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WINDSOR nsw Local Recruits.1916

Windsor and Richmond Gazette, Friday 21 April 1916
Local Recruits.

AKINS, CHARLES, Windsor
AKINS, THOMAS
ALDERTON, BERT, Windsor
ARMSTRONG, ROY, Windsor.
ARMSTRONG, GEORGE F., Cornwallis
ALLEN, WiLLIAM CHARLES, Windsor
ARNOLD, W., Windsor
BRADSHAW, R. N., Scheyville
BAIRD, NORMAN, Pitt Town
BAIRD, ERIC J., Pitt Town.
BALL, WILFRID A., Lower Portland
BAKER, W., Oakville.
BARTLE, THOMAS, Windsor.
BASS, OLIVER, Windsor
BENNETT, W. H.. Windsor
BELL, ROBERT, Wilberlorce
BLACKET, ULRIC A., Vineyard.
BLACKET, NIGEL A., Vineyard.
BOLTON, Hy. H., Windsor (wounded).
BROOKS, JOHN, Freeman's Reach.
BLACKMORE, WALTER, Wilberforce
BROWN, BOY, Wilberforce.
BROWN, WILLIAM EDWIN, Oakviile (rejected).
BRENNAN, SERGT. G., Scheyville
BUCHANAN. DONALD, Windsor
BOWMAN, WILLIAM J., Courangra
BUTTSWORTH, ROY, Bullridge
BUTTSWORTH, GLEN., Bullridge
BRAGG, ROWLAND, Maroota.
CALLAGHAN, CLIVE, Windsor
CALLAGHAN, REG., Windsor
CALLAGHAN, CLEN. C, Windsor (not accepted.)
CAMPBELL, WALTER, Lower Portland
CASE, G. (not accepted)
CASE THOMAS, Bullridqe
CAMBRIDGE, K., Windsor
CAMBRIDGE, THOMAS, Windsor
CAREY THOMAS, Magrath's Hill (killed)
CLARKE, B., Oakviile
CLARKE MANFRED H., Windsor
CLOUT, LESLIE, Windsor
CLIFFORD, FREDERICK, Windsor
CLIFFORD, OSCAR, Windsor
CLIFFORD, CHARLES, Windsor
COBCROFT, B. H., Windsor
CONROY, GEORGE. Pitt Town
COOPER, ALICE, Windsor (Matron Hospital Ship)
CONNELLY, FRED., Windsor (killed)
CAMPBELL, ROD, Leet's Vale (not accepted).
CHRISTIE, JERSEY, Lower Portland.
CROFT, G.
CUPITT, GUY FRANKLIN (rejected)
CLARKE, LAWRENCE CLYDE'
CARSON, FREDERICK JAMES, Cattai.
DAVIS, ERIC, Windsor
DAVIS, TRISTRAM J., Pitt Town' (not accepted)
DEAL. LESLIE, Laughtondale
DICKSON, P. A., Windsor
DICKSON, WALTER. Windsor
DICKSON, JOHN, Windsor
DUNN, RICHMOND, Windsor
DWYER, GREGORY, Clarendon
DWYER, JOHN, Clarondon
DWYER, WILLIAM, Clarendon
EATHER, CECIL George. Windsor (killed 1915 Gallipoli)
EATHER, FRANK Hilton, Windsor(Killed 1917, Bullecourt)
EATHER, FREDERICK Reuben, Upper Colo
EATHER, ROLAND JAMES, Upper Colo.(killed 1917, Ypres)
FIASCHI, Dr. THOMAS. Sackville
FULLERTON, Dr. A. Y., Windsor
FARLOW, ALWYN, Freeman's Reach
FARLOW, CECIL V., Windsor
FLEMING, GEORGE, Central McDonald(killed).
FORD, A. E., Windsor
FORD. HERBERT, Windsor.'
GREEN. MERVYN, Magrath's Hill
GOW, HAROLD, Windsor
GIBSON, GEOF. V., Windsor
GIBSON, V. J. V., Windsor
GREENTREE, C. A., Cattai
GREENTREE, D. S., Cattai
GREENTREE, ALFRED JAMES Cattai.
GOSPER, CHARLES, Windsor'
GOSPER, CLARENCE. Upper Colo
GOSPER JOSEPH. Upper Colo
GRONO, WILLIAM CHARLES, late Windsor
GADSDEN, E. JEFFERY, (not accepted)
GREENWELL, ERIC .
HAGEL, ERNEST, Lower Portland
HALL, RONALD, Wilberforce (not accept
HANCHETT, SAMUEL, Windsor
HARDRES ALFRED, Scheyville (not accepted)
HAXBY, E. C. H. Windsor (twice wounded)
HAXBY, HAROLD G.
HARRIS ARTHUR, Upper Colo
HEARNE, ARTHUR, Central McDonald
HERPS, ARTHUR M. C, Lower Portland.
HERPS, CLAUDE, Lower Portland
HERPS, CARL, Lower Portland.
HERPS, RUPERT, Lower Portland.
HOLDEN, REGINALD, Windsor
HONEMAN, GARNET, Windsor (rejected)
HONEMAN, GORDON, Windsor (rejected)
HOSKISSON, JAMES, Clarendon
HOUGH, ERNEST, Windsor
HIDER, F., Windsor
HIPWELL, H., Windsor
HIPWELL, WALTER Windsor
HUDSON, SID, Vineyard
HUGHES. ROBERT B., Windsor
HULBERT, WILLIAM, Windsor (wounded).
HUMPHRIES, T. (not accepted)
HENNING, WILLIAM, Lower Portland
HIBBERT, RICHARD THOMAS, Freeman's Reach
HESSION, CLEVE.
HOLDEN, JAMES, Windsor
HOBBS, REGINALD, Pitt Town
HUNT, GEORGE C, Windsor, (rejected).
IRELAND, G., Windsor
JAMES, HENRY, Windsor
JENNINGS, C. R. E., Windsor
JENKINS, THOMAS, Lower Portland (wounded;
JOBSON, HUBERT CLIFTON
JOHNSTON, CLARENCE (not accepted)
JONES, JOSHUA, Ebenezer
JONES, HILTON, Windsor
JONES, RUSSELL, Cattai
JONES, BERT, Sackville.
JURD C. C. St. Albans (wouridadj
JURD, OWEN PEARSON, Central McDonald (wounded)
JOHNSTON, STAUNTON, Magrath's Hill.
KELLY, EDMUND, Scheyville
KEMP, ARTHUR, Ebenezer
KINGHAM, ARTHUR, Freeman's Reach
KINGHAM, JOHN, Freeman's Reach
KINGHAM, STANLEY, Freeman's Reach
KERSHAW. PICTON, Sackville.
LARAGHY, VICTOR. Sackville
LARAGHY, JACK, Sackviile
LARAGHY, ROY, Sackville
LAYCOCK, G. C, Scheyville (not accepted)
LIDDLE, EDWIN S.. Windsor
L1DDELL, SYDNEY, Windsor
LIDDLE, FRED., Windsor
LINDSAY, A. J. H., Cattai
LINDSAY, W. S. T., Cattai
LEE, - , Lower Hawkesbury
LEET, SIDNEY, Leet's Vale (ill)
LILLIS, LEO, Freeman's Reach
LOCKART, HUBERT CLENDON, Wilberforce
LOCKART, WILLIAM RALPH, Wilberforce (not accepted).
LYE, ERIC, Upper Colo.
MAISEY, FRED. T.. Windsor
MALONEY, D., Central McDonald.
MALES, HENRY. Upper Colo
MALES, WILLIAM, Upper Colo
MALES, ARTHUR. Upper Colo.
MARR, ALEXANDER, Central Colo
MARSHALL, A. CAMPBELL, Caltai
MARSHALL, STEWART, Cattai (not accepted).
MARTIN, ERNEST, Freeman's Reach
MITCHELL, BENTLEY (Bullridge), recovered from illness.
MITCHELL, G. W. Bullridge.
MOLLOY, JAS. V., Windsor
MOSES, JAS. W., Windsor
MULL1NGER, ROYr, Windsor
McCULLOCH, D., gcheyvfllo
M'KELLAR. ERNEST
MARNEY, EUGENE, Windsor
McDONALD, LIEUT. A. J., Scheyville
McDOUGALL, HAROLD, Lower Portland.
MARTIN, WILLIAM, Freeman's Reach
NAGLE, E., Upper Colo
NOLAN, THOMAS, Lower Portland (died of illness)
NORRIS, ARTHUR, Windsor
NORRIS, HENRY, Windsor.
NYE, PERCY GEORGE, Cattai
O'BRIEN, V.. Windsor
OGDEN, JOSEPH, Oakviile (wounded)
ONUS, LAL?,(LANGLY)
O'TOOLE, LEIGHS
PAGE, PHILIP C, Lower Portland
PAINE, LIEUT. -COLONEL J. J., Windsor.
PARKIN, R. T., Windsor
POTTS, ROLAND, Windsor
PYE, Dr. CECIL R. A, Windsor
PEARCE, WILLIAM P., Pitt Town
PYE, ERIC J. D., Windsor
PICKUP CLIVE, Windsor
PICKUP, FRANK A., Windsor
ROBERTS, JOHN JOSEPH, Pitt Town-road
ROBERTSON, Wm, Windsor
ROBERTSON, F. J., Windsor (not accepted).
REES, VICTOR JOHN, Windsor
RHODES, WILLIAM R., Wilberforce (not accepted).
RUTHERFORD, ROBERT, Oakviile
RIGG, WILLIAM, Sackviile
RYAN, HUGH, Jun., Pitt Town (not accepted).
SANDOZ, GEORGE E., Windsor
SCHOLER, RICHD., Windsor
SCHOLER, JOHN, Windsor (not accepted)
SHIRLEY, WILLIAM, Windsor
SHEPHERD, GEORGE, Clarendon
SHIMMELS, ARTHUR, Scheyville
SMITH, WALTER C, Currency Creek
SIM, E., Windsor
SMITH, ROBT., Freeman's Reach
SPARKES, THOMAS, Lower Portland
START1N, Wm., Mulgrave
SMITH, ALBERT EDWARD, Freeman's Reach
SMITH, FREDERICK, Freeman's Reach.
SWORDS, R. E., Windsor
SULLIVAN, REGD., Windsor
SOUTH, R. B., Scheyville
SIMPSON, CECIL, Wilberforce
SIMPSON, NORMAN, Wilberforce(wounded).
SHADLOW, CECIL D. (no! accepted)
SMITH, FREDERICK A., Scheyville
SMITH. JOHN, Scheyville
STREETER, FREDERICK, Windsor,(wounded).
STREETER, ROY, Windsor (killed).
STREETER, OSCAR, Windsor
SMALLWOOD, WILLIAM J., Cattai
SOWDEN, ROLAND, Windsor
SIMMONS, RICHARD T., Upper Colo
STEWART, CHARLES, Windsor
TURNBULL, CECIL G. W. Wilberforco(wounded).
TAYLOR CHARLES, Lower Portland
TAYLOR, FRED. C, Windsor
TEALE, ALEX., Wilberforce
THOMSON, F. S., Cattai
THOMPSON, JOHN ALBERT, Caltai
TOOMEY, ALFRED, Windsor (killed)
TOOMEY, EDWARD, Windsor
TOWERS, JOHN
TURNBULL, FRED., Wilberforce (wounded)
TURNBULL, HARRY N., Wilberforce
TUCKERMAN, JACK, Windsor (not accepted).
ULSTROM, CHAS., Windsor
UPTON, CECIL, Windsor
UREN, Dr. CECIL, Windsor
WALKER, ARCHIBALD G., Windsor
WALL, STANLEY, Windsor (wounded)
WOODS, WILLIAM H., Sackville
WARD, OSCAR D., Windsor (injured).
WARD, WILLIAM, Windsor
WHITE, W. FRANK Vineyard (wounded).
WHITE, ROLAND (Cattai)
WOOLARD, ALFRED, Windsor
WOOD, EDGAR CLAUDE, Windsor
WOODS, JAMES
WHEELER, WILLIAM T., Windsor.
WALKER, WILLIAM GEORGE, Windsor.
WILSON, WILLIAM, Pitt Town.

RIVERSTONE LIST.

ALDERTON. R.
ALCORN, S.
ALCORN, CECIL
BAMBRIDGE, PHIL.
BROOKS, ALFRED .
BERTIE, J.
BERTIE, LEO
BROOKS, ERNEST
BORROWDALR. GEORGE PROUD. '
BROWN, JOSEPH
CARTER, FRANK .
CASSIDY. JOHN.
CLARKE. F.
CLOUT, CYRUS
COMYN, FRANK
CONWAY, JOHN
DAVIS. H.
DAVIES, W.,
DRAKE, E.
DRAYTON, S.
EDWARDS, WILLIAM.
FLETCHER, THOMAS JOSEPH.
FREEMAN, HERBERT
FOLEY, F. W.
GRIFFIN, E. W.
GRENSHAW, CECIL (not accepted;
GREEN, JOHN.
GIBSON, EDWARD CLAUDE.
HAYWARD, F. A.
HAYWARD, JOHN
HAYWARD, ROBERT
HURLEY, F.
HEWITT, EUWIN F. EL,
JOHNSTON, HAROLD (wounded)
JAMES, MATTHEW.
JONES, JOHN.
JONES, ROBERT.
KNIGHT, C. C.
KENNY, JACK (wounded). :
KENNY, R. E. G. (wounded
KEEGAN, F.
MACKAY, WILLIAM STEWART,
MASON. AMBROSE
MARLIN, ERNEST
MATTHEWS, REX.
MATTHEWS. ERIC
MORRIS, CLEMENT
PYE, J. J.
RIMMINGTON, H. J.
ROBBINS, J.
SCHOFIELD, A.
SCHOFIELD, E. .
SCHOFJELD. H.
SCHOFIELD, S. R. (not accepted)
SHOWERS, A. R. (killed)
SMITH, AUSTIN, (wounded)
SYMONDS, J.
TEALE, W.
TEALE, GEORGE
TAYLOR, FRANK W..
WIGGINS, C.F., seriously ill
Below:
Service No.1544 Private Cecil "Curly" George Eather, 3rd Battalion of Windsor, New South Wales.
He died at sea on 17 May 1915 aboard the SS Lutzow from wounds received in action at Gallipoli, Turkey, on the 8 May 1915, aged 22. He has no known grave and is remembered with honour on the Lone Pine Memorial, Gallipoli, Turkey.


1 comment(s), latest 8 months, 3 weeks ago

St Peters Church Richmond. NSW

AT A PUBLIC MEETING of the Inhabitants of Richmond,
held at the School House, on the 23d October, 1835,
the Rev. Samuel Marsden in the Chair,
It was proposed by Mr. Cox, sen.; seconded by
the Rev. H. T. Stiles ; and resolved unanimously ---
1st.... That it is expedient to erect a Church in
this Town, for the celebration of Divine Worship,
according to the Form of the Protestant Episcopal
Church of England, on the Ground at the end of
George-street, originally set apart for that purpose.
Proposed by Mr. W. Cox, jun.; seconded by Mr.
G. Bowman ; and resolved unanimously ---
2nd.... That, to carry this object into effect, a Committee
be formed, consisting ot the following Members, of whom any
seven be competent to despatch business : ---
Mr. Cox, sen., Fairfield,
Mr. Cox, jun., Hobartville,
Mr. Bell, Belmont,
Mr. George Bowman,
Mr. William Bowman,
Mr. Faithful,
Rev. H. T. Stiles,
Mr. Martin, sen.,
Mr. C. Palmer,
Mr. Dight,
Mr. C. Powell,
Mr. Parnell,
Mr. G. P. Wood.
Proposed by Mr. William Bowman ; seconded by
Mr. Faithful ; and resolved unanimously
3rd..... That, to forward the object of this Meeting,
Funds be immediately raised by voluntary Subscription ---
that the Members of the Committee do agree to use their best
exertions to this end ---
that Subscription Lists be opened at the several Banks ---
and that an Appeal be made to the Public through the medium
of the following Newspapers :---
Sydney Herald, Monitor, Colonist, Australian, and Sydney Gazette,
to be inserted three times in each Newspaper.
Proposed by Mr Martin ; seconded by Mr. William Bowman ;
and resolved unaminously ---
4th.... That William Cox senior, Esq., be requested to take the
office of Treasurer, and the Rev. H. T. Stiles that of Secretary.

THE Protestant Population of Richmond and its Neighbourhood, as shewn by
the last Census, is upwards of 1300. The present Building used as a
Church will barely accommodate one hundred Persons : and as the other
engagements of the Chaplain prevent him from having more than one service
on the Sunday, it is obvious that out of every thirteen Inhabitants who
may wish to participate in the ordinance of Divine Worship, twelve
must be deprived of that privilege, because there is no room for them.
This simple fact constitutes, in itself, a strong appeal to the
liberality of the Residents, not of Richmond only, but of the Colony
generally. It is earnestly hoped that the individual, domestic, and
social advantages to be derived from a due observance of the Public
Worship of Almighty God, will be so appreciated by the Colonists
universally, as to produce a corresponding willingness to contribute,
when, as at present, an opportunity is offered them towards an object
so fraught with benefits to our adopted country, our families, and ourselves.

Contributions will be thankfully received by William Cox, Esq., Hobartville ;
by the Rev. H. T. Stiles, Windsor; by the Rev. S. Marsden, Parramatta;
by the Members of the Committee ; and at either of the Banks in Sydney.

Subscriptions already promised :—
£. s. d.

The Archdeacon....... ...........200 0 0
Mr. Cox, senior, Fairfield.........35 0 0
Mr. Cox, junior..... .....................25 0 0
Mr. George Bowman ..............20 0 0
Mr. William Bowman .... ......... 20 0 0
Mr. Faithful .... ............. .......... 20 0 0
Mr. John Town, junior.......... ..20 0 0
Rev. H.T. Stiles............... ..10 0 0
Mr. Onus.... .................. ..........10 0 0
Mr. John Town, senior. ...........10 0 0
Mr. Martin..... .... ......................6 0 0
Mr. Martin, junior. ... ............ ......6 0 0
Mr. Seymour... ..... ... ..... .........5 0 0
Mr. Cross .... .............. .... .......5 0 0
Mr. Hughes...... . ......... ... .........5 0 0
Mr. Dight ..... ........... ....... .... ....5 0 0
Mr. George Pitt. ..... .......... ..... ..5 0 0
Mr. Robert Williams. ..... .... .....5 0 0
Mr. Price ...... ..... .............. .. ....5 0 0
Mr. G. P. Wood . .... ..... ..... ......2 0 0
Mr. J. Markwell ... ..... ......... ....1 0 0
Mr. Robert Aull ...... ..................1 0 0
Mr. William Farlow..... .............1 0 0
Mr. C. Palmer ...... ...................1 0 0
Mr. Benjamin Cawer.... ...........1 0 0
Mr. George Mortimer..... .........1 0 0
Mrs. Crawley. ... ..... ... ............1 0 0
Mr. John Brown. .... ..... ..........3 0 0
Mr. Thomas Eather..... ... .......2 0 0
Mr. P. M'Alpin...... ... ...............2 0 0

Collected by the Rev. S. Marsden.

Rev. Richard Hill.... ....... .....2 0 0
Mr. R. Jones, M C...... ...... .6 0 0
Mr. R. Smith. ... ..... .......... ..2 0 0
Mr. Thomas Marsden......... .2 0 0
Mr. Caleb Wilson..... ...........2 0 0
Mr. Richard Fitzgerald. &
Mr. Robert Fitzgerald ..... ...5 0 0
Mr. James Chisholm. ... .....5 0 0
Mr. Samuel Terry.... ..........10 0 0
Mr. Edward Terry..... ............2 0 0
Mr. John Terry.... .. ... ...........2 0 9
Mr. P. W. Flower...... ...........2 0 0
Mr. C. S. Marsden. .... .........1 0 0
Mr. John Connell...... .... .......2 0 0
Mr. William Walker...... .......3 0 0
Mr. Thomas Walker..... .......2 0 0

Source:-
The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser
Saturday 21 November 1835
Page 1
Transcription, janilye 2014.

Historical notes: The site of St Peter's church was nominated in Governor Lachlan Macquarie's planned layout for Richmond. He intended to have the church, schoolhouse and burial ground on a very beautiful elevated block immediately above Pugh's Lagoon, a fine basin of fresh water. The burial ground, then 1 hectare, was surveyed by James Meehan and consecrated by the Rev Samuel Marsden and fenced by William Cox. The first burial was George Rouse and contains the headstones of many early Hawkesbury settlers The first school/church opened in 1810. It played an important part in the early life of Richmond. It was situated in Francis Street near the northern corner of the cemetery. The lower floor was the residence of the schoolmaster whilst the upper room was used for school and church purposes.

This building soon became too small to meet the ever increasing congregation and at a meeting chaired by the Reverend Samuel Marsden on 26 November 1835 the inhabitants of Richmond resolved to erect a church for the celebration of divine worship. A notice calling for tenders to erect the church appeared in The Australian on 18 October 1836. The committee formed to forward the project included Mr Cox, Sen,"Fairfield', Mr Cox, Jnr 'Hobartville', Mr Bell, 'Belmont', Mr George Bowman, Mr William Bowman. Mr. Faithful, Rev H.T.Styles, Mr Martin, Snr., Mr. G Palmer, Mr. Digit, Mr C Powell, Mr Parnell and Mr CP Wood. By 1833 the sum of 570 pounds had been subscribed and 200 pounds had been donated by the English Church Society. Tenders were called for the erection of the church in 'The Australian' on October 1836.

