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All the kings and Queens since William 1st

Horrible Histories has found an easy way to remember all the Kings and Queens of England, just click on This song it's so much more fun!

Here are the lyrics:-
I'm William the Conqueror
My enemies stood no chance
They call me the first English king
Although I come from France

1066, the Domesday book
I gave to history
So fat, on death my body burst
But enough about me

To help remember all your kings
I've come up with this song
A simple rhyme and ditty
For you all to sing along!

Oh! William!
(Bit short, init? We need more kings. Who came next?)

William second, cheeks were red
Killed out hunting, so it's said
I took over, Henry one
That's my next eldest son

Then King Stephen, it's true, check it!
Hi, Henry two, killed Thomas Beckett
Richard Lionheart? That's right!
Always spoiling for a fight

Oh, King John! What a disaster!
Rule restrained by Magna Carta!

William, William, Henry, Stephen
Henry, Richard, John, oi!
Time for my mate, King Henry eight
To take up this song

Henry three built the abbey
Ed one hated Scots
A red hot poker killed Ed two
That must have hurt him lots!

Edward third was a chivalry nerd
Began the hundred years war
Then Richard two was king, aged ten
Then Henry, yes one more!

King Henry four, plots galore
Not least from Henry five, moi
I killed ten score at Agincourt
Then Henry six arrived!

Edward four, Edward five
Richard the third, he's bad
'Cause he fought wars with Henry seventh
First Tudor and my dad

So Henry eight, I was great
Six wives, two were beheaded
Edward the sixth came next, but he died young
And so my dreaded
Daughter Mary ruled, so scary
Then along came... me!
I'm Liz the first, I had no kids
So Tudors RIP!

William, William, Henry, Stephen
Henry, Richard, John, oi!
Henry, Ed, Ed, Ed, Rich two
Then three more Henrys join our song!
Edward, Edward, Rich the third
Henry, Henry, Ed again
Mary one, good Queen Liz
That's me! Time for more men!

James six of Scotland next
Is English James the first, he led
Then Stuarts ruled, so Charles the first
The one who lost his head

No monarchy until came me,
Charles two, I liked to party
King Jimmy two was scary, oooh!
Then Mary was a smarty

She ruled with Will, their shoes were filled
By sourpuss Queen Anne Gloria
And so from then, you were ruled by men
Till along came Queen Victoria!

William, William, Henry, Stephen
Henry, Richard, John, oi!
Henry, Ed, Ed, Ed, Rich two
Then three more Henrys join our song!
Edward, Edward, Rich the third
Henry, Henry, Ed again
Mary one, good Queen liz
Jimmy, Charles and Charles and then
Jim, Will, Mary, Anne Gloria
Still to come, it's Queen Victoria!

And so began the Hanover gang
George one and George two... grim!
Then George the third was quite absurd
Till I replaced old him

King George the fourth and known henceforth
As angry, fat and cross... hang on!
It's true you beat Napoleon
But were mostly a dead loss... bang on!

Old William four was a sailor... ahoy!
That's nearly the end of the storya
As onto the scene comes the best loved queen
Hail to Queen Victoria!

William, William, Henry, Stephen
Henry, Richard, John, oi!
Henry, Ed, Ed, Ed, Rich two
Then three more Henrys join our song!
Edward, Edward, Rich the third
Henry, Henry, Ed again
Mary one, good Queen Liz
Jimmy, Charles and Charles and then
Jim, Will, Mary, Anne Gloria
George, George, George, George
Will, Victoria!
Victoria!

(I ruled for sixty four years, you know!)

Ed seven, George five
Then Ed, George sixth
Liz two then reigned and how!
And so our famous monarch song
Is brought right up to now! Oh!

William, William, Henry, Stephen
Henry, Richard, John, oi!
Henry, Ed, Ed, Ed, Rich two
Then three more Henrys join our song!
Edward, Edward, Rich the third
Henry, Henry, Ed again
Mary one, good Queen Liz
Jimmy, Charles and Charles and then
Jim, Will, Mary, Anne Gloria
George, George, George, George
Will, Victoria!
Edward, George, Edward, George six
And Queen Liz two completes the mix!

That's all the English kings and queens
Since William first that there have been!




