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Anyone can be a Genealogist !!!

Anyone can be a genealogist!

These days it seems, to call yourself a genealogist, all you have to do is learn to spell 'genealogist', or find an old photo of your grandfather when you moved the fridge.

If you're thinking of hiring a 'genealogist' note that Certification and accreditation are not a requirement for genealogists who wish to accept clients.

Of course certification or accreditation does help you to know that these individuals have had their competence as genealogical researchers thoroughly tested by their peers and not just any individual who knows how to find the Mormons Family Search on the internet. Which is the first online site we all find during our first steps into trying to find where the rellies all hailed from.

Professional Genealogist: - This title generally applies to any genealogist with knowledge and experience of proper genealogical research methods and techniques, and who supports and upholds high standards in the field of genealogy. People who call themselves professional genealogists are usually either certified or very experienced, but this is not always the case. Anyone can use the title "professional," so be sure to inquire about their education, experience, and references.

Do you think that the genealogical profession is one that you will enjoy? Follow these simple steps to see if you have the necessary skill, experience, and expertise to offer your services to others on a fee basis.

Below I've added some tips by Kimberly Powell for those thinking they may be able to earn a bit of extra change in the field of genealogy.

How To Become a Professional Genealogist

By Kimberly Powell, source- About.com Guide

HERE'S HOW::

1. Read and follow the code of ethics of the Association of Professional Genealogists and the Board for Certification of Genealogists.

2.Consider your experience. A genealogist must be familiar with the various types of genealogical records available and know where to access them, as well as know how to analyze and interpret evidence. If you are unsure about your qualifications, enlist the services of a professional genealogist to critique your work and offer guidance.

3. Consider your writing skills. You must be knowledgeable of the proper format for source citations and have good grammar and writing skills in order to communicate your findings to clients. Practice your writing constantly. Once you have it polished, submit an article or case study for possible publication in a local genealogical society newsletter/journal or other genealogical publication.

4. Join the Association of Professional Genealogists. This society exists not only for practicing genealogists, but also for people who desire to further their skills.

5. Educate yourself by taking genealogy classes, attending seminars and workshops, and reading genealogical magazines, journals, and books. No matter how much you know, there is always more to learn.

6. Volunteer with a local genealogical society, library or group. This will keep you in touch with a network of fellow genealogists, and help to further develop your skills. If you have the time, start or join a transcribing or indexing project for additional practice at reading genealogical documents.

7. Make a list of your goals as a professional genealogist. Think about what types of research interests you, the access you have to necessary resources and the profitability of doing research as a business. What do you want to do? Professional genealogists don't all do client research - some are authors, editors, teachers, heir searchers, bookstore owners, adoption specialists and other related fields.

8. Develop your business skills. You cannot run a successful business without knowing about accounting, taxes, advertising, licenses, billing and time management.

9. Get a copy of Professional Genealogy: A Manual for Researchers, Writers, Editors, Lecturers, and Librarians. This book by Elizabeth Shown Mills is the bible for genealogy professionals and those who want to become professional. It offers advice and instruction on everything from abstracting to setting up a business.

10. Consider applying for certification or accreditation. The Board for Certification of Genealogists (BCG) grants certification in research, as well as in two teaching categories, and the International Commission for the Accreditation of Professional Genealogists offers accreditation in specific geographical areas. Even if you decide not to become certified or accredited, the guidelines offered by these testing programs will help you objectively evaluate your genealogical skills.

If you are in Australia,The Society of Australian Genealogists has a formal course and examination, resulting in a Diploma in Family Historical Studies (Dip. F.H.S.).


Tips:
1.Practice your research skills every chance you get. Visit courthouses, libraries, archives, etc. and explore the records. Get as much experience as you can before working for others.

2.Don't stop researching your own family history. It is most likely the reason you fell in love with genealogy in the first place and will continue to provide inspiration and enjoyment.



Kimberly Powell is a member of the Association of Professional Genealogists, the National Genealogical Society, the International Society of Family History Writers and Editors, and several local genealogical societies. She has been writing about genealogy for About.com since 2000, and her work has also appeared in several genealogy magazines.


6 comment(s), latest 5 years, 8 months ago

Anzac Commemorative Medallion

Do you have a relative who was entitled to the Anzac Commemorative Medallion?
Every Anzac soldier who served on the Gallipoli Peninsula, or in direct support of operations there - or his family if he did not survive until into the late 1960s - was entitled to be issued with the Anzac Commemorative Medallion.
(shown below).

