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A Hawkesbury Calender

JANUARY

1. 1827. The Australian Cricket Club held their annual meeting in Sydney;
when some good play was exhibited, lt was announced at the meeting that the
Windsor Cricket Club had refused to play their brother amateurs in Sydney.

1, 1844. Post office first established at Richmond.

1, 1870. Telegraph office opened at Richmond.

1, 1807. An address presented to Rev. Samuel Marsden- Parramatta,
Principal Chaplain of the colony signed by 302 magistrates and land owners'
in the interior?prior to his departure to England on a visit.
Marsden frequently visited ; the Hawkesbury in connection With his professional duties,
and he owned property at Windsor. He died at the Parsonage, Windsor.

1. 1839. Elizabeth Pitt, wife of Thomas Matcham Pitt, died aged 39.
The Pitts were the first free settlers to take up their residence in the Richmond district,
and were the founders of the Australian family of that name, descendants of whom still
reside in the district. The founders were related to Lord Nelson, and bore letters of
introduction from him when they arrived in the colony.

2, 1805. Advertisement appeals in the Sydney Gazette of this date of the auction sale
of a farm situated on the banks of the Hawkesbury, opposite Cornwallis, contesting
of 50 acres, mostly cleared, belonging to George Barrington (the famous Lon don pickpocket),
then deceased.

4, 1822. Governor Macquarie replies' to an address presented by Hawkesbury Settlers
on Dec. 12, 1821?just prior to his departure from the colony.

4, 1814. James Gordon married, to Miss Arndell, at Windsor, by Rev. Cartwright,
chaplain at St Matthew's.

4, 1816. W. Gaudry, a well-known settler, died at Windsor.

8, 1833. Thos. Hobby, of the N.8.W. Gorps, and afterwards Lieut., of the 102nd Regiment,
died, aged 57. Buried Richmond C.E. cemetery.

11, 1800; Father Harold, General Holt, Rev. Henry Fulton, participants
in the '98 Irish Rebellion, ; arrived with William Cox; and family in Sydney Cove
in the Minerva. William Cox eventually settled down at the Hawkesbury, and became the
founder of the famous and respected Australian family of that name. Holt for a time was
overseer of Cox's farms in the Parramatta and Hawkesbury districts.
Fulton became the much respected chaplain at Richmond and Castlereagh, and conducted a
school at the latter place. Tompson, the first Australian poet, attended this school.

11, 1819. Windsor Charitable Institution (now known as the Hawkes bury Benevolent Society)
established. ?300 value in wheat, and 60 head of breeding cattle donated by leading settlers
for its maintenance. The first public meeting was called on Dec. 31, 1818.
The first committee were Rev. R. Cartwright, William Cox (of Clarendon and Fairfield),
James Jones, Thomas Matcham Pitt (father of the late G. M. Pitt), Henry Baldwin, and George Hall
(founder of the Caddai family).

12, 1810. Andrew Thomson, the father of Windsor, appointed a magistrate by Governor Macquarie.
The appointment of an emancipist to the position gave great offence to the military and
prominent free settlers. Thomson died October 22, 1810, aged 37.

12, 1838. Solomon Wiseman (Wiseman's Ferry) died, aged 61.
He was the uncrowned king of the Lower Hawkesbury.

12, 1811. Thomas Gilberthorp, a Pitt Town farmer, advertises in the "Sydney Gazette"
of this date endeavouring to induce the Hawkesbury farmers to co-operate in the purchase
of wheat screens. This is the first record of practical farming co-operation in Australia.
Gilberthorp. was an industrious and honorable settler.

13, 1818. The following land grants to local settlers were gazetted at this date-
Samuel Terry, 950 acres in the Evan district ; John Palmer 1500 acres; John Pye, 300 acres;
and Richard Rouse, 450 acres.- all the latter being situated in the Bathurst district.

14, 1815, William Cox, of Clarendon, concludes the herculean task of constructing a
carriage road over the Blue Mountains from Emu; Plains to Bathurst--within six months.
Commenced July 7, 1814, and continued under adverse conditions as regards weather and
difficulties of crossing an unexplored mountain,' Distance ; accomplished, 101? miles.

15, 1855. 150yds footrace between Judd and Dalton for ?100 a-side at Windsor racecourse.
Won by latter by 3yds.

16, 1837. Ann Tebbutt died, aged 71. Buried St. Matthew's Cemetery, Windsor.
Mother of John Tebbutt, F.R.A.S.

16, 1897. Windsor Swimming Club held successful aquatic carnival in the river.
150 Sydney swimmers and New Zealand champions present.
Chief events-One mile championship of Australia won by Percy Cavill;
championship of Hawkesbury (440yds) won by Tom Atkins ;
monster banquet at the Fitzroy Hotel in the evening; Austrian band present.

17, 1900. John Low Thompson died at Burwood. He was Principal of Dookie College, Victoria ;
instructor in agriculture to the government of N.S W. ;
and the first Principal of the Hawkesbury Agricultural College.

20, 1850. William Cox, Junr., of Hobartville died, aged 60.

20, 1829. Jas. Watson died, aged 43. Buried Richmond.

21, 1815. Road over Blue Moun tains constructed and opened for traffic.
Superintended by William Cox, J.P., of Clarendon.

21, 1809. Andrew Thomson appointed auctioneer for the district of the Hawkesbury
by Deputy-Governor Paterson, the Hawkesburys first auctioneer.

21, 1809. The Portland Head Christian etc. Society at a meeting at this date agree to
engage William Harvey and William Barrow, stone masons (free men), to build the wall
of the Ebenezer chapel, and David Dunstan, carpenter, to do the carpentering.

26, 1788. Assistant-Surgeon Arndell arrives with the first fleet- as surgeon on "Friendship."
Captain Walton with 100 male and female convicts. Arndell soon afterwards resigned
from his government appointment, and received a land grant at Caddai, where he resided for
many years, as the first Hawkesbury magistrate and as a prominent settler identified with
farming pursuits. He was much respected.

26; 1788. Commissary John Palmer, purser Of the " Sirius," arrives in the first fleet.
Cobbold, the author of the life of Margaret Catchpole, makes frequent mention of Palmer
as the friend and patron of the Richmond midwife.

28, 1808. Governor Bligh deposed. Although Bligh incurred the enmity of the N.S.W. Corps,
he was well respected at the Hawkesbury, owing to his efforts to stop the iniquitous drink traffic
by the "Rum Selling Corps." Bligh stated that if he could have escaped to his friends at the
Hawkesbury, the high-handed proceedings of Johnston and Macarthur would never have occurred.

28, 1858. John Single died, aged 66.

30, 1889. Ann Elizabeth Hobby, widow of Thomas Hobby, died, aged 72.

31, 1855. 150yds footrace between Dalton and Davenport for ?100 and championship,
run on Parramatta-rd, Won by Dalton.

January, 1805 (day uncertain). George Barrington, the famous London pickpocket,
died at Parramatta, now compos mentis.

January, 1826, (day uncertain). Black snake, 22ft long (?) killed near the Hawkesbury by a
free settler named Fleming.

January, 1794. About the middle of this month the first farms were established on the
Hawkesbury by Deputy-Governor Grose, who placed 22 settlers there.
Amongst those receiving land were J.Ruse and C. Williams, the first Australian farmers.
These had previously been placed on poor land at Rosehill, but were after wards given land grants
at the mouth of South Creek and the Hawkesbury. They did not, however, enter into possession
at the Hawkesbury with the other settlers until some months afterwards, when they had disposed
of their farms at Rosehill. Ruse eventually left the Hawkesbury, and years afterwards died,
and was buried in the Camden R C. cemetery, his tombstone denoting the fact that he "sowed"
the first grain in this colony. Williams held his grant, which is now still held and
cultivated by his descendants, the Hannabus family.

FEBRUARY

1795, The firs?public store established at Green Hills ( Windsor) by Government
early in this month. Baker appointed first storekeeper.

1800. Captain Wm. Cox (after wards of Clarendon) purchases Brush Farm, on the
Parramatta River, early in this month, and commences farming. He appoints General Holt,
the '98 Irish Rebel, as his manager.

1, 1871. Hawkesbury Race Club established. Arthur Dight, president; John L. Smith, secretary.

1, 1828. Francis Beddek, better known as the Hawkesbury lawyer, admitted to practise
as a solicitor in the colony. He lived at Windsor for many years. He was the fifth lawyer
admitted to practise in Australia. It is said that he was the first solicitor practising
in Windsor, but one George Crossley (transported for forgery), preceded him.
William Walker was articled to Beddek.

2, 1802. Mary Pitt (Matcham) arrives with four daughters and a son at Sydney Cove
by the Canada. Founder of the Australian family of that name.
They settled at Mulgrave Place on the Hawkesbury. Mary Pitt died 1815, and the son
Thomas died in 1821, aged 39. The late G. M. Pitt, of North Sydney, was a son of the latter.

2, 1840. Frederick Bridges, chief inspector of schools, N.S.W., born at
Windsor. His father was one of the Scotch masons Dr. Lang brought out from Scotland.
The family left the Hawkesbury owing to disastrous floods.

3, 1821. Thomas Spencer, a mariner in the first fleet, died. Buried at Richmond.

8, 1837. William Harrington, who came with the 73rd regiment, died.
He was an honest and industrious man. Buried Richmond.

9, 1805. William Roberts advertises in the " Sydney Gazette" that he intends to run
at this date a covered waggon, to and from the Hawkesbury-once in three weeks-
with goods and passengers. Probably the first recorded regular communication with Sydney.

10th and 11th, 1791. Terrible heat at Rosehill (Parramatta.) 105 in shade at Sydney.
Birds and flying foxes dropped dead whilst on the wing. Bush fires. (Collins.)

10, 1873. John Richard Rouse died, aged 72. Buried Riohmond.

12, 1796. J. Brabyn, captain of the famous. 102nd regiment, better
known as the Rum Selling Corps, arrives in the colony with his regiment
in Marquis of Cornwallis. Magistrate from 1808 to 1810. Was concerned in the
deposition of Governor Bligh. For this he went to England in 1810
with others of the 102nd regiment to attend the trial of Major Johnston.
Re-appointed magistrate on his return to the colony shortly after.
Presided at Windsor for several years. Street named after him.
His residence, York Lodge, in George-street, near railway station, still stands.

12, 1822. Six men sentenced to death for breaking into the dwelling
of James Mackenzie at Caddai, and putting him on the fire and dreadfully beating him.

12, 1801. Shock of earthquake ; very sensibly felt at Parramatta and Hawkesbury at 11 p.m.,
lasting three minutes, and giving repeated shocks.

14, 1807. Governor Bligh issues ; an order at this date, forbidding the exchange of spirits
for food, on account of the destitution amongst the Hawkesbury settlers.

15, 1815. At a meeting of the Portland Head Society, it was decided
to establish a sabbath school. It was opened, but only continued a few weeks.
Probably the first recorded Sunday school at the Hawkesbury.

26, 1803. Andrew Thomson, chief constable at the Hawkesbury, takes into custody
two escaped convicts for rioting at Baulkham Hills.

17, 1797. William Cox, of Clarendon, appointed Lieutenant 68th Foot.

20, 1819. First ale and spirit license granted to Black Horse Hotel,
Richmond (Paul Randall, owner) The Inn was then known as the Black Horse Prince.
This is now the oldest licenssd hotel in Australia.
It has an ?nteresting history, and as a honeymoon resort at one time for leading colonista,
it was called "Honeymoon Cottage."

22, 1838. Samuel Terry died, leaving half a million in real and personal estate.

25, 1834. Caroling Louisa W. Calvert, author and botanist of Kurrajong, born.
Died April 28th, 1872. She was a talented lady, and a friend of Reverends Drs.
Woolls and Cameron, of Richmond.

25, 1868. James Stanbury, a champion sculler of the world, and a native of the Hawkesbury, born.

26. 1828. William Walker, member of the Legislative Council, born at Glasgow-
Represented Windsor in Parliament from I860 to the end of 1869. Alderman and Mayor
of Windsor. Founder of the Windsor School of Arts and its first president,
which position he occupied for many years. Secretary of tne Hawkesbury Benevolent Society
for eleven years, and wrote its history ; afterwards president. Writer of poetry and prose.
An early correspondent for the "Sydney Morning Herald," etc. His father was one of the
Presbyterian teachers induced to come to the colony by the late Dr. Lang.
He was educated by his father in Windsor, articled to Francis Beddek, of the same town,
and admitted an attorney in 1852, since which time he has practised in Windsor.

26, 1816. John Anderson murdered in his house at Caddai, aged 36 years.
Buried Church of England cemetery, Windsor.

27, 1815. Miss Wilshire, second daughter of James Wilshire
(Deputy Commissary General under Governor Macquarie) and Hester Pitt, born.
Died November 5, 1900.

MARCH

1800. Several floods at Hawkesbury during this month.

1811. Floods destroyed maize crops during this month

1, 1795. Official communication of this date from Lieut Gov. Paterson states
that he "had erected a small store at the Green Hills (Windsor), putting Baker,
the Superintendent, in charge "--Windsor's first store.

2nd to 9th, 1788. Between this date Pitt Water (mouth of the Hawkesbury),
named by Gov. Philip, during an exploration.

2,1801. John Stogdell, a free settler, lost his life in the big flood in
attempting to swim his horse over a hollow 3 miles from Hawkesbury (Windsor).
Horse and rider were drowned. This man was evidently buried at Sydney in the
old cemetery upon which the Town Hall now stands.
A resident in Sydney not long ago stated in the press that he had a coffin nameplate
referring to this man which had been unearthed from this cemetery.

3,1799. Heavy flood at the Hawkesbury, lasting until the 19th.

4,1804. Insurrection of prisoners at Castle Hill. Martial Law proclaimed.
Repealed March 9.

4,1871. Windsor Municipality proclaimed, R. Dight first Mayor,
J. T, Smith Council Clerk.

4,1815. Laurence May (father of Christie May), advertises in the " Sydney Gazette "
of this date that he "has erected a horse flour mill in the middle of the town
of Windsor, and that he is prepared to grind his neighbour's wheat expeditiously."

5, 1819. Rebecca, wife of William Cox, of Clarendon, died at Clarendon after
several weeks' illness, aged 56, leaving 5 sons.

6, 1822. Road from Richmond to Wallis Plains (Newcastle) opened to the public.

6,1898. Benjamin Richards died, Aged 81.

10,1813. Terrific hailstorm in the Hawkesbury district, much damage done to crops.
The windows in the Windsor chapel and Fitzgerald's residence were broken,
poultry were killed, and Crossley, Armitage, and other settlers were, injured.
Some of the hailstones measured 6 inches in circumference.
The chapel referred to was situated on the site occupied by the present School of Arts.
Crossley ?a convicted attorney ?was prominent in the time of Governors Hunter, King
and Bligh, figuring largely as the friend of the latter during his (Bligh's) deposition
by the military.

