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Anzac Commemorative Medallion

Do you have a relative who was entitled to the Anzac Commemorative Medallion?
Every Anzac soldier who served on the Gallipoli Peninsula, or in direct support of operations there - or his family if he did not survive until into the late 1960s - was entitled to be issued with the Anzac Commemorative Medallion.
(shown below).

The medallion was issued in 1967, and as a result
MANY HAVE NEVER BEEN CLAIMED.

For Australian Soldiers' Medallions

If you are the descendant of an Anzac soldier, you MAY still be entitled to claim the medallion.

Mailing address for all Medals applications
Directorate of Honours and Awards
T-4
Department of Defence
PO Box 7952
CANBERRA BC ACT 2610

Email www.defence.gov.au/medals
Website: http://www.defence.gov.au/medals
Toll-free Medals Inquiry Phone line:
1800 111 321 (Operating Hours: 8:30am-5:00pm, Monday to Friday)


Include as many details as possible regarding the soldier on whose behalf you wish to claim the medallion.
Full name, rank and unit, and service number
are generally required

For New Zealand Soldiers' Medallions

For claiming the Anzac Commemorative Medallion for a New Zealand soldier,
write to:

Staff Officer Medals,
New Zealand Defence Force,
Private Bag 905,
Upper Hutt, New Zealand.

______________________________

OBTAINING A COPY OF THE SOLDIER'S DOSSIER (New Zealand)

For a copy of a soldier's WW1 service dossier, contact the Personnel Archives of the New Zealand Defence Force (Te Ope Kaatua O Aotearoa). The cost for this service varies depending upon how much material must be photocopied, up to a maximum of $28.00 NZ.

All Requests Must Be In Writing (letter or fax: [04] 527 5275) to:


Personnel Archives / Enquiries & Medals
Trentham Camp, NZDF
Private Bag 905
UPPER HUTT
NEW ZEALAND

Include the following information in your request:

Enquirer's details:
Mr/Mrs/Miss/Ms:
Name:
Address:
Phone number:

Soldier's Details:
Supply as many of the following details as possible

Surname:
Full Given Names:
Any other names known by:
Date and place of birth:
Living or deceased:
Service Number:
Rank:
Unit:
Period of service:
Next-of-kin at time of enlistment:
Address at time of enlistment:
Occupation at time of enlistment:

REMEMBER - This is to receive a copy of the soldier's service file - NOT the Medallion.

DIGITAL COPIES OF SOLDIERS' DOSSIERS (Australia)

If you would like more information on the soldier, digitised individual's service dossiers are available from
National Archives. You will need to log in and then conduct a Search.



_____________________________________________________________________


A little background reading...

Statement by the Prime Minister [of Australia],
the Rt. Hon. Harold Holt,
in the House of Representatives

16th March, 1967
The Minister for Defence announced that it had been decided by the Australian Government, in consultation with the New Zealand Government, to issue a medallion and lapel badge to the veterans of the Gallipoli Campaign.

I am glad to be able to announce that arrangements have now been completed for the production of the medallion and badge. The Minister for the Army will be arranging distribution to those wishing to receive them as soon as possible.

The Government hopes that production of the medallion and lapel badge will be sufficiently advanced to permit at least some of them to be distributed by Anzac Day.

The medallion (with the name of the recipient inscribed) will be issued to surviving members of the Australian Defence Force who served on the Gallipoli Peninsula, or in direct support of the operations from close off-shore, at any time during the period from the first Anzac Day in April, 1915, to the date of final evacuation in January 1916. Next of kin or other entitled persons will be entitled to receive the medallion on behalf of their relatives, if their relative died on active service or has since died.

For surviving members, a lapel badge will also be available for wearing. This will be a replica of the obverse (or front) of the medallion and will be about 1" high and 2/3" wide, the same size as the R.S.L. badge.

The medallion is the work of Mr. Raymond Ewers, the well-known Australian artist, based on a suggestion by Mr. Eric Garret, a staff artist with the Department of Army. It has been endorsed by both the Government of New Zealand and ourselves. It will be approximately 3" high and 2" wide. The obverse of the medallion depicts Simpson and his donkey carrying a wounded soldier to safety. It will be bordered on the lower half by a laurel wreath above the word ANZAC. The reverse (the back) shows a map in relief of Australia and New Zealand superimposed by the Southern Cross. The lower half will be bordered by New Zealand fern leaves.

The medallion will be cast in bronze and the lapel badge will be a metal of bronze colour


2 comment(s), latest 3 years, 4 months ago

Arrival by the JOHN ELDER. March 12, 1879 South Australia

The Orient steamship John Elder, A. J. Cooper commander, arrived at Semaphore, South Australia and anchored at half past 4. on Wednesday, March 12, 1879.
SHE had a capital passage but no special incidents occurred. One birth took place, and the child was named John Elder.

The following is the list of immigrants by the s.s. John Elder, with their ages and occupations :
Gilbert Aitkins, 18, agricultural laborer;
William Bacon, 25, do.;
George Beavis, 22, do. ;
Charles Bennett, 20, do. ;
Matthew Blakey, 20, do.;
William Bond, 22, do. ;
Robert Brewis, 24, pick and shovel laborer ;
Peter Brooks, 27, do.;
John Brown, 21, agricultural laborer ;
William Dabrnett, 19, do. ;
Robert Dunn, 24, pick and shovel laborer ;
John George, 31, agri cultural laborer ;
John Glover, 22, do. ;
William Gosling (special constable), 25, do.;
Samuel Grapes, 20, pick and shovel laborer;
Robert Gummer, 23, agricultural laborer ;
Job Hallett,23, do.;
Thomas Harrison, 21, quarryman ;
David Holland, 17, agricultural laborer ;
Tom Horner, 31, pick and shovel laborer;
George Hoyes, 21, agricultural laborer;
Albert V. King, 22, do. ;
Robert Madus, 21, pick and shovel laborer;
Henry Male, 23, agricultural laborer;
Watson Male, 17, do. ;
William Meadlan, 23, pick and shovel laborer;
Robert A. Munro, 20, house and cartwright;
John McAskill, 20, agricultural laborer;
Alexander McKenzie, 19, do.;
John McPherson, 22, do. ;
Edward Peel, 25, pick and shovel laborer;
Robert Purdy, 29, agricultural laborer ;
William Read, 23, do. ;
Edwin Robins, 18, do.;
Ben Russ, 20, do.;
Alfred Smith, 21, do.;
William Smith, 22, pick and shovel laborer ;
Anthony Steel, 28, do.;
Benjamin Thomson, 22, agricultural laborer;
James Turner, 22, laborer.

The following is the list of first saloon passengers: -
Miss Allessandri,
Colonel Browne,
Mr and Mrs Arthur Bull, family (seven)and servant;
Mr Arthur Campbell,
Miss Caswell,
Miss E C Caswell,
Mr Arthur Crocker,
Mr and Mrs J C Davie,
Mr John Duncan,
Mr John H Durham,
Mr Easles,
Miss C D Fergusson,
Mr Gaynor,
Rev C. J. and Mrs Godby,
Mr J H Hickson,
Mr Edgar W Hoe,
Mr and Mrs Arthur Howell,
Dr Thomas G Kerr,
Mr Alex Maclean,
Mr and Mrs G F Maberly and child,
Miss Auguste Innes,
Rev T M O'Callaghan,
Miss Palmer,
Miss Patterson,
Rev. G.D.P. Pritchard,
Mss Richardson,
Mr Richardson,
Mr Richman,
Mr A. O. Robotham,
Mr Frank J. Sheppard,
Mr Richard M. Sheppard,
Mr H Spragge,
Mr and Mrs C G Tindal and servant,
Mr Charles F. Tindal,
Mr John T. Tindal,
Miss Annie Tindal,
Miss Louisa Tindal,
Miss Jane Tindal,
Miss Elizabeth Tindal,
Miss Esther Tindal,
Mr H P Tomkinson,
Mr W P Turton,
Mr R E Nowell Twopenny,
Mr Edward Twynam,
Mr Wickens,
Mr and Mrs Forster Willson, child, and nurse,
Mr Charles V Wilson,
Mrs Willson, the Misses Willson (two),
Mr A. J. Winterson,
Mr Wm. Wood,
Mr and Mrs.Reginald Young,
Miss Young.

Also received European correspondence and files of English papers to the 30 January, 1879,
and South African letters and papers to the 22 February 1879.

Australian Settlement in a nutshell

In 1788, a colony of convicts was founded in Australia, and for awhile Australia was thought of mostly as a British Gaol.

The Governors of early Australian colonies were ordered by the British government to grow enough food to support their population. The Governors replied that they did not have enough of the right kind of people to do that; most convicts knew nothing of farming.
The Governors then asked for settlers to come to Australia. So, the British government promised land to emigrants with enough convicts to work it and supplies for a year.