Built as a result of the establishment of the Church Act of 1840 St Peter's church was one of four churches consecrated in 1841. The church was built on a site overlooking Ham Common and the Hawkesbury River flats. It was agreed 162 hectares of the common would be given as Glebe land for the church. It was opened by Bishop Broughton on 15 July and designed by Francis Clark and built by James Atkinson who also built St Bartholomew's, Prospect and St Thomas, Mulgoa at the same time. It was designed in the Georgian style in contrast to most of the other churches, except St Batholomew's, which have Gothic style detailing. Clarke was responsible for a number of Sydney houses and the church of St Mary Magdalene at St Marys. A simple rectangular building with a square tower topped with a timber spire the original layout of the pews was to face inwards to the centre of the church. In 1850 a porch designed by E Blackett was added to the northern side and not long after, in 1857, a chancel was added. Once the chancel had been added the internal pew layout was altered to face the chancel. William Woolls, a prominent late nineteenth century writer on the botany and flora of Australia was incumbent at St Peter's from 1873 and from 1877 to 1883, Rural Dean of Richmond. . In the churchyard a small obelisk was built of bricks from the old school church building. THE CEMETERY is older than the church and contains the graves of many early pioneers including John Bowman, Thomas Matcham Pitt and Lt Thomas Hobby of the NSW Corps. Chief Officer at Hawkesbury in 1800 and a supporter of Maquarie. It was the second cemetery dedicated in the Hawkesbury district, around 1814, four years after St Matthews. THE RECTORY was designed by Francis Clarke and completed in 1847 and is said to have been a copy of an English rectory known to Bishop Broughton in the mid 19th century vogue for picturesque rectories. It was added to in 1863 by Edmund Blacket. Later alterations have changed its quality.
Reference: http://www.environment.nsw.gov.au/heritageapp/ViewHeritageItemDetails.aspx?ID=3880010


Some Ups and Downs of an old Richmondite (june 1910)

Mr Alfred Smith.
Chronicled by Robert Farlow.
[For the Gazette:]
"As we have spoken of Hobartville,
will pick up the track there and go along
the Yarramundi road, where I knew
several old hands of the good old type.
Where Mr Matthew Nowland is living
was, in my earliest days, occupied by the
Dight family. The old Mr Dight I don't
remember, but his wife was living there
with the family when I first recollect it.
I knew three of the boys before they were
married Sam, George and Arthur.
There were two more, John and Charles.
It was a flour mill worked by horses when
I was a lad, and I used to go there with
Mr James to get flour, and often saw the
mill at work. Mr and Mrs Douglas,
parents of George, James, Robert, &c,
lived there for a long time. When they
left they went to live where they resided
for so many years, and where George,
Robert and Mary died. Mr Bowman
Douglas still occupies the home where
they died. While the Douglas family
were living in Dight's old home Mr. Nowland
purchased the property, and after they left
went there to live and has been
there ever since. The place has been
known for many years as 'Mountain View.' The
hill hard by the front which leads to the lowlands
has been known as Dight's Hill many years, and the
lane along the lowlands in that spot known as Dight's lane.
While Mr and Mrs Douglas were living there I often put
sheep in the little orchard alongside, in which there
used to be good grass.
Not far from the front of 'Mountain View' is a piece
of land bounded on one side by the late Albert Cornwell's
old home, now occupied by Mr Nathan Mitchell, and on the
other by a piece of land belonging to Mr Nowland, and
the front faces the reserve.
There was a house there many years ago, and Daniel Eaton
lived in it for many years. He rented Bowman's farm down
under the hill, and was a big farmer. He also had a
station property on the Big river. Mentioning Mr Dan Eaton
and his station reminds'me of one trip I made from there.
I was on the station this trip for about a fortnight.
Most of the family were there, and as they were homely people,
it was a pleasant time. I remember Johnny, George, Tom, Billy,
and Mrs James William's were there.
Aiex. Gough, father of Johnny Gough, fattened the sheep I
brought down that trip. I went, to school with the Eaton boys;
also with Jane, the eldest girl. The old house above-mentioned
near Nowland's I don't remember anyone else living in after
old Mr. Dan Eaton, and it has gone the way of old places, many years.
Where the Douglas home is still to be found belonged to Mr William Small,
father of Ben, the wheelwright, and Bill, the blacksmith, who carried
on together a wheel wrighting business in Lennox-street, Richmond, for
a very fair lifetime; father also of Susan, who now lives in Richmond in
the skillion on the site of the old business. He sold the property to
one of the Bowmans, and it passed on to the Douglas family.
The piece between the last named and Albert Cornwell's old
home belonged to Thomas Small, who managed to stick to his
little lump of land. On this property his son, Ned,
lives, near the reserve. Ned married a Miss Baldwin, sister
to George, Dick, Janey and Betsy. Mrs Ned Small used
to be a great raiser of geese and when I would be crossing the
old common with stock you could see her feathered stock
about in all directions. Arthur, Charley and Ada still live
in the old home, handed down to them by their father and mother.
Where 'Cracker' Cornwell's (as he was nearly always known) old home
is I remember when there was no house on it. The original house
was built by Mr Isaac Cornwell, who purchased the property
from one of the Small family we have been speaking about.
Mr Isaac Cornwell had the house built and went there to live
after he left the shop in Richmond.
Albert Cornwell's old home has also been occupied by such men
as the late Mr Cleeve, at one time stock inspector, the
late Edward Robinson ; and the present squire of Hobartville
put in a few years there.
Farther along the Yarramundi road we have the home of the
Faithful family on our right, standing some considerable distance
back from the road. The old home seems to be tumbling to
pieces and looks much the worse for wear.
The first I knew living at 'Lakeville' were Mr Faithful and
his first wife. She died there. I remember Jane, a daughter
of the first wife, who married a Mr Wilshire. Mr George Faithful,
a son, was a tall, nice young fellow' and I knew him very well;
but another son, William, I didn't know much about, although I have
often seen him. I knew old Mr Faithful's second wife, who was
Miss Maria Bell, of 'Belmont.' She died at 'Lakeville' also, and
Mr Faithful ended his days here.
I remember a little accident Mr. Faithful had out on the former
common, close to the old top entrance gate of the Hobartville big paddock.
Mr James and I were coming home from the bush at Londonderry with a load
of wood and when we got about where I have stated he was out of his gig
and gigs were aristocratic turnouts, in those days. James made enquiries
and Mr Faithful told him he had lost one of the lynch pins out of
the axle and the wheel came off.' Mr Faithful wanted to go to Sydney
urgently couldn't catch three trains a day. from Richmond then and
was in a great way about the pin. Without a pin he couldn't go on, and
he couldn't find it. His servant, who we knew as 'Red Bill,' was
with him so he came in to our place and managed to get one to fit the axle.
This was really the first time I got
to know Mr Faithful. Miss Jane was a good living young woman, and one
Sunday going home there happened to be a row on at the old 'pub' at the
corner of Bosworth and March streets. There were no police watching
the pubs on Sundays in those times. On this occasion there
was an extra big row aboard. Miss Faithful came up at night
to make a complaint to George James, then a constable, about the noise
and row. Mr James went down and soon settled the disturbance.
Going along towards Yarramundi we have old 'Bronte' the home of the
Pitts. The old house still stands, but years ago a fine modern cottage
was built for Mr Edwin Pitt, and he removed into it. Since then the
old home has been occupied at different times by men who have worked on
the place. Old Mr George Pitt was the first I remember at 'Bronte.' I
knew him very well and a grand old man he was. He was my boss
for three years at the punt, and during that time I always found it
a pleasure to have anything to do with him. He once stood for Parliament
against the late Hon. William Walker, for Windsor and Richmond, and was
only beaten by some eight or ten votes.
But about 'Bronte.' Dan Carter could tell a lot more
than most of us, as he lived with old Mr. Pitt for a long while,
and Mr Pitt thought there was no one like Dan.
In the corner of Bronte estate at the junction of Crowley's lane
and the main Yarramundi road, there was a house which has only been
pulled down a few months, and the first person I remember living in it
was Bob Johnson, or, as he was generally called, 'Hominy Bob.' He was
a poultry dealer.
Then I knew and remember Ned Harper, who was a blacksmith living
in this house and had his shop there for many years. The late
John Madden had a wheelwright shop there, and lived in a
little three roomed place with a kitchen which stood between
Harpur's house and Pitt's gate, where the men's house stands.
He also lived in the house where Mr. Charles Davis lived, and
which is still occupied by Miss Eliza Davis and her brother Ted.
At the time John Madden lived in it, it was owned by John Markwell.
I will content myself with mentioning some of the-Old hands of Yarramundi
who come to my mind. Among them were my old friend John Crowiey ;
Mr Isaac Pearce, who lived for years in a house just inside the
road fence, and near the entrance gate ; Thomas Kirk, where
William Pearce lived ; Bill Paris, Andy Farrel, who married the widow
of Bill Paris; Greenhalgh, who kept a pub;
Krochnert and Low, who kept shop ;
Robert Aull kept the 'Governer Darling' hotel, and
John Wheeler's father kept the pub later on ; Dan Dickens, kept a pub
there and Tom Kirk also ; Johnny Tindale, William Heath, William Farlow,
who kept the 'Waggon and Four Horses' in the old two storey place ;
Tom Hornery and his wife. Poor old Tom was drowned in the lagoon, and
I have heard them say old Mr Pitt gave Ben Mortimer 5 for finding his body;
Gilbey the well sinker ; Cross lived near the lagoon in Crowley's paddock.
I remember there used to be great fights there. Some of
the battles fought there were between Ben Mortimer and Tom Saunders, a
Windsor chap ; and Joe Windred and Ben Mortimer.
I remember hearing Mr James talk about a fatal fight out there
somewhere about the waterhole just down from the Presbyterian church,
and I remember him telling me he arrested a man for it. But all these
old hands are gone the way of all flesh, and after all they
were friendly and good natured people. That was my experience, anyhow.
Yarramundi can claim to be the home of some people who have lived to
be great ages. Among them can be reckoned the Timmins family of the
older generations. I knew 'Granny'Timmins, as she was known in later years,
and her husband very well. I think she was over ioo years
old when she died. Mr and Mrs Timmins used to come round the back
bushtrack to Richmond no H.A. College, or thought of such in those days,
and cail at Mr James and take the old lady James into Windsor to attend
service in the Roman Catholic Church there on Sunday mornings. We had no
churches then so handy to up, yet the old hands thought nothing of going
miles to attend service. My wife has often walked to Penrith to attend
the Roman Catholic Church and thought nothing of it. But coming back to
this old couple Timmins. They had several children, some of whom lived
to be great ages.
I went to school with 'Betsy'Timmins, who married the late Mr. George Mortimer,
also with Agnes who became Mrs George Pearce. Betsy lived to be a very old
woman, and Agnes was an old woman when she died.
Then in my early days old Mr Markwell was living down on the flats on the
farm, which, I think was bought by Mr Klein, where he settled down
after leaving off school teaching, and now belongs to his daughter
Mrs Albert Smith.
I went to Mr Hogsflesh's school with Thomas Markwell, and
John, his brother. John was found dead in the bush near where
Sam Wood used to live at one time. He went out for a load of wood and had
it on, and made a pot of tea. He must have dropped dead,
or passed away very easily, for I believe he was found next morning resting
with his head on his arms near his billy. His horses were standing there with
the load on the dray, and must have had a rough time standing all that time.
Old Mr. Markwell had a man working for him I remember well. He used to bring
vegetables, mostly cabbage, turnips, and melons, to Richmond for sale. He had
an old white horse with one 'bumble' front foot and was much attached to the
old animal. The old man went by the name of Cheshire.
Then I knew old Mr William Stinson. He it was who married
the widow of Mr Wheeler, who kept a pub in Yarramundi.
I remember old Mr George Mortimer living out there. I remember George, Ben,
William, Alf, Tom and James of the boys. Among the girls I knew Annie,
who married John Lord, and another whose name I think was Sarah.
Then I can remember the founders of the Williams family out that way,
Mr Robert Williams and his wife lived where Wellington Freeman is
living. I remember old Mr Williams dying and being buried on a Sunday.
His widow married William Maloney.
Then I knew Mr Williams' son, Thomas, both before he was married and
after, when he lived in a weatherboard house which stood off the present
main road where Mr John Devlin is living.
I knew Thomas Howell who had the 'flour mills out there.
George Wood also had a house along the lane going down to the
present falls. His first wife was Miss Caroline Aston, and his second
Mary Collins. I went to school with Caroline Aston, and her sister,
the widow of the late John Wood, of the Grose, Annie Crowley,
sister of the late Mr John Crowley of 'Crowley Park,' was another schoolmate
of mine from out that way.
As 1 have I said, I went to school with John Markwell, and I remember
the sad accident which happened him many years before he died. I put
him over the river in the punt, one moonlight night about 9 o'clock
and when he got up on the bill after leaving the river he started
galloping the grey mare he was riding. When he got about in front of
where Mr Bowman Douglas lives there was a large stump along the track,
and he came to grief against the stump. The mare was killed, and he
was rendered unconscious, and was found very early next morning by
Joe Fletcher, who was going to work at Dight's. John was unconscious
for several days, and though he pulled through, it used to come against
him at times.
On the farm where Mr John Riley lives, I remember the old Mr.
Shields of all living. He would be grandfather of the present
Mr.George Shields, senr., of Bosworth-street Richmond. Old
Mr. Shields was a little man, but a worker.
On the adjoining farm I remember old Mr George Pearce living for
a great number of years. He had several sons and a daughter, Clarissa.
Among his sons with us to-day we have Sam, who has suffered two losses
with fire at the hands of some malicious persons; Edwin, who was for
many years working a part of 'Bronte' farm and now lives at
Agnes Banks, and William. The sister I belive still lives at the
old home on the farm.
One time I was talking to old Mr Pearce about the price of corn
and telling him I knew old Mick Gavin to bring Mr James 25 bushels from
Little Kurrajong, as it was then known, at 9d a bushel
He told me he knew it to be sold for 8d a bushel.
Mr George Pearce had a brother Charlie who lived down the lane
going to the river falls. He was a boot maker by trade, I
think. His wife was a great nurse. They reared a large family
of boys and girls. Some of the boys are still in the district.
George lives in Richmond. Edward in the old home, and works
for Mr P. Charley, of Belmont Park ; and Arthur also works for
Mr Charley, and looks after the Clarendon property
Among the daughters of Mr Charles Pearce we have with us
Mrs. John Riley, of Yarramundi, Mrs William Parker,
Agnes Banks, and Charlotte, who lives at North Richmond with
the Pitt's, of 'Sunnyside,' I think.
While speaking of Mr and Mrs Pearce living down the
lane near the falls, reminds me that behind Mr Howell's place
near the river old Jack Timmins lived a long time while he
was droving.
Old Mr. William Scott lived on the property where old
Mr.Michael Waters is living, only nearer the river.
Many a time I have been on the farm when Mr Scott lived there.
Mr James and I used to go down, generally on Saturday, and get
a bag or two of chaff for the horse, and some marsh mallows
and wild mustard out of the wheat for the cows. The wild
mustard was very plentiful in those times. I went to school
with two of Mr Scott's children John, who died in Kurrajong I
think, and Betsey, who married Jack Timmins. There were two other girls.
Fred Thomson had the next farm to Scott's before he took the
farm near Parnell's.
The adjoining farm to this I remember the late Peter Hough
occupying for some time.
Somewhere about there a man named 'Jacky' Green owned a farm and
lived on it for many years. I remember Fred Thomson had a farm near
Parnell's old place. Parnell's was a weatherboard piace and I have
heard them speak about him keeping a pub there. I knew the Parnell
family very well. There was Edward, who died only a short time ago,
William, Thomas, Charles, John and Matthew. The eldest
girl, Mary, married a Mr Joseph Cope, of Windsor, and I believe
the solicitor of the name in Sydney is a son of his;
Elizabeth' married a Mr Baker ; and Sarah, Mr. Theo Cooper. Agnes was
unmarried and there were two more younger ones I knew very well, but
I forget their names, as the time I speak of is so long ago.
Thomas Parnell, the father of the children mentioned, and wife, and
some of the family, after leaving this district, went to
live on the Hunter River, somewhere near Maitland, and Mrs Parnell
told me they gave 8,000 for the place. William married and stayed
at the Hawkesbury river, and it was for him I worked at the punt.
I shall never forget Mrs Parnell's kindness to me while at the river.
Mr. Parnell always made it a practice to give me a pound every Christmas,
as he used to say, "for your kindness to the daughters by obliging
them with the boat at different times." In the old place on the
opposite side, of the road to Parnell's and it is a ruin now I knew
a boy and girl by the name of Sam and Mary Glasseye when they lived there
and came to Hogsflesh's school. I have heard their father kept a pub there,
but have no recollection of it.
After them came two brothers, William and Edward Jeffrey.
William was married, but Edward wasn't. I remember them keeping a pub,
and it was these men Mr. Ben Richards bought out when he left the
house in March street, Richmond, where Mr. C. S. Guest has his saleyards
now. Mr Richards kept a pub there for some time, and lived in
this place for about 18 years. It was while he was living here he started
butchering at Blackwattle Swamp,Sydney.
Not far away from here, on the corner of Dight's lane and the lane which
runs along the farms to the river end of Crowley's lane, there was a slab
house of four rooms and a verandah. The first I remember living there was
John Edwards. Jerry Hansell lived in it for a long time, but this old house,
too, has been a thing of the past many years.
While Jerry Hansell was living there I put a man named Samuel Wickham
over the river in the punt one morning with his two horses and a load
of corn and potatoes. When he got about opposite Jerry's house there
was a big mud hole, and while trying to steer the horses to miss it they
slewed and jammed him between the dray and the fence and killed him on
the spot. He married a widow, Elliot, grandmother to our present Jack,
and had his stepson, Simon, with him at the time.
And before I leave what we might call the Yarramundi block I must mention
that Andy Farrell lived on the farm adjoining
Mr Markwell's, and the late Abe Eather married his only daughter,
Ellen, while he was living there. Going down the river from where
Mr B. Richards kept the pub,
I'll say a little about some old hands I knew, and as near in the
order they came as my memory has them, which I think will not be far out.
The farm next to the old pub at Richmond bridge was owned by one of the
Rouses. I remember old Mr. and Mrs. Dempsey living on it for a long time.
I remember the three sons, James, Joseph, and George ; also two girls.
Liza married Henry Mills, and Betsy was single at this time and often
stayed with the Mills when they lived in Lennox street, Richmond, where
Harry Fong lives. This old place plays a big part in the early history
of Richmond. I believe Betsy Dempsey married after the family
left here. Mr. and Mrs. Rigney lived on the farm for a long time.
Mrs. Seymour bought this farm afterwards for 1350.
Mr. Guest, Charley's father, was the auctioneer and put it up for
sale at old Mr. John Town's while he was keeping pub over the river.
Mr Richard Watts (father of George, James and Henry
Watts, three well-known farmers and horsebreeders over North Richmond way
for many years) was empowered by Mrs. Seymour to bid for the property on
her behalf, and he managed to secure it for her. George Watts has passed
away. He was a wonderful man. Although he had lost his sight completely
he was a splendid judge of a horse, and a hard man to deceive in this respect.
His brother, Henry has also passed away. He, too,
was a good judge of horses, and can be reckoned among the Hawkesburyites
who have helped to make the district notable for good horses. Harry was
living at the time of his death at Yarramundi, but died, I believe, in one
of the hospitals in Sydney after an operation. James, the other brother, is,
I think, still alive.
The next farm belonged to Mrs Seymour, and Mr Richard Watts mentioned
lived there many years, and both he and his wife died there. Thus it
will be easily under stood how it was Mr Watts was empowered by Mrs Seymour
to purchase the adjoining place for her.
The next farm belonged to Mr Sam Thorley. Old Mr Thorley died there, and
his widow lived there for some time after. While Mr Thorley had it
Mr Edward Allen and his wife (parents of the late Charles Allen,
of North Richmond) lived near Thorley's house on a little piece of the
farm for a long time, and died there. Then I remember a man who had only
the use of one arm living on a part of Thorley's farm. This old man was a great
gardener, and grew a lot of peas. He used to bring them up to Richmond on
his shoulders in bags and sell them about the town. Then William Thorley's farm
came next, and on it he lived a long time.
Afterwards Mr Ben Richards got it from Thorley. William Thorley had one son,
a saddler, and the last time I saw him was at Narrabri, where he was in
business.
On what was William Thorley's farm I remember Mr Mills (father of old
Mrs Thomas Collison, who has not long left Windsor) keeping a school in a
weatherboard place. Afterwards Mr. Mills kept a school at Grose Vale somewhere
about the present post office.
Then we have the farm on which Mr Edward Inall (the present Albert's grandfather)
lived for many years, and I think he died there. At the time of his death he was
what can truly be called a very old man. Mrs Edward Inall, who was a sister, I
have heard, to William Scott, died down there. Some of Mr Inall's children
I remember, John, and another's name I am not certain of just now. There were
some daughters, but I knew very little about them.
Somewhere here Mr. William Ives lived. I think it was between Stevenson's farm
and the one owned by Edward Lewis. I remember some of the family. The
present Mrs. John Pearce, of Agnes Banks and she must be getting on in years now
was one of the girls. Then we have the farm on which Mr Edward Lewis lived for very
many years, and died there. I knew some of his family very well. The two
boys, Jack and Ned, I went to school with, and the daughters I can reckon
among my schoolmates were Mary Ann, the present Mrs William Tomkinson, of
Richmond, and another one who married Mr Henry Whitney. There were others
in the family. We come along to the old farm owned by Mr Thomas Griffiths,
father of the present Tom, senr., of Richmond, and our Tom is getting on
in years now. The old Mr Griffiths was the first I remember living there,
and was a big farmer. He kept a pub, 'The Richmond Inn' in York-street, Sydney,
at one time, and the wife and myself, have stayed there while he was keeping it.
Among his family I knew our present
Tom, Bob, of Penrith, Jack, who was a saddler, Jim, the great old-time foot
runner, and Bill, who was a great man among music. Mrs John Gough. who
was so well-known and popular in Windsor, was one of the daughters.
The old Mr Griffiths was a great horseman and could ride a buckjumper in
good style; also a good all round sport. He had two brothers who used to
stay with him down there, but went up country Richard and Jonathan.
The next farm was owned by the late Mr Edward Powell. I knew
him and his wife, and many bags of corn husks for the milking cows we brought
from there. Among Mr Powell's family were Edward, Richard, George, Sydney,
and Henry. Emma was the only girl I remember, and she married old Mr Joseph
Onus. I went to school with Richard, George, Sydney and Henry.
Then some where handy old Mr Joseph Stubbs, a great farmer, lived for many
years, and died there. The first wife died there.
Mr Stubbs married a second time - Paddy Kenny married his widow. Paddy died
there.
Then on the farm which belonged to Mr Ben Richards, and now occupied
by the H. A College, old ' Granny 'Hough lived for many years. It was she
who laid Mr Richards on to buy it and he secured it at 1200. He often told me
that was the price he gave for it. And speaking of 'Granny' Hough reminds
me I was speaking to the present Joseph Onus, of Richmond, a little while ago,
and Margaret Catchpole's name cropped up.
Mr Onus' mother was Annie Hough, and a sister to the late Peter, John and George,
sons of 'Granny' Hough. He says he has heard 'Granny' speak of Margaret,
and that she was buried in that portion of the cemetery running parallel with the
present Sunday School ground.
Then old Mr James Huxley, who put in so many years on the Grose farm,
rented it from Mr Richards for many years. Afterwards Pat Casey lived
there a long, while, also Mr Hill, father of Jack, formerly of
Richmond, and our present Herb Hill.
Then we have the farm which was occupied by old Mr John Hough for a fair
lifetime, so to speak. He reared a large family there, and both he and his
wife died there he dying first.
Then there was a farm where Mr George Hough lived for so many years. The
first man I remember living on this farm was George Wilson, who, as I have
stated, lived at one time where Tom Miles lives in Lennox street. Richmond,
and had some fine stallions. While down there he was farming.
I went to school with Wilson's two sons George and William, and his
his daughter, Betsy. They used to come in a spring cart to school. Between
where George Wilson lived and the next place old Mr Pearson, father of Albert,
the elder, of Richmond Bottoms, lived for a good while. This farm then belonged
to Mr Thomas Tebbutt. I remember the two sons, Albert and Charley, pretty well,
also two girls who became Mrs M. Phillips, junr., and the late Mrs John Gosper,
of Windsor. I knew old Mr Pearson fairly well. He bought both bundle and
sheet stringy bark from me when I was at the punt. On another occasion while
I was at the punt he bought a hundred slabs from me. He told me one day it
was a wonder I didn't trade in this sort of things, and I told him I hadn't been asked
for any such, so he told me he wanted a hundred and they must be good and not
above the price he stated. I got the slabs and made twopence each on the deal,
which paid me well, as I had no trouble with them in the handling. Then came
Mr William Smith, who was a big farmer and lived there for many years.
I remember three of the boys James, William and Joseph, when they were young.
He also had some daughters. Later on in life I got to know them, among them
being the present Mrs Duncombe, of Richmond, the late Mrs Alf. Bailey,
Mrs. John Bailey, of Richmond Bottoms, and the late Mrs Charles Westall.
Mrs. Smith was a sister to the Mrs Bailey who died at Clarendon some time ago at
an advanced age, and also a sister to Mrs Single, mother of the late Joseph Single,
who was a prominent man in the Hawkesbury Race Club and Agricultural Association
for so many years.
The next farm to Mr William Smith's belonged to Mr. Thomas Bailey, who was also
a big farmer in those days. I knew his boys, John, William and Alfred. I have often
bought oaten hay and oats off Mr Bailey for the racehorses while I kept the pub on
the road at Clarendon.
Then adjoining each other were the three brothers, George, William and Thomas Eather,
who suffered so disastrously in the big flood of June, '67. Old Mr John Single of all
owned a farm near the Eather brothers on which Mr Charles Eather, father of the boys
mentioned, lived for many years in a big brick house. I knew Mr. John Hand,
who lived on a farm adjoining Charley Eather's. He was a farmer and had a run,
I am told, out in Long Wheeney.
Further along there were James Upton and "Grandfather" Hoskisson, who lived
there and owned farms George Freeman, though living in Windsor, worked a farm
down there.
We will take an imaginary walk back to the old crossing at the punt.
David Brown lived somewhere near the farm occupied by Charley Eather.
One time I met Mr Brown, who happened to see a good chance of making
a little money, but he hadn't any cash on him at the time. He asked
me to lend him some and I gave him what he wanted, and in
'no time' he returned me my money and some for interest.
Back at the punt again we will record a few little incidents I have
thought of since I started. There had been a fair flood and is was
the first day the punt got to work. Charley Eather was keeping
the pub at the time, and a flock of cattle came down. They were put into
the river to swim over, except one which they couldn't get into the water,
as he was very contrary. After a deal of galloping about they got him in
and be began to ring about and wouldn't steer for the other side.
The owner called out for me to bring the boat down and steer him over.
I had a lively half hour of it and nearly got capsized more than once.
The owner of the cattle and five or six others went up to
the pub to have drinks, and when they came back I was back at the
North Richmond side. They got into the punt to go over. When we
were nearly over, the man who owned the cattle put two coins into my hand
and closed it on them so as the others would not see what they were. I
didn't look at what they were just at the time as I was busy with the punt.
When they were all off the punt except a man namsd Davis, he said to
me 'Half a sovereign, Alf, I suppose.' I opened my hand and
showed him what the coins were six pence for the owner and his horse
coming over in the punt, and sixpence for my half hour's hard work
after his bullock in the river ! I took good care to let that
man do the best he could with his bullocks in the river after that.
Then I put Mr. James Martin he wasn't Sir James then
and "Grandfather" Hoskisson over two days when they were electioneering
the other side of the river the first time James Martin was
elected to Parliament. Mr Hoskisson took great interest in that contest,
and worked hard to get Mr Martin in.
Another day I had a lady overboard. I was putting her over on horseback
in the punt, and when about half way over and there was 18 or 20 feet of
water at the spot the horse began to plunge and wanted to make back to the
other side, with the result he got overboard, lady and all. The horse struck
out for the shore, and the woman stuck to him and managed to get out safely.
A young man once brought some horses to the punt one wet day and was putting
them in to swim them over to take them to Kurrajong. When the horse he was
riding got into the water he began to play up and unseated his rider. I happened
to be handy with the boat and pulled over to him quickly and he grabbed the
side and nearly swamped the boat. He begged me to lift him in, but as he had a
big overcoat on, and was a big chap, I hadn't a hope of getting him into the
boat. However, he clung to the side till I got over. He often remarked that
only for me he would have been drowned.
Thomas Carnell also nearly met his death in the river, while I was there. He had
been over to the races at the old course, near Charley Eather's pub, and I was
putting him across in the punt. When we got the best part of the way over he
wanted me to pull faster and I told him I couldn't. He was a little annoyed about
it, and said he wouldn't wait. He put his spurs into the horse and made him
jump off the flaps of the punt, and in he and horse went, and under they went.
When he came up the horse was plunging about and soon unseated him. I had the boat
alongside and went to his assistance. I wasn't strong enough to lift him into the
boat, so he clung to the side of it till I got ashore with him.
I had another experience, and a case of nearly drowning
-- a woman this time. An old lady had been to Richmond with her basket
of eggs 2/- a dozen then and I was putting her
back over the river in the boat. I cautioned her not to stand up as she
might overbalance, but she wouldn't take the advice and into the water she went.
I couldn't get her into the boat, so I had to hold her with one hand to help her
keep a good hold of the side of the boat, and work the oar with the other till I got
her over safely.
Mrs John Town was living in the cottage where Mr John Pitt
lives, and as the old lady I had saved knew Mrs Town very well,
she went up to her and got a change of clothes.
Mr Lockrey was a farmer up Kurrajong and was going into Windsor for loading for
Mr John Lamrock, senr., with his four bullocks and dray. When he got to the
river, and I was going to put him over in the punt, I could see the bullocks were
thirsty and I advised him to water them before he got on to the punt,' as there was
a good watering place there. He said he would water them when he got over to the
other side. When we got, over I wanted him to take them out for safety, but be
reckoned he could manage them alright and wouldn't take them out. When he
put them in they were very thirsty and began swimming about and tried to make
back to the other side. He soon found out he couldn't manage them, and saw
they stood a good chance of being drowned. I saw there was trouble and
got the boat and went to their assistance. I tried my best to get the pin out of the
pole. After a deal of trouble I got it out and managed to save one beast. The
poor old man was in a great way about losing three of his bullock, and reckoned
he was ruined. Another old friend of mine was going to Kurrajong and as I
was putting him over in the punt, and the river was rising very fast, I asked him to
be sure and get back very soon as we expected to be compelled to take the punt
off before very long. He was fond of a little drop and stayed away longer than
he should have. When he came back we had taken the punt off about an hour,
and had no chance of getting it on again. He wanted me to put the
punt on and put him over, but I told him it was impossible,
and offered to put him over in the boat. He said he wouldn't wait for the boat, and
would swim his horse over. I saw how he was and begged him not to attempt
such a thing. He put his horse into the water in spite of my pleadings.
The piebald horse he was riding was a great swimmer and struck out for the
other side. I expected something would happen to him going over, so I followed him
up in the boat. When he got about half way the horse began plunging and put
him off. He was no sooner off the horse in the water than he grabbed the horse's
tail and hung on for all he was worth. I wanted him to come to the boat but he
wouldn't, preferring to stick to the horse's tail, and the animal took him safely over
and landed him about where the cattle used to land. He got a change of clothes
at a friend's place up on the bank and a drop of something to warm him inside.
Another day I put Thomas Onus over in the punt about two o'clock as he was
going up to Freeman's, on the Comleroy Road, to, have a look at a lot of cattle
which had to be there that day. When I was putting him over the river was rising
and I wanted him to get back as soon as possible. After he left the river began to
rise very rapidly and we had to take the punt off. When he came back, well after
dark, and found the punt off he came and told me he had to get to Sydney next
morning the train was only running to Blacktown then and begged me to put
him over in the boat. It was very dark and the timber was coming down and I
didn't care about facing it. I explained to him the danger I was running, and that
I couldn't swim. He then asked whether, if he got Jim Merrick to come with me
with a lantern and keep the timber off the boat, I would put him over. He told
me he would give me a pound and Merrick ten shillings. After some persuasion
I agreed, but told him I was frightened of the job and that it was not
for the sake of the money I was doing it. Merrick came up and we chanced it, and
on our way over he pushed five or six lots of timber off the boat with a pole about
six feet long. When we got over I wanted to go up and stay at Parnell's, but
Merrick wasn't a bit afraid and persuaded me to come on back. On the way back
he pushed off several lots of timber.
That pitch dark night and dangerous trip I have never forgotten.
Dr. White, of Windsor, used to ride a fine black horse
and when he went to Kurrajong I always put him over in the punt. No matter
what late hour, or how cold the winter night might be when he was returning
and I had to put him over, he would never have the punt. I always had to use
the boat for him and swim his horse behind. When we got over I always had
an iron hoop scraper which I kept for the purpose, and gave his horse a good scrape
down and rub over. The old doctor used to say it was as good as a feed of corn to
the horse. Dr. White married a Kurrajong girl by the name of Miss Townsend, who
lived about opposite the old Church of England at the foot of the Big Hill.
I have heard it said he was a very clever doctor.
He always treated me well for the trouble I took with him
and his horse.
I had a mishap there one day. I was bringing a lot of sheep over for
Mr. Ben Richards. Old Mr Joseph Onus got his horse on to the flap of the punt just as we
were going to start and he didn't think it was safe and jumped off again. When
we got about half way over I had Harry Gibbs helping me that day the sheep
got fidgeting about and on top of one another in one corner, which knocked our
punt out of balance. The water began to flow in rapidly, and down it went in quick
sticks. When we saw she was sinking we got the sheep out. and were lucky
enough to lose none. We got Bill Carverdown he was a good hand at the work
to help us get the punt up, and it took us nearly two days to get it right. As a
rule we bad tbe boat with us, but this day we didn't, and it taught us never to
be without it in the future. As the river was up it meant a great inconvenience to
the people as they couldn't get over the Yarramundi falls. There were two lots of
sheep to come over and they meant easy earned money for us. I had got paid
beforehand for them and we got the first lot over and when the sheep on the other
side saw them feeding along the banks in they rushed and swam over. In one lot
one sheep was drowned, and in the other lot none were lost. I shall never forget
one little incident that happened while I was down there. Mrs Parker, who lived
in the house on the hill where Johnson Pay and William Fuller lived, used to
come over and work for Mrs Parnell. She was over there one Christmas eve, and
when she was going home they gave her a sucking pig for her Christmas dinner.
She put it in a bag and I put her over in the boat, and home she went delighted
to think they would have such a fine Christmas dinner ; but that night the pig
got out. Next morning Mr Parker was hunting all round among the neighbours
to see if they had seen the pig, but could not find any trace of it. A little
later he was telling me about their misfortune. I happened to be talking to
Mr Parnell and told him about Parker's pig being lost
when he 'told me the pig was up with its mother. I saw Parker and told him what
Parnell had said, but he could hardly believe the pig would swim the river, and
thought I was having a lark with him. He made up his mind to go and have a
look for himself, and when he got up it was there right enough. He bagged it
again and had the pleasure of tasting it for Christmas dinner after all.
Jack Turner was coming over from the other side and we had a stage outside of the
punt on the side the rope worked, and Jack set to work to help me over to make
it easier for me. It was a bit windy and made the punt lurch about a little and
the rope happened to come off the roller, and into the water Jack
went backwards and got a fine ducking. He was a jolly natured
fellow and took it in good part I shall always think of poor old Dr.
Wittaker as he was coming back from Kurrajong and over in the punt.
William Parnell and I were out on the stage pulling. It was windy and the rope came
off the roller on the end Parnell was working and in he went. We were about 40
yards from the shore when it happened and Parnell had to swim. As soon as he
went in I saw he made for the flap of the punt and got underneath it, and began
singing out he was drowning and for the doctor to catch hold of his hand. The old
doctor was in a great state of mind about William, as he used to call him, and
wanted me to catch hold of his hand. I told him William wanted his hand, not
mine, but the old doctor wouldn't catch hold of it. I didn't bother, as
I knew well enough Parnell was a good swimmer and that he could get out safely.
Mr. Parnell told me after he was on for a lark with the old doctor, and what
he wanted was to get hold of his hand so that he could pull him in and give him a ducking.