11, 1804. The "Sydney Gazette" of this date states that Cunningham, one of the rebel chiefs
of the Castle hill insurrection was hanged at Hawkesbury (Windsor).
He was hung on the staircase of the public store, Hawkesbury, which he had boasted
in his march at the head of the rebels he would plunder.
He had been overseen by stone-masons at Castle Hill. The public store was situated
on the site where Mr. Brinsley Hall's residence now stands.

11, 1799. Rev. Ralph Mansfield, Wesleyan minister, and a prominent Sydney citizen,
was stationed at Wind sor; died June, 1880, at Parramatta.
Editor and co-proprietor "Sydney Gazette."

12, 1833. Mary, wife of Richard Fitzgerald, died, aged 53.
Buried Church of England Cemetery, Windsor.

15, 1837. William Cox, J P., Lieut, and Paymaster of N.S.W Corps or 102nd Regiment,
of Clarendon, died at Fairfield, aged 72. Buried at St. Matthew's Church of England, Windsor.
Founder of the Australian family of that name.

22, 1806. Memorable flood; immense damage done; caused a famine.
Bread rose to 4/6 and 5/-loaf of 2lbs. Wheat sold 70/- and 80/- per bushel.
This flood rose 8ft. higher than on any previous occasion. ?36,000 worth of property was
destroyed, and several lives lost. It commenced last week of February, and its greatest
height was reached on March 22, 6000 bushels of corn were destroyed.
100 persons, who had taken refuge upon the tops of their houses were saved through the
exertions of Arndell and Biggers, two settlers. Arndell was the founder of the
Hawkesbury family of that name. He arrived as a surgeon in the First Fleet.

1897. J. Ayling, Presbyterian minister at Pitt Town, and a noted apiarist,
died in New Zealand, aged 71.

24, 1807. The vessel Governor Bligh (owner, Andrew Thompson) launched from
the Green Hills (Windsor).

25, 1897. Sen. Coastable McNeely retires after 21 years' service in the
district.

25, 1804. Governor King thanks the settlers for their assistance in putting down the
Irish insurrection at Castle Hill.

28, 1828. First postmaster at Windsor appointed. Salary ?84/7/9 per annum.

1814. Rev. Wm. Wools, Ph. Dr., A.L.M., F.L.S., born.
Incumbent of St. Peter's, Richmond, and Rural Dean.
Literateur and scientist, botanist, lecturer. Died 1894

Alexander Munro 1812-1889 NSW

Alexander MUNRO was born in Ardersier in the Scottish Highlands, on the Moray Firth, east of Inverness, near Fort George, and Nairn,Scotland on the 18 July 1812 the son of George MUNRO and Isabel MAIN.

On the 3 September 1829 Alexander was transported for seven years, he had been sentenced the day before in Inverness, where the family had moved after the death of his father. Along with two other boys, Alexander robbed a grocery store.

He arrived with 200 other convicts onboard the ship, York on the 7 February 1831. Measuring only 5'3" tall, he could read and write and his occupation was given as a Farm Boy. Alexander was assigned to John BROWNE a settler of Patricks Plains.

Alexander gained his Certificate of Freedom in 1836 and soon began buying up depasturing licenses all around the Singletom Area.

On the 6 July 1838 the Reverend HERRINGTON at Whittingham married Alexander MUNRO to Sophia LOVELL 1812-1889, Sophia, a convict sentenced to seven years had come from Isle of Ely, Cambridgeshire, on the 'Diana', arriving in 1833.

Sophia and Alexander failed to have children of their own and in 1840 adopted 3year old Harriet. Harriet was the natural child of Thomas PHILLIPS and his wife Catherine.

Harriet 1837-1873 became known as Harriet MUNRO and married Walter COUSINS 1829-1904.

Alexander in 1839 began a successful carrying business in 1839 and with his depasturing licenses soon began to acquire wealth. In 1841 he built the Sir Thomas Mitchell Inn on the corner of Cambridge and George Streets in Singleton and managed several other hotels and began his mail coach service from Singleton.

In 1851 Alexander built Ness House in George St., Singleton which is still standing today and he replaced the old Sir Thomas Mitchell Inn with the large Caledonian Hotel. In the 1868 Rate Book it was stated as "two,story,brick iron roof,13 rooms". The Singleton Argus 9th November 1901 advertisement stated" 14 bedrooms, 2 dining rooms, 2 parlours, sample room,kitchen,bathroom, laundry, pantry, man's room, stables, 4 stalls, buggy house etc". It had a 73ft frontage to George St, 73ft to High St, and 332ft to Cambridge St. The sale was on account of Mrs R.H.LEVIEN his grandaughter Harriet Emma COUSINS 1860-1946

MUNRO began the 'Bebeah' Vineyard and his wines won more than 2000 prizes all over the world; more than 500 first prizes. He built his house 'Ardersier House' on the grounds of Bebeah.

Alexander MUNRO was elected the first mayor of Singleton in 1866, when Singleton became a municipality.

Alexander MUNRO was a good man with a big heart, always putting back into the community and always helping those less fortunate than himself. He was very much admired by both the wealthy and the not so wealthy.

When the council in 1884 was not interested in building a gas making plant themselves, they passed an act on the 16 May 1884, to allow him to build it himself thereby giving the town light. He then turned the plant over to the town at cost price.

He donated the land for the Glenridding Church and Cemetery, the Masonic Hall and was a huge benefactor in the building of the Singleton Grammer School. He was the founder of the Oddfellows Lodge and his Hunter River Building Society financed the building of a north wing on the hospital in John Street and gave money to the hospital. He had a beautiful fountain made in Glasgow and gave it to the Town

In 1878 Alexander Munro retired from politics and was given a large banquet by the town, he returned to Scotland with Sophia for a short holiday.

On the 2 February 1889 Alexander MUNRO died at Ardersier House. Two days later on the 4 All the shops in Singleton were closed at 1:00pm to allow the town to mourn in what was to be the largest ever funeral Singleton had ever seen. The cortege being a half a mile long.

Sophia followed on the 26 July 1889.

Alexander in his will left 6,000 to various lagacies and 500 to the Singleton Benevolent Society. All this from a man who had been transported for stealing groceries.

The Maitland Mercury paid homage to Alexander Munro with this stirring obituary
in their newspaper on the 5 September 1889

SINGLETON.

"DEATH OF MR. ALEXANDER MUNRO.The kind and sympathetic voice is
hushed for ever, and the noble eye will no longer speak the sentiments
of a heart that for three-quarters of a century was beating full of
truly Christian love.
Alexander Munro is no more-the Great Conqueror claimed him to join
the silent majority.
Singleton has lost one of its greatest citizens, and the colony,
a prominent philanthropist and one of Nature's gentlemen.
The sad event took place at the residence of the deceased,
Ardesier House, near Singleton, on Saturday, the 26th instant, at half-past
two o'clock in the afternoon. For more than a week all hope had been
abandoned by Mr. Munro's medical attendants, and it was only a
question of time when the end should come. During nearly the whole
of that period the deceased was in a comatose state, but when
consciousness returned at intervals he appeared to suffer much pain.
Life, however, ebbed gradually away until the last grain
had dropped out of the glass and a merciful Providence ended
the earthly troubles of our noble friend and fellow townsman.
Mr. Munro was born at Ardesier, Invernesshire, Scotland, in the
memorable year 1812, and arrived in the colony in 1831, and has
resid ed here ever since, with the exception of a trip to his native
land about 11 years ago.
Arriving here when quite young, he soon adapted himself to the
rough mode of life then prevailing in New South Wales, with that
readiness and endurance for which the national character of Caledonia's
sons has so eminently qualified them as the best colonizers in
the world.
One of his first ventures in Singleton was to build the Caledonia Hotel.
Having made some money at hotelkeeping, he subsequently took up stations
in the Liverpool Plains district, where he was squatting for many years.
In all his undertakings he was singularly prosperous, and wealth flowed
in from all sides.
About thirty years ago Mr. Munro, being fully convinced
that viticulture as an important industry would eventually take root
as an important industry in the valley of the Hunter, he started
to work with that determination and enterprise so characteristic of
the man, and having obtained a suitable piece of land-a portion of the
well-known Kelso estate, near Singleton-planted there the Bebeah vineyard,
now so famous throughout the length and breadth of the Australian colonies.
At an early period of the establishment of Bebeah, Mr. Munro
engaged the services of Mr. Mackenzie, under whose excellent management
Bebeah wines attained such a celebrity that at length
they appeared at the table of the gracious Sovereign who rules the
destinies of this great Empire. The late Emperor William of Germany also
patronised Bebeah wines, and expressed himsnlf in approving terms of
their excellent character.
As the demand for Bebeah wines was increasing at a rapid rate, in
order to add to the supply, Mr. Munro about a dozen years ago purchased
the adjoining Greenwood Vineyard from Mr. James Moore, and between
the two vineyards there are now about eighty acres in full bearing.
After purchasing the Greenwood Vineyard, Mr. Munro built there, on
an excellently elevated site, the residence where he ended his days.
When in England some eleven years ago, Mr. Munro ordered a gas plant
for Singleton, and, having subsequently got an Act passed through
Parliament, the gas works were established.
the first lamp in Burdekin Park being lit by Mr.James P. Quinn, then
Mayor of Singleton, in October, 1881.
Throughout his long residence in Singleton, Mr. Munro took an active
part in all public matters. On the establishment of the municipality
in the year 1867, he was elected the first mayor, and was twice re-elected
after wards, thus remaining in office for three years.
The subject of this notice took an active part in the establishment
of the Singleton and Patrick's Plains Benevolent Society some forty-five
years ago, and throughout that long period Mr. Munro was always, we believe,
on the Committee of Management,
He was subsequently for many years Vice-President of the Society,
and on the retirement of the late President, Mr. J. C. S. M'Douall,
Mr. Munro was elected as President, an office which he held up till
his death.
Mr. Munro's sympathetic disposition made him at all times take a
deep interest in the poor inmates of the Asylum and nothing gave him greater
delight than to provide an ample feast for the old men and women on holidays,
namely Christmas and New Year, Easter, and Queen's Birthday, etc.,
making it a point to be present at the meal and enjoying
the hearty manner in which the old people appreciated his kindness.
Many years ago Mr. Munro showed his deep interest in the welfare of
the Benevolent Society by giving a munificent donation of 1000 towards
completing the Benevolent Asylum in accordance with the original design
prepared by Mr. Rowe, architect, Sydney.
In order to recognize this noble act the people of Singleton determined
to perpetuate Mr. Munro's memory by erecting a marble bust of the
generous donor in that building, and the ceremony of unveiling it
was performed last year by Miss White, eldest daughter of the
Rev. Dr. J. S. White, in the presence of a large number of people;
the day having been made a half-holiday in Singleton.
Mr. Munro was an ardent Freemason, and took an active interest
in masonic affairs. He joined the first lodge established in Singleton
in the year 1864, and passed the chair, and remained in connection
with various lodges here ever since.
Some time ago he presented the brethren with an allotment of land
in a central position in John-street for the purpose of erecting
there on a Masonic Hall, and further contributed a donation of 100
towards the building fund.
Mr. Munro was also one of the founders of the Oddfellows' Lodge
in Singleton many years ago, and remained a consistent member till
his death.
He took great interest in the Northern Agricultural Association from
its establishment in the year 1868, and for several years was one
of the vice-presidents ot that society.
He was a liberal contributor to the funds of the Mechanics' Institute
and all public movements which in his opinion were worthy of support.
Quite recently he gave the handsomesum of 1000 to the funds of
St. Andrew's Presbyterian Church for the purpose of building
a new church ; but although a consistent supporter of the church of
his forefathers, he was at all times ready to support any calls made
upon him by other denominations, and his charitable feelings made no
distinction between creed or country : no poor man was ever turned
away from the door of good Alexander Munro without a crust of bread.
An instance of the genuine charitable character of Mr. Munro was
lately conveyed to us from a trustworthy source, and it may not be
out of place to give it here. It appears that when in Scotland
some 11 years ago he ascertained that some of his relatives were
rather reduced in circumstances, and in order to provide against
want for the rest of their lives he built four cottages, one for each,
and allowed each an annuity of 40 per annum, the money having been
remitted regularly since then.
All honor to the noble departed. May a glorious resurrection be his reward."


Singleton, 3rd February, 1889.




researched, written and transcribed
by janilye 1999


Family Note:

Thomas EATHER 1824-1909 established a vineyard which was soon producing wine grapes of good quality and Thomas sometimes sold Alexander grapes from his vineyard at "Meerea" to help his growing business. Family legend has it that his wife, Eliza nee CROWLEY threatened to leave Thomas if he persisted in selling grapes to MUNRO for his "immoral liquor trade". Faced with this threat, Thomas is said to have dug out his wine grapes and replaced them with table grapes. However later on the family again began to grow good wine grapes as you see here in Meerea Park Today
The photograph below taken in George Street, Singleton around 1900 shows The Caledonian Inn on the left and the horses drinking from Munro's fountain.


Alfred Smith 1831-1917

It certainly pays to take the time to ask the old locals "What was it like?"
These are the recollections of Alfred Smith of Richmond in New South Wales, which hold a wealth of valuable family history.
Alfred was born in Hobartville, New South Wales (when old William Cox owned it), on the 13 July 1831 to John Smith 1798-1833 a convict who drowned in a river near Liverpool in 1833 and Adelaide Eliza De La Thoreza 1808-1877 she had been born in Madrid. After John Smith died, at 15 months of age, Alfred was adopted by George JAMES 1768-1862 and his wife Ann Kelly 1789-1864. They had only one girl, Eliza JAMES 1824-1862 ( the mother of Ann ONUS 1841-1927) Alfred died on 24 December 1917.
On the 11 October 1854 at St.Matthew's Catholic Church, Windsor, Alfred married Ann Amelia KINSELA 1838-1917 the daughter of Martin KINSELA 1793-1860 and Ellen, nee HENDLING 1794-1862. Alfred had many jobs throughout his lifetime, including Town Stockman, running The Punt across the river and a Drover, droving throughout New South Wales and as far down as Victoria.