A few thousand people took up this offer and emigrated. But they were mostly retired soldiers and paupers. The colony was still struggling to feed itself and the land was difficult to farm.
So the explorers took off inland to investigate and returned with news that the land was excellent for farming and grazing.
The settlers made their way inland from the coastal cities.

But still not enough came to Australia, so then the government wanted immigrants with money, who wished to get rich by running big farms. They also wanted immigrant workers who could work on these farms.
So, instead of giving land to those who arrived the government sold it to them and used the money raised to pay people's passage out here.

Once these free passengers arrived in Australia, life was not easy. There were few jobs in the cities during the early days and immigrants would have to travel out into the newly settled areas. The assignment of convicts as unpaid workers had stopped in 1841. Farmers were eager to hire helpers and paid good money.These newcomers were refered to as 'New Chums and 'Jimmy Grants'

Then in 1851 gold was discovered and the diggers streamed in, in their thousands. Many liked the country and stayed.

The picture below which I suppose you could call a very early government ad campaign, was published in London in 1848. It shows how poor British families would be better off if they went to Australia


Australians as America saw us in 1942

Nothing like coming here prepared!

AUSTRALIANS AS AMERICANS SEE THEM
"An Outdoors People;Breezy, Democratic"
WASHINGTON, Sunday, 25 October 1942 AAP


["You will find Australians an outdoors people, breezy, very democratic, with no respect for stuffed shirts their own or anyone else's," says a pocket guide on Australia which is being distributed among American troops.

Issued by US War and Navy departments, the booklet states that Australians have much in common with Americans. They are a pioneer people, they believe in personal freedom, and they love sports.

"There is one thing to get straight right off the bat," the booklet says. "You are not in Australia to save a helpless people from the savage Japanese. Recently in a Sydney bar an American soldier turned to an Australian and said, 'Well, Aussie, you can go home now. We've come over to save you.' The Aussie cracked back, 'Have you? I thought you were a refugee from Pearl Harbour.'
Being simple, direct and tough, the Digger is often confused and nonplussed by the manners of Americans' in mixed company; or even in camp. To him those many 'Thank you's" Americans use are a bit too dignifled.

You might get annoyed, at the blue laws which make Australian cities pretty dull places on Sundays.
For all their breezieness Australians do not go in for drinking or woopitching in public, especially on Sunday.

In Australia, the national game is cricket, but they, have another game called Australian rules football.
It is rough, tough, and exciting. There are a lot of rules, which the referee carries in a rule book the size of Webster's dictionary. The game creates the desire on the part of the crowd to tear someone apart. The referees in some parks have runways covered over so that they can escape intact after a game.

As one newspaper correspondent says, Americans and Australians are 2 of the greatest gambling people on earth. It has been said of Australians that if a couple in a bar have not anything else to bet on they will lay odds on which of 2 flies rise first from the bar.
Aussies do not fight out of textbooks. They are resourceful, inventive soldiers with plenty of intiative.
The Australian habit of pronouncing "a" as "I" is pointed out, and an example quoted: "The trine is lite to-di." The booklet includes "Waltzing Matilda" in full."]

I don't know about the too many thank-yous. It would seem that the Australian girls liked it, for 10,000 Aussie brides returned to America with these well heeled, well mannered and certainly well informed troops.


1 comment(s), latest 2 years, 5 months ago

Bardoc Murder suspects.

The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954) Thursday 20 September 1894
WESTERN, AUSTRALIA.
By Telegraph.
THE BARDOC MURDER.
COOLGARDIE, Wednesday.
The sensation of the hour is still the discovery of the murdered man five miles beyond Bardoc. In addition to the principal blow several fractures were caused by blows with a pick, all apparently struck from behind. The only property found on the body was an old watch and a small compass. There was also a small speck of gold, evidently overlooked by the murderer when stripping his victim. The police have returned from Bardoc, and confirm the news of the murder committed there. They state that on the body being exhumed it was found that a pick had been driven with terrific force clean through the skull of the deceased. The body had then been huddled into the workings, which were then roughly covered in with dbris lying round the pit's mouth. The murderer, so far, has eluded the vigilance of the police, but as he is a foreignor, and a perfect Hercules appearance, his capture is considered certain. It is thought probable that he will try to make for the Mount Margaret district.
The body of the murdered man was buried without identification. It is generally regretted that the police did not publish a full description of the marks on the body as it is believed that these were sufficiently peculiar to make identification easy. A crowd inspected the body, but only one person had previously seen the deceased but did not know his name.

Western Mail (Perth, WA : 1885 - 1954)
Saturday 29 September 1894

William Sodding was arrested near Londonderry on Saturday, on suspicion of being the Bardoc murderer. He answers to the general description of the assassin, in regard to height, build, etc. and was known to have been out at the rush at or about the time the murder was committed, but beyond that there is nothing to connect him with the tradgedy as yet. Persons who saw the digger at the time he was burying the murdered man, have been telegraphed for to see whether they can identify Sodding. There are stains on the prisoner's trousers, but be states they were merely caused by carelessly eating jam. Sodding is a German tailor, formerly employed in the town.

The West Australian
Wednesday 2 January 1895

The Coolgardie Miner of December 22nd *writes:-
A member of the jury who sat on the Bardoc murder case has called at The Miner office to express his grave suspicion that one of the three 'discoverers' of the victim was actually the murderer.
He observed at the time of the inquest that one of them appeared to be almost paralysed with fear, and had himself to attempt to support him had he needed it. The same juryman was in the neighbourhood of Bardoc at the time of the crime, and thinks then if the three witnesses had done their duty they would have called a roll-up forthwith. Our informant says that he is moved to make this communication by a worrying fear that he has perhaps unwittingly contributed towards throwing justice off the track. He is prepared io identity the object of his suspicions, and to assist the police in every way.
For obvious reasons the juryman's name is not made public, but the police are welcome to it on application to us. It is not a little curious that this opinion coincides with the one so frequently expressed in these columns and echoed by Mr. A. G. Hales in an Adelaide journal. It is probable that intelligent investigation -even at this late hour would lead to a reopening of the case and the ultimate vindication of outraged humanity and law. We earnestly urge upon others who have scraps of evidence in their possesion either favourable or the opposite to our expressed opinion to forward them without delay. We promise the utmost secrecy in regard to such communications, except so far as informing the police ara concerned."


Kalgoorlie Western Argus (WA : 1896 - 1916)
Thursday 6 October 1898

A Lunatic at Large.
THE ALLEGED BARDOC MURDERER. The Bunbury Herald of Saturday has the following : For several months past the vagaries of a lunatic at large named Bret Holsten have been the case of considerable annoyance and no little alarm to the settlers in the Black wood district. The unfortunate man used to sleep in hollow trees, under logs and in such like resting places, and would wander about during the day, turning up at the various homsteads.
Information was conveyed to the police at Bridgetown and Bunbury,amid several attempts were made to capture the " wild" man, but without success. The force at Bridgetown became weakened through the illness of two con stables stationed there, so that when news of the whereabouts of the outcast was again sent to the officer-in-charge of police in Bunbury Constable Shields was sent out with a tracker, but the track was lost by the runaway swimming the river and escaping into the bush. Constable Vaughan, of Bunbury, was then despatched about 10 days ago to assist Shields to capture the man. After many days of fruitless search the tracks of the fugitive were picked up on Saturday last near Mr Wheatley's on the Warren River and going towards the south coast. The tracks led through a dense undergrowth,through which it was impossible to take the horses. The constables therefore dismounted and Shields took the horses round while Vaughan followed the tracks. Traces of the haunts of the man were found in several places, such as rush beds and camp fires, many of which seemed to have been several months old. On Monday the constables found the hollow tree in which the fugitive had slept on the previous night, and fresh tracks leading in the direction of Mr Wheatley's residence. Following the tracks the fugitive was sighted about 9 o'clock in the afternoon. He took refuge in the barn, and when driven to bay turned on his pursuers armed with a tomahawk and a butcher's lknife, remarking, "You will not take me alive, I will fight for my life. I know what I have done, and I know that I will swing for it." A desperate struggle lasting about 20 minutes then ensued, and when the constables disarmed him the lunatic kicked and bit like a dog and foamed at the mouth. He refused, when overpowered, to give his name, saying that the police knew his name, as they had been after him for four years. He refused to walk, and a cart had to be hired to bring him to Bridgetown. Before leaving he started to tell his captors that he had done away with his mate at the diggings." Vaughan warned him in the usual manner, and he started to pray to God to forgive him for what he had done. On the journey to Bridge town he made several attempts to escape, and one of the constables had to sit up at night to watch him. During the night the prisoner conversed with his captors quite rationally, and in the course of the conversation asked why it was that 1000 had been offered for Ned Kelly's head and only 100 for his. He was charged at the Bridgetown Police Court with being of unsound mind, and on the certificate of Dr Dickinson was committed to the Fremantle lunatic asylum. On his arrival in Bunbury in charge of Constable Vaughan; persistent rumors became current that the man was suspected by the authorities to be the man who was wanted in connection with the brutal Bardoc murder which took place on the goldfields nearly four years ago. To ascertain the correctness or otherwise of this rumor, our representative waited on Sergeant. Mitchell yesterday morning and was told by that official that he could not account for such a rumor, as he was not aware of the alleged identity of the prisoner. "If," continued Sergeant Mitchell, "people will circulate wild reports of this descriptin they should have some grounds for their statements." It is also said that at Picton Junction a former resident of the goldfields identified the prisoner as having been on the fields some four years ago.