SOURCE:
Windsor and Richmond Gazette
Saturday 4 June 1910
Saturday 11 June 1910
Saturday 18 June 1910
Saturday 25 June 1910
Page 14
transcription, janilye 2012

LAND GRANTS NEW SOUTH WALES 1821

SURVEYOR GENERAL'S OFFICE, SYDNEY NEW SOUTH WALES
28 April 1821
JOHN OXLEY, Surveyor General.

THE following LIST of NAMES of NEW SETTLERS, who are to receive GRANTS of LAND, and of OLD SETTLERS, who are to have additional LANDS located for them in the Year 1821, is published for general Information:

James Atkinson, Thos. Arkell, Edward Alcorn, Robert Aull, James Arndell,
Thomas Allen, George Alleburn, Samuel Arndell, Richard Adams,
Francis Allen, Jos. Atkins, William Alsop, J. Aiken, Francis Able,
Michael Ansell, Edward Allen, Thos. Asplin, Thomas Ashford,
Charles Armitage, Pat. Allen, J. Andrew, J. Agland,
Alex Berry, George Barber, William Baker, David Brown,
Wm. Bradbury, Robert Bateman. Geo. Best, sen.
Bryan Byrne, Michael Bryan, J. Brown, Noah Bryan,
Charles Beasley, Timothy Brophy, J. Brown, John
Bryan, Wm. Bruce, Thos. Byrne, John Booth, N.
Boon, Wm. Beaumont, Thos. Bowers, Thos. Bates,
Wm. Beggs, Dennis Bigley, Jas. Bolsover, J. Brown,
J. Brackfield, George Bradley, Wm. Bannister, Thos.
Bowning, Sam. Barber, Thos. Bird, Michael Byrne,
Jas. Brackenry, J. Bent, Thos. Bates, Thos. Baker,
J. Barker, J. Byrne, Thos. Biggen, Andrew Biggen,
Jas. Beckett, J. Bell, Thos. Benson, Bursella Bensley,
Edw. Burke, Brien Bagnall, Jos. Bullock, Jas. Badgery,
H. Batman, Owen Byrne, Jas. Butler, Richard
Bryan, H. Butler, Aaron Burt, J. Burrell, Daniel
Brown, J. Bentley, Stephen Burr, Wm. Britain, J.
Bradford, Jon. Broker, J. Bowman, Wm. Barron,
Jas. Byrne, Martin Burke, Geo Best, jun. James Barker,
Jas. Brailey, Jas. Burgess, H. Bray, Thomas Byrne,
Robert Brodie, Jas. Burke, Thos. Brown, J. Brown, Thos Brian,
Wm. Burridge, D. Burne, Wm. Briant, Eber. Bunker, James Butler,
Silvester Butler, Owen Boyne, J. Bennett, D. Brown, John Bayley,
Edward Bailes, John Bull, John Bailes, jun.
Daniel Bisex, Michael Boland, Thos. Cowper, James Cobb,
Donald Cameron, George Cutter, Adam Clink, Isaac Cornwall,
William Chadworth, Timothy Connor, James Carroll, John Cahill,
John Cheers, Benj. Carver, Owen Connor, Peter Cooney, John Crawley,
Thomas Campbell, Richard Cavanagh, Jas. Cavanagh,
James Cox, George Clarke, Samuel Craft, Thomas Cross, John Cribb,
Peter Carrol, Roger Connor, John Cowley, John Craft, John Colcroft,
William Craig, Farrell Cuffe, John Cromen, Dennis Connolly,
James Connell, Michael Cartwell, Peter Carroll, John Collins,
Hugh Crabtree, Abraham Champray, Thos. Cowling, John D. Campbell.
Richard Carr, Dennis Conway, John Cummins, William Cheshire, Thos. Clarke,
Edward Churchill, John Chaseling, James Connelly, Thomas Cheshire,
John Day, John Dight, Andrew Doyle, William Davis, Edward Doyle,
Thos. Dutton, Jas. Donnelly, James Duffey, Wm. Douglas, Jas. Devlin,
Jas. Daly, Jas. Dempsey, Pat. Downey, Thos. Davy, Peter Dunn, Edmund Doyle,
Cyrus Doyle, Jas. Donahar, Stephen Dunn, Pat. Devoy, Pat Dacey, Michael Doran,
Nicholas Dukes, Thos. Downes, Charles Dodding, Geo. Dowling, J. Dell,
Francis Dalton, Jas. Dearing, Wm Dockrell, Michael Duggin, Richard Donelly,
J. Darrah, Isaac Dowse, Garrett Donally, John Dewhurst, Christopher Downes,
John Dogharty, Walter Duggan, Joseph Dargon, George Davis,
Shady Davey, Samuel Davis, John Davis, Thomas Davis, William Davis,
John Dalton, Patrick Downey, Edward Dillon, John Dunn, John Eyre,
John England, James Eldridge, Eliker Everitt, Joseph Eades,
Charles Eather ,Thomas Eather, Thomas Eather sen.
Joseph Emm, Joseph Earles, Daniel Eaton, Joseph Eyles, Henry Early,
William Edney, John Edney, Wm. Edwards, Wm. Eagleton, Wm. Etsell,
John Ellison, John Wm. Fulton, Wm. John Fitz, Henry Fleming,
Bernard Fitzpatick, John Frazier, Samuel Fry, George Freeman,
Wm. Field, Bernard Fitzpatrick, Robert Farlow, James Frazier,
Edward Field, sen. John Finch, Wm. Fulford, John Freebody,
S. Foley; James Freeman, Thomas Frost, Geo. Fieldhouse,
Francis Frendard, John Floyd, and J. Forster.
Robert Forrester, Wm. Forrester, John Farrell,
John Fowler, Richard Friar, John Foley, Edward Franks,
Edward Fletcher, William Flynn, Thomas Francis, jun.,
Patrick Flynn, Peter Fitzpatrick, John Ferguson, J. Golledge,
Wm. Guise, J. Galvin, Jas. Gooding, jun., James Goddard, Benjamin Grimshaw,
P. Garey, J. Grono, George Graves, James Greenslade,
J. Grant, Mich. Geary, Robt. Gray, Henry Gaskin,
Mich. Gavagan, Robt. Garratt, Benjamin Goddard,
Wm. Gwillim, Jas. Griffiths, Dennis Green, Wm.Goodere,
Wm. Galvin, Dennis Guinny, John Glade, Val. Goodwin, Richard Guise,
J. Goodwin, Thomas Galvin, Thos. Gilbert, J. Gosport, Joseph Gosport,
J. Gardner, Joseph Gilbert, Isaac Gorrick, John Higgins, George Howe,
J. Howe, Wm. Holmes, Wm. Hayes, Wm. Hardman, Joseph Hately,
Pat. Harper, Francis Hainsworth, William Hearn, Henry Howell,
Mich. Hogan, Richard Haviland, Philip Hogan, J. Harris, J. Harris,
William Hawkins, John Hanabus, Charles Herbert, Thomas Hinton,
Pat. Hand, Lawrence Harvey, David Horton, jun., J. Hope,
Thomas Hall, Wm. Hill, Peter Hough, Joseph Hunt, Henry Hunt,
Samuel Harding, D. Hawkins, George Hambridge, James Henry,
Maurice Hallihan, Edward Harrigan, Thomas Howell, George Hill,
Christopher Harris, Joshua Holt, Tim. Hoy, Wm. Harrington,
John Hodges, Mich. Hughes, John Hoile, Henry Hoile, Joshua Heap,
Abraham Herne, Lawrence Halfpenny, James Harper, John Herbert, jun.,
J. Hazard, Jas. Higgins. Robt. Higgins, Enoch Hutchinson,
Thos. Higgins, Peter Hibbs, jun., J. Holden, Wm. Hewitt, Edw. Hobbs,
J. Hearn, Thos. Hansey, Hugh Hughes, jun., Jas. Hall, Henry Huff,
George Hughes, J. Holt, George Higginson, Peter Hibbs, J. Holden,
Thos. Hooton, Wm. Howell, Francis R. Hume, J. Hendle, Jas. Hayden,
Jesse Hudson, David Horton, sen., Robt. Johnston, George James,
John Johnston, John Jacklin, Thomas John, George Johnstone, Wm. Jones,
Wm. Ikin, Joseph Inch, Wm. Jacklyn, Charles Ivory, Edward Jones,
Mich. Joyce, Thos. Jones, George Jubb, jun., Thos. Jones,
John Innes, John Johnson, Richard Johnson, Charles Jackson, John Joyce,
James Kay, William Klen endorlff, Pat. Kirk, John Kennedy,
Wm. Kearns, J. Keighran, Thos. Keane, J. Kirlaghan, R. Kibble,
Cornelius Keoe, Donald Kennedy, jun., John Kelly,
Joseph Lendall, Jas. Kavannagh, Duncan Kennedy,
John Kennedy, Wm. Kellow, Wm. Kenney, Thomas Kelly, Archibald Kane,
Daniel Kelly, Thomas Kelly, D. Knowland, Thos. Kendall, James Kelly,
James Kenney, J. H. Lawson, Walker Lawry, William Lilly,
Francis Lawless, Samuel Leverton, Henry Lendon.
J. Holmes, J. Lynch, Samuel Leverton, jun. Jas. Lewis,
Richard Lillis, Thos. Lawrence, J. Leadbeater, sen.
J. Larken, Peter Lawry, George Lilley, James Lyons,
Wm. Landron, Miles Leary, John Lavis, James Layton,
Nicholas Lacy, William Lees, Peter Lillis,
Elijah Lane, Wm. Lawrence, J. Lapish, Mich. Lamb,
J. Lees, J. Lacey, Owen Lenaghan, John Longford,
Wm. Lovegrove, H. Lamb, J. Lyons, Hannibal M'Arthur,
James M'Arthur, William M'Arthur, Charles M'Arthur, Andrew M'Dougal,
J. M'Henry, Henry Marr, Wm. Minchin, William Mobbs, J. Mobbs,
George Mobbs, Isaac Mobbs, J. M'Loughlin, Fred. Meurant,
Joseph Meyrick, Tristram Moore, Cornelius M'Arthy,
P.Moore, Pat. Mernan, J. Madden, Mich. Maloney,
Wm. Morgan, John Mills, Jas. M'Arty, jun.
Thomas Martin, jun. Jas. M'Arty, J. Mackey, Thos. Miller,
Christopher M'Guire, Thos Mortimer, J. May, Pat. Mason, Pat. Moore,
Thos. Maloney, Jas. M'Guire, Matthias Miller, Jas. M'Arty.
John M'Arty, William Makepiece, Thos. Moran, Fred. Murphy,
Patrick Mulhall, Thos. M'Caffery, George Maginnis, Edw. Merrick,
Thos. M'Kenna, Robert Maxwell, Henry M'Allister, James M'Manis,
John Murphy, George Marley, Kennedy Murphy, Patrick M'Hall,
George Murphy, Thos. Mustagh, Owen Martin, jun. George Mortimer,
Thos Murray, Charles M'Carty, William Mobbs jun. Jas. Mosely,
H. Morton, J. Merzagora, J. M'Peake, Isaac Mills, Jas. Macdonald,
Jas. Milson, Dennis M'Neary, Jas. M'Aloney, Brian M'Cormic,
John Moss Wm. Mannix, Michael Macdonald, John M'Donald, Joseph Mason,
John. M'Guigan, Joseph Mackinley, Thos. M'Guire, Jas. Marshall,
Thomas Moakson, Andrew' M'Dougall, Jame M'Dougall, J. M'Dougall,
J. Moss, Alexander M'Guigan, Patrick Mahar, Thomas McVitie,
Simon Moulds, Edward Meurant, jun, J. Matthews, Robt. Marshall,
William M'Haslan, Alexander M'Donald, Hugh M'Avoy,
J. Murphy, Mich. Minton, Jas. M'Donald, Patrick
Naughton, Richard Norris, J. Nash, Thomas Nugent,
Thos. Newman, Andrew Nash, Jas. Nugent, James Nowlan,
William Newport, John Norris, John Nowland, George Nash. J. Neil,
J. Nicholds, Walter Noy, F. O'Meara, J. O'Meara, p. Oakes,
James O'Brian, Charles O'Brien, James Owen, Thomas Owens, William Osburne,
Samuel Owen, James O'Harra, William Olds, Mark Opong,
Brien O'Brien, Wm. Oliver, Joseph Onus, Terence O'Brien,
Chas. Pennon, G. T. Palmer, George Panton,
Wm. Pithers, Mr. Parmeter, J. Price, Wm. Parkins
F. Pendergrast, J. Pike, J. Pike, Morgan Poor, N. Payton,
J. Pitcher, Saml. Paine, Wm. Page, John J. Peacock,
Robt. Plumb, J. Patfield, Thos. Prentice, J. Phillips,
Mich. Parker, George Pinkerton, F. Peisley,
George Phillips, J Pendergrast, Wm. Paris, J. Pye,jun.
Wm. Pritchard, Daniel Pegg, Saml. Perkins George Plummer,
H. Pullen, R. Partridge, Joseph Pashley, Mich. Power, J Pugh,
Deison Post, Tim Poor, F. Piper, Wm. Piper, H. Paul, J. Pender,
Jas. Pender, Edwin Rouse, Edw. Riley, Thos. Rose, Edw. Redmond,
J. Robinson, Chas. Rushton, John Riley, Malachi Ryan, Thos Riley,
J. Ready, J. Redmond, Wm. Reynolds, J. Ross, Barnabas Rix,
Wm Rafter, Mark Russell, Wm. Rose, Wm. Roberts, Joseph Rye, jun.
Mich. Rourke, Alex. Routledge, J. Riley, Nich. Ryan,
Wm. Rixon, Robt. Ray, Owen Riley, Thos. Rudd, J. Rudd,
Moses Rosetta, H. Rose, J. Roberts, Jas. Roberts, J. Ruby,
J.Robb, Edw. Redfern, Wm. Radley, Wm. Redfern, J. Rentwell,
Richard Ruff. H. Rochester, Barnabas Rix, Chas. Smith, Wm. Smith.
Mich. Stack, Jas. Stack, Jas. Shepherd, sen. G. Smith,
Wm. Scott, Jas. Shepherd, jun. F. Spencer, Andrew Scott,
J. Sunderland, Martin Sweeney, Dennis Shield,
Dan. Smallwood, George Sewell, Edw. Stinton, Jos. Smith,
H. Styles, Jas. Smithers, Wm. Skinn, Joseph Smith, jun. Wm. Smith,
Wm. Stenson, Jas. Smith, Edw. Shipley, Wm. Speers, Hugh Scott,
W. Scott, Wm. Smith, J. Smith, Jas. Smallwood, Roger Shea,
J. Scully, J. Stone, Thos. Stevens, Jos. Stubbs, Jas. Speers,
Wm. Stubbs, Wm Simms, Thos. Stone, Thos. Stack, Jos. Smith, Jas. Smith,
F. Stafford, James Smith, Dennis Stacey, Chas, Summerell, Stephen Smith,
J. Smith, Edw. Stowers, Daniel Step, Thos. Smith, Dan. Sweeney,
Thos. Sanders, jun. J. Smith, J. Stanbury, jun.
Robt. Smith, George Scott, Murty Shields, Wm. Sherries,
J. Sewell, Wm. Stabler, Chas. Throsby, jun.
Robt. Turnbull, Chas. Thompson, Wm. Tuckwell, J. Tindell,
J. Tarlington, Edw. Tompson, J. Turnbull, Jas. Thompson,
Chas. Thomas, Bishop Thompson, Thos. Thompson, J.Tague, J.Taylor,
H. Fretheway, Jas. Toucher, S. Tuckman, Chas. Tunks, H. Thorn, jun.
J. Thorm, jun. Jos. Tuzo, Jean Francois Theon,
J. Town, Jas. Turner, Wm Thorn, jun. Jas. Thomas,
D.Thompson, J. Taylor, Thos. Trotter, Jas. Turner,
George Tuckwell, Wm. Tyson, Philip Tully, George
Trace, Owen Tierney, Wm. Tompson, Thos. Turner,
James Vaughan, J. Vardy, R. Virgin, Thos. Vardy, J.Voildes,
Thos. Upton, Edw. Wollstonecraft, Wm.Walker,
George Woodhouse, G. P. Wood, George Ward, J. Whalan,
Wm. Welsh, Thos. Woolley, J.Williams, Edmund Wright,
Robt. Wilkinson, Daniel Wellings, J. Wright, J. Walker,
Jas. Williams, Wm. Wright, Chas. Wilson, Thos. Warner, P. Workman
Aaron Walkers, Job Wilson, Wm. Williams, Robert Wells, Thos. Wilson,
Thos. Wood, J. K. Williamson J. D. Wood, Wm. White, Chas. Watson,
J. Williams, Jas. Walbourn, J,. Weevers, Chris. Ward, H. Wells,
Wm. Walker, J. Warby, J. Warby, jun. J. Wood, James Wright.
Wm. White, Wm. Wakeman, James Whalan, James Were, J. Wright,
William Wall, Joseph Walker and Charles Yorke.