Below is part of Alfred SMITH's recollections which were Chronicled by Robert FARLOW, which began when Alfred was 78, in November 1909 and published in The Windsor Richmond Gazette, under the heading,
Some Ups and Downs of an old Richmondite, Mr. Alfred Smith

"Adjoining old Mr Roberts' place, at the back, was Wiltshirehurst. Here Mr Wiltshire lived for a while when I first went to the punt. Then George Case rented it. He farmed a little, and dealt largely in sheet stringy bark.Coming along we had Peter Hornery living. He owned the place he lived on. He had been a bricklayer, but could not follow the trade on account of being a cripple for many years. William Maughan bought the land from Peter Hornery, except the little piece on which Hornery lived. Maughan lived there for some time while he was droving. Next was William John, father of Mrs Robert Pitt and Mrs John McQuade. Mrs John was a great butter maker. Next to Mr John's was Mr Kingswood. He owned the property. Richard Gow (father of the popular Frank, who was a large produce dealer in Richmond years ago) lived with the Kingswood's, was married to the only daughter. He grew a great quantity of maize. The Kingswoods and Gows left Kurrajong a good while before I left the punt, and went to live down on Griffiths' old farm. A man named Rich went to live in the place at Kurrajong. He was a shoemaker but didn't work at the trade in Kurrajong, though I remember him working at it in Richmond. He grew potatoes and vegetables and took them to Richmond and Windsor. Ad joining this property was Tom Jones' ? "Kingswood's Tom " as he was generally known. He was father to Mrs Thomas Stanford and Mrs Thomas Brown. He grew a lot of fine oaten hay. Mrs Jones would never ride in a cart, and I often wondered why. One day I asked her, and she told me Mrs Stanford, mother of Mr Tom Stanford, and herself were driving home in a cart once and capsized in the rough road and Mrs Stanford was killed. The next farm belonged to the Gilligans. James Leavers, father of Harry, rented it, and lived there. He did some farming, and with his two horses and dray took his produce and wattle bark to town. Leavers met with an accident by his horse running into a tree which stood in the road opposite Thomas John's place. Leavers was well liked. Harry was born some three weeks after his father's death. Old Mrs Leavers left there after her husband's death, and went to Richmond to live. Edward Mitchell, father of the present Robert in Kurrajong, lived on the Comleroy and owned the property he lived on He had six bullocks and a dray and drew a considerable quantity of wattle bark to town. Mrs Mitchell made a lot of butter. She was a sister to John Lord, who lived many years in Yarramundi. She was a great step-dancer, Mr Mitchell was coming home from Penrith one night, and told me he got a great fright coming down Crowley's lane. He declared he saw Andy Farrell's wife, who had been dead some time. He was perfectly sober, and whether it was imagination or a reality, he was quite upset over it. _ Close to Mitchell's, Denny McCabe lived. He married a daughter of Edward Mitchell. Denny McCabe was a king among bark. He was a jolly fellow and a great step-dancer. The last time I saw him was at Mr. A Towns station, near Boggabri, where he was fencing. It was Christmas time, and we spent a good time together. Some of his sons are still in the Kurrajong. Below Mitchell's property George Turner lived on some property belonging to Thomas John. He did a little farming and made grass-tree brooms. Then we had Mr Parker living on the Comleroy Road somewhere handy to the present Methodist Church. He did some farming, and with his one horse and cart took his maize and potatoes to town. There were some old hands scattered about the locality worthy of mention. John Williams?"Blackjack" they used to call him ? lived by himself, being a single man. He was a hard working man and took bark, etc., to town with his one horse and cart. George Turner was another great man among the bark. He married Sarah, a daughter of Edward Mitchell.
Robert Eather, father of the late Abe Eather who lived many years in Richmond, lived on the Comleroy. He owned a station on the Narran. The four sons were Thomas, Robert, James and Abe. Mr and Mrs Robert Eather died at Comleroy. After their death Jim lived there for some time. Mr and Mrs John Norris lived close by the Eather's. Norris was killed on the property. Mr Coleman lived near the Norris family. He was a fencer, but did a little farming. Cornelius McMahon can be reckoned among the old hands. He married a daughter of John Norris. I knew them both before they thought of getting married. Then we had Bill London ? ' Bill the native,' as they used to call him. Some of his children are still in the Kurra jong. Mr Murray was another old hand. Richard Skuthorp, father of our present Richard, was another I knew well. His wife was a daughter of John Ezzy. It was old Mr Skuthorp who first brought the racehorse Veno to the district, having purchased him from Mr William Clarke, who managed Bomera for years for Mr A. Town. Mr and Mrs Lamrock, parents of the late William and John, lived up Kurrajong, and I don't think they ever missed a fine Sunday going to the Presbyterian Church in Richmond. Having had a fair say about the old hands in Kurrajong we will now proceed to Colo. There wasn't a very great number of people living there in my early times, but among them were some who should not be forgotten. Colo has seen the time when it could boast of its police man. I knew two that were stationed at Colo. Curry was one. He used to visit George James. He was a tall man with sandy hair. He used to look very well in his black "bell topper". Jim Hunt was another policeman there. He was a short man and dark complexion. Mr and Mrs Cavanough kept a boarding-house down there for many years. The house was noted for its good table, and as it stood. on the Kurrajong side of the river Mr Cavanough used to help the drovers with their sheep and cattle up "the rock." Cavanough did some farming, and grew a lot of maize. They both died at Colo, the old man dying first. I knew their sons Tom, George and Jim very well. Tom was on the railway for some years in Richmond and was very popular. The last time I saw Jim was at Jerry's Plains, many years ago. William Penton, the blacksmith, who is still alive, living at North Richmond, lived for many years in Colo and I believe his family are natives of there. He lived up under the mountain on the other side of the river. He worked at his trade and did good business. There were plenty of drover's horses to be shod. He became a road contractor and carried out some big jobs on the Bulga road. His wife, was Miss Lucy Lord, but in no way related to John Lord, of Yarra mundi, There were a lot of the Gospers at Colo. Mrs Cavanough and Mrs Ivery were Gospers. I knew Robert Gosper. The late John Gosper, of Windsor, was, I believe, a native of Colo, also Henry. He kept an accommodation house at "The Gibber," It was a good place to stay at. Harry Gosper was a real friend of the drovers. If ever they lost a beast and it was to be found, Harry would get it for them. I have often heard him spoken of hundreds of miles up country, and always referred to as honest Harry Gosper. Of course there were others living up the river, but as I never went far off the road I didn't see much of them. Among them I knew Mr Caterson. I knew his son, the present Thomas, and his wife, who was Miss Grace Richardson, before they were married. Getting along from "The Gibber ' we soon get to Putty. Among the good old sorts out there were Mr Robert Ridge and his wife, He grew a lot of maize, and did droving. Mrs Ridge was post mistress, and kept an accommodation house. You could also get rations there. Mr Ridge had a mill and ground his own flour. Mrs Ridge was a sister to Mrs George Pitt and Mrs. John Crowley. Then we had Thomas Laycock and his wife. Mrs Laycock was a sister to George and Robert Pitt. I knew their sons Thomas, Andrew, Henry, George and Robert. They were always great cattle men. Andrew for many years before his death was a noted breeder of stud cattle, and was always a prominent exhibitor at the Sydney show. The eldest boy was a great pig raiser and used to drive his flocks of swine to market. Bob was killed from his horse. Thomas Laycock did a lot of droving, and bought stock for Sydney men. He was a horse fancier as well, and owned some well bred mares. At Bourawell we had Charles Sympton managing the place belonging to Mr William Farlow, senr., of Yarramundi, and also looking after Boggy swamp for the same man. I remember Mr Farlow giving me ?40 to pay Davy Hayman who was fencing out there for him. Charley was there a good while. Mr Farlow did some cultivation out there. Mr and Mrs Chapman lived at Putty on a place they bought from old Stephen Tuckerman, Their son George is still out there and seems to be doing well.
The first gaoler I remember in Windsor was a Mr Steele. He was a tall man. Mr North was the first police magistrate, and lived at old Government House, Windsor, in my early days. How I came to know a little about early Windsor, was by going with my foster father, then a policeman, on court days. What I will say about Windsor must be taken as Meaning my early recollections of that place. There was what we always knew as the watch box. This stood between the court house and the gaol wall. It was a little movable place of weatherboards. The watch box, I believe, used to be occupied by soldiers in turn, to prevent any prisoners escaping out of gaol. Then we had the flogging period in Windsor, and I knew Reuben Bullock who administered the lash. When flogging was done away with in the Haw kesbury Bullock, kept a public house. Reuben was a thin man of medium height, and although his former occu pation was not the pleasantest, he was well liked. He was of a pleasant disposition and very obliging. He was generally called "Little Bullock."

The first chief constable I have any recollections of was a Mr Hodgins. He had son Benjamin, who used to knock about Charlie Eather's over at Enfield. 'He had a daughter Ann. She was a tall, buxom young woman, and married a man named Bill Allsop. She has been dead many years. The next chief constable was Moses Chapman, a Jew I believe. He was mostly known as "Mo the Jew." He was a short stout man and a smart little chap at his work. He was well liked. Then I mind George Jilks, another chief constable, and his wife, one son, and two daughters. He was a man who was highly respected. The daughters, Kitty and Jane, would take it in turns and come and stay a few days with the James' at Richmond. His son George was then but a lad going to school. Mr Jilks lived where Mr W. McQuade is living. George Shirley was another chief constable. He was a stout man, with a very flushed face. After him was William Hobbs, who was the last chief constable in charge of Windsor before we got our sergeants. We start our sergeants with a Mr Frewin. He was an Irishman. He wasn't in Windsor a great while. The first lockup keeper I knew there was John Horan. This was when the lockup was where the Council Chambers stand. I remember one day, in Horan's time, we had been into court, and were starting for home in the cart when I happened to look round and noticed two men with a man on the ground. I told James about it and he drove up to them. It was two police men with a prisoner who wouldn't get up and they couldn't make him move. As soon as James came up it was "Here George give us a hand.'" James had a quince stick in his hand and gave him a few smart cuts with it on a portion of his body, which made him jump up quickly enough. The first C.P.S. I knew there was a Mr Wyatt, in Mr North's time. He was a tall man. Then as a C.P.S. there we had Mr Callaway, "little Callaway" they used to call him. Then there was Mr G. A. Gordon, who was C.P.S. for many years. Mr Gordon was father of Mrs Brinsley Hall, and died recently. He was a Police Magistrate up country for a few years when he retired. Then there was old Mr J. J. Fitzpatrick, father of Mr J. C. L Fitzpatrick, M.LA., who spent many years in old Windsor. In the corner by the old Fitzroy bridge there was a large two storey place which was kept as a pub by a man named Thomas Cross. He was a very big man. I remember this same pub being kept by Mrs. Aspery, who was mother to the late Mrs M. Nowland. Her son, Thomas, who was killed at Denman by lightning, used to serve in the bar. Nearly opposite the barracks there was a pub kept by John Shearin ? "Jack the baker," as he was called. He left there and built the two storey place opposite the court house where he kept a pub for a long while. Jack died there, and his widow kept the business on for some time after his death. I remember ihe 26th, 50th, 8oth and 99th regiments being in the old Windsor barracks at different times. The present Royal Hotel used to be what we always knew as the mess house. Robert Fitzgerald lived there for a long time, and was living there at the time of the first election when he was a candidate against William Bowman Quite close to the barracks, only in Macquarie-street, there was the old "Jim Crow" inn. It was kept by Henry Hudson. He dealt a lot in horses. He had two stallions, Jim Crow, a trotter, and Clinker, a draught. He imported both of them. He died there. His widow kept the pub a while after his death, and then married James Lane. Lane kept the pub for a while. She was a native of Richmond, a sister of our Henry Silk, and I knew her before she was married to Henry Hudson, who came from Birmingham. Somewhere about where the late William Gosper lived there once lived a man named O'Dell who kept the post office, and this was the first post office I remember in Windsor. Going along Macquarie-street we come to the big house, part of which is pulled down, and the remainder occupied by Edward Day. The father of the popular mailman. Tom Thompson, kept a pub there. The hospital was built before my time. At that time it was an hospital only. The poor house, as we called it, was where the old people's quarters are at present A man named Williams, was overseer of the poor house then. He was a brother to Fred Williams, the constable who was stationed at Enfield once. I have mentioned that Reuben Bullock kept a pub. Near where the "Jim Crow " stood, and on the same side, he kept the pub. I think his sign was "The hole in the wall". John Rafter kept a pub there also. Mick Hagon kept a pub there. Mick was a big Irishman, and his wife was no small woman. Mrs Hagon kept the pub for a while. At Moses' corner I remember Mrs Moses, William's mother, having a baking business. William and Henry were only lads then. Henry used to drive his mother's bread cart. He was always a smart business chap, and to-day he is reaping the reward in wealth and honor.
The first bailiff I remember in Windsor was Richard Sheriff He was a short stout man with a very red face, and a a great horseman. The earliest mounted police I recollect were Sergeant Lane and Trooper Joseph Levy. Levy shot Armstrong, the bushranger, on a Good Friday morning. Windsor has had its bellmen, and I remember the 0ld bellman Oliver. He had a very strong voice and could be heard a long way off. He was a comical old chap and after he had finished 'crying' his business was always wound up with "God save the Queen." The attached residences of Dr. Callaghan and the late Dr. Gibson in my earliest days in Windsor was an hotel kept by Mr Coffey. He was a tall man of fair complexion. I recollect also that James Ridge kept an hotel in a two-storey house between the Royal Hotel and where Coffey kept the hotel. Where our member, Mr Brinsley Hall, lives was once occupied by Dr. Dow. He was coroner for a long while. Robert and James Dick lived up the top end of the town facing the main street. They kept the post office and a store. In the bouse where the late Ben Richards lived for years, and which is now owned by Mr Daniel Holland, I remember old Mr. Thomas Dargin living. Mr Dargin died there. In the course of time Laban White married his widow and lived there.
He was auctioneer and coroner at Windsor.
Somewhere about where Mr. R. A. Pye has his business, stood a pub kept by a man named Weller. The sign was painted by Tom Masters' father, and represented a blackfellow with a big nugget of gold in his hand. Where the Bank of New South Wales is, belonged to James Hale. He lived there for a long while, and when he left he went to live at "Fairfield," which he had bought. He died there. About where Pulsford's shop is, Mr Fox kept a general store, and about where the post office is Mr Crew had a large ironmonger's shop. Adjoining Mr Crew lived the father ot Peter Beveridge. He was in business as a confectioner. Fitzgerald-street we always knew as Hangman's Row. In this street old Mr Chandler had a furniture store on the left hand side between the post office and Macquarie street. At the time of the big fire, when the Barraba Hotel was burnt down, the shop was saved. The first I remember keeping the Barraba Hotel was Charles Blanchard. I was in the Barraba the day before it was burnt down and had a glass of beer with John Grono of Pitt Town. Miss Isabella Bushell kept it at that time. Not far away, on the same side as the Barraba, lived old Mr Gallaway, a tailor. Then handy we had Mr. Watt, a shoemaker, with whom George Eather served his apprenticeship. His son, Edward, lived about Windsor for a long while, and a daughter married George Eather's eldest brother, Charles Eather.
Mrs. O'Donovan kept a draper's shop where W. H. O'Brien lives. She owned the place. She had two daughters, the last dying some little time ago, unmarried. Where W. H. O'Brien's shop is William Gaudry and his brother Charles lived, William was a great sporting man, and was clerk of the course at the old Dargin track. Old Mrs Cope lived in the house where Mrs. Brancker lives. She. owned the property and died there. Where the Commercial Bank stands old Mr Richard Ridge kept a pub. He built the Fitzroy Hotel and kept it for a good while. Ridge was a great mail contractor in conjunction with a man named Hill. Old Harry Martineer used to drive for them in the days when the train only came as far as Parramatts. I am not likely to forget those days, as I came from Sydney one day, and when I got out of the train at Parramatta Harry Martineer couldn't take me as he had too many on board. I had to put 7000 sheep over the river in the punt next day and to Richmond I had to get ? so I walked going by the Blacktown road. Mr Richard Ridge had the mail contract when the train came on to Black town. Paddy Doyle was the driver of the mail. After Ridge went to the "Fitzroy" old Mr Broderick had a watch maker's shop in the place Ridge left. Sometimes I brought watches down to him from up-country for repairs while I was droving. Close to Broderick's was another watchmaker named Stewart. The house where Mr William Primrose had a saddler's shop for many years, was built by Mr Mumford, the chemist. He was thrown off his horse out Magrath's Hill way, which proved fatal. He had only insured his life some nine months before for ?500. Not far from where the "Fitzroy" stands and in the direction of the railway, old Mr Thomas Tebbutt kept a store. At the present day I have a pair of old fashioned brass candle sticks which George James bought off Mr Tebbutt while in was in business there. A daughter of mine in Sydney has a small, extension table which James purchased at Mr Tebbutt's shop. George Freeman kept the Cricketer's Arms on the corner where Miss Bushell conducted the Royal Exchange Hotel for so many years. In connection with this pub I had a funny experience once which I must tell. Up stairs the Oddfellows held their meetings, and I had been proposed by Mr Peebles. How I came to be proposed was, Peebles used to draw the grog to the pubs over the river, and I used to put him over in the punt. Anyhow I had been proposed, so I mounted my horse and rode in. Dr.Day was the medical officer and when he examined me he wouldn't pass me. He told me to come again next meeting night, in a fortnight, and in I went. Again he wouldn't pass me, and wanted me to come again in another fortnight, but I told him I wouldn't come any more. Dr.Day thought I had heart disease, but here I am battling well in my 80th year, while the doctor went to his rest many years ago.
A little further in the direction of the railway Thomas Freeman kept the St. Patrick's Hotel. About opposite the Salvation Army barracks Frank McDonald kept a pub in a two-storey house. He did a good business. I knew both him and his wife well. McDonald was a great man with the late Hon. William Walker in election time. Hon. William Walker's father kept a school in the cross street close by. I knew the, Hon. William's brothers, George, Robert, and John. The last time I saw George was when he was a storekeeper on a large sheep station near Coonamble. Some time after he was an auctioneer in Mudgee. The first time I saw William was on Dargin's old race course. He was pointed out to me as the young chap who was learning to be a lawyer under Mr Beddick."