Benjamin Thomas Bridge 1863-1950

Benjamin Bridge was born at Stockyard Creek in the Wollombi district of New South Wales
on the 31 May 1860.
One of seven children and second son of Hawkesbury born Joseph Bridge Jnr.1835-1923
Joseph Bridge Jnr was the son of Parramatta born Joseph Bridge 1814-1891 and
grandson of convict Joseph Bridge 1776-1829
Benjamin's mother was Sarah Jane Payne 1839-1899. Sarah Jane born at
Payne's Crossing New South Wales was the daughter
of Convict Edward Payne 1800-1880 and Ann Hanratty 1823-1913.
Benjamin married 1st cousin, Bertha Amelia Teresa Australia Medhurst 18651932,
at Inverell on the 25 June 1881. The daughter of George Medhurst 1838-1888
and Ann Matilda Bridge 1839-1927.
Ann Matilda Bridge and Benjamin's father Joseph Bridge Jnr. were brother
and sister.
The couple managed to have seven children in Inverell between 1879 and 1909,
in spite of the fact the police never seemed to know where he was.
Francis Robert Medhurst/Bridge 18791927
Alice Maud Bridge 18841951
Annie May Bridge 18861945
Benjamin William Bridge 1889 1936
Hilton Victor Joseph Bridge 18911985
Clarice Evelyn Edith Bridge 18921985
Walter Edward Alexander Bridge 19041978
Cecil Meldorn Bridge 19091963

Benjamin died in Tamworth, New South Wales on the 25 August 1950.

The Maitland Mercury & Hunter River General Advertiser, Thursday 4 February 1892.
At Scone last week Benjamin Bridge, a well-known horse-trainer, arrested
at his residence by Senior-sergeant Coady, was brought up on a charge of
horse stealing from the properties of Thomas Cook and Bakewell Bros.
Upon the application of the police, the prisoner was remanded till Saturday
for the production of evidence. Two others, alleged to be implicated, are said
to have been arrested up the country, and the evidence is likely to be of
a sensational nature.

The Maitland Mercury, Thursday 3 March 1892.
Benjamin Bridge, found guilty of stealing a colt of Wm. Bakewell,
recovered at Mogil Mogil, was remanded for sentence, and on a second
charge of stealing a horse of Thos. English, the jury are still locked up.

Singleton Argus, Wednesday 9 March 1892
THE ESCAPE FROM THE MURRURUNDI GAOL
Benjamin Bridge in Trouble.
The Murrurundi Times of Saturday last says: "On Thursday evening,
about-half-past 5 o'clock some excitement was caused in Murrurundi
by a report that a prisoner had escaped from the local gaol and the
hurrying of the foot and mounted police in pursuit.
On enquiry we learned that Benjamin Bridge, who had on the previous
day been found guilty of horse stealing on two charges and sentenced
to 10 years penal servitude, had escaped from gaol by scaling the wall.
The gaol wall is about 15 feet high. Bridge was confined with three other
prisoners in the yard all day, and closely watched by gaoler Gall. About
1 o'clock the prisoners were given their tea, and about 5 o'clock were
provided with water, when they were alright, and the gaoler sat down to
wait till half-past 5, the time at which the prisoners are locked up for
the night. In the interval Bridge quietly effected his escape by scaling
the front wall at its junction with the main building. There is a small
cell window at this corner about 9 feet from the ground, the sill of which
projects several inches, the eaves of the roof being a couple of feet higher;
about 18 inches from the ground the base course projects a couple of inches.
It is surmised that Bridge, who is a pretty smart fellow, reached the window
sill by spring from the base course, and then with the aid of the other prisoners
and a broom got on the roof, and once there to climb over the remaining portion
of the wall and drop down on the other side was easy enough. The es cape seems
to have been well planned, as the other prisoners at once retired to their
cells to avert suspicion.
Immediately on escaping Bridge crossed the garden in front of the gaol,
leapt lightly over the fence, decended the steep bank there, and proceeded
along the river, to Messrs Stuart and M'Fadyen's residences, and thence in
the direction of the Chinamen's gardens, but here all trace of him was lost.
He was seen crossing the garden in front of the gaol by Mrs Brennan, who,
believing something was wrong gave the alarm to the sergeant, who was returning
from the railway station but some minutes elapsed before the prisoner was missed,
and he got a good start. Although we shall be glad to hear of the prisoner's
speedy capture It is hardly likely he will be retaken in a hurry.
No blame attaches to the gaoler."

Singleton Argus, Wednesday 9 March 1892
BENJAMIN BRIDGE WANTED.
50 Reward. [By Telegraph]. Sydney, Tuesday.
The Government have offered a reward of 50
for the capture of the man Bridge, sentenced
to 10 years' for horse stealing, and who escaped
from the Murrurundi gaol on the 3rd instant.


Australian Town and Country Journal,Saturday 12 March 1892.
The Government has offered a reward of 50 for information leading
to the recapture of Benjamin Bridges, alias Texas Jack, a prisoner
under sentence of 10 years for horse-stealing, who, on the 3rd instant,
effected his escape from the gaol at Murrurundi.
He is described as about 29 years of age, 5 feet 8 inches high,
fair complexion, small sandy beard and moustache, grey eyes, rather bow-legged

Australian Town and Country Journal, Saturday 20 August 1892
Recapture of a Prisoner.
Murrurundi, Tuesday.The man Benjamin Bridge, who was sentenced to
10 years' penal servitude and two days later escaped from
Murrurundi Gaol, has been recaptured at Burketown, Queensland.

Northern Star, Wednesday 14 September 1892.
DARING ESCAPE FROM GAOL.
AT Burketown (Queensland) on Friday morning a most daring escape was made by a prisoner
named Benjamin Bridge from the police barracks.
It appears that about 12 months ago Bridge escaped from Murrurundi Gaol in
New South Wales when he was under sentence of 10 years' imprisonment for
horsestealing.
The fugitive successfully evaded the police until some six weeks back,
when he was captured by the local police at Riversleigh Station.
A New South Wales police officer arrived on Thursday, and had identified
the prisoner, intending to take him to Sydney by the next boat, to avoid this,
the prisoner set fire to his cell and gave the alarm. Senior-constable M'Grath,
who was the only constable on the premises, opened the cell and removed
the prisoner, who after a desperate resistance was manacled and chained to the
fence.
In the mean time, in spite of willing assistance, the whole of the barracks were
in flames. M'Grath with others then went to the rescue of his wife and family,
and of the court records, books, &c. During the con fusion the prisoner escaped,
making for the man groves, where he disappeared, and has not yet been re-captured.
He is 30 years of age, and is said to have been 22 times before a jury, the present
being his fourth escape from custody. He informed the New South Wales officer that
he would never take him to Sydney.
Nothing now remains on the site of the courthouse and the barracks but a heap
of smouldering ruins.

Kalgoorlie Western Argus (WA), Thursday 4 January 1900.
A NOTORIOUS CRIMINAL. ARRESTED AT DENHAM RIVER. PERTH, Dec. 31. 1899
On Saturday the Commissioner of Police received a telegram from Derby
stating that Constable Freeman had just arrived at Wyndham with the
notorious Benjamin Bridge whom he had arrested at Denham River.
Bridge is an escapee from Brisbane gaol, who regained his freedom in 1892.
He is a notorious horse and cattle thief, and during the last seven years
he is reported to have been carrying on cattle duffing on a large scale
in the Northern territory of the Kimberley district.
He has successfully evaded capture for seven years, and is regarded by
the police as an exceptionally dangerous criminal.

