janilye on FamilyTreeCircles - journals

janilye on Family Tree Circles

sort: Date Alphabetical
view: full | list

Journals and Posts

Showing: (clear)
Category: Irish Research


Throughout the 19th century Ireland saw an exodus of people to all corners of the world especially to the colonies and former colonies governed by the British, in particular to Canada, United States and Australia. These countries are often referred to now as the Irish Diaspora.
I'd like to bring to the attention of our Australian members the Irish Famine Memorial website which has a free online searchable database for ORPHANS from workhouses in all 32 counties throughout Ireland and SHIPS to Australia between 1848 and 1850.
Compiled initially from article by Trevor McClaughlin, 'Barefoot and Pregnant?Female Orphans who emigrated from Irish Workhouses to Australia, 1848-1850', in Familia: Ulster Genealogical Review, incorporating Ulster Genealogical & Historical Guild 'Newsletter', Vol.2, No.3, 1987, pp.31-36 and updated from shipping lists in New South Wales and South Australia.

The Great Irish Famine Commemoration Committee is gathering stories about all the women, following on from the work of Dr Trevor McClaughlin. Some of the stories are attached as pdfs to the individual girls and are mainly complied by descendants - some have not been authenticated by The Great Irish Famine Commemoration Committee but have been compiled from research conducted by descendants.

NOTE THAT NOT ALL 4114 WOMEN FROM THE 20 SHIPS ARE IN THE DATABASE - 2 South Australian ships are still being researched

© copyright 2011 irish famine memorial

National Archives of Ireland
THE FRIARS BRITCHES at the Corkman Pub, Carlton, Melbourn

Researching your Irish Roots

Unfortunately, some important records are no longer in existence mainly due to:
Fire in the Four Courts, Dublin, 1922.

The destruction of the Public Record Office of Ireland in the Four Courts, Dublin (as the result of a fire during civil disturbance in 1922) left a considerable gap in the archival heritage of Northern Ireland. Many important records were lost, including:
The census returns from 1821 to 1851
A small number of volumes survived, covering parts of Co. Fermanagh and Cavan in 1821; parts of Co. Londonderry and for Killeshandra Parish in County Cavan for 1831; and for parts of County Antrim for 1851. These are available in PRONI under the main reference number MIC/5A. Extracts from the 1841 and 1851 census returns can be found in the Old Age Pension books - those for Northern Ireland are in PRONI under the main reference number T/550 see Your Family Tree Leaflet 5 - Census Records (19th Century) (27KB) for further details.

Pre-1858 original wills, administration bonds and marriage licence bonds
Although the original wills, administration bonds and marriage licence bonds were destroyed, indexes survived in manuscript and printed form. Those for the dioceses covering Northern Ireland are available in PRONI - it is therefore possible to extract some details about individuals from these indices. Copies of many destroyed wills can also be found in various privately deposited archives.

Church of Ireland parish records
The records of 1,006 Church of Ireland parishes, originally deposited in the Public Record Office of Ireland in Dublin, were largely destroyed in 1922. However, most of those relating to Northern Ireland (and several from the Republic of Ireland) that survived are available in PRONI either on microfilm or in original form. Those surviving for the majority of parishes in the Republic of Ireland can be accessed at the National Archives of Ireland in Dublin.

The destruction of census records by Government order
Census returns covering the whole island of Ireland for the years 1861-1891 were destroyed by order of the Government on grounds of confidentiality.


Hopefully these sites will offer you a pathway to finding your Irish Ancestor.
P R O N I Public Records Office of Northern Ireland
GENUKI: Ireland for information related to all of Ireland
Irish Genealogy Exploring your Irish family history, step-by-step

Church records in Ireland.
The church records preserve details of the baptisms, marriages and burials which took place within a particular parish, church or congregation and were usually compiled by the relevant clergyman.

There is a great degree of variation in the level of detail contained within these records. Indeed over a period of one hundred years or more there can be considerable variation even within a single parish, church or congregation. In general, baptism records record the date of the baptism; the names of the child, the parents and the names of the child?s sponsors or godparents. The family address and the name of the clergyman may also be recorded.

Marriage records generally record the date of the marriage, the names of the spouses and witnesses. Other information such as the names of the spouse?s parents, residences of the spouses, ages, occupations and the name of the clergyman may also be recorded.

4 comment(s), latest 6 years, 1 month ago

The Ship THAMES 1826

Please contact me if you had an ancestor who arrived on the THAMES

The Irish immigration ship the Thames which brought wives and children from Cork Ireland to Sydney to unite with their husband/father who had been transported prior to 1826

The Thames was the first immigration ship to carry families directly from Ireland.

The Thames sailed from Cork 14 November 1825 and arrived 11 April 1826 and carried 37 wives and 107 children. There were also 16 paying passengers and crew captained by Robert Frazier and Surgeon Superintendant Dr. Linton R.N

There is no official passenger list existing in the NSW State Archives, the National Archives in Canberra or the National Archives in Dublin Ireland .

The purpose is to locate extended family members of those that immigrated on the Thames with the view to drawing together background information on what has happened to those Thames families and their convict husbands since 1826.

The objective is to document as many as possible Thames family stories and provide this information to the Mitchell Library and to the Society of Australian Genealogists (SAG) in the form of a manuscript.

A researcher named Lyn Vincent of Lyndon Genealogy has managed to reconstruct a passenger list through using the 1828 Census, the Ship Surgeon's Report, Birth, Death and Marriage Indexes and the Australian Biographical & Genealogical Record.

A Constable Michael Sheedy in the 1830s also compiled a list of family names that travelled on the Thames .

Unfortunately there were 16 deaths on the voyage (3 wives and 13 children). Close analysis of the Surgeon's Report (Dr. Lynton) has identified 2 of the wives and 8 children) on a microfilm held by the Mitchell Library. It would seem that not all of the Surgeon's report has been copied to microfilm.

The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (NSW ) Wednesday 12 April 1826. Page 2
Yesterday arrived the ship Thames, Captain Robert Frazer, with stores for Government.
She sailed from Cork the 14th November; from Teneriffe 29th November; and from
Pernambuco 11th January last.
By this conveyance are forwarded 37 women, the wives of free men and prisoners, who
bring along with them 107 children. We are sorry to say that 3 women and 13 children
died on the passage. Passengers, Mr. Raymond, Mrs. Raymond, and 9 children, and Mr. James Richards,
saddler. Surgeon Superintendent, Dr. Linton, R. N.
Another vessel, with male prisoners, was to leave shortly after the departure of the Thames.

The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (NSW) Wednesday 19 April 1826 Page 3
The women and children landed from the Thames on Saturday last, and were conducted
to the Old Orphan School, where they continued until called for by their several
relatives and friends.
The women, generally, looked hearty enough. As for the boys and girls, they were
perfect models of the Hibernian race; they seemed quite at home on their way up
George-street, and were as dignified in their step as any emigrant. This is a nouvelle
method to "ADVANCE AUSTRALIA," in importing children by wholesale. However, it's all
grist that comes to our mill. We hope the next importation the Ministry will send us,
may turn out to be a cargo of healthy and attractive damsels, and children will follow of course.

16 comment(s), latest 6 days, 20 hours ago