1066 King William the Conqueror 1066-1087

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1087 King William Rufus (son of William) 1087-1100

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1100 King Henry I (William Rufus brother) 1100-1135

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1135 King Stephen (nephew of Henry I) 1135-1154

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1154 King Henry II (grandson of Henry I) 1154-1189

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1189 King Richard I (third son of Henry II) 1189-1199

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1199 King John (fifth son of Henry II) 1199-1216

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1216 King Henry III (son of John) 1216-1272

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1272 King Edward I (son of Henry III) 1272-1307

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1307 King Edward II (son of Edward I) 1307-1327

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1327 King Edward III (son of Edward II) 1327-1377

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1377 King Richard II (grandson of Edward III, son of the Black Prince) 1377-1399

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1399 King Henry IV (grandson of Edward III, son of John of Gaunt) 1399-1413

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1413 King Henry V (son of Henry IV) 1413-1422

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1422 King Henry VI (son of Henry V) 1422-1461

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1461 King Edward IV ( youngest son of Edward III ) 1461-1483

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1483 King Richard III (uncle of Edward V) 1483-1485

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1485 Henry VII (grandson of Henry V) 1485-1509

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1509 Henry VIII ( son of Henry VII)
1509-1547

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1547 Edward V (Henry's son by Jane Seymour) 1547-1553

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1553 Mary (Henry's daughter by Queen Katherine of Aragon) 1553-1558

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1558 Elizabeth I (Henry's daughter by Anne Boleyn) 1558-1603

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1603 James I (great-great-grandson of Henry VII) 1603-1625

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1625 Charles I (second son of James) 1625-1649

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1649 The Commonwealth under the Cromwell rule 1649 - 1659

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1660 Charles II (oldest son of Charles I) 1660-1685

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1685 James II (brother of Charles II) 1685-1688

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1689 William of Orange (grandson of Charles I) and Mary (daughter of James II) 1689-1694

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1694 William III - Ruled alone after death of Mary 1694 - 1702

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1702 Anne (sister of Mary)
1702-1714

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1714 George I (great-grandson of James I) 1714-1727

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1727 George II (son of George I) 1727-1760

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1760 George III (grandson of George II) 1760-1820

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1820 George IV (son of George III)
1820-1830

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1830 William IV (brother of George IV)
1830-1837

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1837 Victoria (niece of William IV) 1837-1901

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1901 Edward VII (son of Victoria and Albert) 1901-1910

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1910 George V (second son of Edward VII) 1910-1936

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1936 Edward VIII (son of George V)

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1936 George VI (second son of George V) 1936-1952

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1952 Elizabeth II (daughter of George VI)




I love Horrible Histories


Amy Eather Guest born 1862 (Australia)

Up until last year, the majority of Eather family research claimed Amy E GUEST who was born on the 6 February 1862 at Muswellbrook, New South Wales married Somerset John VON STURMER. Using this marriage Registration as reference:-

5274/1900 STURMER SOMERSET J V GUEST AMY E SYDNEY
5274/1900 STURMER SOMERSET J VON GUEST AMY E SYDNEY
5274/1900 VON STURMER SOMERSET J GUEST AMY E SYDNEY
5274/1900 VONSTURMER SOMERSET J GUEST AMY E SYDNEY

It wasn't until last year that my research proved conclusively that in fact Somerset John VON STURMER married Amy Elvina GUEST the daughter of the late Henry George GUEST on 25 July 1900 at St Andrews Cathedral. I researched this family thoroughly and there is no doubt whatsoever.

Amy Elvina GUEST died 1901 in Paddington.

Then on the 11 December 1907 at All Saints Petersham Somerset VON STURMER married Bertha Amelia PODMORE, the youngest daughter of A S PODMORE of Narranderra. This marriage being performed by the bride's uncle J H MULLINS.

Once again 4 AMY Von STURMER death registrations-due to spelling differences:
10663/1901 STURMER AMY E VON HENRY C ELVINA PADDINGTON
10663/1901 STURMER (VON) AMY E HENRY G ELVINA PADDINGTON
10663/1901 (VON) AMY E STURMER HENRY G ELVINA PADDINGTON
10663/1901 STURMER(VON) AMY E HENRY G ELVINA PADDINGTON

My evidence is solid and conclusive with many many newspaper articles, certificates and hours of VON STURMER research to back it up.