Western Mail, Perth, WA. Saturday 24 March 1900.
A NOTORIOUS GAOL-BREAKER
ADELAIDE, March 16. 1900
Among the passengers by the s.s. Marloo, from Western Australia,
on Friday, were two New South Wales sergeants of police with four
of the mother colony criminals in their charge.
One, - Benjamin Bridge, has a black record. He escaped in 1893 from
Murrurundi gaol, while undergoing a sentence of ten years' imprisonment
for horse stealing. He was re-arrested at Burke, in Northern Queensland,
eighteen months later, but again escaped by burn- ing down the lock-up
in which he was incarcerated. For over four years he eluded capture; although,
the police were most vigilant through all Queensland and New South Wales.
Recently, however, he was brought to bay in the Kimberley district of
Western Australia by Constable Freeman, who, by the way, gained promotion by
his smartness in the matter.
The other prisoners in charge of the sergeants are charged with ordinary wife
desertion. On the arrival of the s.s. Marloo at Port Adelaide they were lodged
in the police cells for safe keeping. They will rejoin the vessel just
previous to the resumption of the voyage eastwards.

Singleton Argus, NSW. Tuesday 10 April 1900.
THE ESCAPEE BRIDGE.
Sentenced to Two Years.
Benjamin Bridge, who had pleaded guilty at the Darlinghurst Quarter Sessions
on Friday to escaping from Murrurundi Gaol in 1892 was brought
up for sentence in the afternoon Mr Levien asked Judge Heydon to
deal leniently with the prisoner. It was now eight years since he had
escaped, and the term of six years to which he was sentenced had expired.
Bridge had been living an honest life in W. Australia, and, indeed had
discovered a property which would in all probability have made him independent
for life had he been left undisturbed. His wife, as good a woman as ever
lived, and to whom Bridge had constantly remitted money, had travelled
to Sydney to see him and he trusted that his Honor would take these
matters into consideration in passing sentence.
His Honor Judge Haydon said that, while there was no moral indignation against
a man for escaping yet it, of course, was flouting the law and could not
be passed over. He would be as lenient a possible, the sentence to be imposed
would be two years.
He was not satisfied as to the evidence of Bridge's good character since he escaped,
and if Mr. Levien could produce evidence that he had been an upright man during
that time, he would recommend the Minister for Justice; to reduce the sentence.

the Northern Territory Times was not available in Sydney

Northern Territory Times and Gazette (Darwin, NT) Friday 12 January 1900.
Ben Bridge, the `Out-law.'
The recent capture of Benjamin Bridge by Mounted Constable Freeman in East Kimberley, W.A.,
brings a climax to the wrong-doings of a very notorious character.
Bridge hails from northern New South Wales, where he once raced horses.
A friend leased him some racers on one occasion for a meeting at a neighbouring town,
but fortune frowned, and to satisfy the demands of his landlord he sold him the
horses. Subsequently he stole the horses from the landlord and gave them back
to the rightful owner! Gaol followed, but he broke it and turned into Queensland,
where 'the feeling' came on him again, and he eventually got into Burketown gaol
for horse stealing.
Not long after he was celled here the gaol caught fire and was burnt down,
some say from the inside, some from the outside. To save Bridge he was
taken out and chained to a post. When the fire was subdued the police went to
remove Bridge, and found he had vanished.
It is generally agreed that the prisoner swam the river, with heavy irons and all on,
and then walked 60 miles to a camp where his chains were knocked off. At all events
the police never saw him again. Bridge moved down to Western Queensland, where he took
jobs at station work. From there he gravitated into the Territory, and spent some time
on the cattle runs at stockman's work. His identity was pretty well known, though his
name was mostly 'McDonald.' He was gradually moving west, and on the way called at all
the police camps for the latest papers! From Newcastle Waters he had a mate who was
drowned in Murrenji Waterhole. Bridge reported this to M.C. O'Keefe, at the Victoria,
who, investigated the matter but couldn't find the body. There was nothing to warrant
further enquiry, consequently O'Keefe had no scruples about letting Bridge camp
close to the police quarters, particularly as he seemed a decent sort of chap. He
even swapped horses with him, giving Bridge, amongst others, the one-time racer Bluegown,
with which, curiously enough, he lost a 20 match to a western member of the force later on.
After spelling a bit, Bridge moved on into Western Australia, about four years ago.
One story says that he 'gammoned green' about horses while, employed on one station,
until he got a bet on about breaking in a lot of colts. He spent some time poisonings
dingoes, and is said to have collected, 200 worth of tails in a very short time.
Not long after his arrival in the west he dropped on the police sergeant's camp
and turned out for a while, boldly faced the camp and sat down and engaged in
conversation with the sergeant. After he had been in camp some time the
sergeant, who must have had a keen scent, advanced to Bridge, put his
hand on his shoulder, and was proceeding to deal out the usual formula 'I
arrest you in the Queen's name ' and so forth, when Bridge wriggled free, and with a
parting 'Not yet' cleared for a creek close by, where his boy had just brought his
horses, picking up a revolver from his pack as he ran. The sergeant, in following the outlaw,
kicked his foot against a stiff grass tussock and got a spill, and when he
rose again Bridge was mounted and gone.
After that, but little was heard of Bridge, no one really seemed to
trouble about him. He had done no harm there, he could pitch a pitiful tale, he was
a great hand with horses, and in short the whole district stood to him rather than otherwise.
He came and went on the stations like a free man, camped where he pleased in apparent safety,
and if he wanted to attend the annual races at Wyndham, well, he simply stood a little back
from the crowd. Where everyone helped the fellow the police had what is some times
called 'Buckley's chance' of catching him. But by and bye the feeling began to change.
There were things happening which could not be accounted for. Valuable stock disappeared
mysteriously from their accustomed haunts, and kept on vanishing for a long time before
anyone would admit Bridge to have a hand in it. 'Billy,' as he was called in the West,
wouldn't do such a thing ; but faith in him soon turned to anger against him when
indisputable evidence of his treachery was produced from time to time.
There were even then a few of a sort who helped him whenever they could against the police.
Three months ago or a little better the Wild Dog police, Freeman and M'Ginley, made an excursion after 'Billy ' and came upon him near Argyle station.
'Well Freeman,' says he, 'are you going to take me this time!' To which Freeman said 'I'm going to have
a hard try,' and the chase began. Bridge was well mounted, while the troopers had scrags
that couldn't head a duck. The result was that after a long stern chase first Freeman's
horse and then McGinley's dropped down exhausted, just when the outlaw's mount could only
be kept going by plenty of flogging. A black tracker was sent on to keep Bridge in sight,
but darkness beat him, and by cutting a wire fence he gave his pursuers the slip.
I was at Rosewood when the police came that night, horses and men were tired out ;
'Billy' had gone towards Newry, on the N.T. border.
Next morning the police crossed over into the Territory to hunt for Bridge's main camp,
supposed to be somewhere near Auvergne. Though they lost 'Billy' the
day before they managed to secure his packs and a boy, and the boy was useful as a guide.
Their mission resulted in securing another of Bridge's black boys and some more of his
horses and packs. This boy, Larry by name, was afterwards used by Freeman to track down
the outlaw. At this stage Trooper McGinley fell sick and had to go into hospital at Wyndham.
Freeman, after the lapse of some days got on Bridge's tracks again and followed him to Turkey Creek,
the station owned by his brother, where the scent soon got red hot.
Bridge held out as long as he could, even after Freeman had secured his last horse:
but he was run down eventually and safely landed in Wyndham gaol (where his brother Joseph
is serving a sentence) last week in December. His 'pals' declared he would shoot rather than
be taken alive; he vowed the same thing himself, but so far as is known there was no firing before the capture.
The district is well rid of a most expert horse and cattle thief, and his capture is all the
more creditable because he could ride with any man in Australia, was always well horsed, and
had several staunch confederates who never hesitated to shelter him. It was the common talk
of the district that if Bridge had acted 'on the square ' no man's hand would have been turned
against him. It would complicate matters very much if he broke gaol at Wyndham, but his past
history ought to show the need for taking extra precautions against such an untoward
event


BLACK FRANCIS - THE FLOGGER - New South Wales

Black Francis was a callous negro sent here as a convict after the American War of independance. He was given the job of flogger at the Goulburn Gaol between 1838 and 1841.

The government floggers at the penal stations were volunteers for this brutal work, to avoid the penalities of the chain gang, of which they were quite often originally members.The worst behaved prisoners and perhaps the unluckiest worked for the government in these chain gangs building roads or clearing land.

There were two floggers in that area at the time.
The other was Billy O'ROURKE known as The Towrang Flogger at the Towrang Stockade ten mile north of Goulburn, In New South Wales, by the Wollondilly River. The Towrang Stockade was the chief penal establishment in the southern district from 1833 to 1846 and there were never less than 250 prisoners.

It would be fair to say that Black Francis liked his job, for when things were slow in the 'flogging department' he would befriend the "Ticket-O-Leave" men he knew were in the habit of robbing the carriers, taking spirits up north to Sydney.

After sharing their plunders he would then inform on them to the magistrate.