Sources:
Windsor and Richmond Gazette (NSW : 1888 - 1954)
Saturday 17 September 1910
Windsor and Richmond Gazette (NSW : 1888 - 1954)
Saturday 24 September 1910
Transcription, janilye, 2012





The photograph below of Windsor,
the Royal Hotel on the right
was taken around 1880


Alfred Smith 1831-1917 recollections 5&6

Some Ups and Downs of an Old Richmondite, Mr. Alfred Smith
Chronicled by Robert Farlow.
[For the Gazette.]
Windsor Street.? (Continued.) 2 April 1910
Where John Allen now lives I don't remember getting built. My first know ledge of the place was Mr Ben Richards keeping a mutton butcher's shop, there. He married there and went to live in the corner house, a remnant of which has been made into the comfortable residence occupied by Mrs Alex Benson. Old Mr Kidd lived there many years ago. He was a sort of a butcher; the chief thing he made was sausages. He also went round killing pigs and such like for anyone who needed his services. He was the father of good old 'Ned,' who is not forgotten in Richmond at the present time. When the Frenchmen lived in old Mrs Cuff's place, I used to sell them green frogs, and out of them they used to make soup. They gave me fourpence a dozen for them. They also bought them off other boys. One day Mrs ? went into their shop? they were keeping a store there then? to buy something, and they were at dinner. They asked her if she would try some soup. She said she would. They gave her a cupful and after she had finished it they asked her how she liked it. She said it was a nice drop of soup. They then told her what it was, and whether she ventured on frog soup again I don't know. On St. Patrick's night and other festive occasions there used to be great dancing in the hotels in Windsor-street and other parts of the town in the olden times. Step-dancing, four-handed reels, etc., were the fashion, It was quite a common thing to see men and women dancing. The race between the late 'Abe' Eather and a horse, fifty or a hundred yards and back, took place in Windsor street, and we have several still in the flesh who remember the event. "Abe" won the race.

FRANCIS STREET.
We will commence this street from the Windsor end.
About where Mr J. G. Percival's factory is was an old slab place with a verandah, and bark roof. Old Thomas Kenny's father, Charles, lived in it and worked a farm on the lowlands. He would be grandfather to Charles Kenny, well-known to local residents. Old Charles Kenny, after leaving there, removed to Windsor-street, opposite to where the late Mr Joe. O'Sullivan lived. In the same place a man named Robert Smith lived for some time. He was a farmer. This old place I don't remember getting built. Where Mr John Madden lived the first I remember there was William South, who married a Miss Byrnes, and did farming.
He was a brother to Ben. South, and James South. The Rigneys lived there for a long while, and were farmers also. From there they went up country and took up selections. The building of this old house took place before my recollections. Where Mrs Ridge lives there was a cottage of several rooms before the present front was put on. This old place I remember getting built for old Mr Ben- son, father of William Benson, the elder, of Richmond. It was ready for him when he came out from Scotland with his wife and family. Alongside this place was a cottage of several rooms where old Mrs Fossett lived. She died there. I remember Mrs Fossett's husband, James, very well. Also her previous husband, Byrnes. Byrnes was a short, stout man, and he, too, died there. He was a Presby- terian, and I remember him going to I church where ' Granny ' Ashton lives. He was father of the late William South's wife. The next house in this street was the old place which stood on the ground where Mr Robert Marlin has his nice house. I don't remember this place getting built. It belonged to Mr Vincent, grandfather of Mr Neville, who lived in Paget street. In this place Frank Gow's father and mother lived some time. His mother died there. She was a Miss Kingswood, 'Ned' Thompson lived there at one time. ' Bandy ' Smith, as they used to call him, lived there also and did some farming. Jim. Douglas, a brother to ' Billy ' the bricklayer, lived there for some time and farmed. He afterwards went up country, and, I believe, did well.
Then we come to where "Abe" Eather lived for a number of years. This place I have no knowledge of getting put up. The first I knew living in it was old 'great grandfather' Martin. His wife died there. After he left Frank Simons (father of the late Frank, of Windsor) came there to live and went in for farming. Then the father of Mr Alex Matheson, J. P., lived there for some time. Like some of his predecessors he went in for farming. This place has been pulled down some time. The house where Mr Thomas Horan lives was erected before my time. The first I remember living in it were Paddy and Jimmy White, brothers. Both died there. Jimmy married a widow named Mrs Kelly, who owned a public house on the road between Windsor and Parra- matta. It was a great house of call for teamsters. After leaving the house next to Mrs Ridge's William South went to live in this place. He was farming and carrying. He brought a large quantity of loading up for old Mr Ducker. I remember a man named Stubbs, a farmer, living there. Then we come to where Mr Joseph Onus lives up on the hill, 'The Cedars.' This was built when I knew it first. William Sharpe was the first man I remember living there ? and he was there for a long time. It belonged to William Onus, father of Mr Joseph Onus, now living in it. [To be continued] .

Continued). 9 April 1910

When William Onus married Miss Annie Hough, sister to the late Peter Hough, of Agnes Banks, he went there to live. Good old Edward Robinson, also lived there for a while, and kept a boarding hoase. On the same side, down rear the lagoon, was a brick house of four rooms and a verandah with a kitchen at the back , where Jacob Inness lived. He was a farmer and had three sons, Jacob, Isaac and John, and one daughter, Betsy. I went to school with them. Betsy was a fine working girl, and I have heard them say she was a great reaper ? girls thought nothing of that work in those days ? and could do her half acre a day. Mr Inness died there. After they left, the place went to ruin, and Mr Joseph Onus, senr., had it pulled down.
Another place was built and that, too, has been down a long time. We will take the opposite side of this street, and work from the Windsor end. There were no houses on this side till we come to the old brick place opposite to where Abe Eather lived. It was a big place with a verandah back and front, and a barn. It belonged to Robert Martin, Mrs William Price's father, who lived there. He sold the property to old Mr. Fossett. Mr Fossett had the barn built. He died there. I don't remember it getting built, Crawford Bedwell lived there for a number of years, and a large portion of his family were born there. Afterwards old Mr. and Mrs. Field lived there. Here old Mr Field died.
Then we come to the long weatherboard place on the corner, which was built before my time. The first I remember there was old Mr Peter McAlpin, father of the well-known William. He was a blacksmith, and carried on business there. He was a fine singer, and had a very strong voice, and I remember him singing at the Presbyterian services, which they held where 'Granny' Ashton lives. When Thomas Eather left the pub he went there to live. Mrs Eather was a daughter of Mr Peter McAlpin. Old Mr. McAlpin, the black smith, died there Mrs Thomas Eather died there also. We then had vacant land till we come to where Mr Henry Hughes lives. This must be a very old place, and was built before my time. The first I remember living there was Henry Hughes' father, the old schoolmaster, and his wife. Both Mr and Mrs Hughes died there. This house has always been occupied by the Hughes family. Where Mr Fred Powell had his milking yard there was a four-roomed weather-board cottage, with a verandah. It belonged to Mr Joe Sharpe, who lived in it. This also I cannot remember getting put up. Mrs Faithful's coachman, Riley. lived there after he left 'Lakeville.' This place, has been pulled down many years. The next place is the skillion where Miss Thorley lives. This is a very old place. The first I remember living there was Jack Cafe, better known as Jack Tailby. He was a splitter and fencer. He married a sister to old William Timmins, and she died there. Miss Thorley has been living there a great number, of years.
Where Matthew Hughes lived there was an old weatherboard place with a verandah I don't remember getting built. When Matthew got married and went there to live they made alterations and additions to it. Here the good old Matthew lived all his life, and died. His wife died somewhere about Goulburn. She had a married daughter living up there, and went up for the good of her health.
The next place is the historic building, the old church and school. The portion down stairs was used as a church and the upstairs as a school. The first minister I heard preach there was the Rev. H. Stiles, and the first schoolmaster I remember was old Mr Hughes. The next schoolmaster was Mr Braham and then came Mr Griffiths. He was the first registrar of births, deaths and marriages in Richmond. I understand a daughter of his was keeping a boarding house at Manly a short time ago. Mr Braham was a little man, and I remember hearing people say he was the last of a family of twenty two.
While in this locality I am reminded of old *Mr George James when we used to go down to the lagoon for casks of water. He was fond of children, and when leaving home would bring out a basket of fruit to take with him. When he got to the school he would scramble them among the school children and delight in the sport.

CHAPEL STREET.
Commencing at the lowlands end of this street.
I can just remember the two-storey house on the corner belonging to the Onus' being finished. It was here old Joseph Onus went to live when he married Emma Powell, sister to Mr Henry Powell, and daughter of the late Edward Powell, His son, 'young' Joe, lived there also for a great number of years and died there. Coming along on the same side about half way between the house we have mentioned and Windsor-street there was an old weatherboard place of several rooms without a verandah. There were two doors in the front. One end of it was occupied by 'Jerry' Hill, a very tall Stout man. He had no family. He was a veterinary surgeon, and will be remembered by some of the very old hands. At the other end towards Windsor-street Tom Watson, 'Tom the Tinker'as he was called, lived. His sign was "T. Watson, tinman and brazier" lettered on a piece of tin. This old place has been pulled down many years, and I don't remember it getting built.
That is all the houses in this street at that time. On the opposite side was a paddock.
The house in which old Herbert Travis lived for so many years, and the places to be seen to-day, have all been built within my recollection.

BOSWORTH STREET.
At Cox's lane end the first house I remember was up before my time. The first person I knew there was James Griffiths. He was a shoemaker, and a brother to Mrs Parnell and Mrs Potts. He had three daughters and two sons. When he first came to Richmond he and the wife and family ? it wasn't quite as large then ? stayed with old Mr. and Mrs. George James for a week or two till they got a house. They went back to Launceston.
Mr Thomas Richards lived there for years and kept a butcher's shop. When he left there he went round into Windsor Street, and there ended his days. Old Mr William Heath lived there for many years, and carried on tailoring. He sent clothes to all parts of the district, and miles up country. He was a jolly old man and good company. He had been an old soldier, and learnt the tailoring while in the army. His training as a soldier stuck to him, and in his advanced years was a very nimble man, and could kick the top of a door frame quite easily ? and the hat off your head if you wished. He was a great admirer of game fowls, and an excellent hand at making 'heels,' and heeling the birds. Others have lived there also, but Charley Curtis crosses my mind at present as living there for a while. The old house was pulled down years ago. A few years ago a new cottage was
put up on the same block of land. When Mr Jim. Shields and his sisters are living I don't remember getting put up. I remember Thomas Harris keeping a 'pub' there, but that is many, many years ago. Old Mr Potts kept a ' pub ' there also. After the 'pubs' a Jew, whose name I forget, kept a shop there. He was a very big man, jolly, and good company. Old Mr George Shields lived there pretty well a life time, Both Mr and Mrs Shields died there. The house is still in the possession of the family and occupied by the children already mentioned. I fancy old Mr Joseph Stafford kept a shop there, and dealt in poultry. Where the two skillions are next to Shields' old place was one block of land, on which stood a weatherboard place of four rooms, the two back rooms being skillion roof. This, like Shields' house, I don't remember getting put up. There was an old low paling fence in front. A man whom we always knew as ' Robison the carpenter ' lived there for some time. He and his wife died there, leaving no family. I have heard it said he was a good tradesman. This old place has been down many years. The two skillions standing there to-day I remember getting built. Harry Willis, a shoemaker, lived in the old house. He worked for old Mr Swinbourne.
We then come to where Mr Richard Allen lives? and truly 'Dick' is a very long way over the three score and ten. Mrs Masters, my mother, stands first in my mind. I was taken down to see her one day, and told she was my mother, but I couldn't make out how it was possible to have two mothers. I had always known Mrs James as mother, and I was too young to know anything about being adopted at the age of fifteen months. This place is too old for me to recollect. Old Mr Allen has been living there a very fair lifetime ? and may he be spared many years yet. Old Mr Allen was a wheel wright, and I was going to be bound to him for seven years to learn the wheel wrighting, I was then fourteen years of age, and my term was to be till I was twenty one, The indentures was drawn up and ready to be signed when my foster father and mother jibbed on it. I went to school with Mrs Richard Allen, who was Miss Matilda Cornwell then.
The little skillion on the corner is a very old place ? long before my time. The first person I knew living in it was a man named Whalan, a basketmaker. He was a short man, and had a great habit of saying How do ! How do !'to, himself as he went along. Little 'Bob the Hatter' lived in it. He was a very short, stout, jolly man, and made straw hats for sale. When walking up the street he would have his plait of straw with him and hard at it as he went along. Tom Watson, the tinker, removed from Chapel-street and lived in it for some time. Alex. McKay lived there for a number of years. He worked for Mr Thomas Richards for many years. He was a jolly old fellow, and a true-born Scotchman. In one of the skillions we have been speaking about in this block Thomas Young lived, but the exact one I cannot say. He was a quiet, harmless old man, and was thought a great deal of by Mrs W. H. Holborow, the Rev. Dr. Woolls and others. All were kind to Tom. Where Mr Charles Sly has been living for a number of years ; where the old skillion so many years occupied by 'Janey' Baldwin stands; where the old homes of Mr Houghton and his son Clem, and where the old home of good old 'Betty' Mortimer are to be seen, was all vacant land when I first knew it. It was at the old Houghton home that 'Clem' ran the livery stable for so many years.
We next have the old, low, house on the corner, opposite to the side 'Dick' Allen lives on, which was built before my time. When I first knew it it was a pub. kept by Thomas Mortimer. His wife died there. A man named Harris, or Owen, kept it as a 'pub' also.
John Markwell also kept a ' pub ' there for some time. While Markwell was there a very funny thing happened. A man who was famous for his non-shouting propensities was in there, sitting on the seat. Several jolly boys came in for a drink, and invited him to take one with them. The next one's turn came, and he, too, extended the invitation. And so it went the rounds of the boys, the invitation being given every time. They thought they would drag a shout out of the man by this method, but no. Some of them had been out back and knew a little about the black's language, and, as they knew their guest prided himself on knowing more about the blacks language than anyone else, they challenged him to a test. Their friend led off with some of the language and told them they did not know what he was saying. One of them said he was asking them would they have something to drink, and named their drinks and told Markwell to draw them.
The old man protested strongly that wasn't what he was saying, but it was no go. They were all of the same opinion that that was what he, said, and the wind up of it was the old man had to pay for drinks all round. Then a Douglas Hadkins kept a 'pub' there also. Douglas in years after drifted into Sydney. He invented an incubator, etc , for poultry raising and was, I believe, keeping a shop in that line in Bathurst-street. Old Mr. Joe. Stratford lived in this old place at one time. He kept a little shop, and still dealt in poultry.
(To be continued).