SOURCES:
The Sydney Gazette
(NSW : 1803 - 1842)
Saturday 28 April 1821
P.1
Saturday 5 May 1821
P.2
Saturday 12 May 1821
P.2
transcription, janilye
2012

Land Grants for 1820


Recollections of Richmond, New South Wales, Chronicled in 1910

[These are the memories Alfred Smith of the Hawkesbury in New South Wales.
Alfred was born in Hobartville, New South Wales on the 13 July 1831 to John Smith 1798-1833 a convict who drowned in Liverpool in 1833 and Adelaide Eliza De La Thoreza 1808-1877 she had been born in Madrid. After John Smith died, at 15 months of age, Alfred was adopted by George JAMES 1768-1862 and his wife Ann Kelly 1789-1864. They had only one girl, Eliza JAMES 1824-1862 ( the mother of Ann ONUS 1841-1927) Alfred died 0n 24 December 1917. On the 11 October 1854 at St.Matthew's Catholic Church, Windsor, Alfred married Ann Amelia KINSELA 1838-1917 the daughter of Martin KINSELA 1793-1860 and Ellen, nee HENDLING 1794-1862. Alfred had many jobs throughout his lifetime, including Town Stockman, running The Punt across the river and a drover, droving throughout New South Wales and as far down as Victoria.]
Many of the people mentioned are my ancestors and his recollections have been an invaluable aid not just to my own family research but many other family trees seeded in the Hawkesbury.janilye

Right in the corner of the vacant allotment at the corner of Paget and March streets, there stood a weatherboard house, which had a verandah in front. At the side of the house was a very large cedar tree. When I first remember the place the old man Douglas of all lived there. He would be great-grandfather to the present William Douglas, who we all know today as a good bricklayer in Richmond. In those days we always knew the corner as Douglas' corner, and the big tree at the side of the house as Douglas's cedar tree. I still have a vivid recollection of old Mr. Douglas. He used to wear his hair very long, brush it round behind his ears, and it would hang well on to his shoulders. He had two horses and carts, and hired them out to people who wanted to draw wood. He charged five shillings per day for each horse and cart. He had one very funny saying, which he would use on special occasions. It was this "Bad luck to all informers! You're a liar ! Whether or no too bad. cabbage is no good without pork." He bad two sons, wheelwrights, Joseph and Isaac, and about where Ernest Marlin is living at present there was a skillion, and they had a big workshop there. In this same skillion Ellen Cavanah lived for some time. I think old Saunders, the brickmaker,lived there also. Alderman T. Biddle's father was the agent. Where Mr Sid Paull's residence stands there was a blacksmith's shop kept by Dan Ward. He was a single man and lived with his mother, who we always knew as Granny Ward. I remember three daughters. Sarah married a man named Brett. Jane married a man named Ben Gawthorn, and went to Mudgee to live. I think there are some of the descendants about there now. Phyllis married a chemist named Lester, in Mudgee. Old Granny Ward had a white cockatoo, which could say almost anything, He would call her whenever she was wanted in her little shop. I understood he was 35 years old when Mrs Ward died, and I heard her daughter, Mrs Lester, took him to Mudgee. Outside her family she had a boarder named Robinson, who was a tailor. The old lady was a most industrious woman, and had a big mangle, with which she did a large trade.
Then there was vacant land till we came to where Mr W. Drayton is residing. Here was an old house, used as a school, which was kept by Mr Hogsflesh. Mrs Harrington, a widow, lived there after Mr Charles Hogsflesh kept the school. I think Mr Harrington was killed by the blacks somewhere up Kurrajong. Old Mrs Harrington was a chatty old woman. She often came round to Mr James for advice, as he was a constable. If I were about when she came she would say to me 'Go out ! get out of this!' and away I would have to go. Later she becme Mr. Preystnell, but the union did not turn out a happy one. They did not live long together, and Preystnell told me the reason.
In the course of time the property came into the hands of the Draytons, and is now owned by my old friend Mr W. Drayton. Some years ago he built an up to date cottage on the land, which has improved it so much that only us old hands can have an idea of what it was like in my boyhood days. Next door to this stood the old Horse and Jockey Hotel that was pulled down when the Imperial was built on the corner. The first person I remember living there was Thomas Silk, Harry's father, who kept it as an hotel. His sign was the Lion and the Unicorn. We lads had a song among ourselves which went :
The Lion and the Unicorn Are fighting for the crown,
The Lion beat the Unicorn All around the town.
The first circus I ever saw was in the paddock at the back when Tom Silk kept the pub. A man named Croft was the proprietor, and I never forgot Quinn the tight rope walker. We thought it was something wonderful to see a man walking backwards and forwards on a tight rope. Old Mr.Joseph Onus lived there for a while. Here he had 'Jerry Sneak,' the racehorse, half brother to the famous 'Jorrocks' The first gold cup run for in the colony was won by 'Sneak' at Homebush. When old Mr Crisford and family first came to Richmond it was in this place they commenced housekeeping. Caleb Crisford was only talking to me about it the second last time he was in Richmond. Then a tall man, whose name I don't remember, kept a school there. He had a school also down on the 'Bottoms,' by 'Smashem' Smith's. One night as he was going to Windsor two fellows nearly killed him. The Rev. Father Terry, the Roman Catholic priest, held services upstairs in the big room. Old Mr Brooks also kept a school here, and no doubt some of his pupils are alive to-day in the district. At the time Mr. James Bates took it over to start pub keeping, the building was in a state of great disrepair, and it cost him a large sum of money to put it in thorough order. He was living there at the time of the '67 flood, and I heard it was about half an inch over the counter, but I was up the country at the time and only heard this.
Among others who kept the old place as an hotel will be remembered 'Black' Johnny Gough, ]im Ryan (Toby's son), Tom Hough, George Cobcroft, Tom Young, Campion, Ted Morgan and, after his death, his widow. On the piece of land on which the Imperial Hotel is built was a weatherboard place in which Dan Neil lived. Right on the corner he had a blacksmith's shop. I have been given to understand he was a Government man to old Mr Cox, of Clarendon, and did his blacksmithing. But to his credit, with good conduct and a good record he became a free man, and started black smithing on his own account on this corner.
On this same corner Tom Masters, of Windsor, kept his first little shop. He had been droving, but his health began to give way, and he decided to start in business. On the opposite side of the street where Joseph Ashton keeps his cases there was a little slab place with no verandah. 'Bill' Wilmott a shoemaker, lived in it. While living there he died suddenly. Mrs Morgan, who they called 'Betty,' a very stout woman, was his housekeeper. Next door, only on the same block of land, there stood one room in which lived an old bachelor known as 'Bob the Stockman.' For a long time he made ti-tree brooms, and sold them for sixpence each. He would go out to the Black Swamp and get the good class of ti-tree, cut it, and let it wilt for a certain time before making it into brooms. You would see him coming home with a large bundle of it on each shoulder. Where Mr. S. Orchard's own house stands, and where he kept a store for many years, stood a skillion with no verandah and containing three or four rooms. Here Mrs. Davis, mother of Mrs S. Orchard, lived for some time. Later on Mrs. Davis married Matthew Webb, a carpenter. It was Mr Webb who had the front put on and started storekeeping. Later on he went to St Mary's, and kept a tannery. He died over there. Tom Masters kept a general store there also. Coming down nearer the present day we knew it as a butcher's shop kept by 'Ike' Cornwell. Mr. Orchard conducted a successful business there and a general store for a long time.
What we now call the park, wasn't such a beauty spot when I first knew it, and was called the Market Square. In wet weather water would lie in a few places about the centre. It wasn't quite as level as now. There were a few trees standing, a few logs on the ground, and plenty of stumps. On the 5th of November, Guy Fawkes day, they would build a platform some five or six feet high about where the pavilion now stands, and make a effigy of a man. They had the effigy on show at day time, and large heaps of wood piled up about a a rod away. When night came they set fire to the man and heaps of wood, and great was the rejoicing.
Where the School of Arts and public school stands was the pound paddock. About where Constable Ross has his garden was the pound. The first poundkeeper I remember was old 'Dicky' Lounds.
Returning to the corner where Mr. S. Orchard keeps his present "Railway Stores" I remember there stood a skillion with a small verandah. In this humble, dwelling Charles Chamberlain, the fencer and splitter, lived. On the spot where Mr Orchard's store stands there were several lots of bricks made by 'Tim ' the brickmaker. This was the only name I knew him by. Where Mr. F. Gow's places are there stood a weatherboard skillion of four rooms and no verandah, which was occupied by Mr Tafe. He used to grow tobacco, and had two sons, Joe and Dick. After that there stood a brick skillion, where Mr Wade lived. Mr Wade was a gardener to Mr William Bowman. In his spare moments, and with the help of his wife, he used to raise a lot of good vegetables, his wife used to sell them. He also grew tobacco. He had two daughters, Jane, and Harriet. but only one son, I think. He had a tobacco press made out of logs and a long lever to press his tobacco leaf. A man named Province 'Ratty,' as he was always called lived with him for a long time and helped him with the tobacco.
A brick house stands on the allotment where Mr Guest's saleyards are. It is an old place. I don't remember it getting built, but I don't think it had been up many years when I first knew it. Here old Mr Ducker (Roland's father) kept a shop when they first came to Richmond. Old Mr Ducker was an industrious man and I recollect him driving his team up and down for goods. Mr B. Richards had a butcher's shop in the verandah portion on the end towards Mr. F. Gow's property, and sold, mutton only. This was the last place he lived in in Richmond till he built the beautiful mansion 'Kamilaroi.' From here he went to live at the bridge, where he kept public house. Mr Joseph Single lived there also.
I have heard old Mr Martin, who married Miss Henderson (Granny Field) gave it to his granddaughter, who married Charley Price. Charley lived here a good while. Next door, where Miss Fergusson is living, must be a very old place, as it had an old look when I first recollect it. Mr King occupied the whole premises late years it has been made into two dwellings. Old Mr King was a nail maker, and consequently was always known as 'King the nailer.' He used to live in one end and have his shop in the other. After Mr King left it, Joe Poole lived there. He ran a one horse coach to Windsor. Nixon, the tailor, lived there also.
Then there was a vacant allotment next in my earliest days. Later on, but standing on this piece of ground is the old two-storey place which has been in the possession of the Price family for many years. The brick work was done by Caleb Crisford and his father. Grand father Price died there, as also did Rebecca, his daughter. It was from this place that Mrs Archie Kennedy buried a son, Donald, and a daughter, Mary, in a very short space of time. Mrs Parkinson, who afterwards went to England, kept a school there.
Next door we have the old home of the Price family which I don't remember getting built. Old Mr. William Price of all (great grandfather of the two young Prices now living in Richmond), kept the second post office in Richmond in the old place. At the back was the tan-yard. He also carried on undertaking, &c.
Again there was vacant land, but afterwards there was a black-smith's shop erected, and this, combined with monumental work, made it a scene of activity.
I don't remember the house at the corner, owned by William Sly, getting built. The first I recollect living there was 'Joe the wheeler,' a wheelwright by trade. Joe engaged with Mr William Bowman to go to Tunnabutta but he never turned up. He arranged to go by Bell's Line, and some considerable time afterwards the remains of a man were found at the Bald Hill, seven miles the other side of Mount Tomah. As he was never heard of after leaving Richmond it was always thought to be his body.
Dr. Rowan lived there also. Miss Hawsey a miss, about 60 years of age kept house for him, and did dressmaking besides.
Where Mr Steve Dunston is living plays its part in Richmond's history.The first man I remember living there was James Griffiths. Then old Alexander Gough (father of the 'Johnny' who kept the Royal Hotel) lived there. He was a cooper by trade, and used to make the old fashioned churns, &c, and one of his make I worked many a time when making butter at old Mr James'.
On the same block of ground as John Sly has his house built, only about forty for fifty yards back from March-street, was an old slab place, I think, with a tremendous large vine in front of it. Here lived old Mr and Mrs William Magick. And here it was Mr Magick died at the reputed age of 108 years. I
remember the old man well. He had two bullocks, and with these he ploughed the back paddock of nearly an acre for old Mr George James where he lived. It was through ploughing the paddock I came to know him first. Further down there stood an old weatherboard place. I do not remember its erection. It contained four rooms and had a verandah. Robert Reeves 'Bob Fatty,' as he was generally called who owned this block from March-street to Lennox-street, lived in the house and kept a little shop. He sold pipes, tobacco, starch and blue, He died in this place and I saw him when he was dead. Mr. William Sharpe young Bill as we knew him then married the widow, and I think the old lady died there. At any rate some time after her death, I remember Sharpe marrying old Mrs Onus, mother of the old Joseph Onus, who did a great deal towards the making and advancement of Richmond. The two-storey place next door to where I have been speaking of I remember getting built. Burgess and Shelton kept a store there for a while Burgess married a Miss Dargin, of Windsor, I understood. Thomas Bell, after leaving 'Belmont' came there to live. I sold him many 'possum skins while he lived there. I remember well old Mr Bowen (father of Mr G. B. Bowen, of 'Bowen Mount') living in the two storey house for about two years, It was my work to take them two quarts of milk every morning. They dealt with old Mr George James for butter as well, but he always delivered this himself. Mr G. B. Bowen never forgets it, and always likes to have a chat with me about it. He reckons he was about four years old then. The old house owned by William Sly on the corner will be dealt with when we speak of Bosworth-street, as it faces into that street Where the late Doctor Cameron's grand mansion stands was vacant ground. Next to this vacant block I speak of was a skillion with no verandah, at that time, which belonged to old Mr. Sam Payne, He was grandfather, of the present Mrs. Tomkinson who lives in Windsor street. The first man I remember living there was Thomas Death, a butcher. He was a single man, and was found dead on the floor of his bedroom. They held an inquest, and found the cause to be eating cucumbers. After this 'Long Harry,' the bricklayer, lived there and died there also. I was one who helped to carry him to the cemetery. From there to Bosworth-street was vacant land.
Going down March-street, from the corner of Bosworth-street, toward Mr Charles Guest's there was a skillion standing just past the corner. The front portion has been put on since I first knew it. The first person I have any recollections of living there was John Masters, father of Tom Masters in Windsor. He was a painter and decorator by trade, and a splendid tradesman. He was an artist also, and could paint animals or any other pictures.
Weller , I think, who was a publican of Windsor in the early days, had a sign done by him. It represented a blackfellow and a large lump of gold in his hand.
Sam Nixon, the tailor, lived there also. Nixon's wife was run over by some horsemen while coming home after dark, The accident happened at Seymour's corner (now the 'Black Horse') only in Bosworth-street. In those days they hadn't a Constable Ross to regulate the traffic, and as they were galloping round the corner run over Mrs Nixon.
It was in this house that Bill Johnson was living at the time he got his leg broken in front of my residence, and it was here he had it taken off. Tom Johnson (father of Arthur and Tom) told me that when the doctor was taking off the leg it was like as if they were sawing a baton. He stood the operation without chloroform, and had, I believe, a handkerchief rolled up in his mouth to bite to stand the pain.
[I informed my narrator that my grand father, William Heath, who had been an old soldier, held the leg while the doctor amputated it, and carried it for the doctor who preserved it. Also that Dan Carter saw the handkerchief after, the operation was over, and it was bitten to pieces. R.F.]
Where Mr C. S. Guest is living there was a weatherboard house of' about four rooms with a verandah. In it lived a man by the name of Simpson, who was a currier by trade. I went to school with two of his sons Ebenezer and William. Our schoolmaster was good old Mr Charles Hogsflesh.