Black Francis used the cat with savage ferocity and on many occassions treed and flogged the man he'd been drinking with the night before. He more than once flogged unfairly, striking the prisoner on the neck and the calves.

The cat o'nine tails was rather a brutal kind of discipline for convicts who acted up. There were 9 ropes attached to the whip with notes/knots along it. The cat o'nine tails was first soaked in salted water, which aided in the pain that the convict suffered but also helped in the healing of the wounds. A convict could be sentenced to 25 lashes just for having a smoke or speaking to a passing stranger.Up to 200 lashes a day.

*Extract from Papers Relating to the Conduct of Magistrates in NSW c1825 James Blackburn, attached to the prisoners barrack; ordered to receive 25 lashes every morning, and kept on bread and water, until he tells who were the four men he was in company with gambling...

One morning in 1841 they found Black Francis in the bush near Run Of Water, as dead as a doornail with three leaden lugs in his body.

The Ticket-O-Leave men were the prime suspects of course, probably one who had been flogged by Black Francis in the past. However, nothing was ever proven. The ticket of Leave was developed from about 1801. It gave convicts a chance to work for the master of their choice. It was given to well behaved convicts and was generally successful in making them useful members of society.

The final verse in the song Jim Jones at Botany Bay:

And some dark night when everything is silent in the town,
I'll kill them tyrants one by one and shoot the floggers down.
I'll give the law a little shock, remember what I say,
They'll yet regret they sent Jim Jones in chains to Botany Bay.




The two good looking Irish lads below are not quite the era (about 1860)and by the looks of the uniform are in Fremantle Gaol. I just thought it was an interesting Photograph.
Janilye

For your interest, The following are the particulars of the officers stationed at Goulburn at the time:-

DARLEY, Capt. J. 17th Regiment of Foot. Stationed in 1836 at Goulburn in charge of 2nd Division of Mounted Police.
WADDY Ensign Richard, 50th Regiment of Foot. Stationed at Berrima in 1835/6, in 1837/9 with Mounted Police, Goulburn. In 1841 he was at Sydney.
CHRISTIE Lieut. S.F., Mounted Police, was attached to the 80th Regiment of Foot. In 1839 he was at Bathurst. He is listed in 1840, 1841 and 1842 simply as Mounted Police, without mention of district. In 1843/4 he was at Goulburn.

Excluding the officers seconded to the Mounted Police and whose duties embraced some connection with the Stockade the complete list of officers in charge of the Towrang Stockade were:
1839 Lieut. R. SHERBERASS, 80th Regiment. 1841
Capt.V.Houghton TYSSEN of the 80th, Assistant Engineer and Superintendent of Ironed Gangs.
1842 Lieut. W. COOKSON, 80th, Assistant Engineer and Superintendent of Ironed Gangs. 1843 Lieut. Owen Gorman, 80th, Assistant Engineer and Superintendent of Ironed Gangs.

The Regiments serving in New South Wales from 1838 to 1846 were 50th [West Kent], 1833/41;
21st [Royal North British Fusiliers], 1833/39; 28th [North Gloucestershire], 1835/42;
80th [Staffordshire Volunteers], 1837/44;
51st [2nd Yorkshire West Riding Light Infantry], 1838/46; 96th, 1841/48; 99th [Lanarkshire], 1842/56; 48th [Rutlandshire], 1844/47; 11th [North Devonshire], 1845/57; 65th [2nd Yorkshire North Riding], 1846/49; of which the 28th mainly garrisoned the Stockade.

The actual date of the relinquishment of the Towrang Stockade does not appear in the Almanac of 1844. Presumably its demolition began soon after 1843. Probably the greater part of the material has been used on the roads and culverts in the vicinity. In quite recent years part of the coping of the bridge has been destroyed by vandals or used by road contractors. That date for the relinquishment of the Stockade is suggested by a document in the Lands Office, Goulburn It is a Copy of the descriptive remarks concerning the thirteen portions of land at Tourang inserted by Mr. Larmer on his descriptions thereof dated 6th October, 1843, accompanying plan of same date, and the plan is attached. His valuations were 4 per acre.
Source:Mulwaree Shire Community Heritage Study, 2002 - 2004


Boyne - passenger list from Scotland to NSW 1839

The 619 ton ship, Boyne arrived on Wednesday 2nd January 1839 from Cromarty, Scotland, via Cape of Good Hope, having left the former Port the 1st. September 1838 and the latter the 23rd. November 1838.

Capt. Richardson, with 284 Government emigrants. Passenger - Rev. Colin Stewart (Scotland); Ewen Cameron, Esq., Surgeon Superintendent. Agent, Capt. Richardson.
Boyne was built in Calcutta in 1807.
Name of Owner: J. Somes.
Name of Broker or
Agent: Lachlan & Co.
Rate of Hire per Old Ton: 5/13/5 x 619

Of the 284 emigrants;
158 were adults
60 were children 7 to 14 years
67 were children under 7 years




A very successful voyage and one which prompted this 'Letter To The Editor' to the Sydney Gazette on the 10 January 1839.


SIR,
Although utter strangers in the colony, we shall feel much obliged to you if you will be so kind as to give the following testimony to Captain Richardson, of the ship Boyne, publicity through the medium of your useful journal. I am, sir, on behalf of all the Emigrants in the ship Boyne, your most obedient humble servant.
Charles M'Gregor.

The Emigrants just arrived from the Highlands of Scotland, by the ship Boyne, deem it a duty incumbent upon them to testify in this public manner their unfeigned gratitude and respect to Captain Richardson, for his kind, affectionate and gentlemanly conduct towards them.
He has, indeed, been as a brother to us all, and a father to the children.
His solicitude in directing all things for our comfort, and his unaffected manners, will not soon be forgotten by us.
The first officer, Mr. Daniel, and all the other Officers, and Seamen, also deserve our sincere thanks for their continued kindness to all the passengers.
The manner in which Mr. Ewen Cameron, the surgeon, has conducted the affairs committed to his charge is beyond all praise. His patience and unremitting attention to the sick could not be exceeded. His attention, also, in enforcing and directing the most salutary regulations
for the health and comfort of all has
proved eminently successful.
The Rev. Colin Stewart, who has acted as Chaplain on board, deserves our lasting gratitude, for he has spared no pains in his endeavours to improve the moral and intellectual capacities of all, particularly the young. His public and private ministrations are highly appre- ciated by all his fellow passengers :-the solemnity of public worship on the Lord's, day has been so congenial to our feelings. that we felt more at home than we other- wise could have done.
Mr. Duncan Cameron, who has acted as Schoolmaster, deserves the thanks and gratitude of all the parents on board, for his careful and unremitting endeavours to instill sound principles and communicate useful knowledge to the young.

Ship Boyne, Jan., 1838.

NOTE: Indeed the letter writer above has mistakenly dated it 1838. Also because a passenger list was never published, my source for the list below was found in the 'Index to Miscellaneous Immigrants'
within the NSW Government State Records.
Acknowledgement to Ann Smith a member of staff at State Records who indexed this series NRS 5313, Persons on Government Ships, Aug 1837-Feb 1840.
There are 107 names on this list.
Wives and Children's names have not been included.
I thought of removing the reel numbers and NRS but this way there can be no mistake when searching. janilye