Having proven the error, and alerted other researchers, I am still faced with the task of finding out exactly what happened to Amy E GUEST the daughter of Laban Thomas GUEST and Charlotte nee EATHER 1836-1888.
Many documents show her as Amy E GUEST. Family history research says the E was for EATHER.

So, Familytreecircles I need a death for Amy E GUEST and /or a marriage if there was one. Her father Laban Thomas GUEST 1835-1903 dropped the Laban and usually went by the name Thomas GUEST.
This is her birth registration:-
10707/1862 GUEST AMY E THOMAS CHARLOTTE MUSWELLBROOK

Below is a photograph of her, You can't see it here but there is a ring on the third finger of her left hand. My 1st cousin 3x removed.


3 comment(s), latest 6 years, 7 months ago

Andrew Augustus Johansson 1862-1935

Andrew Augustus JOHANSSON was born in Finland in 1862. The son of Andrew Gustave JOHANSSON and Maria Johanna KALSTROM.

It has been said that Andrew jumped a Russian ship in Launceston Tasmania,
Changing his name to JOHNSON, Andrew married Mary Ann MARTIN b:1846 and died at Nabowla, Tasmania on the 13 November 1931.

Andrew Johnson formerly Johansson aged 74 died on the 31 July 1935 at the Launceston Hospital. Both are buried at the Presbyterian Cemetery in Nabowla, Tasmania.

Obituary EXAMINER Friday 20th November 1931

NABOWLA. On Friday last another old resident of Nabowla passed away in the person of 'Mrs. Andrew Johnson, who had been a resident of the district for 40 years. She was well liked and respected. Mrs.Johnson was 85 years of age. The funeral took place on Sunday afternoon at the Nabowla Cemetery, where a large crowd pald their respects. Mrs. Johnson leaves a husband and six sons.


Three of them I've found;
Herbert JOHNSON, Andrew William JOHNSON and George Sanfelix JOHNSON

DEATHS EXAMINER Friday 2 August 1935

JOHNSON.-On the 31st July, at the Launceston Public Hospital, Andrew Johnson, late of Nabowla. Aged 74 year".

FUNERAL EXAMINER Friday 2 August 1935

JOHNSON.-The funeral of the late Mr.Andrew Johnson is appointed to leave the Nabowla Railway Station for the Presbyterian Cemetery,
Nabowla, to-morraow (Saturday) afternoon, at 2.30.-ARTHUR DOOLAN, Undertaker, Wellington - Balfour Streets.

5 comment(s), latest 6 years, 4 months ago

Andrew Henry Eather 1914-2000

Andrew Henry EATHER alias Alain John COOPER,the son of Andrew Eather 1875-1965 and Enid King 1886-1931 -
The James EATHER Line.

For some unexplained reason Andrew Eather changed his name. Perhaps it was to get away from the law or perhaps a Mrs. Andrew Eather for it seems Andrew enjoyed a good wedding.

His new name began as Alan John Cooper and under that name he went to Grafton and married Monica Ruth BURNS in the Catholic Church at South Grafton on the 12 April 1941

The next year on 19 May 1942 under the name of Alain John Cooper he joins the 1st Armoured Regiment and gets shipped off to New Guinea as a driver. After the war he remains with the army till 1946 when he is discharged.

Before his discharge on the 22 August 1945 he marries again. This time using the name Alain John Cooper he goes all the way down to Goulburn and marries Jean LANHAM in the Church of England.

This 'wife juggling', doesn't last very long for the wives find out and on the 20 December 1945 Jean LANHAM hands him an annulment for Christmas. Not to be outdone, the following week on the 27 December Monica Ruth up in Grafton wishes him a Happy New Year with a divorce.

On a sad note Monica Ruth had a son in 1941, which they named Alain John Cooper, who died in infancy.

1946 rolls around and on the 13 July 1946 Alain John Cooper ties the knot again. This time with Dulcie Elizabeth NEIL. However this time Alain sticks and remains true, for they produced 10 children.

Alain John Cooper formerly Andrew Henry Eather died at Redcliffe, Queensland in the year 2000.