Source:
Some Ups and Downs of an old Richmondite,
by Mr. Alfred Smith
Chronicled by Robert Farlow
Windsor and Richmond Gazette (NSW : 1888 - 1954)
Saturday 2 April 1910
Saturday 09 April 1910
Transcription, janilye, 2012

Alfred Smith 1831-1917 recollections 1

Some Ups and Downs of an old Richmondite, Mr. Alfred Smith
Chronicled by Robert Farlow.
[For the Gazette.]
Right in the corner of the vacant allotment at the corner of Paget and March streets, there stood a weatherboard house, which had a verandah in front. At the side of the house was a very large cedar tree. When I first remember the place the old man Douglas of all lived there. He would be great-grandfather to the present William Douglas, who we all know today as a good bricklayer in Richmond. In those days we always knew the corner as Douglas' corner, and the big tree at the side of the house as Douglas's cedar tree. I still have a vivid recollection of old Mr. Douglas. He used to wear his hair very long, brush it round behind his ears, and it would hang well on to his shoulders. He had two horses and carts, and hired them out to people who wanted to draw wood. He charged five shillings per day for each horse and cart. He had one very funny saying, which he would use on special occasions. It was this "Bad luck to all informers! You're a liar ! Whether or no too bad. cabbage is no good without pork." He bad two sons, wheelwrights, Joseph and Isaac, and about where Ernest Marlin is living at present there was a skillion, and they had a big workshop there. In this same skillion Ellen Cavanah lived for some time. I think old Saunders, the brickmaker,lived there also. Alderman T. Biddle's father was the agent. Where Mr Sid Paull's residence stands there was a blacksmith's shop kept by Dan Ward. He was a single man and lived with his mother, who we always knew as Granny Ward. I remember three daughters. Sarah married a man named Brett. Jane married a man named Ben Gawthorn, and went to Mudgee to live. I think there are some of the descendants about there now. Phyllis married a chemist named Lester, in Mudgee. Old Granny Ward had a white cockatoo, which could say almost anything, He would call her whenever she was wanted in her little shop. I understood he was 35 years old when Mrs Ward died, and I heard her daughter, Mrs Lester, took him to Mudgee. Outside her family she had a boarder named Robinson, who was a tailor. The old lady was a most industrious woman, and had a big mangle, with which she did a large trade.
Then there was vacant land till we came to where Mr W. Drayton is residing. Here was an old house, used as a school, which was kept by Mr Hogsflesh. Mrs Harrington, a widow, lived there after Mr Charles Hogsflesh kept the school. I think Mr Harrington was killed by the blacks somewhere up Kurrajong. Old Mrs Harrington was a chatty old woman. She often came round to Mr James for advice, as he was a constable. If I were about when she came she would say to me 'Go out !? get out of this!' and away I would have to go. Later she becme Mr. Preystnell, but the union did not turn out a happy one. They did not live long together, and Preystnell told me the reason.
In the course of time the property came into the hands of the Draytons, and is now owned by my old friend Mr W. Drayton. Some years ago he built an up to date cottage on the land, which has improved it so much that only us old hands can have an idea of what it was like in my boyhood days. Next door to this stood the old Horse and Jockey Hotel that was pulled down when the Imperial was built on the corner. The first person I remember living there was Thomas Silk, Harry's father, who kept it as an hotel. His sign was the Lion and the Unicorn. We lads had a song among ourselves which went : ? The Lion and the Unicorn Are fighting for the crown, Tbe Lion beat the Unicorn All around the town.
The first circus I ever saw was in tbe paddock at the back when Tom Silk kept the pub. A man named Croft was the proprietor, and I never forgot Quinn the tight rope walker. We thought it was something wonderful to see a man walking backwards and forwards on a tight rope. Old Mr Joseph Onus lived there for a while. Here he had ' Jerry Sneak,'the racehorse, half brother to the famous 'Jorrocks' The first gold cup run for in the colony was won by ' Jerry Sneak' at Homebusb. When old Mr Crisford and family first came to Richmond it was in this place they commenced housekeeping. Caleb Crisford was only talking to me about it the second last time he was in Richmond. Then a tall man, whose name I don't remember, kept a school there. He had a school also down on the 'Bottoms,' by 'Smashem' Smith's. One night as he was going to Windsor two fellows nearly killed him. The Rev. Father Terry, the Roman Catholic priest, held services upstairs in the big room. Old Mr Brooks also kept a school here, and no doubt some of his pupils are alive to-day in the district. At the time Mr. James Bates took it over to start pub keeping, the building was in a state of great disrepair, and it cost him a large sum of money to put it in thorough order. He was living there at the time of the '67 flood, and I heard it was about half an inch over the counter, but I was up the country at the time and only heard this.
Among others who kept the old place as an hotel will be remembered 'Black' Johnny Gough, ]im Ryan (Toby's son), Tom Hough, George Cobcroft, Tom Young, Campion, Ted Morgan and, after his death, his widow. On the piece of land on which the Imperial Hotel is built was a weatherboard place in which Dan Neil lived. Right on the corner he had a blacksmith's shop. I have been given to understand he was a Government man to old Mr Cox, of Clarendon, and did his blacksmithing. But to his credit, with good conduct and a good record he became a free man, and started black smithing on his own account on this corner.
On this same corner Tom Masters, of Windsor, kept his first little shop. He had been droving, but his health began to give way, and he decided to start in business. On the opposite side of the street where Joseph Ashton keeps his cases there was a little slab place with no verandah. 'Bill' Wilmott a shoemaker, lived in it. While living there he died suddenly. Mrs Morgan, who they called 'Betty,' a very stout woman, was his housekeeper. Next door, only on the same block of land, there stood one room in which lived an old bachelor known as 'Bob the Stockman.' For a long time he made ti-tree brooms, and sold them for sixpence each. He would go out to the Black Swamp and get the good class of ti-tree, cut it, and let it wilt for a certain time before making it into brooms. You would see him coming home with a large bundle of it on each shoulder. Where Mr. S. Orchard's own house stands, and where he kept a store for many years, stood a skillion with no verandah and containing three or four rooms. Here Mrs. Davis, mother of Mrs S. Orchard, lived for some time. Later on Mrs. Davis married Matthew Webb, a carpenter. It was Mr Webb who had the front put on and started storekeeping. Later on he went to St Mary's, and kept a tannery. He died over there. Tom Masters kept a general store there also. Coming down nearer the present day we knew it as a butcher's shop kept by 'Ike' Cornwell. Mr. Orchard conducted a successful business there and a general store for a long time.
What we now call the park, wasn't such a beauty spot when I first knew it, and was called the Market Square. In wet weather water would lie in a few places about the centre. It wasn't quite as level as now. There were a few trees standing, a few logs on the ground, and plenty of stumps. On the 5th of November, Guy Fawkes day, they would build a platform some five or six feet high about where the pavilion now stands, and make a effigy of a man. They had the effigy on show at day time, and large heaps of wood piled up about a a rod away. When night came they set fire to the man and heaps of wood, and great was the rejoicing.
Where the School of Arts and public school stands was the pound paddock. About where Constable Ross has his garden was the pound. The first poundkeeper I remember was old 'Dicky' Lounds.
Returning to the corner where Mr. S. Orchard keeps his present "Railway Stores" I remember there stood a skillion with a small verandah. In this humble, dwelling Charles Chamberlain, the fencer and splitter, lived. On the spot where Mr Orchard's store stands there were several lots of bricks made by 'Tim ' tbe brickmaker. This was the only name I knew him by. Where Mr. F. Gow's places are there stood a weatherboard skillion of four rooms and no verandah, which was occupied by Mr Tafe. He used to grow tobacco, and had two sons, Joe and Dick. After that there stood a brick skillion, where Mr Wade lived. Mr Wade was a gardener to Mr William Bowman. In his spare moments, and with the help of his wife, he used to raise a lot of good vegetables, his wife used to sell them. He also grew tobacco. He had two daughters, Jane, and Harriet. but only one son, I think. He had a tobacco press made out of logs and a long lever to press his tobacco leaf. A man named Province ? 'Ratty,' as he was always called ?lived with him for a long time and helped him with the tobacco.
A brick house stands on the allotment where Mr Guest's saleyards are. It is an old place. I don't remember it getting built, but I don't think it had been up many years when I first knew it. Here old Mr Ducker (Roland's father) kept a shop when they first came to Richmond. Old Mr Ducker was an industrious man and I recollect him driving his team up and down for goods. Mr B. Richards had a butcher's shop in the verandah portion on the end towards Mr F. Gow's property, and sold, mutton only. This was the last place he lived in in Richmond till he built the beautiful mansion 'Kamilaroi.' From here he went to live at the bridge, where he kept public house. Mr Joseph Single lived there also.
I have heard old Mr Martin, who married Miss Henderson (Granny Field) gave it to his granddaughter, who married Charley Price. Charley lived here a good while. Next door, where Miss Fergusson is living, must be a very old place, as it had an old look when I first recollect it. Mr King occupied the whole premises ? late years it has been made into two dwellings. Old Mr King was a nail maker, and consequently was always known as 'King the nailer.' He used to live in one end and have his shop in the other. After Mr King left it, Joe Poole lived there. He ran a one horse coach to Windsor. Nixon, the tailor, lived there also.
Then there was a vacant allotment next in my earliest days. Later on, but standing on this piece of ground is the old two-storey place which has been in the possession of the Price family for many years. The brick work was done by Caleb Crisford and his father. Grand father Price died there, as also did Rebecca, his daughter. It was from this place that Mrs Archie Kennedy buried a son, Donald, and a daughter, Mary, in a very short space of time.
Mrs Parkinson, who afterwards went to England, kept a school there.
Next door we have the old home of the Price family which I don't remember getting built. Old Mr. William Price of all (great grandfather of the two young Prices now living in Richmond), kept the second post office in Richmond in the old place. At the back was the tan-yard. He also carried on undertaking, &c.
Again there was vacant land, but afterwards there was a black-smith's shop erected, and this, combined with monumental work, made it a scene of activity.
I don't remember the house at the corner, owned by William Sly, getting built. The first I recollect living there was 'Joe the wheeler,' a wheelwright by trade. Joe engaged with Mr William Bowman to go to Tunnabutta but he never turned up. He arranged to go by Bell's Line, and some considerable time afterwards the remains of a man were found at the Bald Hill, seven miles the other side of Mount Tomah. As he was never heard of after leaving Richmond it was always thought to be his body.
Dr. Rowan lived there also. Miss Hawsey ? a miss, about 60 years of age ? kept house for him, and did dressmaking besides.
Where Mr Steve Dunston is living plays its part in Richmond's history.The first man I remember living there was James Griffiths. Then old Alexander Gough (father of the 'Johnny' who kept the Royal Hotel) lived there. He was a cooper by trade, and used to make the old fashioned churns, &c, and one of his make I worked many a time when making butter at old Mr James'.
On the same block of ground as John Sly has his house built, only about forty for fifty yards back from March-street, was an old slab place, I think, with a tremendous large vine in front of it. Here lived old Mr and Mrs William Magick. And here it was Mr Magick died at the reputed age of 108 years. I
remember the old man well. He had two bullocks, and with these he ploughed the back paddock of nearly an acre for old Mr George James where he lived. It was through ploughing the paddock I came to know him first. Further down there stood an old weatherboard place. I do not remember its erection. It contained four rooms and had a verandah. Robert Reeves ?'Bob Fatty,' as he was generally called? who owned this block from March-street to Lennox-street, lived in the house and kept a little shop. He sold pipes, tobacco, starch and blue, He died in this place and I saw him when he was dead. Mr. William Sharpe ? young Bill as we knew him then ? married the widow, and I think the old lady died there. At any rate some time after her death, I remember Sharpe marrying old Mrs Onus, mother of the old Joseph Onus, who did a great deal towards the making and advancement of Richmond. The two-storey place next door to where I have been speaking of I remember getting built. Burgess and Shelton kept a store there for a while Burgess married a Miss Dargin, of Windsor, I understood. Thomas Bell, after leaving 'Belmont' came there to live. I sold him many 'possum skins while he lived there. I remember well old Mr Bowen (father of Mr G. B. Bowen, of 'Bowen Mount') living in the two storey house for about two years, It was my work to take them two quarts of milk every morning. They dealt with old Mr George James for butter as well, but he always delivered this himself. Mr G. B. Bowen never forgets it, and always likes to have a chat with me about it. He reckons he was about four years old then. The old house owned by William Sly on the corner will be dealt with when we speak of Bosworth-street, as it faces into that street Where the late Doctor Cameron's grand mansion stands was vacant ground. Next to this vacant block I speak of was a skillion with no verandah, at that time, which belonged to old Mr. Sam Payne, He was grandfather, of the present Mrs. Tomkinson who lives in Windsor street. The first man I remember living there was Thomas Death, a butcher. He was a single man, and was found dead on the floor of his bedroom. They held an inquest, and found the cause to be eating cucumbers. After this 'Long Harry,' the bricklayer, lived there and died there also. I was one who helped to carry him to the cemetery. From there to Bosworth-street was vacant land.
Going down March-street, from the corner of Bosworth-street, toward Mr Charles Guest's there was a skillion standing just past the corner. The front portion has been put on since I first knew it. The first person I have any recollections of living there was John Masters, father of Tom Masters in Windsor. He was a painter and decorator by trade, and a splendid tradesman. He was an artist also, and could paint animals or any other pictures.
Weller, I think, who was a publican of Windsor in the early days, had a sign done by him. It represented a blackfellow and a large lump of gold in his hand.
Sam Nixon, the tailor, lived there also. Nixon's wife was run over by some horsemen while coming home after dark, The accident happened at Seymour's corner (now the 'Black Horse') only in Bosworth-street. In those days they hadn't a Constable Ross to regulate the traffic, and as they were galloping round the corner run over Mrs Nixon.
It was in this house that Bill Johnson was living at the time he got his leg broken in front of my residence, and it was here he had it taken off. Tom Johnson (father of Arthur and Tom) told me that when the doctor was taking off the leg it was like as if they were sawing a baton. He stood the operation without chloroform, and had, I believe, a handkerchief rolled up in his mouth to bite to stand the pain.
[I informed my narrator that my grand father, William Heath, who had been an old soldier, held the leg while the doctor amputated it, and carried it for the doctor who preserved it. Also that Dan Carter saw the handkerchief after, the operation was over, and it was bitten to pieces. ? R.F.]
Where Mr C. S. Guest is living there was a weatherboard house of' about four rooms with a verandah. In it lived a man by the name of Simpson, who was a currier by trade. I went to school with two of his sons Ebenezer and William. Our schoolmaster was good old Mr Charles Hogsflesh.