SURNAME FIRST NAME AGE DATE COPY PAGE/S ITEM REMARKS SERIES

BUCHANAN Dugald 34 02/01/1839 Reel 2654 182 [4/4780] Wife 30; ploughman NRS 5313
CAMERON Agnes 25 02/01/1839 Reel 2654 186 [4/4780] Unmarried; dairy woman NRS 5313
CAMERON Alexander 25 02/01/1839 Reel 2654 184 [4/4780] Unmarried; shepherd NRS 5313
CAMERON Alexander 28 02/01/1839 Reel 2654 184 [4/4780] Unmarried; shepherd NRS 5313
CAMERON Alexander 30 02/01/1839 Reel 2654 182 [4/4780] Wife 30; shepherd NRS 5313
CAMERON Alexander 32 02/01/1839 Reel 2654 182 [4/4780] Wife 30; farm labourer NRS 5313
CAMERON Allan 38 02/01/1839 Reel 2654 182 [4/4780] Wife 32; shepherd NRS 5313
CAMERON Allen 38 02/01/1839 Reel 2654 184 [4/4780] Unmarried; ploughman NRS 5313
CAMERON Anne 24 02/01/1839 Reel 2654 186 [4/4780] Unmarried; farm servant NRS 5313
CAMERON Archibald 28 02/01/1839 Reel 2654 184 [4/4780] Unmarried; shepherd NRS 5313
CAMERON Archibald 35 02/01/1839 Reel 2654 182 [4/4780] Wife 28; farmer NRS 5313
CAMERON Archibald 40 02/01/1839 Reel 2654 182 [4/4780] Wife 40; shepherd NRS 5313
CAMERON Cathrine 20 02/01/1839 Reel 2654 186 [4/4780] Unmarried; house servant NRS 5313
CAMERON Cathrine 27 02/01/1839 Reel 2654 186 [4/4780] Widow; house servant NRS 5313
CAMERON Christie 22 02/01/1839 Reel 2654 186 [4/4780] Unmarried; dairy woman NRS 5313
CAMERON Christina 21 02/01/1839 Reel 2654 186 [4/4780] Unmarried; house servant NRS 5313
CAMERON Christina 24 02/01/1839 Reel 2654 186 [4/4780] Unmarried; house servant NRS 5313
CAMERON Donald 23 02/01/1839 Reel 2654 184 [4/4780] Unmarried; shepherd NRS 5313
CAMERON Donald 35 02/01/1839 Reel 2654 182 [4/4780] Wife 33; shepherd NRS 5313
CAMERON Duncan 30 02/01/1839 Reel 2654 184 [4/4780] Unmarried; teacher NRS 5313
CAMERON Duncan (Mrs) 41 02/01/1839 Reel 2654 182 [4/4780] Husband 35; farm servant NRS 5313
CAMERON Ewen 25 02/01/1839 Reel 2654 182 [4/4780] Wife 21; shepherd NRS 5313
CAMERON Ewen 36 02/01/1839 Reel 2654 182 [4/4780] Wife 30; shepherd NRS 5313
CAMERON Flora 27 02/01/1839 Reel 2654 186 [4/4780] Unmarried; dairy woman NRS 5313
CAMERON George 40 02/01/1839 Reel 2654 182 [4/4780] Wife 35; shepherd NRS 5313
CAMERON Johanna 4 02/01/1839 Reel 2654 189 [4/4780] Died in the buildings 15 Jan 1839;&family NRS 5313
CAMERON John 20 02/01/1839 Reel 2654 184 [4/4780] Unmarried; farm servant NRS 5313
CAMERON John 23 02/01/1839 Reel 2654 184 [4/4780] Unmarried; ploughman NRS 5313
CAMERON John 29 02/01/1839 Reel 2654 182 [4/4780] Wife 28; shepherd NRS 5313
CAMERON John 30 02/01/1839 Reel 2654 182 [4/4780] Wife 27; shepherd NRS 5313
CAMERON John 40 02/01/1839 Reel 2654 182 [4/4780] Wife 33; shepherd and farmer NRS 5313
CAMERON Mary 17 02/01/1839 Reel 2654 186 [4/4780] Unmarried; house servant NRS 5313
CAMERON Mary 18 02/01/1839 Reel 2654 186 [4/4780] Unmarried; farm servant NRS 5313
CAMERON Mary 22 02/01/1839 Reel 2654 186 [4/4780] Unmarried; house servant NRS 5313
CAMERON Paul 21 02/01/1839 Reel 2654 184 [4/4780] Unmarried; shepherd NRS 5313
CAMPBELL Christina 23 02/01/1839 Reel 2654 186 [4/4780] Unmarried; farm servant NRS 5313
CAMPBELL Donald 38 02/01/1839 Reel 2654 184 [4/4780] Unmarried; shepherd NRS 5313
CAMPBELL James 35 02/01/1839 Reel 2654 182 [4/4780] Wife 32; farmer and shepherd NRS 5313
CAMPBELL John 23 02/01/1839 Reel 2654 184 [4/4780] Unmarried; shepherd NRS 5313
CAMPBELL Peter 31 02/01/1839 Reel 2654 184 [4/4780] Unmarried; shepherd NRS 5313
CAMPBELL Robert 35 02/01/1839 Reel 2654 182 [4/4780] Wife 40; shepherd NRS 5313
CAMPBELL William 26 02/01/1839 Reel 2654 184 [4/4780] Unmarried; shepherd NRS 5313
GRAHAM John 24 02/01/1839 Reel 2654 184 [4/4780] Unmarried; farm servant NRS 5313
HUNTER Robina 34 02/01/1839 Reel 2654 188 [4/4780] Unmarried; seamstress NRS 5313
JEFFREY John 38 02/01/1839 Reel 2654 184 [4/4780] Unmarried; farmer NRS 5313
KENNEDY Alexander 32 02/01/1839 Reel 2654 182 [4/4780] Wife 30; shepherd NRS 5313
KENNEDY Allen 33 02/01/1839 Reel 2654 182 [4/4780] Wife 25; shepherd NRS 5313
KENNEDY Charles 47 02/01/1839 Reel 2654 182 [4/4780] Wife 40; farm servant NRS 5313
KENNEDY Hugh 22 02/01/1839 Reel 2654 184 [4/4780] Unmarried; farm servant NRS 5313
KENNEDY John 27 02/01/1839 Reel 2654 184 [4/4780] Unmarried; farm servant NRS 5313
KENNEDY Niel 26 02/01/1839 Reel 2654 184 [4/4780] Unmarried; farm servant NRS 5313
MCARTHUR Donald 28 02/01/1839 Reel 2654 182 [4/4780] Wife 21; shepherd NRS 5313
MCCOLL Sarah 65 02/01/1839 Reel 2654 188 [4/4780] Unmarried; dairy woman NRS 5313
MCDONALD Alexander 20 02/01/1839 Reel 2654 186 [4/4780] Unmarried; carpenter and wheelwright NRS 5313
MCDONALD Alexander 29 02/01/1839 Reel 2654 186 [4/4780] Unmarried; shepherd NRS 5313
MCDONALD Allan 36 02/01/1839 Reel 2654 182 [4/4780] Wife 29; shepherd NRS 5313
MCDONALD Angus 24 02/01/1839 Reel 2654 184 [4/4780] Unmarried; shepherd NRS 5313
MCDONALD Angus 44 02/01/1839 Reel 2654 182 [4/4780] Wife 22; shepherd NRS 5313
MCDONALD Anne 17 02/01/1839 Reel 2654 186 [4/4780] Unmarried; house servant NRS 5313
MCDONALD Archibald 32 02/01/1839 Reel 2654 182 [4/4780] Wife 19; shepherd NRS 5313
MCDONALD Duncan 60 02/01/1839 Reel 2654 182 [4/4780] Wife 48; shepherd NRS 5313
MCDONALD Ellen 16 02/01/1839 Reel 2654 186 [4/4780] Unmarried; house servant NRS 5313
MCDONALD Ewen 24 02/01/1839 Reel 2654 186 [4/4780] Unmarried; shepherd NRS 5313
MCDONALD Janet 16 02/01/1839 Reel 2654 186 [4/4780] Unmarried; house servant NRS 5313
MCDONALD John 26 02/01/1839 Reel 2654 184 [4/4780] Unmarried; shepherd NRS 5313
MCDONALD John 35 02/01/1839 Reel 2654 182 [4/4780] Wife 38; farmer NRS 5313
MCDONALD Margaret 25 02/01/1839 Reel 2654 188 [4/4780] Unmarried; laundry maid NRS 5313
MCDONALD Margery 20 02/01/1839 Reel 2654 186 [4/4780] Unmarried; house servant NRS 5313
MCDONALD Ronald 19 02/01/1839 Reel 2654 186 [4/4780] Unmarried; shepherd NRS 5313
MCDONALD Sally 22 02/01/1839 Reel 2654 186 [4/4780] Unmarried; house servant NRS 5313
MCEWAN John 17 02/01/1839 Reel 2654 186 [4/4780] Unmarried; shepherd NRS 5313
MCGREGOR Robert 39 02/01/1839 Reel 2654 182 [4/4780] Wife 35; gardener NRS 5313
MCKENZIE Allen 44 02/01/1839 Reel 2654 182 [4/4780] Wife 34; agriculturalist NRS 5313
MCKENZIE Janet 24 02/01/1839 Reel 2654 188 [4/4780] Unmarried; dairy woman NRS 5313
MCKILLOP Donald 34 02/01/1839 Reel 2654 184 [4/4780] Unmarried; shepherd NRS 5313
MCKINNON Donald 28 02/01/1839 Reel 2654 184 [4/4780] Unmarried; shepherd NRS 5313
MCKINNON Dugald 19 02/01/1839 Reel 2654 186 [4/4780] Unmarried; shepherd NRS 5313
MCKINNON Duncan 17 02/01/1839 Reel 2654 184 [4/4780] Unmarried; shepherd NRS 5313
MCKINNON Ewen 22 02/01/1839 Reel 2654 184 [4/4780] Unmarried; shepherd NRS 5313
MCKINNON Ewen 62 02/01/1839 Reel 2654 182 [4/4780] Wife 51; shepherd NRS 5313
MCKINNON Mary 19 02/01/1839 Reel 2654 188 [4/4780] Unmarried; house servant NRS 5313
MCKINNON Peter 30 02/01/1839 Reel 2654 184 [4/4780] Unmarried; shepherd NRS 5313
MCLEAN Alexander 25 02/01/1839 Reel 2654 186 [4/4780] Unmarried; farm servant NRS 5313
MCLELLAN Mary 32 02/01/1839 Reel 2654 186 [4/4780] Unmarried; house keeper NRS 5313
MCMASTER Allen 40 02/01/1839 Reel 2654 182 [4/4780] Wife 44; farmer NRS 5313
MCMASTER Anne 18 02/01/1839 Reel 2654 188 [4/4780] Unmarried; house servant NRS 5313
MCMASTER Ellen 17 02/01/1839 Reel 2654 188 [4/4780] Unmarried; house servant NRS 5313
MCMASTER Margaret 17 02/01/1839 Reel 2654 188 [4/4780] Unmarried; house servant NRS 5313
MCMASTER Mary 20 02/01/1839 Reel 2654 188 [4/4780] Unmarried; house servant NRS 5313
MCMILLAN William 30 02/01/1839 Reel 2654 182 [4/4780] Wife 28; shepherd NRS 5313
MCMILLEN Cathrine 21 02/01/1839 Reel 2654 188 [4/4780] Unmarried; house servant NRS 5313
MCMULLEN Jessie 18 02/01/1839 Reel 2654 188 [4/4780] Unmarried; house servant NRS 5313
MCNAUGHTEN John 21 02/01/1839 Reel 2654 186 [4/4780] Unmarried; shepherd NRS 5313
MCNAUGHTON Donald 27 02/01/1839 Reel 2654 184 [4/4780] Wife 24; shepherd NRS 5313
MCNAUGHTON James 25 02/01/1839 Reel 2654 184 [4/4780] Unmarried; shepherd NRS 5313
MCPHAIL Donald 25 02/01/1839 Reel 2654 184 [4/4780] Wife 28; shepherd NRS 5313
MCPHEE Alexander 26 02/01/1839 Reel 2654 184 [4/4780] Wife 23; ploughman NRS 5313
MCPHEE Ewen 25 02/01/1839 Reel 2654 186 [4/4780] Unmarried; sawyer NRS 5313
MCPHEE John 21 02/01/1839 Reel 2654 186 [4/4780] Unmarried; shepherd NRS 5313
MCPHEE Mary 23 02/01/1839 Reel 2654 188 [4/4780] Unmarried; house maid NRS 5313
MCPHEE Peter 37 02/01/1839 Reel 2654 182 [4/4780] Wife 27; farmer NRS 5313
MCPHERSON Jean 21 02/01/1839 Reel 2654 186 [4/4780] Unmarried; house servant NRS 5313
MCVICAR Archibald 30 02/01/1839 Reel 2654 182 [4/4780] Wife 34; shepherd and servant NRS 5313
MCVICAR Norman 36 02/01/1839 Reel 2654 182 [4/4780] Wife 38; labourer NRS 5313
ROBERTSON Walter 35 02/01/1839 Reel 2654 184 [4/4780] Wife 38; joiner NRS 5313
SINCLAIR Isabella 34 02/01/1839 Reel 2654 188 [4/4780] Unmarried; house maid NRS 5313
STEWART Alexander 30 02/01/1839 Reel 2654 184 [4/4780] Wife 28; shepherd and farmer NRS 5313
STEWART Donald 14 02/01/1839 Reel 2654 186 [4/4780] Unmarried; shepherd NRS 5313
TROTTER William 21 02/01/1839 Reel 2654 186 [4/4780] Unmarried; farm overseer NRS 5313