WINDSOR STREET.
In the house which is now the back of the Commercial Hotel, and which was occupied by Miss Caroline Price for many years, Mr Alfred Cox lived for some time. He was the son of the original Cox, who died at ' Fairfield,' after leaving Clarendon. This same Mr Cox was grandfather to Sloper. I used to take milk to Mr Alfred Cox, and he was the first person I have any knowledge of living there. It was the post office also for some time
previous to the new office being built. Mr White, who married a step-daughter of Mr William Reid, and a sister to the present Mr. Joseph Onus, of Richmond, was postmaster at the time. In years after Mr George Cobcroft bought the property and built the hotel on to the front of it. Next door Mrs Parkinson, as I have stated, kept her school, and I was her milk boy also. I remember the ser- vant girl she had living with her, whose name was Rebecca Rose. She came from Wilberforce way. At another period it was a school again, and kept by Mr Brown. Again it was a school, and kept by a Mr Gaisley, but only for a short time. I remember the Gaisleys were strict Wesleyans. The ground where the present Wesleyan Chapel stands was given by old Mr Martin. I remember this church being erected. I have said that where Woodhill's drapery store is was the old Wesleyan Chapel, and I remember quite well when they used to preach in it. Afterwards it was bought by old Mr Ducker, and he re- moved from March-street over there. The grocery store was afterwards built by Mr Ducker. Where Mr O Ridge now has a shop, a man named Forrester, who was a baker and confectioner was the first I remember living there. He was a very religious man and a strict, Wesleyan. He brought wood into town with his pair of a blue bullock in the shafts and a chestnut horse leading. Then the late William Sullivan's father kept a school there. I think where the Price brothers have their office was the chemist shop kept by "Cocky" Jones. He also kept the post office. When he left, "Grandfather" Price kept the post office and sold patent medicines, perfumery, etc. But before "Cocky" Jones lived there, the first I recollect was a Mr McCreedie, a boot and shoe maker. When he left there he went to live where Mr. Tom Richardson lived for many years at the corner of Lennox and Paget-streets. Old Mr Collins, mentioned in a previous paper, lived in the same house, which McCreedie left, for some time. In the last house of this terrace of four cottages, and which stands next to Mr Henry Sly's, a Mr Oxley kept a butcher's shop He had been an overseer for Mr. Bowman, of Richmond. At the same time his wife kept a school where "Granny" Ashton lives. The last time I saw his son, Owen, he was at Coonabarraban, where he was carrying on business as a saddler and harness maker. A daughter of his, Mary Ann, married a drover named Baker. The last time I saw her she was living at Cooyal, and told me her husband had been dead a few years. Robert Eather also kept a butcher's shop there. He married the eldest sister of the present Mr John Cornwell, of Richmond. The house where Mr Henry Sly lives I re- member getting built. W. G. Burgess and Shelton kept a general store there. These two men will be remembered as living and keeping a store in the two storey house in March-street. One night a hole was made in the brick wall just large enough for a man to get through. It was in the corner of the building just as you go in off the street into where Mrs Rogers now lives, Several articles were stolen. Old Mr. King, who we always re member as "King the Nailer," kept a store there for a long time. Of course the late William Sullivan kept a boot and shoe factory there for a number of years. The first horse I ever bought I sold to William Sullivan, say, to-day at a profit of 10/-. He rode the horse to Windsor the same day and made 10/- on his deal. Mr Cox, when writing to you about a bit of old times, mentioned William Sullivan running a one horse coach from Richmond to Windsor. Mr Sullivan ran the coach while I was keeping the pub., but before that Joe Poole ran one, and again Tom Phillmore ran one. These two latter plied their coaches to and from Windsor when I was a big lump of a lad. Where Henry Mortimer is living the back portion was built first, and it had a small verandah. A Mr. Burgess, a very big man and no way connected with the other Burgess I have mentioned, was the first one I remember living there. He kept a butcher's shop and used to hang meat in the verandah. Afterwards Tom Eather kept a butcher's shop there for a long time. He married Eliza Crowley, sister of John Crowley, who lived and died at Yarramundi. He was the eldest son of Mr Thomas Eather, who kept the pub. Later on, the front portion was built. The old dwelling portion of the present A.J.S. Bank I saw getting put up. Old Thos. Eather had it built. He was keeping a public house, where the Bank of N.S. Wales is, at the time, and when it was finished he shifted into it. The sign then was the "Union Inn." Afterwards it was kept as a pub by Mrs Griffiths. The old lady dropped dead in the kitchen. I was going up Kurrajong with Mr. An- drew Town to have a look at some horses he had for sale. On our way up Mr Town "shouted" for me and Mrs Griffiths served us. When we came back she was dead. A good, jolly woman she was. She was a daughter of Robert Eather and mother of the present Thomas Griffiths, sen., who lives in Richmond. "Ned" Young must not be forgotten as keeping a pub there also, not George Cobcroft. Mrs Charles Eather died suddenly there while reading a telegram she had re- ceived. Opposite to the place we have been speaking about was the old lockup, and a big cedar tree stood in front of it. It was a brick place of four rooms, whitewashed and a verandah in front. After some time the authorities had a slab building put up at the back, but close to the house, for a lockup. "Daddy" Merrick, grandfather to Mrs. T Pryke, was the first lockup keeper I remember. Fred Williams, the constable, lived there for a number of years. After him a man named Andrews was constable and lockup keeper. Andrews was guardian to William Tom kinson, and it was he who bound Mr Tomkinson to Mr John Long for five years to carpentering. Mr Tomkinson served his apprenticeship where Harry Fong is living. Where Chalmers' build ings and Holborow's store stand was vacant land when I first, recollect it. It be longed to old Mr John Stevenson, grand- father to the present Mr Edwin Steven son. Mr Abraham Cornwell bought the land from old Mr Stevenson, and built the low long house where Thomas Chalmers kept a shop for so many years. Mr Chalmers purchased the house and land from Mr Cornwell, and a few years before his death replaced the old house with the present up-to-date premises. When he was pulling the old place down to build the new terrace I happened to be going by one day and he was standing outside. We entered into conversation, when he said to me "I suppose you don't remember this old place getting built." I told him I did, and where his stables were.
On St. Patrick's Day I have seen cock- fighting, men fighting, a skittle alley and quoit playing. One St. Patrick's Day, Constable Byrnes, who was for years in Yarramundi, was in Richmond, and was what they would now call a hot member. A row had started in Tom Eather's yard just opposite, and he went over and was trying to stop some fighting when Isiah Bell, a blacksmith, gave him "a beauty " on the nose. Byrnes didn't know at the time who it was that had dealt it out to him owing to the crowd, but someone "came it" on Isiah. Byrnes summoned him and he was fined 5. It was made up for Isiah among his pals. He was an apprentice to Jack Freeman at the time. The land on which Holborows shop stands was bought from old Mr John Stevenson by Mr Brew, who built the shop and kept a big store, and a post office as well. Afterwards old Mr Grinsell kept a large store there, and died there. Mr William Holborow kept a store there for years. The back portion of the house this side of Mr Allison's was a brick place of four rooms and a veran- dah, and belonged to old William McAlpin. He was a blacksmith, and carried on his business there. A cabinet maker lived there, and the late Mr. W. Sullivan's father worked with him. There was a saw pit in the yard, and I remember them sawing up big cedar logs there. The portion I have just mentioned I don't remember getting built. The front ot it I remember getting built. About where Mr Allison's shop is there was another brick place of four rooms and a verandah which was built before my time. William Hook, a tailor, was the first I recollect living there. Mrs Hook was a sister of the late Thomas Laycock, senr., of Putty. John Hammond, a butcher, lived there for some time and
died there. Old Tom brown, a shoe maker, who married Mrs Savage, lived there also. The building of Allison's and Pryke's shops will be within the recollec tion of the young generation. I don't remember the present Bank of New South Wales getting built. The first per son living there to my knowledge was Thomas Eather, who was keeping a pub. After he left it and started up at the corner already spoken of, old Mr George Guest kept a saddle and harness-maker's shop there. He also had a tan-yard there. His currier was a Mr Shepherd. Thomas Onus kept a pub there, and here he died. Mrs Thomas Onus married a man named Joseph Rutter, and he died there also. The old residence by the Army Medical orderly room I don't remember getting built, and it looked as if it had been up for a number of years when I first knew it. Old Mr Brew was the first person who lived there to my recollection. He kept a store and post office. I remem- ber old Mrs George James paying him 1 for 4 lbs of tea. At the time the Californian diggings broke out. Mr J. A. Earle, a cabinet-maker, lived there. The Army Medical room was a specula- tion of Mr Sam Boughton's in more re-
cent years. Where the baker now lives had no front when I first knew it. There were four rooms of weatherboards, and a verandah. The land was owned by old Robert Potts. The late Mr Joseph Walden, who some little time ago died in Yarramundi, married Rachael, his daugh- ter, and the house was put up for them to live in when they were first married. After him a single man named "Frank the groom," lived there. He had been a groom to Andrew Town's grandfather. He died there, The first man I remember in the house occupied by Miss Richards was "Bill the painter." He had a man working for him who flew into a rage one day, and in the heat of passion he took an axe and went to cut "Bill" down. He got 75 lashes for it. Then Mr Robert Potts came there to live, and kept a butcher's shop only selling mutton. He lived there for years, and he and his wife died there.
After him old Mr Thomas Richards came there and started butchering.
Then we have no houses till we come to the corner where Mrs Alex Benson is living. This was built before my time. The first I knew there was Mr Issac Cornwell, who kept a big general store there. When Mr Ben Richards got married he lived there and kept a mutton butcher's shop, and while he was living there Mr Robert Richards
was born. William Delange and Mitchell Despointes kept a large store there. I took milk to William Delange, who was always known as ' Billy the Frenchman.' Here old Tiernan, the constable, luckily missed meeting his end. One night calling in for a chat, as was his custom, on his round he happened to have his big over- coat on and buttoned up which saved him from a well directed stab. He had been in the shop only a few minutes when a very tall stranger came in and wanted to buy some clothes. He had selected the goods and put down a 5 cheque, on some of the Dangars, of Singleton. Tiernan had heard about the mail up there being robbed and these cheques being among the missing articles. Naturally he was on the look-out for any stranger on for passing them. David Yates was shopman, and Thomas Hughes, a brother to Henry Hughes, happened to be in the shop talking to Yates. Neither of the owners happened to be there at the time. When he put down the cheque Tiernan asked him how he came by it. "What is that got to do with you?" he said. Tiernan tapped him on the shoulder and told him he was going to arrest him. He sprang back from Tiernan, and as he did so he drew a big knife and made a stab at the policeman. His blow missed the desired mark, and only cut Tiernan's coat a few inches. It was lucky for Tiernan he had his great coat on and buttoned up. In the scuffle that followed the stranger was too much for Tiernan, who wasn't the easiest man to best. He called on Yates and Hughes to assist him. One got hold of one leg and one the other, and between them they downed him and succeeded in popping him in the lockup. Tiernan had got word there were two in the matter, and he 'dropped down ' that the other was about the town, somewhere handy. He sent to Windsor and George Shirley, the chief constable, came out. Well on in the night they were having a cup of tea when they heard someone knocking at the front door of the pub opposite and calling out. Tiernan went out and saw a man there, and told him to go round to the back and what window to knock at if he wanted to get in. He asked Tiernan if this was where the mail of course it was only a one horse coach running to Windsor started from for Windsor. He guessed it was the mate of the man he had arrested, and told him he and a friend were having a cup of tea and invited him to come and have one, as they were going by the coach also. There was a palisading in front of the old lockup, and Tiernan opened the little gate for him to walk in. He walked in ahead of Tiernan till he got to the front door, and as soon as he saw the handcuffs hanging on the wall he knew what was up, and made a bound back. Tiernan grabbed him, and he and Shirley locked him up with his mate. I saw the two next morning when Tiernan was taking them to Windsor handcuffed.
Tiernan told me they got ten years at Cockatoo Island.
Then old Mr Henry Turner kept a general store there for many years. Mr Turner was a schoolmaster at one time down on the front of the river. Coming on to the opposite side, between West Market and Bosworth streets, there was a little place of four rooms with a small verandah some 30 or 40 yards back from where Charley Knott's store stands. A plasterer lived there in my earliest recollections of it. His name I don't remember. Old William Allen lived there and dealt in eggs and poultry in a large way. James Roberts lived there also, and had a blacksmith's shop in front of the place near the road. He shod horses for me when I had the Camden mail. A little farther on there was a little weatherboard place of four rooms, and no verandah. The first I remember living in it was a Mr Shepherd, who was a currier to old Mr Guest. Joe Poole lived there for a while when he was running the one horse coach to Windsor. Where Miss Long is living I remember getting built. It was the first bank of New South Wales in Richmond. I think Mr Hole was the first manager. He married a Miss Long. Old Mr Brew lived there before it was a bank. When he left there he went to England.
Old Mrs Long died in this house. She was half sister to old Richard Skuthorp, on the mother's side. This Richard Skuthorp would be father of the present Mr Richard Skuthorp, J.P., of Kurrajong. The old low long house which stood next door it was pulled down by Mr John Long some time ago I don't remember getting built. When I first knew it there was a big grapevine growing in front. It belonged to old Mr Samuel Payne. I used to mind his cattle for him five milking cows, and among them I remember well he had a white cow and a brown 'poley.' Being the owner he lived in it. Old Mr and Mrs Long lived there for a long time. Their son, Thomas, died there, and Mr Long ended his earthly days there also. Where the third infantry have their office, I remember that getting put up. Atkinson, a builder in Windsor, was the man who had the contract. He was old Mrs Edward Robinson's father. Dr Whittaker and his wife were living there, and one time they happened to be away the roof caved in, and it was a wonder it did not fall right in. It was afterwards put to rights by old Mr George Marlin. Mr Marlin, being such a good tradesman, was sought after, and old Mr William Durham got him to go to Wombo to put up some buildings for him. I also remember a Dr Brown living there. Dr Jockel lived and died there, and Mr. Robert Richards lived there. Of course I don't remember the Black Horse Hotel getting built. It looked old when I first recollect it. Old Dr and Mrs Seymour were the first people I remember there. The old doctor was a bit lame. Ever since I can recollect the sign was in Mrs Seymour's name during the time they kept the hotel. The old pub couid tell many tales if it could only speak. Many of the nobility have spent their honeymoons there. It has been the means of giving Richmond a fair footing in history.
On the opposite side of Bosworth-street, on the corner, there stood a large brick place there must have been six or seven rooms in the place and old Mr and Mrs Cuff were the first people living there in my earliest recollections. The old people lived in the back portion of the premises, and rented the front to William Delange and his partner. This was before they went to live where Mr Henry. Turner kept the store. Living in the same place was a young man named McEwen. He married a widow named Mrs White. Old Mr Cuff died first, and after his death Mrs Cuff rented the front portion, which the French man had occupied, to this McEwen. She died while the McEwens were there. Some time after Mrs McEwen died there. Before McEwens went there to live a woman we always called ' Little Ann,' a dressmaker, lived there. Later on Mr James Haughton kept a shop there for a good while. He had a creamy pony and a cart with a tilt, and used to go over Kurrajong selling ornaments. (Here my narrator showed me an ornament he bought from Houghton, a few weeks be- fore he was married, nearly 56 years ago. It represents an animal like a greyhound dog resting R.F.) I was putting him over the river in the punt when I bought it. While living in this place Mr Houghton had two children die at the same time. In course of time the old place went to ruin and has been pulled down many years. Just this side of where Mrs Stewart is living, about opposite Mrs Onus' place, there stood a four roomed place with a verandah and built of brick. Here a man we always knew as Sam Davison lived. Then it was occupied by 'Johnny the Sexton ' and his wife. He was the first sexton to the church. They had no children, and were peculiar speaking people, and were known as ' Shonny and Shany.' Then Johnny Ward, a brick- maker, lived there. He was a married man, but had no family. Two women also lived there. One was a widow named Mrs Levey and the other they used to call "Big Jane." Where Mrs Stewart lives was built before my time, and was, I think, built by old Mr G. Bowman. I have heard old hands say he kept a pub there. I have heard also he did some blacksmithing there. I remember quite well the old roan horse he had, named Richmond. I have heard them say he was the first foal foaled in Richmond, and that he had turned 30 years when he died. Many a time I have seen him in the water truck fetching water from the lagoon. After the Bowmans left a doctor lived there, but I forget his name. Crossing over to the opposite side of the street there were no houses from the cemetery till we come to the brick place opposite Mrs Stewart's residence. I don't remember it getting built. In my earliest days a man named Tipping lived there. After him Jack Freeman, a blacksmith, came there to live. Jack McGinnity served his apprenticeship there with Freeman. After serving his apprenticeship he married Hannah White, whose father was a farmer, and lived there for a long while. Afterwards he bought a piece of land from Fred Thompson in March-street, about where Ald. Brownlow is now living. He built two places of four rooms and a verandah to each of them. He went up country. But coming back to the old place in Windsor-street, where MrGinnity lived. After he left, a man named Thomas Chapman lived there. He worked for Mr Joseph Onus. He went to Guntawong, and lived for a long time with the Rouses. He met his death while driving a waggon.
About where the A. J. S. Bank was first kept in Richmond (next door to the widow of the old Mr Joseph Onus) there was a weatherboard place of four rooms. The first I remember living in it were the Ashtons old Mrs Ashton, who is still alive, and who we now call "Granny Ashton," and her husband, Thomas. He dealt in poultry and fruit. The late Mrs James Bates, a young maid then, lived with them. Her maiden name was Ivery, and she was a sister of old Mr Thomas Ivery. The next I remember living there was a Mr Shepherd, a currier. Old Mr. Guest kept a butcher's shop in the old place. Charley Shepherd, a son of the currier, went round for orders. Mr Guest had the new place built and had the saddler's shop there. He also had the tanyard as well and they do not tan the leather today equal to what he turned out. A set of leading harness, &c, made by Mr. Guest out of his own tanned leather meant almost a lifetime's wear.
Edward Guest used to go round with the meat on horseback, in a basket. Henry Etherden also lived there and carried on the tannery.
About where Mrs Onus' place is there was the old pub which bore the sign of the "Welcome Inn." It was a low, long house with a long verandah to it. In the end room my daughter, Ellen, was christened. Old Mrs Kenny of all had a daughter christened there the same day on a Sunday morning. It was kept by Dan Harriskey. Paul Devlin also kept it for some time, and William Allen kept it also, I think he was the last to keep it. The erection of this old pub goes back before my recollection, and it appeared very old place when I first knew it.
Where John Allen now lives I don't remember getting built. My first know ledge of the place was Mr Ben Richards keeping a mutton butcher's shop, there. He married there and went to live in the corner house, a remnant of which has been made into the comfortable residence occupied by Mrs Alex Benson. Old Mr Kidd lived there many years ago. He was a sort of a butcher; the chief thing he made was sausages. He also went round killing pigs and such like for anyone who needed his services. He was the father of good old 'Ned,' who is not forgotten in Richmond at the present time. When the Frenchmen lived in old Mrs Cuff's place, I used to sell them green frogs, and out of them they used to make soup. They gave me fourpence a dozen for them. They also bought them off other boys. One day Mrs ? went into their shop they were keeping a store there then to buy something, and they were at dinner. They asked her if she would try some soup. She said she would. They gave her a cupful and after she had finished it they asked her how she liked it. She said it was a nice drop of soup. They then told her what it was, and whether she ventured on frog soup again I don't know. On St. Patrick's night and other festive occasions there used to be great dancing in the hotels in Windsor-street and other parts of the town in the olden times. Step-dancing, four-handed reels, etc., were the fashion, It was quite a common thing to see men and women dancing. The race between the late 'Abe' Eather and a horse, fifty or a hundred yards and back, took place in Windsor street, and we have several still in the flesh who remember the event. "Abe" won the race.

FRANCIS STREET.
We will commence this street from the Windsor end.
About where Mr J. G. Percival's factory is was an old slab place with a verandah, and bark roof. Old Thomas Kenny's father, Charles, lived in it and worked a farm on the lowlands. He would be grandfather to Charles Kenny, well-known to local residents. Old Charles Kenny, after leaving there, removed to Windsor-street, opposite to where the late Mr Joe. O'Sullivan lived. In the same place a man named Robert Smith lived for some time. He was a farmer. This old place I don't remember getting built. Where Mr John Madden lived the first I remember there was William South, who married a Miss Byrnes, and did farming.He was a brother to Ben South, and James South. The Rigneys lived there for a long while, and were farmers also. From there they went up country and took up selections. The building of this old house took place before my recollections. Where Mrs Ridge lives there was a cottage of several rooms before the present front was put on. This old place I remember getting built for old Mr Benson, father of William Benson, the elder, of Richmond. It was ready for him when he came out from Scotland with his wife and family. Alongside this place was a cottage of several rooms where old Mrs Fossett lived. She died there. I remember Mrs Fossett's husband, James very well. Also her previous husband, Byrnes. Byrnes was a short, stout man, and he, too, died there. He was a Presbyterian, and I remember him going to I church where 'Granny' Ashton lives. He was father of the late William South's wife. The next house in this street was the old place which stood on the ground where Mr Robert Marlin has his nice house. I don't remember this place getting built. It belonged to Mr Vincent, grandfather of Mr Neville, who lived in Paget street. In this place Frank Gow's father and mother lived some time. His mother died there. She was a Miss Kingswood, 'Ned' Thompson lived there at one time. 'Bandy'Smith, as they used to call him, lived there also and did some farming. Jim Douglas, a brother to ' Billy ' the bricklayer, lived there for some time and farmed. He afterwards went up country, and, I believe, did well.
Then we come to where "Abe" Eather lived for a number of years. This place I have no knowledge of getting put up. The first I knew living in it was old 'great grandfather' Martin. His wife died there. After he left Frank Simons (father of the late Frank, of Windsor) came there to live and went in for farming. Then the father of Mr Alex Matheson, J. P., lived there for some time. Like some of his predecessors he went in for farming. This place has been pulled down some time. The house where Mr Thomas Horan lives was erected before my time. The first I remember living in it were Paddy and Jimmy White, brothers. Both died there. Jimmy married a widow named Mrs Kelly, who owned a public house on the road between Windsor and Parramatta. It was a great house of call for teamsters. After leaving the house next to Mrs Ridge's William South went to live in this place. He was farming and carrying. He brought a large quantity of loading up for old Mr Ducker. I remember a man named Stubbs, a farmer, living there. Then we come to where Mr Joseph Onus lives up on the hill, 'The Cedars.' This was built when I knew it first. William Sharpe was the first man I remember living there and he was there for a long time. It belonged to William Onus, father of Mr Joseph Onus, now living in it.
When William Onus married Miss Annie Hough, sister to the late Peter Hough, of Agnes Banks, he went there to live. Good old Edward Robinson, also lived there for a while, and kept a boarding house. On the same side, down rear the lagoon, was a brick house of four rooms and a verandah with a kitchen at the back , where Jacob Inness lived. He was a farmer and had three sons, Jacob, Isaac and John, and one daughter, Betsy. I went to school with them. Betsy was a fine working girl, and I have heard them say she was a great reaper girls thought nothing of that work in those days and could do her half acre a day. Mr. Inness died there. After they left, the place went to ruin, and Mr Joseph Onus, senr., had it pulled down.
Another place was built and that, too, has been down a long time. We will take the opposite side of this street, and work from the Windsor end. There were no houses on this side till we come to the old brick place opposite to where Abe Eather lived. It was a big place with a verandah back and front, and a barn. It belonged to Robert Martin, Mrs William Price's father, who lived there. He sold the property to old Mr. Fossett. Mr Fossett had the barn built. He died there. I don't remember it getting built, Crawford Bedwell lived there for a number of years, and a large portion of his family were born there. Afterwards old Mr. and Mrs. Field lived there. Here old Mr Field died.
Then we come to the long weatherboard place on the corner, which was built before my time. The first I remember there was old Mr Peter McAlpin, father of the well-known William. He was a blacksmith, and carried on business there. He was a fine singer, and had a very strong voice, and I remember him singing at the Presbyterian services, which they held where 'Granny' Ashton lives. When Thomas Eather left the pub he went there to live. Mrs Eather was a daughter of Mr Peter McAlpin. Old Mr. McAlpin, the black smith, died there Mrs Thomas Eather died there also. We then had vacant land till we come to where Mr Henry Hughes lives. This must be a very old place, and was built before my time. The first I remember living there was Henry Hughes' father, the old schoolmaster, and his wife. Both Mr and Mrs Hughes died there. This house has always been occupied by the Hughes family. Where Mr Fred Powell had his milking yard there was a four-roomed weather-board cottage, with a verandah. It be- longed to Mr Joe Sharpe, who lived in it. This also I cannot remember getting put up. Mrs Faithful's coachman, Riley. lived there after he left 'Lakeville.' This place, has been pulled down many years. The next place is the skillion where Miss Thorley lives. This is a very old place. The first I remember living there was Jack Cafe, better known as Jack Tailby. He was a splitter and fencer. He married a sister to old William Timmins, and she died there. Miss Thorley has been living there a great number, of years.
Where Matthew Hughes lived there was an old weatherboard place with a verandah I don't remember getting built. When Matthew got married and went there to live they made alterations and additions to it. Here the good old Matthew lived all his life, and died. His wife died somewhere about Goulburn. She had a married daughter living up there, and went up for the good of her health.
The next place is the historic building, the old church and school. The portion down stairs was used as a church and the upstairs as a school. The first minister I heard preach there was the Rev. H. Stiles, and the first schoolmaster I remember was old Mr Hughes. The next schoolmaster was Mr Braham and then came Mr Griffiths. He was the first registrar of births, deaths and marriages in Richmond. I understand a daughter of his was keeping a boarding house at Manly a short time ago. Mr Braham was a little man, and I remember hearing people say he was the last of a family of twenty two.
While in this locality I am reminded of old *Mr George James when we used to go down to the lagoon for casks of water. He was fond of children, and when leaving home would bring out a basket of fruit to take with him. When he got to the school he would scramble them among the school children and delight in the sport.

CHAPEL STREET.
Commencing at the lowlands end of this street.
I can just remember the two-storey house on the corner belonging to the Onus' being finished. It was here old Joseph Onus went to live when he married Emma Powell, sister to Mr Henry Powell, and daughter of the late Edward Powell, His son, 'young' Joe, lived there also for a great number of years and died there. Coming along on the same side about half way between the house we have mentioned and Windsor-street there was an old weatherboard place of several rooms without a verandah. There were two doors in the front. One end of it was occupied by 'Jerry' Hill, a very tall Stout man. He had no family. He was a veterinary surgeon, and will be remembered by some of the very old hands. At the other end towards Windsor-street Tom Watson, 'Tom the Tinker' as he was called, lived. His sign was "T. Watson, tinman and brazier" lettered on a piece of tin. This old place has been pulled down many years, and I don't remember it getting built.
That is all the houses in this street at that time. On the opposite side was a paddock.
The house in which old Herbert Travis lived for so many years, and the places to be seen to-day, have all been built within my recollection.

BOSWORTH STREET.
At Cox's lane end the first house I remember was up before my time. The first person I knew there was James Griffiths. He was a shoemaker, and a brother to Mrs Parnell and Mrs Potts. He had three daughters and two sons. When he first came to Richmond he and the wife and family it wasn't quite as large then stayed with old Mr. and Mrs. George James for a week or two till they got a house. They went back to Launceston.
Mr Thomas Richards lived there for years and kept a butcher's shop. When he left there he went round into Windsor Street, and there ended his days. Old Mr William Heath lived there for many years, and carried on tailoring. He sent clothes to all parts of the district, and miles up country. He was a jolly old man and good company. He had been an old soldier, and learnt the tailoring while in the army. His training as a soldier stuck to him, and in his advanced years was a very nimble man, and could kick the top of a door frame quite easily and the hat off your head if you wished. He was a great admirer of game fowls, and an excellent hand at making 'heels,' and heeling the birds. Others have lived there also, but Charley Curtis crosses my mind at present as living there for a while. The old house was pulled down years ago. A few years ago a new cottage was
put up on the same block of land. When Mr Jim Shields and his sisters are living I don't remember getting put up. I remember Thomas Harris keeping a 'pub' there, but that is many, many years ago. Old Mr Potts kept a ' pub ' there also. After the 'pubs' a Jew, whose name I forget, kept a shop there. He was a very big man, jolly, and good company. Old Mr George Shields lived there pretty well a life time, Both Mr and Mrs Shields died there. The house is still in the possession of the family and occupied by the children already mentioned. I fancy old Mr Joseph Stafford kept a shop there, and dealt in poultry. Where the two skillions are next to Shields' old place was one block of land, on which stood a weatherboard place of four rooms, the two back rooms being skillion roof. This, like Shields' house, I don't remember getting put up. There was an old low paling fence in front. A man whom we always knew as ' Robison the carpenter ' lived there for some time. He and his wife died there, leaving no family. I have heard it said he was a good tradesman. This old place has been down many years. The two skillions standing there to-day I remember getting built. Harry Willis, a shoemaker, lived in the old house. He worked for old Mr Swinbourne.
We then come to where Mr Richard Allen lives and truly 'Dick' is a very long way over the three score and ten. Mrs Masters, my mother, stands first in my mind. I was taken down to see her one day, and told she was my mother, but I couldn't make out how it was possible to have two mothers. I had always known Mrs James as mother, and I was too young to know anything about being adopted at the age of fifteen months. This place is too old for me to recollect. Old Mr Allen has been living there a very fair lifetime and may he be spared many years yet. Old Mr Allen was a wheel wright, and I was going to be bound to him for seven years to learn the wheel wrighting, I was then fourteen years of age, and my term was to be till I was twenty one, The indentures was drawn up and ready to be signed when my foster father and mother jibbed on it. I went to school with Mrs Richard Allen, who was Miss Matilda Cornwell then.
The little skillion on the corner is a very old place long before my time. The first person I knew living in it was a man named Whalan, a basketmaker. He was a short man, and had a great habit of saying "How do ! How do !" to, himself as he went along. Little 'Bob the Hatter' lived in it. He was a very short, stout, jolly man, and made straw hats for sale. When walking up the street he would have his plait of straw with him and hard at it as he went along. Tom Watson, the tinker, removed from Chapel-street and lived in it for some time. Alex. McKay lived there for a number of years. He worked for Mr Thomas Richards for many years. He was a jolly old fellow, and a true-born Scotchman. In one of the skillions we have been speaking about in this block Thomas Young lived, but the exact one I cannot say. He was a quiet, harmless old man, and was thought a great deal of by Mrs W. H. Holborow, the Rev. Dr. Woolls and others. All were kind to Tom. Where Mr Charles Sly has been living for a number of years ; where the old skillion so many years occupied by 'Janey' Baldwin stands; where the old homes of Mr Houghton and his son Clem, and where the old home of good old 'Betty' Mortimer are to be seen, was all vacant land when I first knew it. It was at the old Houghton home that 'Clem' ran the livery stable for so many years.
We next have the old, low, house on the corner, opposite to the side 'Dick' Allen lives on, which was built before my time. When I first knew it it was a pub. kept by Thomas Mortimer. His wife died there. A man named Harris, or Owen, kept it as a 'pub' also.
John Markwell also kept a ' pub ' there for some time. While Markwell was there a very funny thing happened. A man who was famous for his non-shouting propensities was in there, sitting on the seat. Several jolly boys came in for a drink, and invited him to take one with them. The next one's turn came, and he, too, extended the invitation. And so it went the rounds of the boys, the invitation being given every time. They thought they would drag a shout out of the man by this method, but no. Some of them had been out back and knew a little about the black's language, and, as they knew their guest prided himself on knowing more about the blacks language than anyone else, they challenged him to a test. Their friend led off with some of the language and told them they did not know what he was saying. One of them said he was asking them would they have something to drink, and named their drinks and told Markwell to draw them.
The old man protested strongly that wasn't what he was saying, but it was no go. They were all of the same opinion that that was what he, said, and the wind up of it was the old man had to pay for drinks all round. Then a Douglas Hadkins kept a 'pub' there also. Douglas in years after drifted into Sydney. He invented an incubator, etc , for poultry raising and was, I believe, keeping a shop in that line in Bathurst-street. Old Mr. Joe. Stratford lived in this old place at one time. He kept a little shop, and still dealt in poultry.
His first wife died there. I remember the day Joe got married to his second wife. John Cashell also lived there for many years. The little building at the March-street end has been used by different people as a butcher's shop among them my old road mate William Sly.
Where Dr. Helsham lives is of comparatively recent date, and was built by the well-known contractor of Windsor, old Mr John Johnson, father of the late Mrs Edwin Pitt.
One more old place was only to be found in this street when I first knew it. It stood just below where. Mrs Alex Benson lives. The first I have any recollections of living in it was a man named George Smith. His wife was a servant to old Mr. Dan Harriskey, and Smith married her from there. Mr Isaac Cornwell owned it for a long time. Afterwards it came into the hands of Mr Henry Turner, and he used it as a bake-house for many years. I think Thomas Allen used it as a bake-house also. A man named Afflick lived in it for a while, in earliest history. Where old Mr. and Mrs. Buckton lived is an old place so also is the one next to it.
The other places on the opposite side cannot be included among our old building.