As a footnote I'd just like to add, that if you happen to be a decendant of Andrew Eather 1914-2000 and you were brought up wondering what happened to him. Now you know!

When Andrew Eather left home, he left a family, to live out their days wondering whatever became of him.

written by janilye from several sources:
NSW State records,
NSW.BD&M
National Library of Australia


Ann EATHER 1793-1865

Ann EATHER the first born of Thomas EATHER and Elizabeth, nee Lee was born on the 18 April 1793 at Parramatta, New South Wales.Ann was baptised on the 5 May 1793 long before the parish of St John had been established and before a proper Church had been erected at Parramatta.The only clergyman in the colony was the Reverend Richard JOHNSON who had come out with the First Fleet.
When she was four years of age, Ann EATHER moved with her parents and younger brother and sister, Robert and Charlotte, to the land grant in the bushland near the Hawkesbury River at Mulgrave Place. There her father was setting about converting the virgin scrub into a farm. It was there, under primitive conditions, that Ann spent her childhood. Her playmates of those years were an increasing number of younger brothers and sisters, and by the time that she reached the age of fourteen she was the eldest of seven children. Another brother was born after she married. Undoubtedly, Ann had very little formal education during her childhood, living as she did in a community that was largely illiterate, and at a distance from the townships of Sydney and Parramatta. Formal education in the environment of the day was restricted to the children of the few farmers who were sufficiently wealthy as to be able to employ the services of tutors. Nevertheless, it appears that Ann did not grow up completely illiterate. In adult life she was able at least to sign her name upon documents. Ann did not have to wait long for matrimony to come her way. In a community that was still short of eligible spinsters, most girls tended to find husbands while still in their teenage years. About the age of sixteen Ann EATHER became the wife of Joseph ONUS 1782-1835 , a convict who was then about the age of twenty-nine years. Whether Joseph and Ann had a wedding ceremony will probably never be known. There is no record of their marriage in any of the Church registers then in the colony. However, this lack of the record of such an event does not necessarily mean that theirs was a de facto relationship, as the Church registers of those years prior to 1830 are known to be wanting in many instances.Of the six children of Joseph and Ann, only two are listed in the births index of the New South Wales Registrar-General's Department. It was about 1809 that Ann EATHER became the wife of Joseph ONUS and from then until 1835 her life story runs parallel to that of her husband.

The children Of Ann EATHER and Joseph ONUS were:-

1.Elizabeth ONUS 1811 - 1882 m. John Gordon TOWN 1806 - 1843
Children;
John Thomas TOWN 1831 - 1889
Elizabeth Jessie TOWN 1833-1908
William Barker TOWN 1836 - 1838
William Gordon TOWN 1838 - 1858
Mary Ann TOWN 1842 - 1846

2.Mary Ann ONUS 1813 1887 m John EATON 1811-1904
Children;
Mary M EATON 1831 - 1831
Ann EATON 1833 - 1924
Mary Ann Elizabeth EATON 1835 - 1870
Jane EATON 1837 - 1872
Elizabeth Mary EATON 1839 - 1933
Susannah EATON 1842 - 1937
Charlotta EATON 1844 - 1923
Infant EATON 1846 - 1846
William EATON 1847 - 1887
Caroline EATON 1850 - 1850
Martha Mary Richmond EATON 1851 - 1931
Euphemia EATON 1854 - 1939
Veronica EATON 1854 - 1942

3.Susannah ONUS 1815 - 1882 m. William Glas MCALPIN 1810 - 1902
Children;
Elizabeth MCALPIN 1833 - 1835
Ann McALPIN 1836 - 1838
Peter McALPIN 1838 - 1838
William McALPIN 1840 - 1923
Susannah McALPIN 1842 - 1882
Sarah McALPIN 1845 - 1922
Joseph McALPIN 1849 - 1913
Mary McALPIN 1852 - 1915


4.Joseph ONUS 1818 1895elected Mayor of Richmond 1875
m.(1) Margaret SILK 1824-1884
1 child; Maria Emma SILK 1841 - 1883
(2) Emma POWELL 1819-1865
children;
Mary Ann ONUS 18381861
Joseph Edward ONUS 1840-1891
Emma Susannah ONUS 1843-1931
Joseph Tertius ONUS 1844-1928
Laura Australia ONUS 1854-1855
(3) Clara HUNT 1820.
1 child; Linda ONUS 1869 - 1894

