until the 8th, but then the winds proved "Faithless" and the vessel arrived back at Mother Bank on the 15th.

At last, on Sunday 17 January 1790, more than two months after leaving The Thames, the ship "Neptune" left Portsmouth and moved down the English Channel. In chains below, Thomas HEATHER would not have had the opportunity to gaze for one last time upon the land of his birth. The voyage was really under way and the convicts became well aware of this fact two days later when they crossed the Bay of Biscay. The sea was so rough that Mrs MACARTHUR recorded in her diary, "It could not be persuaded that the ship could possibly long resist the violence of the sea which was mountain high".

After a month or so the MACARTHUR's succeeded in being transferred to the ship "Scarborough" after they had had a series of disputes withe John's superior, Captain NEPEAN. Captain TRAILL might have been relieved to see them go. The voyage was nothing new to Donald TRAILL. He had been First Mate on the ship "Lady Penrhyn", one of the transports of the First Fleet. Apparently he had learned a few tricks from his earlier experiences.

Historical records indicate clearly that he deliberately starved the convicts on the ship "Neptune" so that he could draw extra rations for himself, and in addition, enrich himself by disposing of surplus rations on the foreign market at ports of call. One convict wrote later to his parents, "we were chained two and two together and confined in the hold during the whole course of our long voyage, without as much as one refreshing breeze to fan our langous cheeks. In this melancholy situation we were scarcely allowed a sufficient quantity of victuals to keep us alive, and scarcely any water".

Sickness was prevalent right from the beginning of the voyage. Heavily ironed and without adequate access to fresh air and sunlight; inadequately fed and without sufficient bedding for warmth at night, the convicts soon began to succumb to the ordeal of their conditions. By the time the ordeal of the cold weather was over they found that they were faced with another which was just as trying - the heat and humidity of the tropics as the ship "Neptune" crossed the Equator and continued south down the coast of Africa. By the time The Cape of Good Hope was reached after 87 days, no fewer than 46 of the convicts had died. Anchoring in False Bay at Capetown on 14 April, the ship "Neptune" stayed for fifteen days, taking on board food, water, a large number of cattle, sheep and pigs, and also twelve convicts from the ill-fated ship "Guardian".

The HMS "Guardian" had been dispatched with supplies for the infant colony of New South Wales in response to an urgent plea sent home by Governor PHILIP with the last returning vessel of the First Fleet. Unfortunately, after the ship "Guardian" had left Capetown on its voyage eastwards, the skipper, Lieutenant RIOU, had taken it too far to the south in his quest for the Roaring Forties, and the ship had run into an iceberg. Two months later RIOU had brought his crippled vessel back into the port at Capetown. The mishap had played a large part in the food shortages which Sydney Town suffered in 1790.

After its stay at Capetown, the ship "Neptune" departed on 29 April to commence its run across to Van Diemen's Land. The existence of the strait we now know as Bass Strait was unknown at that time, so all vessels heading out to Sydney Town via Cape of Good Hope sailed around the south of Van Diemen's Land. More deaths occurred amongst the convicts on board during this leg of the voyage, and while the ship "Neptune" beat its way up the east coast of New South Wales. By the time the ship made its way up Sydney Harbour and dropped anchor in Sydney Cove on 28 June 1790, it had built up the worst record of all convict ships of all time. In all it had lost 147 male and 11 female convicts, and upon its arrival landed 269 others who were sick.

Into Sydney Cove on the same day as the ship "Neptune" arrived, came also the ship "Scarborough". The ship "Surprize" had arrived two days previously. Fortunately the convicts on those ships had fared much better than had the unfortunate souls on the ship "Neptune". The arrival of the Second Fleet was a source of interest for those already in the colony, and many were attracted to the shore to take in the scene. What they observed as the prisoners disembarked was a shocking spectacle. Great numbers of those who came off the ship "Neptune" were not able to walk, or even move a hand of foot. These were slung over the ship's side in the same manner as a box would be slung over. Some fainted as soon as they came out into the open air. Some dropped dead on the deck, while others died in the boat before they reached the shore. Once on the shore some could not stand or walk, or even stir themselves. Some were lead by others and some crept upon hands and knees. All were shockingly filthy, with their heads, bodies, clothes and blankets full of filth and lice.

Somewhere amongst those who came ashore was Thomas HEATHER. It was a scene which he undoubtedly remembered for the remainder of his life. Whether he was one of the sick we do not know, but if he was he soon recovered. He had arrived in a settlement which was so short of food that the hours of public work had recently been shortened, and even the soldiers had pleaded loss of strength. Amongst those who witnessed the shocking spectacle down at the shore that day was Governor PHILIP himself. Not surprisingly, he ordered that an inquiry be held into the conditions on the ship "Neptune".

Thomas HEATHER arrived in the colony when the settlement at Sydney was 2 years old. A second settlement was also being developed on a tract of land at the head of the harbour, and ground prepared for sowing corn. The farm so established became known as Rose Hill. By June 1790 Rose Hill had a population of 200, and in the following month a town was laid out there under the Governors instructions. During that first year that Thomas spent in the colony, many convicts were transferred from Sydney to Rose Hill. It is most likely that Thomas was one of those at the new town before 1790 was out.

The following, is a letter published in the London Morning Chronicle on the 4 August 1791 from a female convict at Sydney Cove, dated 24 July 1790.

"Oh! If you had but seen the shocking sight of the poor creatures that came out in the three ships it would make your heart bleed.
They were almost dead, very few could stand, and they were obliged to fling them as you would goods, and hoist them out of the ships, they were so feeble; and they died ten or twelve a day when they first landed.
The Governor was very angry, and scolded the captains a great deal, and, I heard, intended to write to London about it, for I heard him say it was murdering them. It, to be sure, was a melancholy sight.."



Convict Women on the Neptune
Ships of the Second Fleet

Souces;
A History of THE EATHER FAMILY:
Thomas EATHER and Elizabeth LEE
by John St PIERRE
for the EATHER Family history committee.
The Women of Botany Bay, by Portia Robinson
Australia's Second Fleet - 1790 by Jenny French
janilye

The children of Thomas and Elizabeth LEE :-

1. Ann EATHER 1793 1865
2. Robert EATHER 1795 1881
3. Charlotte EATHER 1797 1862
4. Charles EATHER 1800 1891
5' Thomas EATHER 1800 1886
6. John EATHER 1804 1888
7. Rachel EATHER 1807 1875
8. James EATHER 1811 1899


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