WEST MARKET STREET.
Commencing from Lennox-street the old house in which Mrs John Collins lived for some years was built before my time. The first people I remember living there were old Mr and Mrs Thomas Ashton. Mr Ashton was dealing in poultry then. Then old Mr and Mrs George Campling lived in this house for a long time. One of his daughters was a teacher, and well up in the profession. George Smith, the brickmaker, lived in it also. Mr and Mrs John Collins lived there for a long while, and on more than one occasion.
On the opposite side of the street, only facing into this street, was a very large weather board room with a single roof and no verandah to it. In this old place a single man whom I never knew by any other name than old 'Warley Camp' lived for a long time. He was a brickmaker and very deaf. This room was built on the property of old "Scotch John". It has been pulled down many years.
Where Mr Tom Chalmers lives I remember getting built, and the brickwork was the first done in Richmond by the late Caleb Crisford.
In this street there was only one more house standing in my earliest recollections. It was a skillion which stood about where Mr John Cashell is now living. It contained two main rooms, and a little room at the back, with a shingle roof, and no verandah. Thomas Hogsflesh lived there for some time. He was a blacksmith by trade, having served his apprenticeship to Jack Freeman, and had his shop there. He left Richmond, and I think he died at Rope's Creek. I often saw his widow there.
The Salvation Army barracks is not an old place by any means, and is now used by the Richmond Light Horse as an orderly room.
Where Mr Alf Sly lives is a more recent addition to the street, and a few more houses like it would make this street look up. I think it was on this allotment of land where Peter O'Hara had a weatherboard building where he kept a bit of a shop. One of his sons, Harry, kept a billiard room there, and finally, it was burnt down. The old house on the corner of March Street was mentioned when we spoke of March-street, but the blacksmith's shop adjoining Mr. Alf Sly's place faces into this street, and has been a busy little shop more than once. Mr. Fred Small has only left it a few months. Fred is a son of William Small, of Lennox-street, whose reputation as a blacksmith spread far and wide.
The house belonging to some of the Onus family, and rented by Mr Fitzsimons, has been up some time, but does not come in our list of old Richmond buildings.
Coming along the street we have the School of Arts, and when I first knew the ground on which it stands it was a portion of the pound paddock. I was at the laying of the foundation stone. The stone is at ihe corner of the building on the March-street side as you enter the main hall. It was laid by Mary Ann Bowman, who afterwards became the wife of the medical Dr Cameron. A sovereign was put under the stone, a copy of the daily paper was put under it also.
The Presbyterian Church I remember getting built. Mr Long had the contract for the woodwork. Later on Mr Sam Boughton was the contractor for the tower. While the work was in progress Mr. Tom Masters and I went round to have a look at it. Mr.Boughton was working about where the clock is, and a ladder was standing up almost as high as the ball on top. Tom was chaffing me about not being game to go up to the ball, and Sam happened to hear him at it, and remarked he had seen me as high as that in the trees out on the common after possums. To show I still had nerve left, up I went and placed my hand on the ball.
The Commercial Bank, which faces into Windsor-streets is a comparatively recent ornament to the town. So also is the police station.
Years ago old Mr William Stevenson kept a shop in a weatherboard place close to where Mr Les. Wheeler lives. He dealt in poultry as well. The houses on the same side as Mr Wheeler's have been up some years, but are not the oldest.
The opposite side of this street was much improved by the two new cottages built to the order of the late William Sullivan. The skillion next to these cottages is not a youngster, though I remember when it was vacant land. William Douglas has built himself a comfortable home close by. He is a great gardener, and what he grows on his small plot shows what can be done both in quantity and quality.
The Public School is in this street, and as I see the youngsters playing about in such numbers I think of the big difference there is now for a child to get an education and when I was a youngster. If they do not get a good schooling now it is the parents' fault.

EAST MARKET STREET
Commencing at the Lennox street end, we have the old place where "Granny" Ashton lives, which dates back before any time. When I first knew it there was only one room, and in it Mr.and Mrs. Johnson lived. This would be 'Bill' Johnson's father and mother, Afterwards they went to Londonderry 'Town's paddock' in those days where they lived for years. After they left it was done up for the Presbyterian Church, and services were held there for a long time. I have heard Dr. Lang, Dr. Fullerton, and the Rev. Mr Adam, of Windsor, preach there. The pulpit stood at the end of the room on Lennox-street side. As you went in at the door, on the left side along the wall, there was a long cedar seat with a back to it which was occupied by George Bowman and his family. William Bowman, his wife and daughter, Ann (who married a Mr. Caddell) went there to worship also.
On the opposite side of the room to the Bowman's seat was another long seat where William McAlpin and his father, Peter McAlpin, sat. On a front cross seat, facing the pulpit, sat Mrs. Field's father, John Henderson. He, too, like McAlpin, was a great singer, and his voice was always loud and clear during the singing. Mrs. Martin had a Sunday school there, and taught a few children.
The old weatherboard house which stood by the fig tree which grew in the paddock at the back of the Imperial Hotel I remember getting built. It was an old place, and has been pulled down many years. Among those who have lived there we have with us in Richmond to-day Messrs. Ernest Marlin and John Ashton. Mr. Sam Farley lived there also. Mrs. Elliott lived there for years, The good old lady went to her last resting place some few months ago. The railway station is in this street, but though built a goodly number of years looks different to my boyhood days. What is to be found in the way of buildings below the Royal Hotel is the outcome of later years.

PAGET STREET.
We will start in this street at the College end, and up to the corner of Lennox street there was only two houses when I was a boy. George James lived in one and Thomas Silk in the other. About where Mr John Cornwell now lives there stood a very large bushy apple tree, which were plentiful on the common then. On Sunday evenings people used to sit there in the hot weather. The blacks were about then, and had their camp not more than a hundred yards the other side. All about there then was a wild bush, but just about that spot it was principally gum trees.
About where Mr Dan Carter lives there, was a saw pit where they used to cut timber for the town. It was kept by a man named Robert Westmore. Before Westmore came here he worked at Cockle Bay, and here he was known as 'Cockle Bay Bobby.' His wife used to help him saw, and at work in the pit he acted as top sawyer, his wife underneath. To prevent the sawdust getting into her eyes she wore a veil.
Coming along towards the railway there was only the old white house standing. I have no recollection of this getting built. These were the only three houses facing into this street in those days.
The large hole in Paget street between where Thomas Richardson lived for years and the double house just mentioned, is the result of brickmaking. Many a kiln of bricks were made there by Jack Short. Speaking of Jack Short reminds me we had at that time living in Richmond Jack Short, Jack Long, Jack Large, Jack Small. Jack Short was short, Jack Long was short, Jack Large was a big man, Jack Small a big man also.

MOORAY STREET.
In my earliest days no houses. Later on Charley Roberts kept a butcher's shop between March-street and the railway line for many years-His first house was close to the butcher's shop, but some time after he built another house lower down and facing into March-street. His wife died in the latter house, so also did old Charley.
The few other houses in this street have been built long enough since I first knew it.
We have now been round the town, a street at a time, and dealt mainly with it in the very early days.
A casual jaunt around it in more recent years will not be out of place before we leave it.
Where James Moulds now lives (the last house in Lennox-street going towards the Blacktown road) Ned Kidd kept a blacksmith's shop alongside it for many years. His wife died there.
the corner house where Tom Richardson lived Mr Willliam Mitchell lived for some time. It was on this spot Mr. Mitchell laid the foundation of what afterwards developed into the famous coachbuiiding, horseshoeing, general smithing and implement making business. When he first came to Richmond he worked, I think, for William Price. He then started on this own account on the corner I have just mentioned. His wife's brother, named Ross, who was a clever man, used to do woodwork and painting. Mr Mitchell was by no means a man of money then, but he was a great tradesman and a very hard worker. It was nothing unusual for him to work all hours of the night, and he got along by degrees.
I have just alluded to Ned Kidd's blacksmith's shop in Lennox street, and at one end of the shop Fred Thomson had his wheelwright's shop and carried on his work for some time. William Heath, 'the old taiior,' as he was often called, lived in the skillion a little this side of Kidd's blacksmith's shop. Years after two brick rooms and a verandah were put on the front of the skillion, and Tom Kewen lived there for years. Tom was a fetler on the line, Heath lived there for years and did his tailoring. I think it was from here Dan Carter married a grand-daughter of Heath's. I often met his son John in after years while I was droving. The last time I saw him was at Gunnedah where he was keeping a pub. Before he started pub keeping I often camped at his place at Middle Island.
In the house on the corner where Mr Mitchell first started in business Mr Swinbourne, Mr Collins, and McCredie lived at different times. John Waldren, a blacksmith, lived in this corner house for a time also. When he left Richmond he went to Rouse's, at Guntawang. Tom Masters went up with him, having agreed with Mr George Rouse.- Tom was striking for Waldren up there. I shall never forget one little thing which happened to Mr Roland Ducker in this locality. He had been out to the 'three holes' to get their mare, "Busy," and could not catch her. He asked me to go and help him catch her, and we succeeded. Both of us mounted her bare back and came along alright till we got about where Mrs. Magick now lives-plenty of trees and stumps there at that time and I wanted to get off.
As I was getting off the mare started to buck and I fell off unhurt. Roland was thrown, and as he fell the mare kicked him on the forehead. He bled a good deal and was unconscious for about half an hour I called Eliza James and Mrs. Martin to come over, and with a jug of water they bathed him and brought him round. I have no doubt Mr Roland Ducker carries the scar today.
Close to the College avenue entrance stood the old pound. I remember Tom Pryke being poundkeeper there many years ago Harry Gunton kept it for a long time. He also kept the present pound many years.
Opposite to this old pound is the old house which has been there many years, but which I remember getting built. Mr Dean lived in it for a long time and had a tan yard. The old shed, which still stands, was built for Mr Dean, and in it many a score of hides I have seen hanging up to dry. George Dean, his son, was married from there. Both of his sons, Billy and George, were very venturesome boys with snakes. I have often seen them catch a snake by the tail and pull it out of a log and kill it. They would then cut the heads off and take the body home. These their mother boiled down for the oil, which was considered a cure for cer tain complaints in those days. Old Mrs Dean died in this old house. George was always a jolly chap and ready for a lark. He played a good one on Johnny Roberts one day. We had been out in the bush and had brought a good lump of a snake home, and after I left him he saw Roberts coming. He knew Roberts would have to go round Richardson's corner on his way home, so he laid the snake about a couple of yards round the corner across the footpath with the head part of the body in some rubbish against the fence. He called me over and told me what was in the wind. Roberts was coming along the Paget-street footpath so we waited and watched him turn the corner. He came on to the snake unexpectedly, and got a great fright. He pulled a rail out of the fence and started to settle the snake, when he found out it was dead. When he saw its head had been cut off no doubt he had his, suspicions as to who played the joke.
cannot pass this part of the town without mentioning a good old woman whom we knew as "Granny" Roberts. She was grandmother to Charley Roberts, of Clarendon, grandmother to the late Thomas Primrose, of Windsor, and several other well known and respected people in the district.
The house I am living in I remember getting built. About where my big gate is there was an old weatherboard place which was nearly down when I first recollect it. The bricks were made on the allotment by 'Tim, the brickmaker'. Mr William Sharpe, 'Daddy', as he was often called in after life, often told me he helped 'Tim' to make the bricks. The bricklayer was Henry White who lived in Silk's old bouse in Paget-street. He was a married man, but had no family. A man by the name of Clayton, a tailor, lived in Silks' house before White. The house was built for Mr Baines He previously lived in the Lodge at "Fairfield," Windsor. Baines died in this house, and Mrs Baines died there in June, 1867. Then their son, Johnny, lived there. Johnny, like his father, was a chair-maker, but didn't work much at it. It was the rush bottom chairs in those days.
If my old stable could only speak it could tell some very funny tales about the gaffing schools they carried on in it. It was here that ' Bricky ' Colley stayed with us, and not at the old pub, as I stated when speaking of my pub-keeping days. I shall never forget 'Bricky' giving me the tip about Sterling for the Metropolitan once. He told me, bar accidents, he was going to win. Sterling was a 10 to 1 chance, and I decided to go down and have 5 on him. But a day or two before the races I had to start up country, and as Tom Masters was keeping shop round the corner, I commissioned him with instructions what to do, as he intended going down. As I was going up country I met the mailman as asked if he had, heard what won the Metropolitan, and he told me Sterling. When I got up country there was a letter from home and I learned Tom had not gone to the races, so I was as far off as if 'Bricky' had never given me the tip.
Old Mr. and Mrs. Baines had two daughters and one son. Emma married William Crowley from here, and as tin kettling was all the fashion then they got a good one. Louisa married a Mr Wood, who was a brother to the late Mr John Wood, of the Grose River. Wood was a saddler and lived for years in Singleton. Mrs Baines was a dressmaker, and the present Mrs Henry Powell, senr., learned the art from her, Sam Freeman lived in Francis-street.
He could tell some stirring tales about the old rimes. I knew Sam very well and for many years. I remember when he was a boundary rider for Mr. A. Town for years at Bomera. He also worked at Lakeville for some time for Mr Town, who had the property rented. After leaving Bomera he came down over Bell's Line known as Maddocks' line then and got lost for two days. It was a cold "shop " to be lost in, and when Sam got out of it he was nearly done up. When he came to Richmond, after this adventure, he stayed with us for fully a month. Sam had seen a deal of the old convict days, and the treatment the men received. He was a jolly old fellow, and it didn't take much to start him going about the flogging days. And it was no secret about town how to start him, and when one felt inclined they only had to say to him, "Where is Dr. B -?" The answer he would give you was, "Dr. B- 's in hell." Then he would tell you about the brutal work, and the scant regard this doctor had for human life. Sam never forgot to tell you that Dr. B- would say, "Men's no object to me. If there's 50 killed to-day, I can get 50 more to-morrow". Sam was a brother to Tom and George Freeman, who kept a Public house in Windsor. The Town family thought a lot of Sam, and other families were good and kind to him, while the boys found him interesting and amusing.
In Richmond we had another Sam Freeman, but in no way related to this one. He was a carpenter, and lived for some time in the weatherboard house where Robinson, the carpenter, lived, which stood on the ground where the two skillions stand next to where Jim Shields and his sisters live in Bosworth-street. His sons William and Jack were blacksmiths. William left Richmond and secured property on the Comleroy Road, and was living there when I was at the punt. He kept a public house there. Billy sold the property to Michael McMahon, now ' Garryowen.' He then went out somewhere about the Cockfighter to live. While out there he had the promise of a great crop of wheat one year, but the grain got blighted. He mowed it and made it into hay and I have heard that this was the first time he found out the value of wheaten hay. He later came to live on what we call the Grose Farm which lies between the Grose and Nepean rivers, now occupied by Mr Donald Clemson. I hear his father, Edward, owns it. Billy left there and went to live in the old house by the river, on a farm belonging to Mr George Williams. There he lived till he accidentally met his death. He reared a large family. The boys were a fine big lot of men, and the girls were good styles.
Among the family I knew Bob, William, Joe, Tom. George, Wellington and Annie, who married Mr W. Maughan and still lives in Richmond. Charlotte was another of the girls, she married Mr John Devlin, who is still living at Agnes Banks. George is still at Riverstone meatworks and liked by all who know him. Bob and Tom are dead William, Joe and Wellington are still living at Agnes Banks, the latter occupying the same house as his late father and mother.
Then not long ago there died an ex Richmondite who took great interest in town matters when he was here David Cobcroft. He was for years an alderman in the Council, and the opposition side wished him out of it many a time. In those days party feeling in the Council was very strong, but the Onus side carried the sway. But for all that, Dave fought them, and, if he couldn't best them, often tormented them.
He lived in the two-storey house in March street which stands about half way between East and West Market streets. He was a good chemist and had his shop there. Before he took up chemistry he was in a bank. One time I was going up to Warrah and had a five pound note I wanted to change, so I went into a bank at Muswellbrook, and he was in charge of it. Before he came to live in the two storey house in March-street he lived in the old long house in Windsor-street which belonged to old Mr Long. He was married to a sister of William Benson, senr., who has been dead many years. The loss of two sons cut him up very much. One fine young fellow accidentally met his death at South Creek railway viaduct one encampment at Gosper's Groves. The other one died at home after a lingering illness. After Dave left Richmond he was in Sydney for years, and died somewhere in Forest Lodge.
R. B Hughes, "Bobby" Hughes as he was generally called, was a good chemist and as good as plenty of the doctors with some complaints. He often saved a poor person the expense of a doctor. I re member him coming to Richmond. At one time Richmond was lively on Saturday when German Charley, the doctor, used to visit it. He was a queer old sort in many ways, but could cure many things. He used to attend patients at my place, and I have seen as many as 18 vehicles in front from Penrith, Kurrajong, Pitt Town. Wilberforce and Freeman's Reach.
Old 'Bob' Eggleton, the wheelwright, who was buried quite recently, was reared up Kurrajong, and when a lad of about 14 started to serve his apprenticeship with William Small who had a wheelwright's shop on the property Mr Bowman Douglass owns and occupies.
Johnny Madden served his apprenticeship to the wheelwrighting to the same man and at the same time as Eggleton. Bob lived at one time in the old house in Lennox-street where I lived and saw the ghost. He was there for a long while. Later on he bought the ground opposite, the Roman Catholic Church at the Windsor end of Richmond. Here he built, and carried on business as a wheelwright and blacksmith for years. He was a good tradesman. Bob was a good sportsman a great pigeon shot, quail shooter, wild duck hunter and an ardent fisherman with both the rod and the net. The latter he could make and was considered a good hand at hanging them. He had an old gun and good one it was he kept for duck shooting which they called 'Long Sal.' He married a Miss Roberts who died some time back. They reared a family of fine big children. Among the boys I knew Jack, George, Bob, Ted ; and Kesiah, the girl. Jack was for years in charge of the Hawkesbury racecourse, and could do wheelwrighting as well. Bob was a great hand among horses. George is in the railway service.
I was at the punt when the railway was opened to Richmond. Among the station masters in Richmond I remember Mr. McKenzie, who is buried in the Church of England cemetery here. Mr Morris was here, but had to leave on account of ill-health. Mr Lackey was here for many years, and is now in charge of Burwood station, I think. The present station master's residence, at the corner of Bourke and March streets, was built for him. Then We had Mr. Gazzard for a while. Mr Stafford was a great bike rider, and used to take part in the bike races on the park, which were all the go here at that time. Then Mr. Chivers was here for years, and when he left took charge of Blacktown station where he is at present. Then came Mr. Cox, who stayed with us till he retired from the service, when he was given a hearty send-off by his fellow railway men only a month or two ago.
Tom Cavanough was here for some time and was head porter, and afterwards worked up to be stationmaster.
Among the men on the engines who have been in Richmond, a man named Frost was the first driver from Blacktown to Richmond, and lived in the old house in Lennox-street occupied by Tom Miles. Then there was old Mr Ritchie who spent many years among us and was well liked.
(To be continued).


Source:
Some Ups and Downs of an old Richmondite,
by Mr. Alfred Smith
Chronicled by Robert Farlow
Windsor and Richmond Gazette (NSW : 1888 - 1954)
Saturday 12 February 1910
Saturday 19 March 1910
Saturday 26 March 1910
Saturday 16 April 1910
Saturday 23 April 1910
Transcription, janilye, 2012

Alfred Smith 1831-1917

It certainly pays to take the time to ask the old locals "What was it like?"
These are the recollections of Alfred Smith of Richmond in New South Wales, which hold a wealth of valuable family history.
Alfred was born in Hobartville, New South Wales (when old William Cox owned it), on the 13 July 1831 to John Smith 1798-1833 a convict who drowned in a river near Liverpool in 1833 and Adelaide Eliza De La Thoreza 1808-1877 she had been born in Madrid. After John Smith died, at 15 months of age, Alfred was adopted by George JAMES 1768-1862 and his wife Ann Kelly 1789-1864. They had only one girl, Eliza JAMES 1824-1862 ( the mother of Ann ONUS 1841-1927) Alfred died on 24 December 1917.
On the 11 October 1854 at St.Matthew's Catholic Church, Windsor, Alfred married Ann Amelia KINSELA 1838-1917 the daughter of Martin KINSELA 1793-1860 and Ellen, nee HENDLING 1794-1862. Alfred had many jobs throughout his lifetime, including Town Stockman, running The Punt across the river and a Drover, droving throughout New South Wales and as far down as Victoria.

Below is part of Alfred SMITH's recollections which were Chronicled by Robert FARLOW, which began when Alfred was 78, in November 1909 and published in The Windsor Richmond Gazette, under the heading,
Some Ups and Downs of an old Richmondite, Mr. Alfred Smith

"Adjoining old Mr Roberts' place, at the back, was Wiltshirehurst. Here Mr Wiltshire lived for a while when I first went to the punt. Then George Case rented it. He farmed a little, and dealt largely in sheet stringy bark.Coming along we had Peter Hornery living. He owned the place he lived on. He had been a bricklayer, but could not follow the trade on account of being a cripple for many years. William Maughan bought the land from Peter Hornery, except the little piece on which Hornery lived. Maughan lived there for some time while he was droving. Next was William John, father of Mrs Robert Pitt and Mrs John McQuade. Mrs John was a great butter maker. Next to Mr John's was Mr Kingswood. He owned the property. Richard Gow (father of the popular Frank, who was a large produce dealer in Richmond years ago) lived with the Kingswood's, was married to the only daughter. He grew a great quantity of maize. The Kingswoods and Gows left Kurrajong a good while before I left the punt, and went to live down on Griffiths' old farm. A man named Rich went to live in the place at Kurrajong. He was a shoemaker but didn't work at the trade in Kurrajong, though I remember him working at it in Richmond. He grew potatoes and vegetables and took them to Richmond and Windsor. Ad joining this property was Tom Jones' "Kingswood's Tom " as he was generally known. He was father to Mrs Thomas Stanford and Mrs Thomas Brown. He grew a lot of fine oaten hay. Mrs Jones would never ride in a cart, and I often wondered why. One day I asked her, and she told me Mrs Stanford, mother of Mr Tom Stanford, and herself were driving home in a cart once and capsized in the rough road and Mrs Stanford was killed. The next farm belonged to the Gilligans. James Leavers, father of Harry, rented it, and lived there. He did some farming, and with his two horses and dray took his produce and wattle bark to town. Leavers met with an accident by his horse running into a tree which stood in the road opposite Thomas John's place. Leavers was well liked. Harry was born some three weeks after his father's death. Old Mrs Leavers left there after her husband's death, and went to Richmond to live. Edward Mitchell, father of the present Robert in Kurrajong, lived on the Comleroy and owned the property he lived on He had six bullocks and a dray and drew a considerable quantity of wattle bark to town. Mrs Mitchell made a lot of butter. She was a sister to John Lord, who lived many years in Yarramundi. She was a great step-dancer, Mr Mitchell was coming home from Penrith one night, and told me he got a great fright coming down Crowley's lane. He declared he saw Andy Farrell's wife, who had been dead some time. He was perfectly sober, and whether it was imagination or a reality, he was quite upset over it. _ Close to Mitchell's, Denny McCabe lived. He married a daughter of Edward Mitchell. Denny McCabe was a king among bark. He was a jolly fellow and a great step-dancer. The last time I saw him was at Mr. A Towns station, near Boggabri, where he was fencing. It was Christmas time, and we spent a good time together. Some of his sons are still in the Kurrajong. Below Mitchell's property George Turner lived on some property belonging to Thomas John. He did a little farming and made grass-tree brooms. Then we had Mr Parker living on the Comleroy Road somewhere handy to the present Methodist Church. He did some farming, and with his one horse and cart took his maize and potatoes to town. There were some old hands scattered about the locality worthy of mention. John Williams"Blackjack" they used to call him lived by himself, being a single man. He was a hard working man and took bark, etc., to town with his one horse and cart. George Turner was another great man among the bark. He married Sarah, a daughter of Edward Mitchell.
Robert Eather, father of the late Abe Eather who lived many years in Richmond, lived on the Comleroy. He owned a station on the Narran. The four sons were Thomas, Robert, James and Abe. Mr and Mrs Robert Eather died at Comleroy. After their death Jim lived there for some time. Mr and Mrs John Norris lived close by the Eather's. Norris was killed on the property. Mr Coleman lived near the Norris family. He was a fencer, but did a little farming. Cornelius McMahon can be reckoned among the old hands. He married a daughter of John Norris. I knew them both before they thought of getting married. Then we had Bill London ' Bill the native,' as they used to call him. Some of his children are still in the Kurra jong. Mr Murray was another old hand. Richard Skuthorp, father of our present Richard, was another I knew well. His wife was a daughter of John Ezzy. It was old Mr Skuthorp who first brought the racehorse Veno to the district, having purchased him from Mr William Clarke, who managed Bomera for years for Mr A. Town. Mr and Mrs Lamrock, parents of the late William and John, lived up Kurrajong, and I don't think they ever missed a fine Sunday going to the Presbyterian Church in Richmond. Having had a fair say about the old hands in Kurrajong we will now proceed to Colo. There wasn't a very great number of people living there in my early times, but among them were some who should not be forgotten. Colo has seen the time when it could boast of its police man. I knew two that were stationed at Colo. Curry was one. He used to visit George James. He was a tall man with sandy hair. He used to look very well in his black "bell topper". Jim Hunt was another policeman there. He was a short man and dark complexion. Mr and Mrs Cavanough kept a boarding-house down there for many years. The house was noted for its good table, and as it stood. on the Kurrajong side of the river Mr Cavanough used to help the drovers with their sheep and cattle up "the rock." Cavanough did some farming, and grew a lot of maize. They both died at Colo, the old man dying first. I knew their sons Tom, George and Jim very well. Tom was on the railway for some years in Richmond and was very popular. The last time I saw Jim was at Jerry's Plains, many years ago. William Penton, the blacksmith, who is still alive, living at North Richmond, lived for many years in Colo and I believe his family are natives of there. He lived up under the mountain on the other side of the river. He worked at his trade and did good business. There were plenty of drover's horses to be shod. He became a road contractor and carried out some big jobs on the Bulga road. His wife, was Miss Lucy Lord, but in no way related to John Lord, of Yarra mundi, There were a lot of the Gospers at Colo. Mrs Cavanough and Mrs Ivery were Gospers. I knew Robert Gosper. The late John Gosper, of Windsor, was, I believe, a native of Colo, also Henry. He kept an accommodation house at "The Gibber," It was a good place to stay at. Harry Gosper was a real friend of the drovers. If ever they lost a beast and it was to be found, Harry would get it for them. I have often heard him spoken of hundreds of miles up country, and always referred to as honest Harry Gosper. Of course there were others living up the river, but as I never went far off the road I didn't see much of them. Among them I knew Mr Caterson. I knew his son, the present Thomas, and his wife, who was Miss Grace Richardson, before they were married. Getting along from "The Gibber ' we soon get to Putty. Among the good old sorts out there were Mr Robert Ridge and his wife, He grew a lot of maize, and did droving. Mrs Ridge was post mistress, and kept an accommodation house. You could also get rations there. Mr Ridge had a mill and ground his own flour. Mrs Ridge was a sister to Mrs George Pitt and Mrs. John Crowley. Then we had Thomas Laycock and his wife. Mrs Laycock was a sister to George and Robert Pitt. I knew their sons Thomas, Andrew, Henry, George and Robert. They were always great cattle men. Andrew for many years before his death was a noted breeder of stud cattle, and was always a prominent exhibitor at the Sydney show. The eldest boy was a great pig raiser and used to drive his flocks of swine to market. Bob was killed from his horse. Thomas Laycock did a lot of droving, and bought stock for Sydney men. He was a horse fancier as well, and owned some well bred mares. At Bourawell we had Charles Sympton managing the place belonging to Mr William Farlow, senr., of Yarramundi, and also looking after Boggy swamp for the same man. I remember Mr Farlow giving me 40 to pay Davy Hayman who was fencing out there for him. Charley was there a good while. Mr Farlow did some cultivation out there. Mr and Mrs Chapman lived at Putty on a place they bought from old Stephen Tuckerman, Their son George is still out there and seems to be doing well.
The first gaoler I remember in Windsor was a Mr Steele. He was a tall man. Mr North was the first police magistrate, and lived at old Government House, Windsor, in my early days. How I came to know a little about early Windsor, was by going with my foster father, then a policeman, on court days. What I will say about Windsor must be taken as Meaning my early recollections of that place. There was what we always knew as the watch box. This stood between the court house and the gaol wall. It was a little movable place of weatherboards. The watch box, I believe, used to be occupied by soldiers in turn, to prevent any prisoners escaping out of gaol. Then we had the flogging period in Windsor, and I knew Reuben Bullock who administered the lash. When flogging was done away with in the Haw kesbury Bullock, kept a public house. Reuben was a thin man of medium height, and although his former occu pation was not the pleasantest, he was well liked. He was of a pleasant disposition and very obliging. He was generally called "Little Bullock."