5.Thomas ONUS 1820 - 1855 m. Elizabeth EATHER 1824-1884
Children;
Ann ONUS 1842-1905
Sarah ONUS 1845-1910
Susannah ONUS 1847-1935
Thomas Alexander ONUS 1849-1934
Matilda J ONUS 1852-1853
Elizabeth A ONUS 1854 - 1855
+1 child from relationship with Eliza JAMES 1819-1862
Ann ONUS 1841-1927

6.William ONUS 1822 1855 m. Ann HOUGH 1822-1889
children;
Joseph ONUS 1844-1928
William ONUS 1846-1913
Elizabeth ONUS 1848-1892
Emily A ONUS 1851-1907
Andrew ONUS 1853-1855

Joseph ONUS died on the 22 June 1835 leaving Ann a very wealthy woman according to the terms of his Last Will and Testament.

On 14 February 1837, approximately twenty months after the death of Joseph ONUS, his widow Ann, married again in a ceremony held in St Matthew's Church at Windsor. Her second husband was William SHARP, a widower without any children. Ann was 43 and William only 26. A number of relatives and friends were present at the ceremony and no fewer than five signed the register as witnesses to the event. They were Thomas EATHER and his wife, Sarah EATHER; John TOWN, son-in-law of the bride; Susannah McALPIN, daughter of the bride; and Mary SHARP, a relative of the groom. The Reverend H T STILES conducted the ceremony. William SHARP had been born at Parramatta on 6 November 1810, the fifth child and fourth son of Thomas SHARP and his wife, Martha BURRELL. He had married Sarah REEVES, but she had died. His father, Thomas SHARP, had been born circa 1775 at Honeybow in the English county of Gloucestershire. He had enlisted in the New South Wales Corps as a private, and arrived in the colony on the ship "Sugar Cane" on 17 September 1793. Upon arrival he was stationed at Parramatta and lived there until about 1814. In 1800 he had assigned to him Martha BURRELL, who had arrived in the colony on the ship "Speedy" on 11 April 1800. She had been born circa 1775 in Surrey, England, and had been tried there and sentenced to seven years transportation in January 1796. She brought to the colony with her her son, John BURRELL, born in 1798 while she was in prison. In the period between 1801 and 1821, Thomas and Martha had a family of eight children; the first six being born at Parramatta and the last two at Richmond. They married at St Phillip's Church, Sydney on 13 March 1810, although they were at that time still residing at Parramatta. By the time of the 1814 muster, they were living in the Hawkesbury district and were still there in 1822. Thomas was still a soldier and at that time a member of the 102 Regiment. He died on 30 January 1823 at Richmond and was buried in St Peter's Cemetery. At the time of the 1828 census, his widow, Martha, was living with James PAGET. She lived to see the two daughters of her son, William, before she died at her home in Richmond on 14 November 1852, almost thirty years after the death of Thomas. She had been pre-deceased by two of her daughters and one son. In her decision to marry again, Ann was evidently undeterred by the stipulation in her first husband's will that, upon so doing, she would forfeit the family home. Her son William was still a minor and could not inherit it until he was 21. Technically, upon her marriage, the house passed to her eldest son, Joseph, to hold in trust until William turned 21, but he too was still a minor. Undoubtedly a satisfactory arrangement was worked out whereby Ann and her new husband resided in the house along with her sons until they eventually married and moved into homes of their own. As far as it is possible to ascertain, Ann and William resided in the house until her death in 1865, and by then her son, William, was already deceased. William SHARP continued to reside there for many years after he became a widower again, but eventually the house became the home of William ONUS's elder son, Joseph, as it rightfully should have.

In 1843 Ann SHARP turned fifty. With all six children of her first marriage now wedded and raising families of their own, she probably felt a great deal of contentment and satisfaction. She was now one of the senior citizens of Richmond, the town that had not existed when she was first married. She was surrounded by numerous relatives. Nearby, in the town, was her brother,Thomas, landlord of the "Union Inn", and also her youngest brother, James, now a married man with several young children and earning his living as a wheelwright. Just down the road at "Agnes Bank" was her sister, Charlotte, now remarried to William MALONEY. Up in the hills above North Richmond, each with a spouse and children, there dwelt on their respective farms, eldest brother, Robert and youngest sister, Rachel. The latter had returned to the district only two years
previously after having lived for seven years at Hobart Town in Tasmania. Over at Cornwallis near Windsor on another farm was another brother, Charles, with his wife and younger children, and somewhere around the district was her other brother, John, now nearly forty and still unmarried.