Below is a photograph of the Ship Boyne's Passenger Record Book


1 comment(s), latest 2 years, 6 months ago

BRIDGET EATHER nee HONAN 1833-1886

The wife of James Joseph Eather 1821-1906, son of Robert Eather 1795-1881 and Mary Lynch 1802-1853

The benefits of North Richmond, where normal amenities were close at hand, would have been much appreciated by Mrs. Bridget Eather, an Irish woman of some culture, originating from Limerick. She could read, write, sew and play the piano. All accomplishments which were much appreciated after she left the civilisation of Richmond with her husband and several small children for the barely explored wilds of the Bellinger River district. The date on which that difficult journey was undertaken was in 1863 when the Richmond Bottoms proved as unrewarding to James as it had to his brother.

They arrived at Urunga Heads in a sailing vessel and from there on it was hard travelling with a horse and three slides for twenty three miles up the river to the spot where they settled, at Boat Harbour near the later town of Bellingen.

The attractions of the district to which the Eathers came, among the very first who accepted the invitation of paying off their farms under the Free Selection legislation of 1861, were the lush river flats, temperature climate and limitless expanses of virgin land.

At first, however, the only economic use to which the land could be put was cedar-getting. The earliest settlers cut the cedar from the foothills of the valley, axing their way finally onto the Dorrigo plateau and sending out the precious logs on the boats which brought in their supplies.

The land was in it's virgin condition requiring much toil before crops could be sown and it was 1864 before the first blocks, including the Eather's could be surveyed.

There, on what became the "Orange Grove" property, the Eather children grew to sturdy adulthood, the daughters were taught sewing by their mother who had somehow managed to bring both sewing machine and piano to the little clearing in the frowning forrest, and both boys and girls finding their recreation in the Irish jigs which she taught them. She was obliged likewise to instruct the elder children in reading and writing, for a provisional was not yet established on the Upper Bellinger until 1869 when James Eather became one of the members of the local board.

One of the other members of the board was William Jarrett, reputed to be the first settler on the river. Before many years the link between the two families was made even stronger with the marriage of the eldest Eather daughter, Mary, to Thomas Jarrett.