The medallion was issued in 1967, and as a result
MANY HAVE NEVER BEEN CLAIMED.

For Australian Soldiers' Medallions

If you are the descendant of an Anzac soldier, you MAY still be entitled to claim the medallion.

Mailing address for all Medals applications
Directorate of Honours and Awards
T-4
Department of Defence
PO Box 7952
CANBERRA BC ACT 2610

Email www.defence.gov.au/medals
Website: http://www.defence.gov.au/medals
Toll-free Medals Inquiry Phone line:
1800 111 321 (Operating Hours: 8:30am-5:00pm, Monday to Friday)


Include as many details as possible regarding the soldier on whose behalf you wish to claim the medallion.
Full name, rank and unit, and service number
are generally required

For New Zealand Soldiers' Medallions

For claiming the Anzac Commemorative Medallion for a New Zealand soldier,
write to:

Staff Officer Medals,
New Zealand Defence Force,
Private Bag 905,
Upper Hutt, New Zealand.

______________________________

OBTAINING A COPY OF THE SOLDIER'S DOSSIER (New Zealand)

For a copy of a soldier's WW1 service dossier, contact the Personnel Archives of the New Zealand Defence Force (Te Ope Kaatua O Aotearoa). The cost for this service varies depending upon how much material must be photocopied, up to a maximum of $28.00 NZ.

All Requests Must Be In Writing (letter or fax: [04] 527 5275) to:


Personnel Archives / Enquiries & Medals
Trentham Camp, NZDF
Private Bag 905
UPPER HUTT
NEW ZEALAND

Include the following information in your request:

Enquirer's details:
Mr/Mrs/Miss/Ms:
Name:
Address:
Phone number:

Soldier's Details:
Supply as many of the following details as possible

Surname:
Full Given Names:
Any other names known by:
Date and place of birth:
Living or deceased:
Service Number:
Rank:
Unit:
Period of service:
Next-of-kin at time of enlistment:
Address at time of enlistment:
Occupation at time of enlistment:

REMEMBER - This is to receive a copy of the soldier's service file - NOT the Medallion.

DIGITAL COPIES OF SOLDIERS' DOSSIERS (Australia)

If you would like more information on the soldier, digitised individual's service dossiers are available from
National Archives. You will need to log in and then conduct a Search.



_____________________________________________________________________


A little background reading...

Statement by the Prime Minister [of Australia],
the Rt. Hon. Harold Holt,
in the House of Representatives

16th March, 1967
The Minister for Defence announced that it had been decided by the Australian Government, in consultation with the New Zealand Government, to issue a medallion and lapel badge to the veterans of the Gallipoli Campaign.

I am glad to be able to announce that arrangements have now been completed for the production of the medallion and badge. The Minister for the Army will be arranging distribution to those wishing to receive them as soon as possible.

The Government hopes that production of the medallion and lapel badge will be sufficiently advanced to permit at least some of them to be distributed by Anzac Day.

The medallion (with the name of the recipient inscribed) will be issued to surviving members of the Australian Defence Force who served on the Gallipoli Peninsula, or in direct support of the operations from close off-shore, at any time during the period from the first Anzac Day in April, 1915, to the date of final evacuation in January 1916. Next of kin or other entitled persons will be entitled to receive the medallion on behalf of their relatives, if their relative died on active service or has since died.

For surviving members, a lapel badge will also be available for wearing. This will be a replica of the obverse (or front) of the medallion and will be about 1" high and 2/3" wide, the same size as the R.S.L. badge.

The medallion is the work of Mr. Raymond Ewers, the well-known Australian artist, based on a suggestion by Mr. Eric Garret, a staff artist with the Department of Army. It has been endorsed by both the Government of New Zealand and ourselves. It will be approximately 3" high and 2" wide. The obverse of the medallion depicts Simpson and his donkey carrying a wounded soldier to safety. It will be bordered on the lower half by a laurel wreath above the word ANZAC. The reverse (the back) shows a map in relief of Australia and New Zealand superimposed by the Southern Cross. The lower half will be bordered by New Zealand fern leaves.