Source:
Some Ups and Downs of an old Richmondite,
by Mr. Alfred Smith
Chronicled by Robert Farlow
Windsor and Richmond Gazette (NSW : 1888 - 1954)
Saturday 12 February 1910
Saturday 19 February 1910
Transcription, janilye, 2012

Alfred Smith, an old Richmondite, Remembers

continued
Windsor in days gone by had its mills, and a busy time it was. Hopkins' steam mill just below the Council Chambers in George-street, I remember getting built. knew old Mr and Mrs Hopkins and their sons Abe (who used to do droving) and William. Then we had Teale's steam mill opposite the park, which was built before my recollection. Teale did a great trade. The last time I saw Joe Teale was when I was coming in with sheep at Wallerawang years ago, but good old Henry I saw in Windsor about six months ago. Then there was Caddell's brewery which stood near the Church of England, as you go down the lane to Cornwallis. This was built before my time. Other boys and myself often walked from Richmond in there for our sixpennoth of yeast. When they left there they built the big brewery near the residence of Miss Dick. Mr Thomas Caddell, who owned the brewery, married Ann, the only daughter of old Mr William Bowman.
The old place just over Windsor bridge on the Wilberforce road I knew as a pub, and being kept by old Mr. Cunninghame. About where James Rowthorn lives close to "Fairfield", I remember there was a two storey brick place kept as a pub by James Cullen. He was a great sporting man, and much interested in horse-racing. He had been butchering before he went into the pub business, but it was while keeping the pub I got to know him. He was a popular man.
The first I remember keeping the pub at Clarendon now owned and kept by Mrs Edwards was Charles Ezzy, who owned it. Others who have presided over it as a pub were Charles Barker. James Norris and James Huxley. In Charley Barker's time they had seen good foot races there. and, of course, the [--- ----] sport of cockfighting was frequent enough ? and I think it no worse than pigeon shooting and other things one might mention. The last time I saw Charley Barker and his wife was in Walgett where they were keeping a
butcher's shop. At one time Charley did droving for Joseph Cope and we often travelled together. The old two-storey place a little further on, William Thomas Bayliss kept as a pub when I first knew it. The house was built before I can remem ber. The property belonged to Bayliss, and he lived there and kept the pub for many years. His sign was "The bird in hand." A widow Smith kept it at another period, and it was while she was there Johnny Higgerson's experience in love matters commenced.
We can now get back to Windsor. I remember the old wooden bridge which did duty where the Fitzroy bridge is. It looked a very old bridge when I first knew it. They didn't build bridges then on the same lines as they do now-a-days. Charley Marsden was a big butcher in Windsor in those days, and had a narrow escape one day. He was driving a lot of fat bullocks out Magrath's Hill way, and was just over when a good slice of the bridge fell in. The first man I remember being super intendent of the Hawkesbury Benevolent Asylum was Timothy Paull. Then I mind the time when James Rowthorn had the position.
An old man who had been living with us for years went into the Asylum and came back to visit us a little while before he died. He told us all about the institution, and spoke very highly of James Rowthorn.
Old Mr Champion was a prominent citizen in Windsor years ago. He was agent for Tooth and Co. He visited the pubs in Richmond and Enfield regularly for orders. After he gave up being agent for Tooth and Co. he used to take photographs. I knew some of his sons, and the last time I saw his son Charley he had a big business in Tamworth as a saddle and harnessmaker.
Ben Barnett I knew from boyhood. He went to Hogflesh's school, next to Mrs Tomkinson's in Windsor street, Richmond, the same time as I did. He had a brother David. I knew their father and mother, the latter was a sister to Dean, the tanner of Richmond.
There was a Mr Edwards who was a chemist and dentist in George-street, Windsor. I remember him very well ? and I have good cause to remember him. I went to him once to get a big double tooth out and he couldn't shift it with two pulls in the chair so he sat me on the floor and got my head between his legs and after some lugging got the tooth. Mr Edwards was uncle to C. S. Guest, of Richmond.
Jimmy Dargin, who died in Macquarie street some time ago, was an old school mate of mine when Hogsflesh kept school where Harry Fong lives in Lennox-street, Richmond. When I first knew "Grand father" Hoskisson he was farming at Cornwallis. And while he was farming there he had "Gravesend" on the Big River, Barraba and Gyrah, three cattle stations. He had a flock of cattle coming in nearly every week while I was at the punt. He was always at the river to see his cattle put over. He had a fine chestnut horse and used to ride in till the water would be up to his knees and with his stockwhip steered the cattle along. He delighted in the work, and no matter how many others were there with cattle he would help them in. He prided himself on being the ' Grandfather ' of them all putting cattle over, and on that account we always knew him as 'Grandfather' Hoskisson. He was an industrious man, made a heap of money, and took care of it. He bought 'Clifton' from Charles Smith.
Mr Montague was the first auctioneer I remember in Windsor. I remember him having a sale of bacon in Richmond. Dick Meagher was another old hand. He kept a pub opposite the military barracks, and his sister kept house for him. Both were from Ireland.
I have mentioned William Durham living at Wombo, but I must speak of him again in Windsor, when be was a single man. In the first election in the colony when Fitzgerald and Bowman were up the seat Mr Durham took a very active interest in it. He was a very staunch Fitzgerald man, and was very busy riding about to get votes for his man, In those days they wore colors, and Mr Durham had a very big green rosette in his jacket. They were worn a great deal in those times. Mr Durham was very disappointed when his man was beaten, While on this election I might mention a few others who fought hard to get Fitzgerald in. Among them I remember Jimmy Cullen, Mr Burgess (a shopkeeper), a man named Sibthorpe, and George Freeman. There was a little song about it, but all I remember of it is "Calico, butcher, and Sibby the swell". Calico was meant for Burgess, butcher was meant for Jimmy Cullen as he was butchering at the time, and 'the swell' was given to Sibthorpe who was a bit of a 'swell'.
Among the Js P. who sat on the Windsor bench when I first remember were William Cox (of Hobartville), James Bligh Johnston (who lived out at Magrath's Hill); Captain Scarvall (from Killarney) ; Stepnen Tuckerman (down the river), George Bowman (Richmond), William Bowman (Richmond), Thomas Bell (Belmont), and James Ascough (Windsor).
Ned Armfield, and a man named Miller were among old timers in Windsor. They were constables, and under some of the chief constables I have already mentioned.
I knew old "Ben the fisherman," very well, and many a time saw him in Richmond with his fish. He had his little slab house on the point, and fished about the river, and it has been known as Ben's Point ever since.
"Fairfield " has seen gayer days than it is seeing now, I remember when old Mr Baines, "Daddie's" father, lived in the lodge at the entrance before Mr Hale bought the property. During Dr. Gamac's time, Alex. Gough lived in the lodge. In Mr.Hale's time Robert Tilling occupied the lodge. Opposite to "Fairfield," on the brow of the hill, John Seath occupied the cottage. Afterwards Thomas Wall and family lived there a lifetime. Again, good old Edward Roberts (Charley's father), John Barker and James Dargin are worthy of a place, as they, too. have played their part in making the district what it is.
While I had the mail to Windsor there was a big flood. After it went down I was the first man along, and when I got over the Ponds bridge, near Fairfield, I saw the body of a man dead. I recog nised it as Bill White. He was engaged burning charcoal out at the Glebe, and was drowned returning home.
Edward Robinson I knew away back in the days when he was poundkeeper at Gulgong, where he made a good bit of money Then we often met on the roads when he was droving. He went in for cattle droving and buying on commission for Thomas Sullivan, while I turned my attention to the sheep.
Charley Smith owned "Clifton," now the property of Mr Samuel Hoskisson. Among his racehorses I remember Crazy Jane, Beeswing (Beeswing broke her loins at the turn on the old racecourse near Charley Roberts' and was being ridden by George Marsden, who got hurt a little) Lady Cordina, Betsy Bedlam. Among his jockeys were George Marsden and Johnny Higgerson. Other jockeys were John McGrath, Micky McGrath, Dunn, Micky O'Brien, Joe Badkin and Johnny Cuts, who rode on the old racehorse.
Jorrocks, died at "Clifton" one cold, wet, winter while I was keeping the pub on the Clarendon road, and they drew the carcase out on the common a little distance from the gate. A servant man of old Mr Hoskisson's came and told me that they had drawn it out to the prickly pears ? they were plentiful about there then ? so I went out in the afternoon to have a look at the old warrior. Jorrocks had a very short mane but I was bent on having some of the hair as a keepsake of the old horse that punters and myself had so often hoorayed for. I pulled a good piece out and have had it ever since. Beside the piece of hair ? which I have had plaited into a long tan plait ? I have two of his long teeth, and would be pleased to show them to any person interested in old Jorrocks. I got the skeleton of his head when it dried and had it hanging on the stable wall for about twelve months, but as my wife was always at me about having such a thing hung up I took it down one day and buried it in the garden at the side of the pub. Some time after I was down in the museum and saw a horse's head there labelled "Jorrocks." Two men were standing by at the time and said they supposed that was the head of the great old racehorse that used to run at the Hawkesbury. I told them the difference, and what I had done with the head, but they didn't seem to believe what I said. Billy Reid took the four hoofs off and sent them to the owner, Mr Archie Thompson spirit merchant, of Sydney. I heard he had them mounted in silver.
To show how sentimental people were about the grand old equine, Mr McAlpin, of Bulga, once told me that he would have given half a sovereign towards digging a grave rather than have the bones bleach on the common. Mr McAlpin had won a lot of money on Jorrocks.
George Cupitt, an old farmer, lived near "Clifton." He was a great breeder of game fowls, and was one of the old time sports. He died there.
The Hawkesbury has had its pugilists, and among them I remember some of the best. George Hough was champion of the colony at one time. He fought Paddy Haddygaddy at Regentville for the championship, and had no trouble in beating Paddy. A lot of the leading sports went over from Richmond, to see the fight George Hough fought Black Perry for the championship some time after, but was knocked out by Perry in five rounds. Then there was the fight with Frank Norris and Dick Hunt, which took place at "Boshey's" at Blacktown. Blacktown at this time was five miles this side of the present Blacktown station. There was a lot of money lost on this fight, Martin Gibbons being a heavy loser. Joe Teale and Jim Johnson fought a great battle at the Chain of Ponds, below the present racecourse. It ended in a win for Teale. Then we had a great battle between Harry Teale and Tom Johnson. Johnson was a very game man, but got such a punishing from Teale that they had to take him away to save him from getting finished altogether. Three fights that day, and the other one was between Isiah Bell and Charles Metcalfe. It was a hard battle, and won by Bell. Each of these three fights was for ?10 aside. I remember the day, though I didn't see this fight, Courderoy and Stringybark Jack fought down about the Ponds. I heard it was a great fight, and Stringybark Jack was killed dead by a chance blow. Then there was another fight down there for ?10 aside between two local chaps who had had a quarrel. The winner is now advanced in years and suffering from paralysis.

Sources:
Ups and Downs of an Old Richmondite
Alfred Smith
Chronicled bt Robert Farlow
Windsor and Richmond Gazette (NSW : 1888 - 1954)
Saturday 22 October 1910
Windsor and Richmond Gazette (NSW : 1888 - 1954)
Saturday 29 October 1910
Windsor and Richmond Gazette (NSW : 1888 - 1954)
Transcription, janilye

Andrew Henry Eather 1914-2000

Andrew Henry EATHER alias Alain John COOPER,the son of Andrew Eather 1875-1965 and Enid King 1886-1931 -
The James EATHER Line.

For some unexplained reason Andrew Eather changed his name. Perhaps it was to get away from the law or perhaps a Mrs. Andrew Eather for it seems Andrew enjoyed a good wedding.

His new name began as Alan John Cooper and under that name he went to Grafton and married Monica Ruth BURNS in the Catholic Church at South Grafton on the 12 April 1941

The next year on 19 May 1942 under the name of Alain John Cooper he joins the 1st Armoured Regiment and gets shipped off to New Guinea as a driver. After the war he remains with the army till 1946 when he is discharged.

Before his discharge on the 22 August 1945 he marries again. This time using the name Alain John Cooper he goes all the way down to Goulburn and marries Jean LANHAM in the Church of England.

This 'wife juggling', doesn't last very long for the wives find out and on the 20 December 1945 Jean LANHAM hands him an annulment for Christmas. Not to be outdone, the following week on the 27 December Monica Ruth up in Grafton wishes him a Happy New Year with a divorce.

On a sad note Monica Ruth had a son in 1941, which they named Alain John Cooper, who died in infancy.

1946 rolls around and on the 13 July 1946 Alain John Cooper ties the knot again. This time with Dulcie Elizabeth NEIL. However this time Alain sticks and remains true, for they produced 10 children.

Alain John Cooper formerly Andrew Henry Eather died at Redcliffe, Queensland in the year 2000.

As a footnote I'd just like to add, that if you happen to be a decendant of Andrew Eather 1914-2000 and you were brought up wondering what happened to him. Now you know!