Now and then Ann would make the journey by cart to Windsor to visit her aged mother, the matriarch of an increasing number of descendants in three generations. Ann now saw less of her daughter, Mary Ann, who had ceased the practice of coming home from the Hunter Valley for the births of her children. Patrick's Plains and the Wollombi were now well-populated and the township of Singleton was taking shape. Mary Ann's last two daughters had been born at home at Bulga. Eldest daughter, Elizabeth, was living close by at North Richmond, where her husband, John TOWN, had several farms along Wheeney Creek. Youngest daughter, Susannah, was also living close by in Richmond, but before long she was to move out over the hills with William and their children to take up farming at Bulga close by Mary Ann and John EATON.


If Ann SHARP had caused some raised eyebrows in Richmond in 1842 when she had a baby at the age of forty-eight, she must have caused some stifled gasps of surprise when she gave birth to yet another daughter on 11 May 1845, a fortnight after she turned fifty-two. This is the oldest at which any member of the EATHER family is known to have given birth to a child. The period of time between the births of Ann's first and last children - thirty-four years - is probably another family record, on the female side at least.

The children of Ann and William SHARP were:-

1. Ann Elizabeth SHARP 1842 - 1902 m. Richard John AINSWORTH 1834-1896 at Richmond in 1860.
Their children were:-
Thomas Robert Ainsworth 1863 -1888
William Richard Ainsworth 1863 - 1922
Joseph Ainsworth 1864 - 1944
Anne Elizabeth Ainsworth 1867 - 1938
Emma S Ainsworth 1872 - 1886
Martha Euphemia Ainsworth 1874 - 1910

2. Martha Mary Ann SHARP 1845 - 1908 m. Arthur Phillip MCMANIS 1836-1918 at Richmond in 1865
Their children were:-
Emily Sharp McManis 1866 - 1947
Annie Elizabeth McManis 1868 - 1957
Ida Evelyn McManis 1871 - 1871
Marion Martha McManis 1873 - 1967
Ethel Constance McManis 1876 - 1960
Zeta Linda McManis 1879 - 1957
Arthur William McManis 1881 - 1968
Roy Onus McManis 1884 - 1915
Bashti Irene McManis 1886 - 1912
Lance Erby McManis 1888 - 1971

----


Part of the above is sourced from
John St PIERRE, writer of
Thomas and Elizabeth Eather
for the EATHER Family history committee.
janilye


The photograph below is Susannah Onus 1815-1882
3rd. daughter of Joseph and Ann Onus, wife of William Glas McAlpin


Ann Eather 1829-1918

Ann EATHER, the fourth child and second daughter of Thomas EATHER 1800-1886 and Sarah, nee McALPIN, was born at Bulga on 18 August 1829. She was still a very small girl when her parents moved back to Richmond and it was there that she grew up. She probably had some formal schooling at the little school in Francis Street, and when a teenager used to attend Church services on Sundays in the new St Peter's Church.

On 14 September 1847 at the age of 18 years Ann EATHER married Edwin YOUNG at Richmond. The young couple took up residence in a house in Windsor Street, Richmond owned by the bride's father. It was next door to the "Union Inn" where her parents lived and conducted business as the proprietors of the inn. Edwin had been born in Sussex in 1827 and Baptised in Sedlescomb, Sussex, on the 18 May 1830 the son of John YOUNG and Mary MERRICK 1800-1874. John young died in 1831 and Mary married John CRISFORD 1797-1855 in Sussex and with her extended family they arrived in New South Wales onboard the 'Florist' on the 26 October 1839.

During the next 22 years following their marriage Ann and Edwin had a family of nine children.