The first chief constable I have any recollections of was a Mr Hodgins. He had son Benjamin, who used to knock about Charlie Eather's over at Enfield. 'He had a daughter Ann. She was a tall, buxom young woman, and married a man named Bill Allsop. She has been dead many years. The next chief constable was Moses Chapman, a Jew I believe. He was mostly known as "Mo the Jew." He was a short stout man and a smart little chap at his work. He was well liked. Then I mind George Jilks, another chief constable, and his wife, one son, and two daughters. He was a man who was highly respected. The daughters, Kitty and Jane, would take it in turns and come and stay a few days with the James' at Richmond. His son George was then but a lad going to school. Mr Jilks lived where Mr W. McQuade is living. George Shirley was another chief constable. He was a stout man, with a very flushed face. After him was William Hobbs, who was the last chief constable in charge of Windsor before we got our sergeants. We start our sergeants with a Mr Frewin. He was an Irishman. He wasn't in Windsor a great while. The first lockup keeper I knew there was John Horan. This was when the lockup was where the Council Chambers stand. I remember one day, in Horan's time, we had been into court, and were starting for home in the cart when I happened to look round and noticed two men with a man on the ground. I told James about it and he drove up to them. It was two police men with a prisoner who wouldn't get up and they couldn't make him move. As soon as James came up it was "Here George give us a hand.'" James had a quince stick in his hand and gave him a few smart cuts with it on a portion of his body, which made him jump up quickly enough. The first C.P.S. I knew there was a Mr Wyatt, in Mr North's time. He was a tall man. Then as a C.P.S. there we had Mr Callaway, "little Callaway" they used to call him. Then there was Mr G. A. Gordon, who was C.P.S. for many years. Mr Gordon was father of Mrs Brinsley Hall, and died recently. He was a Police Magistrate up country for a few years when he retired. Then there was old Mr J. J. Fitzpatrick, father of Mr J. C. L Fitzpatrick, M.LA., who spent many years in old Windsor. In the corner by the old Fitzroy bridge there was a large two storey place which was kept as a pub by a man named Thomas Cross. He was a very big man. I remember this same pub being kept by Mrs. Aspery, who was mother to the late Mrs M. Nowland. Her son, Thomas, who was killed at Denman by lightning, used to serve in the bar. Nearly opposite the barracks there was a pub kept by John Shearin "Jack the baker," as he was called. He left there and built the two storey place opposite the court house where he kept a pub for a long while. Jack died there, and his widow kept the business on for some time after his death. I remember ihe 26th, 50th, 8oth and 99th regiments being in the old Windsor barracks at different times. The present Royal Hotel used to be what we always knew as the mess house. Robert Fitzgerald lived there for a long time, and was living there at the time of the first election when he was a candidate against William Bowman Quite close to the barracks, only in Macquarie-street, there was the old "Jim Crow" inn. It was kept by Henry Hudson. He dealt a lot in horses. He had two stallions, Jim Crow, a trotter, and Clinker, a draught. He imported both of them. He died there. His widow kept the pub a while after his death, and then married James Lane. Lane kept the pub for a while. She was a native of Richmond, a sister of our Henry Silk, and I knew her before she was married to Henry Hudson, who came from Birmingham. Somewhere about where the late William Gosper lived there once lived a man named O'Dell who kept the post office, and this was the first post office I remember in Windsor. Going along Macquarie-street we come to the big house, part of which is pulled down, and the remainder occupied by Edward Day. The father of the popular mailman. Tom Thompson, kept a pub there. The hospital was built before my time. At that time it was an hospital only. The poor house, as we called it, was where the old people's quarters are at present A man named Williams, was overseer of the poor house then. He was a brother to Fred Williams, the constable who was stationed at Enfield once. I have mentioned that Reuben Bullock kept a pub. Near where the "Jim Crow " stood, and on the same side, he kept the pub. I think his sign was "The hole in the wall". John Rafter kept a pub there also. Mick Hagon kept a pub there. Mick was a big Irishman, and his wife was no small woman. Mrs Hagon kept the pub for a while. At Moses' corner I remember Mrs Moses, William's mother, having a baking business. William and Henry were only lads then. Henry used to drive his mother's bread cart. He was always a smart business chap, and to-day he is reaping the reward in wealth and honor.
The first bailiff I remember in Windsor was Richard Sheriff He was a short stout man with a very red face, and a a great horseman. The earliest mounted police I recollect were Sergeant Lane and Trooper Joseph Levy. Levy shot Armstrong, the bushranger, on a Good Friday morning. Windsor has had its bellmen, and I remember the 0ld bellman Oliver. He had a very strong voice and could be heard a long way off. He was a comical old chap and after he had finished 'crying' his business was always wound up with "God save the Queen." The attached residences of Dr. Callaghan and the late Dr. Gibson in my earliest days in Windsor was an hotel kept by Mr Coffey. He was a tall man of fair complexion. I recollect also that James Ridge kept an hotel in a two-storey house between the Royal Hotel and where Coffey kept the hotel. Where our member, Mr Brinsley Hall, lives was once occupied by Dr. Dow. He was coroner for a long while. Robert and James Dick lived up the top end of the town facing the main street. They kept the post office and a store. In the bouse where the late Ben Richards lived for years, and which is now owned by Mr Daniel Holland, I remember old Mr. Thomas Dargin living. Mr Dargin died there. In the course of time Laban White married his widow and lived there.
He was auctioneer and coroner at Windsor.
Somewhere about where Mr. R. A. Pye has his business, stood a pub kept by a man named Weller. The sign was painted by Tom Masters' father, and represented a blackfellow with a big nugget of gold in his hand. Where the Bank of New South Wales is, belonged to James Hale. He lived there for a long while, and when he left he went to live at "Fairfield," which he had bought. He died there. About where Pulsford's shop is, Mr Fox kept a general store, and about where the post office is Mr Crew had a large ironmonger's shop. Adjoining Mr Crew lived the father ot Peter Beveridge. He was in business as a confectioner. Fitzgerald-street we always knew as Hangman's Row. In this street old Mr Chandler had a furniture store on the left hand side between the post office and Macquarie street. At the time of the big fire, when the Barraba Hotel was burnt down, the shop was saved. The first I remember keeping the Barraba Hotel was Charles Blanchard. I was in the Barraba the day before it was burnt down and had a glass of beer with John Grono of Pitt Town. Miss Isabella Bushell kept it at that time. Not far away, on the same side as the Barraba, lived old Mr Gallaway, a tailor. Then handy we had Mr. Watt, a shoemaker, with whom George Eather served his apprenticeship. His son, Edward, lived about Windsor for a long while, and a daughter married George Eather's eldest brother, Charles Eather.
Mrs. O'Donovan kept a draper's shop where W. H. O'Brien lives. She owned the place. She had two daughters, the last dying some little time ago, unmarried. Where W. H. O'Brien's shop is William Gaudry and his brother Charles lived, William was a great sporting man, and was clerk of the course at the old Dargin track. Old Mrs Cope lived in the house where Mrs. Brancker lives. She. owned the property and died there. Where the Commercial Bank stands old Mr Richard Ridge kept a pub. He built the Fitzroy Hotel and kept it for a good while. Ridge was a great mail contractor in conjunction with a man named Hill. Old Harry Martineer used to drive for them in the days when the train only came as far as Parramatts. I am not likely to forget those days, as I came from Sydney one day, and when I got out of the train at Parramatta Harry Martineer couldn't take me as he had too many on board. I had to put 7000 sheep over the river in the punt next day and to Richmond I had to get so I walked going by the Blacktown road. Mr Richard Ridge had the mail contract when the train came on to Black town. Paddy Doyle was the driver of the mail. After Ridge went to the "Fitzroy" old Mr Broderick had a watch maker's shop in the place Ridge left. Sometimes I brought watches down to him from up-country for repairs while I was droving. Close to Broderick's was another watchmaker named Stewart. The house where Mr William Primrose had a saddler's shop for many years, was built by Mr Mumford, the chemist. He was thrown off his horse out Magrath's Hill way, which proved fatal. He had only insured his life some nine months before for 500. Not far from where the "Fitzroy" stands and in the direction of the railway, old Mr Thomas Tebbutt kept a store. At the present day I have a pair of old fashioned brass candle sticks which George James bought off Mr Tebbutt while in was in business there. A daughter of mine in Sydney has a small, extension table which James purchased at Mr Tebbutt's shop. George Freeman kept the Cricketer's Arms on the corner where Miss Bushell conducted the Royal Exchange Hotel for so many years. In connection with this pub I had a funny experience once which I must tell. Up stairs the Oddfellows held their meetings, and I had been proposed by Mr Peebles. How I came to be proposed was, Peebles used to draw the grog to the pubs over the river, and I used to put him over in the punt. Anyhow I had been proposed, so I mounted my horse and rode in. Dr.Day was the medical officer and when he examined me he wouldn't pass me. He told me to come again next meeting night, in a fortnight, and in I went. Again he wouldn't pass me, and wanted me to come again in another fortnight, but I told him I wouldn't come any more. Dr.Day thought I had heart disease, but here I am battling well in my 80th year, while the doctor went to his rest many years ago.
A little further in the direction of the railway Thomas Freeman kept the St. Patrick's Hotel. About opposite the Salvation Army barracks Frank McDonald kept a pub in a two-storey house. He did a good business. I knew both him and his wife well. McDonald was a great man with the late Hon. William Walker in election time. Hon. William Walker's father kept a school in the cross street close by. I knew the, Hon. William's brothers, George, Robert, and John. The last time I saw George was when he was a storekeeper on a large sheep station near Coonamble. Some time after he was an auctioneer in Mudgee. The first time I saw William was on Dargin's old race course. He was pointed out to me as the young chap who was learning to be a lawyer under Mr Beddick."

Sources:
Windsor and Richmond Gazette (NSW : 1888 - 1954)
Saturday 17 September 1910
Windsor and Richmond Gazette (NSW : 1888 - 1954)
Saturday 24 September 1910
Transcription, janilye, 2012





The photograph below of Windsor,
the Royal Hotel on the right
was taken around 1880


St Matthew's Catholic Burial Register 1845 - 1854

S/name. F/names. Abode. deathdate. burialdate. Age. Ship. Occupation. Clergyman.

247 Bourke John Windsor 9 Jan 1845 40 Labourer Thos Slattery
248 Fitzgerald Michl Windsor 23 Jan 1845 67 Pauper Thos Slattery
249 Pendergast Mary Cornwallis 16 Feb 1845 10 weeks Native of the Colony Thos Slattery
250 Breach George Windsor 20 Feb 1845 12 months Native of the Colony John Kenny
251 White James Richmond 21 Mar 1845 50 Farmer Thos Slattery
252 Turner Ann Wilberforce 26 Mar 1845 42 John Kenny
253 Cullen Edward Vinegar Hill 4 Apr 1845 Farmer Thos Slattery
254 Norris James Cornwallis 10 May 1845 5 Native of the Colony Thos Slattery
255 Dempsey John Richmond 11 May 1845 69 Farmer Thos Slattery
256 Slater or Donohoe Mary Clarendon 11 May 1845 22 Margaret 2 Servant Thos Slattery
257 Fogerty Michl Currajong 24 May 1845 37 Labourer Thos Slattery
258 Kenna Patk Currajong 30 May 1845 80 Tilly Sherry Labourer Thos Slattery
259 Kough William Windsor 8 Jun 1845 Labourer Thos Slattery
260 Tighe Anne Windsor 4 Jul 1845 58 Elizabeth Servant Thos Slattery
261 Holt William Currajong 15 Jul 1845 14 weeks Native of the Colony Thos Slattery
262 Collins Patrick Wollombi 31 Jul 1845 5 Native of the Colony John Kenny
263 Pendergast John Windsor 30 Nov 1845 37 Native of the Colony Mr McGrath
264 Brady Thomas Windsor 17 Jan 1846 58 Native of Ireland Mr McGrath
265 Fitzpatrick James Penrith 4 Apr 1846 7 Mr McGrath
266 Fitzpatrick Mary Windsor 14 Apr 1846 15 weeks Mr McGrath
267 McGoven Peter Wilberforce ? 15 Apr 1846 26 Captain Cook Mr McGrath
268 Gaham or Graham Hugh Freemans Reach 13 May 1846 51 Mr McGrath
269 Darey or Doney Thomas Freemans Reach 14 Jul 1846 41 Mr McGrath
270 Davies Mathew Poor House 28 Jul 1846 70 Mr McGrath
271 Keating G Poor House 14 Aug 1846 67 Mr McGrath
272 Foley Catherine Poor House 19 Aug 1846 35 Mr McGrath
273 O'Donnell Patk Poor House 23 Aug 1846 80 Mr McGrath
274 Perkins ? Windsor 18 Oct 1846 43 Mr McGrath
275 Byrne Patk Windsor 15 Nov 1846 32 Mr McGrath
276 Humphreys Ann Wilberforce 18 Nov 1846 6 Mr McGrath
277 Walsh Ann Windsor 28 Jan 1847 58 Mr McGrath
278 Connor Charles Asylum 10 Feb 1847 50 Mr McGrath
279 Cassidy James Windsor 30 Apr 1847 54 Schoolmaster Mr McGrath
280 Curran Mrs Rebecca Richmond 19 May 1847 19
281 Cusack Patrick Windsor 23 Aug 1847 32 Labourer John Joseph Therry
282 Dormer John Windsor 11 Sep 1847 His body was found in the Hawkesbury River How he came by his death the Coroners Jury could not obtain evidence John Joseph Therry
283 Kennedy Patrick Asylum 17 Sep 1847 63 John Joseph Therry
284 Smith Ann Asylum 13 Oct 1847 48 John Joseph Therry
285 Daley Patrick Richmond 25 Oct 1847 28 John Joseph Therry
286 Riley Mary Ann Richmond 12 Nov 1847 20 months John Joseph Therry
287 O'Brien Michael Windsor 12 Nov 1847 one day John Joseph Therry
288 Power or Poore Mary Ann Clarendon 23 Nov 1847 eleven days John Joseph Therry
289 Collins Thomas Windsor late of Wiseman's establishment at Windsor Hospital 24 Nov 1847 about 46 Herdsman John Joseph Therry
290 Maguire Edward McDonald River, died in Windsor Hospital 21 Dec 1847 66 Labourer John Joseph Therry
291 Riley John Cornwallis 24 Dec 1847 78 Labourer John Joseph Therry
292 Cuffe Farrell Richmond 5 Jan 1848 73 Schoolmaster John Joseph Therry
293 McKeon Hugh Windsor 6 Jan 1848 86 Labourer John Joseph Therry
294 Duffy James Kurrajong 13 Jan 1848 75 Farmer John Joseph Therry
295 Connor Bridget Vinegar Hill 15 Jan 1848 45 John Joseph Therry
296 Donelly Thomas Asylum Windsor 7 Feb 1848 72 Labourer John Joseph Therry
297 McDonogh Patrick North Rocks near Windsor 7 Feb 1848 62 Labourer John Joseph Therry
298 O'Grady Thomas Richmond 8 Mar 1848 22 months John Joseph Therry
299 Peible George Windsor 5 Apr 1848 4 1/2 John Joseph Therry
300 McCormick John Windsor 18 Apr 1848 40 Pauper Asylum John Joseph Therry
301 Murphy Samuel Windsor 19 Apr 1848 41 Pauper Asylum John Joseph Therry
302 Elliott Catherine Windsor 24 Apr 1848 63 Pauper Asylum John Joseph Therry
303 Holmes William Windsor May 1848 46 Pauper Asylum John Joseph Therry
304 Cullen Ellen Caddie Creek 28 May 1848 7 John Joseph Therry
305 Carthy Denis Windsor 29 May 1848 84 Pauper Asylum John Joseph Therry
306 Byrnes Patrick Cornwallis 6 Jun 1848 77 Farmer John Joseph Therry
307 Connelly James Windsor 8 Jun 1848 69 Atlas Shepherd John Joseph Therry
308 Carney Rebecca Eastern Creek 7 Jul 1848 84 Atlas Farmer Rev M Stephens
309 Kean Charles Windsor 22 Jul 1848 82 Pauper Asylum Rev E Luckie
310 Kelly James Lakeville 23 Jul 1848 75 Farmer Rev E Luckie
311 Landres James Richmond Aug 1848 88 Haldo 2nd Farmer Rev E Luckie
312 Gribbon Hugh Windsor 15 Aug 1848 78 Pauper Asylum Rev E Luckie
313 Good Arthur Windsor 2 Sep 1848 57 Pauper Asylum Rev M Stephens
314 Mahan John Windsor Sep 1848 36 Shop Keeper Rev M Stephens
315 Keane Peter Kurrajong Sep 1848 30
316 Spinks John Windsor 12 Oct 1848 42 Lady Melville Bricklayer John Grant
317 Barry Thos 26 Nov 1848 61 Dafiesta 1st Pauper Asylum John Grant
318 Haleroft Mary 5 Dec 1848 35 Pyramus Pauper Asylum John Grant
319 Huston Catherine 10 Dec 1848 43 Hooghley Pauper Asylum John Grant
320 Byrnes Walter 12 Dec 1848 38 Lady Harwood John Grant
321 Lynch ? 26 Dec 1848 48 Charles Forbes John Grant
322 unreadable 10 months John Grant
323 Braywood Henry Windsor 31 Dec 1848 14 months Native child John Grant
324 Turner Anne 14 Jan 1849 51 John Grant
325 Cullen James 4 Feb 1849 40 John Grant
326 C? Maria 12 Feb 1849 40 John Grant
327 Hayward Jane 16 Feb 1849 4 days John Grant
328 Spinks Mary 4 Mar 1849 46 Asylum John Grant
329 Harper ? 22 Mar 1849 53 Unreadable John Grant
330 McKeene Mary Richmond 24 Mar 1849 60 unreadable John Grant
331 Foley John Windsor 14 Apr 1849 54 Elizabeth [3] Asylum John Grant
332 McKibbett Bridget 14 Apr 1849 61 John Grant
333 Trodden Henry 24 Apr 1849 12 days John Grant
334 Costigan William 29 Apr 1849 45 Labourer John Grant
335 Doyle George 3 Jun 1849 70 Asylum John Grant
336 Herring Thos 11 Jun 1849 50 John Grant
337 Brennan John 22 Jun 1849 66 unreadable John Grant
338 Connor Timothy Windsor 24 Jun 1849 76 Unreadable Pauper John Grant
339 Riley Patrick Windsor 1 Jul 1849 59 Unreadable John Grant
340 Clifford Fredk ? Windsor 5 Jul 1849 70 Patra John Grant
341 Coffey Isabel Windsor 10 Jul 1849 38 John Grant
342 Davis Margt Colo 10 Aug 1849 44 Fourth John Grant
343 Donohue Patrick Windsor 19 Aug 1849 49 Andromeda Pauper John Grant
344 McDonald Richd Windsor 21 Aug 1849 10 months John Grant
345 Sullivan Mary Windsor 14 Sep 1849 44 John Grant
346 Baker Margaret Richmond 15 Sep 1849 31 Isabella John Grant
347 Woods James Richmond 6 Oct 1849 8 months John Grant
348 Savage Patrick Richmond 16 Oct 1849 57 Labourer John Grant
349 Pendergast Thos Richard Pitt Town 4 Nov 1849 4 months Native of the Colony John Grant
350 Byrne Maryanne Windsor 11 Nov 1849 5 Native John Grant
351 Maguire Joseph Windsor 12 Nov 1849 2 months Native John Grant
352 *bridge or Petherbridge unreadable Windsor 18 Nov 1849 4 months Native John Grant
353 Carney Edwd Prospect 11 Dec 1849 75 Farmer John Grant
354 Connors Charlotte 14 Dec 1849 60 Maria 2nd Pauper Asylum John Grant
355 Murray Mary Kurrajong 20 Dec 1849 12 months Native of the Colony John Grant
356 Henright Jane Windsor 7 Mar 1850 6 months Native of the Colony John Grant
357 Davis William Tumbledon Barn District of Windsor 7 Mar 1850 14 days Native of the Colony John Grant
358 Colrenny Bridget Windsor 20 Mar 1850 15 Anglia John Grant
359 Rafter Catherine Windsor 7 May 1850 14 months Native of the Colony John Grant
360 Mills Mathew Richmond 17 May 1850 16 months Native of the Colony John Grant
361 Heany Mary Windsor 1 Jun 1850 40 Elizabeth House Servant John Grant
362 Keenan William Windsor 12 Jun 1850 85 Martha Pauper Asylum John Grant
363 Hefferan Patrick Wilberforce 21 Jun 1850 60 Labourer John Grant
364 McAlpin Ellen Richmond 1 Aug 1850 69 Farmer John Grant
365 Timmins Michael Yellowmanday 20 Sep 1850 42 Native of the Colony John Grant
366 Mullens James Windsor 6 Oct 1850 40 Labourer John Grant
367 Ives Mary Richmond 28 Oct 1850 50 Henry Walsh John Grant
368 Reily Francis Richmond 2 Nov 1850 63 Edward Farmer John Grant
369 Smith Henry North Rocks 16 Dec 1850 25 John Grant
370 Gardoll Anton Richmond 21 Dec 1850 12 Weeks John Grant
371 Ahearn James Windsor 25 Dec 1850 8 ? John Grant
372 Brants Mary Windsor 19 Jan 1851 7 days John Grant
373 Wright Johanna Richmond 6 Mar 1851 33 Farmer John Grant
374 Clynes John Windsor 19 Mar 1851 28 Labourer John Grant
375 Pigeon Bridget South Creek 12 Apr 1851 8
376 Mason Mary Buried at Kurrajong 4 May 1851 68
377 Ray David Richmond 10 May 1851 1
378 Redman Martin Windsor 11 May 1851 30 Ogley Pauper Rev N J Coffey
379 Neil Patrick Richmond 1 Jun 1851 37 Farmer Rev N J Coffey
380 Cormack Patrick Cornwallis 10 Jun 1851 47 Labourer Rev N J Coffey
381 Doyle William Windsor 25 Jun 1851 55 Henry Porcher Pauper Rev N J Coffey
382 Egan Michl Windsor 30 Aug 1851 34 Inn Keeper Rev N J Coffey
383 Guthrie John Wilberforce 7 Sep 1851 70 Labourer Rev N J Coffey
384 Kelly Michael Richmond 11 Sep 1851 3 Rev N J Coffey
385 Connor Roger Nepean 1 Oct 1851 77 Neptune Farmer ?
386 Lynch Thomas Windsor 8 Oct 1851 91 Farmer Rev N J Coffey
387 Doyle Bridget Windsor 9 Oct 1851 55 Elizabeth 4th Pauper Rev N J Coffey
388 Collins Thomas Windsor 18 Oct 1851 88 Ann Pauper Rev N J Coffey
389 Ray Alexander Windsor 20 Oct 1851 50 Isabella Pauper Rev N J Coffey
390 Moloney Sarah Buried at Kurrajong 13 Nov 1851 52 Rev N J Coffey
391 Callum James Pitt Town 1 Dec 1851 5 months Rev N J Coffey
392 Smith Patrick Pitt Town 8 Dec 1851 2 months Rev N J Coffey
393 Glasgow Henry Pitt Town 8 Jan 1852 9 Rev N J Coffey
394 Molloy Mary Pitt Town 21 Jan 1852 7 months Rev N J Coffey
394 Mangin Martin Windsor 30 Jan 1852 40 Labourer Rev N J Coffey
395 Fair Richard Calai Creek 1 Feb 1852 2 Rev N J Coffey
396 Heaney Thomas Windsor 4 Feb 1852 61 Pauper Rev N J Coffey
397 McCabe Catherine Buried at Kurrajong 10 Feb 1852 64 Rev N J Coffey
398 Costello Jeremiah Windsor 8 Feb 1852 67 Black Smith Rev N J Coffey
399 Harper Patrick South Creek 16 Feb 1852 72 Farmer Rev N J Coffey
400 Bullok Catherine Windsor 19 Feb 1852 32 Inn Keeper Rev N J Coffey
401 Pendergast Thomas Pitt Town 25 Feb 1852 6 months Rev N J Coffey
402 Higgens Michael Sydney 3 Mar 1852 35 Rev N J Coffey Buried at Kurrajong
403 Dunn Ellen Windsor 4 Mar 1852 72 Labourer's wife Rev N J Coffey
404 Hadden John Kurrajong 11 Mar1852 86 Labourer Rev N J Coffey
405 Sullivan Ellen Windsor 4 Apr 1852 14 months Rev N J Coffey
406 Harris Mary unreadable 22 Apr 1852
407 Maguire Thomas Cornwallis 19 May 1852 62 Farmer Rev P Hallinan
408 Ring John Windsor 20 May 1852 70 Meadicant Rev P Hallinan
409 Broderick Daniel Windsor 31 May 1852 55 Pauper Rev P Hallinan
410 Connely Patrick Cliften 21 Jun 1852 60 Labourer Rev P Hallinan
411 unreadable unreadable Vinegar Hill 13 Jul 1852 58 Labourer Rev P Hallinan
412 unreadable John Michael Windsor 16 Jul 1852 1 day Rev P Hallinan
413 O'Brien Agnes Josephine Windsor 22 Jul 1852 3 weeks Rev P Hallinan
414 Mulhern William McGraths Hill 6 Sep 1852 78 Labourer Rev P Hallinan
415 Davis Margaret South Creek Windsor 15 Sep 1852 70 Rev P Hallinan
416 Kempster James Nepean District 19 Sep 1852 2 yrs 8 mths Rev P Hallinan
417 Day Bridget Cornwallis 29 Sep 1852 55 Widow Rev P Hallinan
418 Leary Mary Windsor 6 Oct 1852 44 Pauper Rev P Hallinan
419 Davies Richd Richmond 14 Oct 1852 34 Labourer Rev P Hallinan
420 Bourke Ellen Windsor 26 Oct 1852 29 Labourer's wife Rev P Hallinan
421 Keogh Walter Windsor 28 Oct 1852 56 John Bayer? Pauper Rev P Hallinan
422 Hamilton John Windsor 12 Nov 1852 75 Rev P Hallinan
423 Sullivan Cornelius Windsor 19 Nov 1852 - Atlas Pauper Rev P Hallinan
424 Cunningham Mary Windsor 20 Nov 1852 Farmer Rev P Hallinan
425 Woods Robert Richmond 21 Nov 1852 18 months Rev P Hallinan
426 Reedy Bridget Windsor 21 Nov 1852 2 Rev P Hallinan
427 Beans Mary unreadable 26 Nov 1852 74 unreadable Rev P Hallinan
428 Hynds Charles Box Hill 1 Dec 1852 18 Farmer Rev P Hallinan
429 McCarthy Thomas Windsor 4 Dec 1852 58 Rev P Hallinan
430 Whelan John Windsor 15 Dec 1852 73 Portland Rev P Hallinan
431 Doyle Patrick Windsor 17 Dec 1852 81 Hodbro? Rev P Hallinan
432 Carthy Mary Windsor 12 Dec 1852 60 Rev P Hallinan
433 Gabon Patrick Windsor 19 Dec 1852 72 Earl of St Vincent Rev P Hallinan
434 Brennan John Windsor 1 Jan 1853 60 Atlas [3] Pauper Rev P Hallinan
435 Cunningham Robert Windsor 6 Jan 1853 30 Royal Saxon Rev P Hallinan
436 King Patrick Windsor 3 Feb 1853 74 Rev P Hallinan
437 Egan Edward Windsor 18 Feb 1853 55 Rev P Hallinan
438 Gaunt Michael Kurrajong 1 Jan 1853 2 months Rev P Hallinan
439 Finley John Windsor 14 Apr 1853 64 Pauper Rev P Hallinan
440 Moffitt Mary Windsor 16 Apr 1853 30 Rev P Hallinan
441 Murray Anne Sally's Bottoms 13 May 1853 33 Rev P Hallinan
442 Goodwin Mary Freemans Reach 15 May 1853 75 Rev P Hallinan
443 McCabe Owen Kurrajong 22 May 1853 27 Rev P Hallinan
444 Norris Mary Ann Cornwallis 27 May 1853 40 Rev P Hallinan
445 Connors Michael Windsor 22 May 1853 80 Rev P Hallinan
446 Harrison Catherine Windsor 24 May 1853 67 Rev P Hallinan
447 Hayes Mary Jane Freemans Reach 2 Jun 1853 37 Rev P Hallinan
448 Barton Stephen Cliften 2 Jun 1853 5 Rev P Hallinan
449 Byrns Peter Windsor 9 Jun 1853 10 Rev P Hallinan
450 Eather Mrs Mary Kurrajong 11 Jun 1853 50 Rev P Hallinan
451 Hanly Jane Richmond 14 Jun 1853 4 months Rev P Hallinan
452 Wayburn Bridget Pitt Town 19 Jun 1853 52 Rev P Hallinan
453 Moore William Pitt Town 21 Jun 1853 50 Rev P Hallinan
454 Read Laurence Windsor 15 Jul 1853 60 Rev P Hallinan
455 Mahon Patrick Windsor 15 Jul 1853 77 Rev P Hallinan
456 Murphy John Hospital Windsor 17 Jul 1853 60 Rev P Hallinan
457 unreadable Mrs Richmond 5 Aug 1853 26 Rev P Hallinan
458 Parkland Mary Windsor 3 Aug 1853 61 Rev P Hallinan
459 Moran Michael Pitt Town 13 Aug 1853 62 Rev P Hallinan
460 Norris Elizabeth Richmond Bottoms 21 Aug 1853 23 Rev P Hallinan
461 Kelly Daniel Pitt Town 3 Sep 1853 79 Rev P Hallinan
462 Gunan Michael Richmond 13 Sep 1853 55 Rev P Hallinan
463 Mellish Maria Sydney 13 Sep 1853 36 Rev P Hallinan
464 Hill Elizabeth Windsor 18 Sep 1853 60 Rev P Hallinan
465 Clarke Thomas Pitt Town 22 Sep 1853 3 Rev P Hallinan
466 Gatton Thomas Windsor 2 Oct 1853 77 Rev P Hallinan
467 Riely John Penrith District 8 Oct 1853 45 Rev P Hallinan
468 Murray Thomas Sally's Bottoms 31 Oct 1853 7 Rev P Hallinan
469 Waddle Thomas Richmond 16 Nov 1853 60 Rev P Hallinan
470 Jones unreadable Windsor 17 Nov 1853 63 Rev P Hallinan
471 Slater unreadable Fairfield 22 Nov 1853 54 Rev P Hallinan
472 Sharry Mary Windsor 23 Nov 1853 19 Rev P Hallinan
473 Dockin John Richmond Bottoms 26 Nov 1853 7 Rev P Hallinan
474 Crawley John Windsor 1 Dec 1853 67 Rev P Hallinan
475 Connors Charles Box Hill 11 Dec 1853 74 Rev P Hallinan
476 Sharry Mary Ann Windsor 12 Dec 1853 1 month Rev P Hallinan
477 nil Rev P Hallinan
478 Buttersworth Bridget Pitt Town Bottoms 2 Jan 1854 26 Rev P Hallinan
479 Buttersworth Bridget Pitt Town Bottoms 12 Jan 1854 17 days Rev P Hallinan
480 Mellish Mary Sydney 26 Jan 1854 6 months Rev P Hallinan Age crossed out
481 Kilduf John Pitt Town 8 Feb 1854 60 Rev P Hallinan
482 Walsh John Windsor 7 Feb 1854 48 Rev P Hallinan
483 Brennan John Windsor 8 Feb 1854 70 Rev P Hallinan
484 Whitford Mary Windsor 18 Feb 1854 60 Rev P Hallinan
485 Power Michael Wilberforce 24 Mar 1854 63 Rev P Hallinan
486 Davies Henry Wilberforce 27 Mar 1854 53 Rev P Hallinan
487 Cavanagh Michael Windsor 10 Apr 1854 78 Rev P Hallinan
488 Pender [gast] Thomas Pitt Town 29 Apr 1854 14 months Rev P Hallinan
489 McQuade Charles Hale Windsor 29 Jun 1854 1 month Rev H Johnson
490 Kenny Anne Richmond 9 Jul 1854 77 Rev P Hallinan
491 Dempsey Denis Richmond 7 Aug 1854 62 Rev P Hallinan
492 Doyle Peter Wilberforce 12 Aug 1854 70 Rev P Hallinan
493 Riley Elizabeth Windsor 17 Sep 1854 63 Rev P Hallinan
494 Norris Michael Cornwallis 28 Sep 1854 30 Rev P Hallinan
495 Doyle Timothy Windsor 17 Oct 1854 80 Rev P Hallinan
496 Hewson Henry North Richmond 24 Oct 1854 11 Rev P Hallinan
497 Tierney Mary Windsor 5 Nov 1854 4 Rev P Hallinan
498 O'Keefe Mary Jane Windsor 13 Nov 1854 7 weeks Rev P Hallinan
499 Tait John Pitt Town 26 Nov 1854 3 Rev P Hallinan
500 Kelly John Richmond Bottoms 28 Dec 1854 2 Rev P Hallinan
501 Gahan Hugh Freemans Reach 31 Dec 1854 1yr 9 months Rev P Hallinan
502 unreadable Thomas Windsor 27 Dec 1854 80 Rev P Hallinan