The medallion will be cast in bronze and the lapel badge will be a metal of bronze colour


2 comment(s), latest 5 years, 8 months ago

Arthur John Cleland 1915-1976

NOTICE
Requesting relatives to contact me,
regarding 4 war service medals, which are in my possession.

but NOT the DFC
Arthur John CLELAND was the son of Alfred John CLELAND and Amy Eliza BARCLAY married at St. Leonards, NSW in 1899
I believe Arthur John CLELAND died at Denistone, Sydney, on 29 July 1976

Name... ARTHUR JOHN CLELAND
Service.. Royal Australian Air Force
Service Number.. 411004
Date of Birth.. 8 November 1915
Place of Birth.. SYDNEY, NSW
Date of Enlistment.. 31 March 1941
Locality on Enlistment.. Unknown
Place of Enlistment.. SYDNEY, NSW
Next of Kin.. Joyce CLELAND, nee COLLETT m. 1940, Ryde, Sydney
Date of Discharge.. 15 May 1945
Rank.. Flight Lieutenant
Posting at Discharge.. General Reconnaissance School
WW2 Honours and Gallantry.. Distinguished Flying Cross

Australian Settlement in a nutshell

In 1788, a colony of convicts was founded in Australia, and for awhile Australia was thought of mostly as a British Gaol.

The Governors of early Australian colonies were ordered by the British government to grow enough food to support their population. The Governors replied that they did not have enough of the right kind of people to do that; most convicts knew nothing of farming.
The Governors then asked for settlers to come to Australia. So, the British government promised land to emigrants with enough convicts to work it and supplies for a year.

A few thousand people took up this offer and emigrated. But they were mostly retired soldiers and paupers. The colony was still struggling to feed itself and the land was difficult to farm.
So the explorers took off inland to investigate and returned with news that the land was excellent for farming and grazing.
The settlers made their way inland from the coastal cities.

But still not enough came to Australia, so then the government wanted immigrants with money, who wished to get rich by running big farms. They also wanted immigrant workers who could work on these farms.
So, instead of giving land to those who arrived the government sold it to them and used the money raised to pay people's passage out here.

Once these free passengers arrived in Australia, life was not easy. There were few jobs in the cities during the early days and immigrants would have to travel out into the newly settled areas. The assignment of convicts as unpaid workers had stopped in 1841. Farmers were eager to hire helpers and paid good money.These newcomers were refered to as 'New Chums and 'Jimmy Grants'

Then in 1851 gold was discovered and the diggers streamed in, in their thousands. Many liked the country and stayed.

The picture below which I suppose you could call a very early government ad campaign, was published in London in 1848. It shows how poor British families would be better off if they went to Australia


Australians as America saw us in 1942

Nothing like coming here prepared!

AUSTRALIANS AS AMERICANS SEE THEM
"An Outdoors People;Breezy, Democratic"
WASHINGTON, Sunday, 25 October 1942 AAP


["You will find Australians an outdoors people, breezy, very democratic, with no respect for stuffed shirts their own or anyone else's," says a pocket guide on Australia which is being distributed among American troops.

Issued by US War and Navy departments, the booklet states that Australians have much in common with Americans. They are a pioneer people, they believe in personal freedom, and they love sports.

"There is one thing to get straight right off the bat," the booklet says. "You are not in Australia to save a helpless people from the savage Japanese. Recently in a Sydney bar an American soldier turned to an Australian and said, 'Well, Aussie, you can go home now. We've come over to save you.' The Aussie cracked back, 'Have you? I thought you were a refugee from Pearl Harbour.'
Being simple, direct and tough, the Digger is often confused and nonplussed by the manners of Americans' in mixed company; or even in camp. To him those many 'Thank you's" Americans use are a bit too dignifled.

You might get annoyed, at the blue laws which make Australian cities pretty dull places on Sundays.
For all their breezieness Australians do not go in for drinking or woopitching in public, especially on Sunday.

In Australia, the national game is cricket, but they, have another game called Australian rules football.
It is rough, tough, and exciting. There are a lot of rules, which the referee carries in a rule book the size of Webster's dictionary. The game creates the desire on the part of the crowd to tear someone apart. The referees in some parks have runways covered over so that they can escape intact after a game.

As one newspaper correspondent says, Americans and Australians are 2 of the greatest gambling people on earth. It has been said of Australians that if a couple in a bar have not anything else to bet on they will lay odds on which of 2 flies rise first from the bar.
Aussies do not fight out of textbooks. They are resourceful, inventive soldiers with plenty of intiative.
The Australian habit of pronouncing "a" as "I" is pointed out, and an example quoted: "The trine is lite to-di." The booklet includes "Waltzing Matilda" in full."]

I don't know about the too many thank-yous. It would seem that the Australian girls liked it, for 10,000 Aussie brides returned to America with these well heeled, well mannered and certainly well informed troops.


1 comment(s), latest 4 years, 10 months ago