When Andrew Eather left home, he left a family, to live out their days wondering whatever became of him.

written by janilye from several sources:
NSW State records,
NSW.BD&M
National Library of Australia


Ann EATHER 1793-1865

Ann EATHER the first born of Thomas EATHER and Elizabeth, nee Lee was born on the 18 April 1793 at Parramatta, New South Wales.Ann was baptised on the 5 May 1793 long before the parish of St John had been established and before a proper Church had been erected at Parramatta.The only clergyman in the colony was the Reverend Richard JOHNSON who had come out with the First Fleet.
When she was four years of age, Ann EATHER moved with her parents and younger brother and sister, Robert and Charlotte, to the land grant in the bushland near the Hawkesbury River at Mulgrave Place. There her father was setting about converting the virgin scrub into a farm. It was there, under primitive conditions, that Ann spent her childhood. Her playmates of those years were an increasing number of younger brothers and sisters, and by the time that she reached the age of fourteen she was the eldest of seven children. Another brother was born after she married. Undoubtedly, Ann had very little formal education during her childhood, living as she did in a community that was largely illiterate, and at a distance from the townships of Sydney and Parramatta. Formal education in the environment of the day was restricted to the children of the few farmers who were sufficiently wealthy as to be able to employ the services of tutors. Nevertheless, it appears that Ann did not grow up completely illiterate. In adult life she was able at least to sign her name upon documents. Ann did not have to wait long for matrimony to come her way. In a community that was still short of eligible spinsters, most girls tended to find husbands while still in their teenage years. About the age of sixteen Ann EATHER became the wife of Joseph ONUS 1782-1835 , a convict who was then about the age of twenty-nine years. Whether Joseph and Ann had a wedding ceremony will probably never be known. There is no record of their marriage in any of the Church registers then in the colony. However, this lack of the record of such an event does not necessarily mean that theirs was a de facto relationship, as the Church registers of those years prior to 1830 are known to be wanting in many instances.Of the six children of Joseph and Ann, only two are listed in the births index of the New South Wales Registrar-General's Department. It was about 1809 that Ann EATHER became the wife of Joseph ONUS and from then until 1835 her life story runs parallel to that of her husband.

The children Of Ann EATHER and Joseph ONUS were:-

1.Elizabeth ONUS 1811 - 1882 m. John Gordon TOWN 1806 - 1843
Children;
John Thomas TOWN 1831 - 1889
Elizabeth Jessie TOWN 1833-1908
William Barker TOWN 1836 - 1838
William Gordon TOWN 1838 - 1858
Mary Ann TOWN 1842 - 1846

2.Mary Ann ONUS 1813 1887 m John EATON 1811-1904
Children;
Mary M EATON 1831 - 1831
Ann EATON 1833 - 1924
Mary Ann Elizabeth EATON 1835 - 1870
Jane EATON 1837 - 1872
Elizabeth Mary EATON 1839 - 1933
Susannah EATON 1842 - 1937
Charlotta EATON 1844 - 1923
Infant EATON 1846 - 1846
William EATON 1847 - 1887
Caroline EATON 1850 - 1850
Martha Mary Richmond EATON 1851 - 1931
Euphemia EATON 1854 - 1939
Veronica EATON 1854 - 1942

3.Susannah ONUS 1815 - 1882 m. William Glas MCALPIN 1810 - 1902
Children;
Elizabeth MCALPIN 1833 - 1835
Ann McALPIN 1836 - 1838
Peter McALPIN 1838 - 1838
William McALPIN 1840 - 1923
Susannah McALPIN 1842 - 1882
Sarah McALPIN 1845 - 1922
Joseph McALPIN 1849 - 1913
Mary McALPIN 1852 - 1915


4.Joseph ONUS 1818 1895elected Mayor of Richmond 1875
m.(1) Margaret SILK 1824-1884
1 child; Maria Emma SILK 1841 - 1883
(2) Emma POWELL 1819-1865
children;
Mary Ann ONUS 18381861
Joseph Edward ONUS 1840-1891
Emma Susannah ONUS 1843-1931
Joseph Tertius ONUS 1844-1928
Laura Australia ONUS 1854-1855
(3) Clara HUNT 1820.
1 child; Linda ONUS 1869 - 1894

5.Thomas ONUS 1820 - 1855 m. Elizabeth EATHER 1824-1884
Children;
Ann ONUS 1842-1905
Sarah ONUS 1845-1910
Susannah ONUS 1847-1935
Thomas Alexander ONUS 1849-1934
Matilda J ONUS 1852-1853
Elizabeth A ONUS 1854 - 1855
+1 child from relationship with Eliza JAMES 1819-1862
Ann ONUS 1841-1927

6.William ONUS 1822 1855 m. Ann HOUGH 1822-1889
children;
Joseph ONUS 1844-1928
William ONUS 1846-1913
Elizabeth ONUS 1848-1892
Emily A ONUS 1851-1907
Andrew ONUS 1853-1855

Joseph ONUS died on the 22 June 1835 leaving Ann a very wealthy woman according to the terms of his Last Will and Testament.

On 14 February 1837, approximately twenty months after the death of Joseph ONUS, his widow Ann, married again in a ceremony held in St Matthew's Church at Windsor. Her second husband was William SHARP, a widower without any children. Ann was 43 and William only 26. A number of relatives and friends were present at the ceremony and no fewer than five signed the register as witnesses to the event. They were Thomas EATHER and his wife, Sarah EATHER; John TOWN, son-in-law of the bride; Susannah McALPIN, daughter of the bride; and Mary SHARP, a relative of the groom. The Reverend H T STILES conducted the ceremony. William SHARP had been born at Parramatta on 6 November 1810, the fifth child and fourth son of Thomas SHARP and his wife, Martha BURRELL. He had married Sarah REEVES, but she had died. His father, Thomas SHARP, had been born circa 1775 at Honeybow in the English county of Gloucestershire. He had enlisted in the New South Wales Corps as a private, and arrived in the colony on the ship "Sugar Cane" on 17 September 1793. Upon arrival he was stationed at Parramatta and lived there until about 1814. In 1800 he had assigned to him Martha BURRELL, who had arrived in the colony on the ship "Speedy" on 11 April 1800. She had been born circa 1775 in Surrey, England, and had been tried there and sentenced to seven years transportation in January 1796. She brought to the colony with her her son, John BURRELL, born in 1798 while she was in prison. In the period between 1801 and 1821, Thomas and Martha had a family of eight children; the first six being born at Parramatta and the last two at Richmond. They married at St Phillip's Church, Sydney on 13 March 1810, although they were at that time still residing at Parramatta. By the time of the 1814 muster, they were living in the Hawkesbury district and were still there in 1822. Thomas was still a soldier and at that time a member of the 102 Regiment. He died on 30 January 1823 at Richmond and was buried in St Peter's Cemetery. At the time of the 1828 census, his widow, Martha, was living with James PAGET. She lived to see the two daughters of her son, William, before she died at her home in Richmond on 14 November 1852, almost thirty years after the death of Thomas. She had been pre-deceased by two of her daughters and one son. In her decision to marry again, Ann was evidently undeterred by the stipulation in her first husband's will that, upon so doing, she would forfeit the family home. Her son William was still a minor and could not inherit it until he was 21. Technically, upon her marriage, the house passed to her eldest son, Joseph, to hold in trust until William turned 21, but he too was still a minor. Undoubtedly a satisfactory arrangement was worked out whereby Ann and her new husband resided in the house along with her sons until they eventually married and moved into homes of their own. As far as it is possible to ascertain, Ann and William resided in the house until her death in 1865, and by then her son, William, was already deceased. William SHARP continued to reside there for many years after he became a widower again, but eventually the house became the home of William ONUS's elder son, Joseph, as it rightfully should have.

In 1843 Ann SHARP turned fifty. With all six children of her first marriage now wedded and raising families of their own, she probably felt a great deal of contentment and satisfaction. She was now one of the senior citizens of Richmond, the town that had not existed when she was first married. She was surrounded by numerous relatives. Nearby, in the town, was her brother,Thomas, landlord of the "Union Inn", and also her youngest brother, James, now a married man with several young children and earning his living as a wheelwright. Just down the road at "Agnes Bank" was her sister, Charlotte, now remarried to William MALONEY. Up in the hills above North Richmond, each with a spouse and children, there dwelt on their respective farms, eldest brother, Robert and youngest sister, Rachel. The latter had returned to the district only two years
previously after having lived for seven years at Hobart Town in Tasmania. Over at Cornwallis near Windsor on another farm was another brother, Charles, with his wife and younger children, and somewhere around the district was her other brother, John, now nearly forty and still unmarried.

Now and then Ann would make the journey by cart to Windsor to visit her aged mother, the matriarch of an increasing number of descendants in three generations. Ann now saw less of her daughter, Mary Ann, who had ceased the practice of coming home from the Hunter Valley for the births of her children. Patrick's Plains and the Wollombi were now well-populated and the township of Singleton was taking shape. Mary Ann's last two daughters had been born at home at Bulga. Eldest daughter, Elizabeth, was living close by at North Richmond, where her husband, John TOWN, had several farms along Wheeney Creek. Youngest daughter, Susannah, was also living close by in Richmond, but before long she was to move out over the hills with William and their children to take up farming at Bulga close by Mary Ann and John EATON.


If Ann SHARP had caused some raised eyebrows in Richmond in 1842 when she had a baby at the age of forty-eight, she must have caused some stifled gasps of surprise when she gave birth to yet another daughter on 11 May 1845, a fortnight after she turned fifty-two. This is the oldest at which any member of the EATHER family is known to have given birth to a child. The period of time between the births of Ann's first and last children - thirty-four years - is probably another family record, on the female side at least.

The children of Ann and William SHARP were:-

1. Ann Elizabeth SHARP 1842 - 1902 m. Richard John AINSWORTH 1834-1896 at Richmond in 1860.
Their children were:-
Thomas Robert Ainsworth 1863 -1888
William Richard Ainsworth 1863 - 1922
Joseph Ainsworth 1864 - 1944
Anne Elizabeth Ainsworth 1867 - 1938
Emma S Ainsworth 1872 - 1886
Martha Euphemia Ainsworth 1874 - 1910

2. Martha Mary Ann SHARP 1845 - 1908 m. Arthur Phillip MCMANIS 1836-1918 at Richmond in 1865
Their children were:-
Emily Sharp McManis 1866 - 1947
Annie Elizabeth McManis 1868 - 1957
Ida Evelyn McManis 1871 - 1871
Marion Martha McManis 1873 - 1967
Ethel Constance McManis 1876 - 1960
Zeta Linda McManis 1879 - 1957
Arthur William McManis 1881 - 1968
Roy Onus McManis 1884 - 1915
Bashti Irene McManis 1886 - 1912
Lance Erby McManis 1888 - 1971

----


Part of the above is sourced from
John St PIERRE, writer of
Thomas and Elizabeth Eather
for the EATHER Family history committee.
janilye


The photograph below is Susannah Onus 1815-1882
3rd. daughter of Joseph and Ann Onus, wife of William Glas McAlpin


Benjamin Thomas Bridge 1863-1950

Benjamin Bridge was born at Stockyard Creek in the Wollombi district of New South Wales
on the 31 May 1860.
One of seven children and second son of Hawkesbury born Joseph Bridge Jnr.1835-1923
Joseph Bridge Jnr was the son of Parramatta born Joseph Bridge 1814-1891 and
grandson of convict Joseph Bridge 1776-1829
Benjamin's mother was Sarah Jane Payne 1839-1899. Sarah Jane born at
Payne's Crossing New South Wales was the daughter
of Convict Edward Payne 1800-1880 and Ann Hanratty 1823-1913.
Benjamin married 1st cousin, Bertha Amelia Teresa Australia Medhurst 1865?1932,
at Inverell on the 25 June 1881. The daughter of George Medhurst 1838-1888
and Ann Matilda Bridge 1839-1927.
Ann Matilda Bridge and Benjamin's father Joseph Bridge Jnr. were brother
and sister.
The couple managed to have seven children in Inverell between 1879 and 1909,
in spite of the fact the police never seemed to know where he was.
Francis Robert Medhurst/Bridge 1879?1927
Alice Maud Bridge 1884?1951
Annie May Bridge 1886?1945
Benjamin William Bridge 1889 1936
Hilton Victor Joseph Bridge 1891?1985
Clarice Evelyn Edith Bridge 1892?1985
Walter Edward Alexander Bridge 1904?1978
Cecil Meldorn Bridge 1909?1963

Benjamin died in Tamworth, New South Wales on the 25 August 1950.

The Maitland Mercury & Hunter River General Advertiser, Thursday 4 February 1892.
At Scone last week Benjamin Bridge, a well-known horse-trainer, arrested
at his residence by Senior-sergeant Coady, was brought up on a charge of
horse stealing from the properties of Thomas Cook and Bakewell Bros.
Upon the application of the police, the prisoner was remanded till Saturday
for the production of evidence. Two others, alleged to be implicated, are said
to have been arrested up the country, and the evidence is likely to be of
a sensational nature.

The Maitland Mercury, Thursday 3 March 1892.
Benjamin Bridge, found guilty of stealing a colt of Wm. Bakewell,
recovered at Mogil Mogil, was remanded for sentence, and on a second
charge of stealing a horse of Thos. English, the jury are still locked up.

Singleton Argus, Wednesday 9 March 1892
THE ESCAPE FROM THE MURRURUNDI GAOL
Benjamin Bridge in Trouble.
The Murrurundi Times of Saturday last says: ?"On Thursday evening,
about-half-past 5 o'clock some excitement was caused in Murrurundi
by a report that a prisoner had escaped from the local gaol and the
hurrying of the foot and mounted police in pursuit.
On enquiry we learned that Benjamin Bridge, who had on the previous
day been found guilty of horse stealing on two charges and sentenced
to 10 years penal servitude, had escaped from gaol by scaling the wall.
The gaol wall is about 15 feet high. Bridge was confined with three other
prisoners in the yard all day, and closely watched by gaoler Gall. About
1 o'clock the prisoners were given their tea, and about 5 o'clock were
provided with water, when they were alright, and the gaoler sat down to
wait till half-past 5, the time at which the prisoners are locked up for
the night. In the interval Bridge quietly effected his escape by scaling
the front wall at its junction with the main building. There is a small
cell window at this corner about 9 feet from the ground, the sill of which
projects several inches, the eaves of the roof being a couple of feet higher;
about 18 inches from the ground the base course projects a couple of inches.
It is surmised that Bridge, who is a pretty smart fellow, reached the window
sill by spring from the base course, and then with the aid of the other prisoners
and a broom got on the roof, and once there to climb over the remaining portion
of the wall and drop down on the other side was easy enough. The es cape seems
to have been well planned, as the other prisoners at once retired to their
cells to avert suspicion.
Immediately on escaping Bridge crossed the garden in front of the gaol,
leapt lightly over the fence, decended the steep bank there, and proceeded
along the river, to Messrs Stuart and M'Fadyen's residences, and thence in
the direction of the Chinamen's gardens, but here all trace of him was lost.
He was seen crossing the garden in front of the gaol by Mrs Brennan, who,
believing something was wrong gave the alarm to the sergeant, who was returning
from the railway station but some minutes elapsed before the prisoner was missed,
and he got a good start. Although we shall be glad to hear of the prisoner's
speedy capture It is hardly likely he will be retaken in a hurry.
No blame attaches to the gaoler."

Singleton Argus, Wednesday 9 March 1892
BENJAMIN BRIDGE WANTED.
?50 Reward. [By Telegraph]. Sydney, Tuesday.
The Government have offered a reward of ?50
for the capture of the man Bridge, sentenced
to 10 years' for horse stealing, and who escaped
from the Murrurundi gaol on the 3rd instant.