Credits: Transcriptions by Kristine Wood - October 2003.

George Leonard Lee 1860-1939

George Leonard LEE the son of John Leonard LEE 1833-1913 and
Mary, nee ECKFORD 1836-1883 was born in Maitland in 1860.
In 1896, George Leonard married Emma Onus TOWN 1867-1948 the
daughter of Andrew TOWN, of Hobartville 1840-1890 and
Emma Susannah ONUS 1843-1941.

This biography below is from the Dictionary of Australian Biography:-
[George Leonard Lee (1860-1939), soldier, was born on 25 June 1860 at West Maitland, New South Wales, son of John Lee, draper and later merchant, and his wife, Mary Ann ne Eckford. Educated at Sauchu House School, West Maitland, and Armidale Grammar School, he worked for a while in the family business, John Lee & Sons, West Maitland. He was a well-known horseman and sportsman, keen on polo.

On 4 October 1889 Lee was commissioned in the local troop of the New South Wales Lancers and during the maritime strike of 1890 acted as adjutant of the partially paid cavalry and mounted rifles who were enrolled as special police in Sydney. Next year he was sent to England for training and by October 1892 had qualified in an equitation course at the Cavalry School, Canterbury, at an Army Service Corps school and at the School of Musketry, Hythe; he also trained for several months with the 20th Hussars at Aldershot. After returning home he joined the New South Wales Permanent Military Forces in December 1892 as a captain and from then until June 1902 was adjutant of the New South Wales Lancers. The New South Wales Mounted Brigade's book of confidential reports contains laudatory references to him. During that time he was also acting staff officer, Mounted Brigade, for over two years, and commandant of the Cavalry School. On 2 January 1896 he married Emma Onus Town at St Ann's Anglican Church, Homebush, Sydney; they had no children.

On the outbreak of the South African War in October 1899 the New South Wales Lancers mobilized a draft to go from Sydney to reinforce their squadron which was proceeding to the war from England after training there. Lee, now a major, was in charge of the draft which joined the squadron in South Africa on 6 December. Lee then took command of the Lancer contingent from Captain C. F. Cox. His unit, part of Lieutenant-General French's force, was employed in operations around Colesberg, the relief of Kimberley, and actions at Paardeberg, Poplar Grove, Driefontein, Zand River, Johannesburg, Pretoria, Diamond Hill and in the Transvaal east of Pretoria to 26 October 1900 when the squadron's year of service ended. For his work in South Africa Lee was mentioned in dispatches and awarded the Distinguished Service Order.

Resuming duty with the Australian Military Forces, Lee was assistant adjutant general and chief staff officer in Victoria in 1902-07. Appointed to the Administrative and Instructional Staff in 1904, he became a lieutenant-colonel in 1909, having held brevet rank since 1902. He served in New South Wales from June 1907, and was commandant in Tasmania in 1911-12 and in Queensland in 1912-17. After that he was temporarily in command in New South Wales, with the honorary rank of major general from July 1918 until he was transferred to the retired list on 13 May 1920 as honorary lieutenant-general. He was aide-de-camp to the governor-general in 1915-20, and in 1917 was appointed C.M.G.

Warm tributes to Lee's personality and ability include praise of his fine horsemanship, geniality and ripe judgement; there was 'no hypocrisy in his make up' and he would not tolerate it in anyone under him. In retirement he worked two oyster leases at Port Stephens, New South Wales. He was a member of the Union Club, Sydney. Survived by his wife, he died on 13 April 1939 at Burwood and was cremated with Anglican rites.]

Citation details
Vernon, P. V., 'Lee, George Leonard (18601939)', Australian Dictionary of Biography, National Centre of Biography, Australian National University, http://adb.anu.edu.au/biography/lee-george-leonard-7146/text12335, accessed 12 July 2012.
This article was first published in hardcopy in Australian Dictionary of Biography, Volume 10, (MUP), 1986





OBITUARY
Printed in the Sydney Morning Herald,
Saturday 15 April 1939

LIEUTENANT-GENERAL G. L.LEE.
Lieutenant-General George Leonard Lee, who died on Thursday night,
aged 78, had a distinguished military career.
He received his first commission in the New South Wales Lancers in 1889,
and was subsequently adjutant of the Lancers for 10 years.
After reaching the rank of lieutenant-colonel he was appointed to the
administrative instructional staff of the permanent military forces.
He was Assistant Adjutant General and Chief Staff Officer in Victoria
from 1902 to 1907, Commandant in Tasmania from 1911 to 1912, and
Commandant in Queensland from 1912 to 1917.

He took part in the South African campaign, and was present at the
relief of Kimberley.
He was mentioned in despatches in 1901, and received the
Distinguished Service Order and the Queen's medal with six clasps.
He was created a C.M.G. in 1917.

A well-known sportsman and horseman, in his younger days he won renown
in many cross-country rides, winning more than one.

Before he was appointed to the permanent staff he was a member of the
firm of John Lee and Sons, general providers, West Maitland.
He was at one time Commandant of the Cavalry School of Instruction.
He was granted the rank of lieutenant-general when he retired from the
position of State Commandant in New South Wales 19 years ago."

Lieut.Gen. George Leonard LEE C.M.G D.S.O died on the 13 April 1939 at his residence,
58 Broughton Road, Homebush.
(the former residence of his mother-in-law, Emma Susannah TOWN)
His widow Emma Onus LEE died on the 15 April 1948, also at Broughton Road.


Cock-Fighting, New South Wales.

Any article or series of articles on the "Good Old Days" that
did not treat the sports of that-period would be like a
meat pie without, the meat. I have attempted to give a complete
and comprehensive digest of the manners and customs of the people
of the times of which I write, and as cock fighting was almost an
institution in those days, some attention must be given to it.

Not many will regret the fact this kind of sport is now a thing of
the past, so far as this district is concernedand has been allowed to
fall into oblivion along with other relics of barbarism.

From the 1840s cock-fighting was one of the most popular sports
in the Hawkesbury district of New South Wales, and in those days unless you had a
game rooster that could masacre twenty of your neighbours' domestic chooks in as
many minutes, you might as well be dead, for you were considered nobody.

But now things have changed, the cock-fighting instincts of the people
are dead, though the sleek bird still retains all the combative instincts
of the olden leaven, and would even now fight till he dropped on his own or
some other party's dung-hill. Many residents well remember the old rendezvous
of the enthusiasts of this branch of sportin Holland's paddock,(Windsor)
facing the banks, In this paddock, where there is now a large pond, a pit
existed for many years, and at the trysting-ground large crowds of people
assembled nearly every Saturday to witness a good encounter between two
game cocks.
An edifying spectacle it must have been, truly, yet amongst the votaries of
the sport were many men who were then leading lights of the district.

For years cock-fighting was carried on in public, and was reckoned a legitimate
sport. Then the State stepped in and dubbed it unlawful; yet it was carried on,
almost with impunity, for yearsbut those who participated in the sport met in
some sequestered nook to hold their meetings, the ti-tree swamp on Ham Common
(Richmond) being a favourite resort.

A man named " Jacky" Carr was among the first to introduce cock-fighting into
the Hawkesbury district. He was an Englishman, and always managed to get hold of
some fine imported birds.

Amongst those who followed the game also were Frank Norris, now residing on the
Brickfields,and one of the best pugilists of his day. Also his brothers Paddy and Jim, (sons of Richard NORRIS 1779-1843)
George Cupitt 1808-1875, Charlie Eather, The Charkers,
Gaudry's and Kable's. William Hopkins 1798-1862,
Joseph and William Onus, (sons of Joseph Onus 1782-1835). Ben Richards 1818-1898, and George Bushell were
also admirers of the game-cock, and they all owned good
fighting birds. The second-named is said to have had a magnificent button-comb
bird, which ended the career of many another good one.

The Dargins, Cornwells, Dan Mayne and Jack Cribb also followed the sport.
W. Hopkins was a great breeder of these birds, and he once owned a cookoo-game,
a very rare bird which was responsible for the death of more than one man's pet.

Jim Norris also had a bird which, after winning. fourteen or fifteen successive
battles met its doom when pitted against "Daddy" Baine's in the Richmond Lane,
close to the residence of Mrs. Onus. The birds always fought with steel spurs,
and a small black red bird weighing 6 lbs, owned by George Cupitt, on one occasion
slaughtered three oponents without having his heels (as the spurs were termed) taken off.

James 'Jack' Cribb 1785-1841 always had a lot of birds, and used to spare no
expense in getting hold of good fighters to take his friends down.
He had been known to pay as much as 10 apiece for them, and once paid that
sum for a big light-grey bird, of which everybody was afraid.

Birds weighing from 6lbs to 7lbs were always very strong and fast fighters, whilst
they varied in weight from 5lbs to 8lbs. The principal breeds were black red,
duck-wing, hen-feather, and the pile. The latter breed was the progeny of two good
distinct strains, and was considered one of the gamest of the game birds.

The fighting generally carried out in what was termed "mains," i.e.,
a number (say 5 or 7) birds of dififerent weights on either side.
The birds of the opposing forces were pitted on as equal terms as possible as
regards weight, and if the result of the " main" was equal, the contest would be
decided by a "turn-out"that is, a match between the heaviest bird of both sides.
The :mains" Comprised a party from Parramatta or Sydney on the one side, and
Windsor on the other.

Phil Williams (Sydney), the Waterhouses (Parramatta), and W. Sparks (Cook's River)
frequently brought their birds to Windsor, and were met in the fray by
Cupitt, Norris and Hopkins.
Matches for 50 or to 100 aside were often made, while a good deal of out
side money was also wagered

Sources:
Windsor and Richmond Gazette
(NSW : 1888 - 1954)
The Good Old Days
Yeldap.
Research and Transcription, Janilye
20 June 2012

Peter McAlpin 1809-1898

It is said, The Singleton Argus, on 25th September 1835, when writing about Peter McAlpin 1809-1898, described him as a man with "a roaming disposition, a giant and in every sense of the term, physically and morally with high principles, lofty ideals". I have been unable to find this article. Never-the-less, he was, all of that.

Peter McALPIN Senior 1758-1850 had taken his family out to the Hawkesbury district and set himself up as a blacksmith at Windsor after arriving with the family as free settlers on the 'General Graham' on the 29 January 1812.

Here the family lived until the end of 1815, when Peter Snr. sold his shop and two houses by auction, the family moved to Richmond early in 1816, again setting up a blacksmith shop, when young Peter was only 7.

In 1822 Peter together with his brother William Glas and Catherine (nicknamed, Kite) attended the school in Richmond for only about a year, just long enough to learn to read and write and do their sums.

In the 1825 census Peter was recorded as living at Richmond, however it was not long after the census that Peter showed his wanderlust by making a trek up north to Muswellbrook, or perhaps he was a little bit envious of his brother's wanderings.

Two years earlier in 1823, Peter's brother William known as Billy Mack at thirteen, had been one of Archibald Bell's party who, with the help of aboriginal guides marked the Bells Line of Road which was an alternative route to Blaxland, Lawson and Wentworths road across the Blue Mountains.

In the 1828 census Peter was living in Bathurst and working as a labourer for John Neville 1780-1854 and his wife Elizabeth nee Vincent, whom Peter had met in Richmond, when they were living there. They had offered him work and Peter was keen to take it.

I'm not sure how long Peter remained with John Neville and his family but John Neville moved from Bathurst to Rylstone in 1830 and Peter didn't like to stay in one place for long.

In 1831 Peter set himself up as the Blacksmith in Patrick's Plains. It's thought that Peter visited Richmond around Christmas 1831 when his little sister Catherine 'Kite' announced she was going to marry William Clark on the 16 January 1832. Of all the family Peter was closest to Kite and I don't see him missing her wedding day.

Another big wedding took place on the 1 February 1833 when brother Billy Mack married Susannah Onus 1815-1882 at Christ Church in Castlereagh. William built a brick home in 1834 in the main street of Richmond, NSW with financial help from Joseph ONUS (the father of his wife, Susannah) and set up a blacksmiths shop at the rear.

On the 9 January 1935 at a chapel in Maitland where his sister and her husband William Clark were now living Peter married Elizabeth Cole alias Harrison, a convict woman whose real name was Phebe Cole, nee Stirrup
1807-1885. Phoebe was a widow with two children.

This marriage was seen as a convenience for both parties and did not last very long. It seems Peter sold the shop bought Phoebe a house, gave her some money and then took off for Victoria. Neither one looking back or having any regrets.

It was on the 30 August 1835 that the first settlers arrived in Melbourne and commenced building along the Yarra River. This pioneering group led by Captain John Lacey with his builder from Launceston George Evans, his servant Evan Evans, carpenters William Jackson and Robert Hay Marr, the Blacksmith James Gilbert and his wife and a ploughman called Charlie Wise. In 1840 Peter McAlpin made his way there not to seek his fortune ( he could have made that in New South Wales), but for the adventure of it all.

From this point on it's not easy to track Peter. He did have a blacksmith shop in Little Bourke Street Melbourne, in 1847. In March 1851 he was shot in his left arm in the city of Melbourne at 1am by George May Smith after Peter called he and his companions some names. George May Smith was charged with assault and fined twenty shillings. Another shot in the arm in 1851 was because Peter was out of the state of nsw for so many years phoebe, had him declared dead. She married Frederick WINGRAVE 1797-1876, at Windeyer on the 31 March 1852.
Then in 1853 we see Peter at the McIvor diggings. I doubt he was digging more likely running the blacksmiths shop.

All told Peter spent thirty five years in Victoria not returning to New South Wales until 1875.

Peter died on the 23 September 1898 in Singleton, New South Wales.
His death certificate states he died without issue

His grave is at the Glenridding Uniting Church Cemetery, formerly known as
the Glenridding Presbyterian Cemetery, on the Putty Road, Singleton, NSW.
The headstone reads-
PETER MCALPINE
23 Sep 1898
Age: 89y

Obituary
Singleton Argus (NSW : 1880 - 1954), Saturday 24 September 1898


Death of an Old Colonist.
"In his 90th year, Mr Peter M'Alpin, of Bulga, died in the local Hospital yesterday,
after a short illness, his death being due to senile decay.
The deceased was a native of Sterling, Scotland, but was only three years of age
when he arrived with his parents in Victoria he lived there for 35 years, when he removed
to N. S. Wales, and has since lived in this part of the colonya term of 51 years.
Mr M'Alpin was married in Maitland, but there was no issue to the union.
The old gentleman was well respected, and those who knew him intimately
in his earlier days retain many pleasant memories of the acquaintanceship "


Note: He arrived with parents in NSW on 29 Jan 1812.
He Lived in Victoria for 35 Years and
in NSW for a total of 51 years.


written by janilye, 2004.
Thank you to Rob Fountain for information re- Phoebe Stirrup