British Contingents which served in the Boer War

Alderson's Mounted infantry
Amphlett's Mounted hfantry
2 Cavalry Household Cavalry
1st King's Dragoon Guards
6th Carabiniers
2nd Scots Greys
Scots Guards,
lst & 2nd Life Guards,
lst & 2nd Royal Horse Guards (Blues)
6th lnniskilling Dragoons
5th Royal Irish Lancers
9th Queen's Lancers
12th Prince of Wales Royal Lancers
16th (Queen's) Lancers
17th (Duke of Cambridge's Own) Lancers
3rd Hussars (King's Own)
7th Hussars ( Queen's Own)
8th King's Royal Irish Hussars
10th Hussars (Prince of Wales's Own)
13th Hussars
14th (King's) Hussars
18th (Victoria Mary, Princess of Wales's Own) Hussars
19th (Queen Alexandra's Own Royal) Hussars
20th Hussars Imperial Yeomanry
lst, 2nd, 3rd, 4th, 5th, 6th, 7th, 8th, 9th, l0th, llth, 12th, 13th, 14th, 15th,
Royal Artillery Horse Field Garrison
Elswick Battery
Honorable Artillery Company
Natal Hotchkiss Detachment
Royal Artillery Mounted RiflesInfantry
Royal Dragoons,
1st & 2nd Dragoons (Royal Scots Greys)
6th (lnniskilling)Dragoon Guards,
Ist (King's)Dragoon Guards
2nd ( Queen's Bays)Dragoon Guards
3rd (Prince of Wales's) Dragoon Guards
5th ( Princess Charlotte of Wales's) Dragoon Guards
6th (Carabiniers) Dragoon Guards
7th (Princess Royal's) Devonshire Regiment,
lst& 2nd Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers
2nd Royal lrish Fusiliers
1st Royal Irish Regiment
1st King's Royal Rifle Corps (60th Rifles)
2nd Kings Royal Rifle Corps
3rd King's Royal Rifle Corps
4th King's Royal Rifle Corps
9th King's Rifle Corps
2nd Royal Irish RiflesRoyal Dublin Fusiliers,
1st & 2nd East Kent Regiment (The Buffs)
2nd Royal West Kent Regiment (The Queen's Own)Border Regiment,
1st Coldstream Guards,
1st & 2ndDuke of Cornwall's Light Infantry,
2nd Grenadier Guards,
2nd & 3rdScots Guards,
1st Royal Scots,
1st & 3rd West Surrey,
2nd (The Queen's)Northumberland Fusiliers
Queen's Own Cameron Highlanders,
1st Royal Fusiliers,
2nd King's Liverpool Regiment,
The Lincolnshire Regiment,
2nd The King's Own Liverpool Regiment,
1st Manchester Regiment,
1st & 2nd Duke of Cambridge's Own Middlesex Regiment,
2nd Suffolk Regiment,
1st Bedfordhire Regiment,
2nd Leicestershire Regiment,
1st Yorkshire Regiment,
1st East Yorkshire Regiment
2nd West Yorkshire Regiment,
2nd Lancashire Fusiliers
2nd Royal Lancaster Regiment
Royal Scots Fusiliers,
2nd Cheshire Regiment,
2nd Royal Welsh Fusiliers
South Wales Borderers,
2nd King's Own Scottish Borderers,
1st Shropshire Light infantry,
2nd (King's)Somersetshire Light Infantry
2nd (Prince Albert's)Scottish Rifles
1st Scottish Rifles
2nd ( The Cameronians)Scottish Rifles
4th Gloustershire Regiment,
1st & 2nd Worcestershire Regiment,
1st & 2nd East Surrey Regiment,
2nd Duke of Cornwall's Light Infantry (West Riding Regiment),
1st (Duke of Wellington's) Royal Sussex,
1st Royal Warwickshire Regiment,
2nd Hampshire Regiment,
2nd Dorsetshire Regiment,
2nd Welsh Regiment,
1st Royal Welsh Fusileers,
1st Black Watch,
2nd Bn (Royal Highlanders)Oxford Light lnfantry Essex Regiment,
1st & 2nd Derbyshire Regiment
1st (Sherwood Foresters)1st Royal North Lancashire Regiment
1st East Lancashire Regiment
1st South Lancashire Regiment
Royal Berkshire
2nd King's Own Yorkshire Light Infantry,
2nd King's Shropshire Light Infantry,
2nd King's Royal Rifles, Wiltshire Regiment,
2nd (Duke of Edinburgh's)North Staffordshire Regiment,
2nd South Staffordshire,
1st & 4th York and Lancaster Regiment,
1st Durham Light Infantry,
1st Seaforth Highlanders,
2nd RossShire Buffs
The Duke of Albany's)Gordon Highlanders,
Ist & 2nd Royal Irish Rifles
Connaught Rangers
1st Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders
1st Leinster Regiment,
2nd Royal Munster Fusiliers,
1st & 2nd Norfolk Regiment,
2nd Northamptonshire Regiment,
2nd Northumberland Fusiliers,
2nd Oxfordshire Light h.fhntry,
1st Highland Light infantry,
1st The Prince Consort's own Rifle Brigade,
2nd Mounted Infantry
Hannay's Mounted Infantry
Hickman's Mounted Infantry
Martyr's Mounted Infhntry
Thorneycroft's Mounted Infantry
Composite Regiment Mounted Infantry
1st, 2nd, 3rd, 4th, 5th, 6th, 7th, 8th, 9th, l0th, 1Ith, 12th, 13th, 15th, 17th, 18th (Sharpshooters),
19th (Paget's Horse),
20th (Roughriders),
21st, 22nd, 23rd, 24th, 25th, 26th Burma Mounted Infantry
Gough's Mounted Infantry
Malta Mounted Infantry
Mounted Pioneers
Naval Brigade
Royal Navy
Royal Marine
Royal Army Medical Corps
Royal Army Nursing Service
Army Service Corps
Army Veterinary Department
Army Ordnance Department
Army Chaplain's Department
Divisional Scouting Corps
Military Police
Corps of Military Mounted Police
Imperial Bearer Company
City of London Imperial Volunteers
Army Post Office Corps


COLONIAL CONTINGENTS

New South Wales


Ist Australian Horse (New South Wales)
New South Wales Artillery
New South Wales Field Hospital and Bearer Company
New South Wales Mounted Infantry
1st New South Wales Mounted Rifles
3rd New South Wales Mounted Rifles
1st New South Wales Bushmen
6th Imperial Bushmen (4th New South Wales Contingent)
3rd New South Wales Bushmen
New South Wales Lancers

Victoria
Victoria 1st 2nd, 5th Victorian Mounted Rifles and Mounted Infantry
3rd Victorian Contingent also designated as Victorian Bushmen and Autralian Bushmen Army Medical Corps

Queensland:

Queensland Mounted Infantry
3rd Queensland Bushmen
4th Queensland Imperial Bushmen
Tasmania
Tasmanian Mounted Infantry
First or Cameron's Tasmanian Contingent
1st Tasmanian Bushmen
1st Tasmanian Imperial Bushmen
2nd Tasmanian Imperial Bushmen
4th Regiment Imperial BushmenWest Australia
1st West Australian Mounted Infantry
1st and 2rd West Autralian Contingents
3rd West Australian (Bushmen) Contingent
4th West Australian Contingent (West Australian Imperial Bushmen)
5th and 6th West Australian Contingent
South Australia
South Australian Mounted Rifles
3rd South Australian (Bushmen) Contingent
4th South Australian (Imperial Bushmen) Contingent
5th and 6th Australian Contingent
Royal Australian Artillery
Australian Army Medical Corps
Doyle's Scouts
Intelligence Department

New Zealand
1st, 2nd, 3rd 4th, 5th, 6th, 7th, 8th, 9th, 10th Contingents consisting of New Zealand Mounted Rifles and one Hotchkiss Gun Detachment
New Zealand Battery
New Zealand Mounted Infantry
Canada
Canadian Artillery: "C ", "D" and "E" batteries
Canadian Scouts
Royal Canadian Dragoons
The Royal Canadian Regiment of Infantry
The Royal Canadian Mounted Ritles
2nd Regiment Canadian Mounted Rifles
Lord Strathcona's Corps

India

Lumsden's Horse
Ceylon
Ceylon Mounted Infantry Commonwealth Horse West India Regiment

SOUTH AFRICA

Aberdeen Town Guard
Adelaide District Mounted Troops
Ashburner's Light Horse
Barkly West Town Guard
Bayly's Horse
Beaconsfield Town Guard
Beaufort West Town Guard
Bechuanaland Police
Bechuanaland Rifle Volunteers
Bechuanaland Protectorate Regiment
Bedford District Mounted Troops
Beddy's Scouts
Bethune's Mounted Infantry
Border Mounted Police
Border Mounted Rifles
Border Horse
Border Scouts
Brabant's Horse
Brett's Scouts
British South African Police
Bushmanland Borderers
Bush Veldt Carbineers
Byng's Scouts
Cape Colony Cyclist Corps
Cape Colony Defence Force
Cape Medical Staff Corps
Cape Garrison Artillery
Cape infantry
Cape Mounted Rifles
Cape Mounted Police
Cape Railway Capetown Highlanders
Ceres Scouts
1st City Volunteer's (Marshall's Horse)
City of Grahamstown Volunteers
Clifford's Scouts
Colonial Light Horse
Commanderin Chiefs
Bodyguard Corps of Cattle Rangers
CradockTown Guard
Cullinan's Horse
Damant's Horse
De Aar Town Guard
De Beers Maxim Battery
Dennison's Scouts
Diamond Fields Horse
Diamond Fields Artillery
District Military Police
District Mounted Troops
Dordrecht Dictrict Volunteer Guard
Dordrecht Wodehouse Yeomanry
Driscoll's scouts
Duke of Edinburgh's OwnVolunteer Rifles
Durban Light Infantry
Eastern Province Horse
Eastern Transvaal Scouts
East Griqualand Mounted Rifle Volunteers
East Griqualand Field Force
Edwards's Scouts
Farmers' Guard
Fraserburg District Mounted Troops
French's Scouts
Frontier Light Horse
Frontier Mounted Rifles
Geoghegan's Scouts
Gorringe's Flying Column
Heidelberg Volunteers and Scouts
Herschel Special Police
Herschel Native Police
Imperial Light Horse
Imperial Light Infantry
lndwe Town Guard
Jamestown Town Guard
Jansenville District Mounted Troops
Jansenville Town Guard
Johannesburg Mounted Rifles
Johannesburg Police
Kaffrarian Rifles
Kenhardt Town Guard
Keeley's Vryburg Farmer's Association
Kimberley Light Horse
Kimberley Regiment
Kimberley Town Guard
Kimberley Mounted Corps
Kitchener's Horse
Kitchener's Fighting Scouts
Klipdam Town Guard
Knysna Rangers
Kofflefontein Defence Force
Komga Mounted Infantry
Kroonstad Scouts
Laingsburg Town Guard
Loch's Horse
Lower Rhodesian Volunteers
Loyal Burgher Corps
Loxton's Horse
Lydenburg Civil Mounted Rifles
Maritzani Mounted Irregulars
Murray's Horse
Mafeking Town Guard
Menne's Scouts
Midland Mounted Rifles
Middelburg Town Guard
Molteno Town Guard
Montagu Town Guard
Montmorency's Scouts
Morley's Scouts
Mossel Bay Town Guard
Namaqualand Border Scouts
Namaqualand District Mounted Police
Namaqualand Town Guard
National Scouts
Natal Volunteer Field Artillery
Natal Volunteers Police and Guides
Natal Bridge Guards
Natal Carbineers
Natal M