Australian Town and Country Journal,Saturday 12 March 1892.
The Government has offered a reward of ?50 for information leading
to the recapture of Benjamin Bridges, alias Texas Jack, a prisoner
under sentence of 10 years for horse-stealing, who, on the 3rd instant,
effected his escape from the gaol at Murrurundi.
He is described as about 29 years of age, 5 feet 8 inches high,
fair complexion, small sandy beard and moustache, grey eyes, rather bow-legged

Australian Town and Country Journal, Saturday 20 August 1892
Recapture of a Prisoner.
Murrurundi, Tuesday.?The man Benjamin Bridge, who was sentenced to
10 years' penal servitude and two days later escaped from
Murrurundi Gaol, has been recaptured at Burketown, Queensland.

Northern Star, Wednesday 14 September 1892.
DARING ESCAPE FROM GAOL.
AT Burketown (Queensland) on Friday morning a most daring escape was made by a prisoner
named Benjamin Bridge from the police barracks.
It appears that about 12 months ago Bridge escaped from Murrurundi Gaol in
New South Wales when he was under sentence of 10 years' imprisonment for
horsestealing.
The fugitive successfully evaded the police until some six weeks back,
when he was captured by the local police at Riversleigh Station.
A New South Wales police officer arrived on Thursday, and had identified
the prisoner, intending to take him to Sydney by the next boat, to avoid this,
the prisoner set fire to his cell and gave the alarm. Senior-constable M'Grath,
who was the only constable on the premises, opened the cell and removed
the prisoner, who after a desperate resistance was manacled and chained to the
fence.
In the mean time, in spite of willing assistance, the whole of the barracks were
in flames. M'Grath with others then went to the rescue of his wife and family,
and of the court records, books, &c. During the con fusion the prisoner escaped,
making for the man groves, where he disappeared, and has not yet been re-captured.
He is 30 years of age, and is said to have been 22 times before a jury, the present
being his fourth escape from custody. He informed the New South Wales officer that
he would never take him to Sydney.
Nothing now remains on the site of the courthouse and the barracks but a heap
of smouldering ruins.

Kalgoorlie Western Argus (WA), Thursday 4 January 1900.
A NOTORIOUS CRIMINAL. ARRESTED AT DENHAM RIVER. PERTH, Dec. 31. 1899
On Saturday the Commissioner of Police received a telegram from Derby
stating that Constable Freeman had just arrived at Wyndham with the
notorious Benjamin Bridge whom he had arrested at Denham River.
Bridge is an escapee from Brisbane gaol, who regained his freedom in 1892.
He is a notorious horse and cattle thief, and during the last seven years
he is reported to have been carrying on cattle duffing on a large scale
in the Northern territory of the Kimberley district.
He has successfully evaded capture for seven years, and is regarded by
the police as an exceptionally dangerous criminal.

Western Mail, Perth, WA. Saturday 24 March 1900.
A NOTORIOUS GAOL-BREAKER
ADELAIDE, March 16. 1900
Among the passengers by the s.s. Marloo, from Western Australia,
on Friday, were two New South Wales sergeants of police with four
of the mother colony criminals in their charge.
One, - Benjamin Bridge, has a black record. He escaped in 1893 from
Murrurundi gaol, while undergoing a sentence of ten years' imprisonment
for horse stealing. He was re-arrested at Burke, in Northern Queensland,
eighteen months later, but again escaped by burn- ing down the lock-up
in which he was incarcerated. For over four years he eluded capture; although,
the police were most vigilant through all Queensland and New South Wales.
Recently, however, he was brought to bay in the Kimberley district of
Western Australia by Constable Freeman, who, by the way, gained promotion by
his smartness in the matter.
The other prisoners in charge of the sergeants are charged with ordinary wife
desertion. On the arrival of the s.s. Marloo at Port Adelaide they were lodged
in the police cells for safe keeping. They will rejoin the vessel just
previous to the resumption of the voyage eastwards.

Singleton Argus, NSW. Tuesday 10 April 1900.
THE ESCAPEE BRIDGE.
Sentenced to Two Years.
Benjamin Bridge, who had pleaded guilty at the Darlinghurst Quarter Sessions
on Friday to escaping from Murrurundi Gaol in 1892 was brought
up for sentence in the afternoon Mr Levien asked Judge Heydon to
deal leniently with the prisoner. It was now eight years since he had
escaped, and the term of six years to which he was sentenced had expired.
Bridge had been living an honest life in W. Australia, and, indeed had
discovered a property which would in all probability have made him independent
for life had he been left undisturbed. His wife, as good a woman as ever
lived, and to whom Bridge had constantly remitted money, had travelled
to Sydney to see him and he trusted that his Honor would take these
matters into consideration in passing sentence.
His Honor Judge Haydon said that, while there was no moral indignation against
a man for escaping yet it, of course, was flouting the law and could not
be passed over. He would be as lenient a possible, the sentence to be imposed
would be two years.
He was not satisfied as to the evidence of Bridge's good character since he escaped,
and if Mr. Levien could produce evidence that he had been an upright man during
that time, he would recommend the Minister for Justice; to reduce the sentence.

the Northern Territory Times was not available in Sydney

Northern Territory Times and Gazette (Darwin, NT) Friday 12 January 1900.
Ben Bridge, the `Out-law.'
The recent capture of Benjamin Bridge by Mounted Constable Freeman in East Kimberley, W.A.,
brings a climax to the wrong-doings of a very notorious character.
Bridge hails from northern New South Wales, where he once raced horses.
A friend leased him some racers on one occasion for a meeting at a neighbouring town,
but fortune frowned, and to satisfy the demands of his landlord he sold him the
horses. Subsequently he stole the horses from the landlord and gave them back
to the rightful owner! Gaol followed, but he broke it and turned into Queensland,
where 'the feeling' came on him again, and he eventually got into Burketown gaol
for horse stealing.
Not long after he was celled here the gaol caught fire and was burnt down,
some say from the inside, some from the outside. To save Bridge he was
taken out and chained to a post. When the fire was subdued the police went to
remove Bridge, and found he had vanished.
It is generally agreed that the prisoner swam the river, with heavy irons and all on,
and then walked 60 miles to a camp where his chains were knocked off. At all events
the police never saw him again. Bridge moved down to Western Queensland, where he took
jobs at station work. From there he gravitated into the Territory, and spent some time
on the cattle runs at stockman's work. His identity was pretty well known, though his
name was mostly 'McDonald.' He was gradually moving west, and on the way called at all
the police camps for the latest papers! From Newcastle Waters he had a mate who was
drowned in Murrenji Waterhole. Bridge reported this to M.C. O'Keefe, at the Victoria,
who, investigated the matter but couldn't find the body. There was nothing to warrant
further enquiry, consequently O'Keefe had no scruples about letting Bridge camp
close to the police quarters, particularly as he seemed a decent sort of chap. He
even swapped horses with him, giving Bridge, amongst others, the one-time racer Bluegown,
with which, curiously enough, he lost a ?20 match to a western member of the force later on.
After spelling a bit, Bridge moved on into Western Australia, about four years ago.
One story says that he 'gammoned green' about horses while, employed on one station,
until he got a bet on about breaking in a lot of colts. He spent some time poisonings
dingoes, and is said to have collected, ?200 worth of tails in a very short time.
Not long after his arrival in the west he dropped on the police sergeant's camp
and turned out for a while, boldly faced the camp and sat down and engaged in
conversation with the sergeant. After he had been in camp some time the
sergeant, who must have had a keen scent, advanced to Bridge, put his
hand on his shoulder, and was proceeding to deal out the usual formula 'I
arrest you in the Queen's name ' and so forth, when Bridge wriggled free, and with a
parting 'Not yet' cleared for a creek close by, where his boy had just brought his
horses, picking up a revolver from his pack as he ran. The sergeant, in following the outlaw,
kicked his foot against a stiff grass tussock and got a spill, and when he
rose again Bridge was mounted and gone.
After that, but little was heard of Bridge, no one really seemed to
trouble about him. He had done no harm there, he could pitch a pitiful tale, he was
a great hand with horses, and in short the whole district stood to him rather than otherwise.
He came and went on the stations like a free man, camped where he pleased in apparent safety,
and if he wanted to attend the annual races at Wyndham, well, he simply stood a little back
from the crowd. Where everyone helped the fellow the police had what is some times
called 'Buckley's chance' of catching him. But by and bye the feeling began to change.
There were things happening which could not be accounted for. Valuable stock disappeared
mysteriously from their accustomed haunts, and kept on vanishing for a long time before
anyone would admit Bridge to have a hand in it. 'Billy,' as he was called in the West,
wouldn't do such a thing ; but faith in him soon turned to anger against him when
indisputable evidence of his treachery was produced from time to time.
There were even then a few of a sort who helped him whenever they could against the police.
Three months ago or a little better the Wild Dog police, Freeman and M'Ginley, made an excursion after 'Billy ' and came upon him near Argyle station.
'Well Freeman,' says he, 'are you going to take me this time!' To which Freeman said 'I'm going to have
a hard try,' and the chase began. Bridge was well mounted, while the troopers had scrags
that couldn't head a duck. The result was that after a long stern chase first Freeman's
horse and then McGinley's dropped down exhausted, just when the outlaw's mount could only
be kept going by plenty of flogging. A black tracker was sent on to keep Bridge in sight,
but darkness beat him, and by cutting a wire fence he gave his pursuers the slip.
I was at Rosewood when the police came that night, horses and men were tired out ;
'Billy' had gone towards Newry, on the N.T. border.
Next morning the police crossed over into the Territory to hunt for Bridge's main camp,
supposed to be somewhere near Auvergne. Though they lost 'Billy' the
day before they managed to secure his packs and a boy, and the boy was useful as a guide.
Their mission resulted in securing another of Bridge's black boys and some more of his
horses and packs. This boy, Larry by name, was afterwards used by Freeman to track down
the outlaw. At this stage Trooper McGinley fell sick and had to go into hospital at Wyndham.
Freeman, after the lapse of some days got on Bridge's tracks again and followed him to Turkey Creek,
the station owned by his brother, where the scent soon got red hot.
Bridge held out as long as he could, even after Freeman had secured his last horse:
but he was run down eventually and safely landed in Wyndham gaol (where his brother Joseph
is serving a sentence) last week in December. His 'pals' declared he would shoot rather than
be taken alive; he vowed the same thing himself, but so far as is known there was no firing before the capture.
The district is well rid of a most expert horse and cattle thief, and his capture is all the
more creditable because he could ride with any man in Australia, was always well horsed, and
had several staunch confederates who never hesitated to shelter him. It was the common talk
of the district that if Bridge had acted 'on the square ' no man's hand would have been turned
against him. It would complicate matters very much if he broke gaol at Wyndham, but his past
history ought to show the need for taking extra precautions against such an untoward
event


Capt. George Manning 1811–1907

A convict arrived on the 'Norfolk' 27 August 1829 sentenced to seven years at the Surrey Quarter Sessions.
It is not given to many (writes a correspondent) to pass the end of their lives close to the place where their life work has been carried on, but such was the case with Capt George Manning, who died at Sackville, on the 22 July 1907.
His home was the farm originally built by Mr George Loder, one of the pioneers of farming on the fertile river when it was the granary for the infant colony an important agricultural asset of the land in times when food was often famine prices. The late Mr Manning was in his 96th year at the time of his death; and two years ago, when the writer visited him, had a vivid remembrance of the river from the days of the very early sailing vessels there. He remembered the boat building that made the river a busy place, and the forests of cedar that the sawyers felled and floated down the numerous creeks and rivers, Although before his time, he could speak of such early men as Griffiths, the boat builder, whose Bee took Governor Bligh on his many expeditions to the Green Hills, as Windsor was then called, 'Boat and ship building formed a most important river industry in my early days,' said Captain Manning. 'Beazley's Wharf, between Richmond and Windsor, was still busy, though the building of the Mary and Elizabeth and the Governor Bourke was before my time. The Glory was the last of Griffiths' boats, built about 1819, and the Francis and the Norfolk were still talked of. Captain Manning's sailing vessel, so many years the favorite passenger and cargo boat of the Hawkesbury, was the Maid of Australia, 'but I suppose,' said the ex-master, 'most of those who travelled by her have joined the great majority,' for few live to bear the weight of 90 years. The Loders, Halls, Churchills, Doyles, Parnells, Bowmans, and many other men who first lived at Hawkesbury, though now their names are known throughout the land, were my passengers, and gladly paid 12/6 for a trip from Sydney to Windsor in The Maid. Many a little girl, now a middle aged woman, has been put under my care for her first trip to the big city, as it was then looked on as quite an adventure for young people to go so far from home as from the river to Sydney.' Captain Manning was long the only survivor of the band of river shipmasters who all rest in the graveyards along the banks of the Hawkesbury - Captains Grono, Herd, Christie, Sternbeck, Books, and his partner, Mitchell, being his early contemporaries. Among his passengers was the one-time almost king of the river, old Solomon Wiseman. 'I knew him well,' said the captain. 'He was providore for the convicts, and made many thousands out of that job. A rough mannered man, but very hospitable, and hand-in-glove with the Government. The judges on circuit, especially Judge Roger Therry used to stay with him, in his old house (now an hotel at the Ferry), in the days of overlanding, when they travelled on horseback that way between Sydney and Maitland. Captain Manning came out from England when a child in the very early emigration days.[sic]
After steamers were introduced on to the river as passenger carriers, he continued to command a vessel; and was, for over 50 years, until his retirement into private life on his farm, constantly engaged in the Hawkesbury River traffic. Even to the last he showed traces of what a fine personage physically he was, being fully 6ft high, and a broad, well-built figure. His daughters, who have lived all their lives in the district, tended him in his declining years, and carried on the work of the farm since he ceased to be able to do so.

The late George Manning had been 78 years in New South Wales, and in 1838, at the age of 26, at Sackville Reach, he married Elizabeth Elkins. The issue of the marriage was 11 children, (three of whom are dead, viz, James, who died at Lower Portland, George, and William, who died on the Clarence River. The surviving members of the family are Mrs T. Turnbull (Canterbury); Ann, Mrs John Warr Turnbull (Sackville) Miss Sarah Manning (Sackville); Mr Frederick Manning (Narrabri); Mrs Griffiths (Colo Vale); Mr Andrew Manning (Terrace, Windsor); Mr Charles Manning (Lithgow); and Miss Clara Manning (Sackville). The funeral took place on Tuesday last, the remains being conveyed from deceased's late residence in Mr Jones' steamer, and interred in the family vault in the Sackville C.E cemetery, where a large concourse of people had assembled. Rev W. S. Newton, M A., carried out the last solemn rites, and Mr J. W. Chandler was the undertaker. The cause of death was bronchitis, and deceased had been ill about a fortnight.
ORIGINAL SOURCE:
Windsor & Richmond Gazette (NSW), 27 July 1907, p 4
Original Copy