In 1856 Edwin YOUNG became the publican at the "Union Inn" next door to his residence. After four years as an innkeeper Edwin retired from the "Union Inn" in 1860 and Thomas EATHER took it over again. After another six years, Thomas EATHER retired from the running of the hotel again in 1866, and Edwin YOUNG assumed the role of innkeeper once more. This situation lasted for the next five years, and then in 1871, Edwin gave up the management of the "Union Inn" once more and on this occasion his wife's cousin, Elizabeth GRIFFITHS, became the new publican at the hotel. Under her management the name of the hotel was changed to that of the "Woolpack Inn', which had been the name of the hotel at North Richmond which Elizabeth had managed previously.

The saga of this hotel in Windsor Street, Richmond was not yet over. Elizabeth GRIFFITHS managed it three years. Then she died suddenly on 28 August 1874 and Thomas EATHER, who owned the hotel, returned to inn keeping once more, and on this occasion changed the name of the hotel to the "Post Office" Hotel. It was quite an appropriate name as the Richmond Post Office was directly across the street. He stayed there as the publican for approximately one year, and then, soon after he turned 75, he sold the hotel to Edwin YOUNG. What occupation Edwin YOUNG had been involved in during those years between his periods as publican is uncertain. Upon his taking possession of the hotel, his parents-in-law moved out and took up residence in a house in Francis Street. Ann and Edwin probably vacated the cottage next door and moved into the hotel. Thomas EATHER still retained ownership of the cottage.

Edwin YOUNG was still an innkeeper in 1881. In that year his father-in-law, Thomas EATHER, made his last will and one of the bequests in it was of the cottage in Windsor Street next door to the hotel. He bequeathed it to Sarah his wife and after her decease it was to go to "Ann YOUNG wife of Edwin YOUNG of Richmond aforesaid innkeeper."

Edwin YOUNG was one of the two executors of his father-in-law's will. Following the death of Thomas EATHER, probate of the will was granted to him and his brother-in-law Charles EATHER on 17 February 1887. Sarah EATHER had predeceased her husband, so amongst the bequests the cottage where Ann and Edwin had resided in earlier years, went directly to Ann.

Over the years from 1867 Ann and Edwin saw seven of their nine children married and their grandchildren increase in number. Only William Henry and Laura May did not marry. Second son, Joseph became a minister of religion.

Edwin died of throat cancer on the 31 December 1896 at 8 Church St., Ashfield, New South Wales, Australia. Ann lived to the age of 88 years, but suffered a great deal of ill health from the age of 82 years.

Ann Young, nee EATHER died on 11 July 1918 at the home of her son William Henry at 24 Marshall Street in the Sydney suburb of Petersham. The cause of death was senile decay.

All of her nine children were still alive and their ages ranged between 70 and 49.
Her funeral was held on 12 July, her body interred in the Church of England section of the Rookwood Cemetery. The service was conducted by her son, the Reverend Joseph YOUNG.
The information for her death certificate was provided by her son, W H Young of 24 Marshall Street, Petersham.
Her death certificate confirms that she had been born at Bulga, NSW.

The children of Ann and Edwin YOUNG were:-
Elizabeth Young 1847 ? 1933 m. William Robert PRICE 1841-1889
Albert Thomas Young 1849 ? 1930 m. Sarah Elizabeth BUTLER 1854-1939
Rev. Joseph Young 1852 ? 1945 m. Marianne CRISFORD 1852-1936
Emma Jane Young 1855 ? 1939 m. John Wesley BOWERS 1843-1897
Edwin James Young 1858 ? 1932 m. Blanche LEWIS 1858-1938
Jessie Sarah Young 1861 ? 1941 m. William PEARSE
William Henry Young 1863 ? 1953
Roland Charles Eather Young 1866 ? 1939 m 1.Flora Grace JOHNSON 1872-1906 2. Jessie GIBSON
Laura May Young 1869 ? 1954

Sources:
janilye
John St.Pierre
Eather family Newsletter
Eather Family History

Annual Licensing Meeting MELBOURNE 1859

The following is a list of the applications for publicans' licences
heard at the Annual Licensing Meeting, Tuesday 19 April 1859.

Amos, John Jervis, South Yarra Club, Punt hill.
Armitage, William, Peacock, Errol-street
Abrey, Jane, Red Lion, Londsale-street.
Alexander, Charles, Oddfellows, Little Lonsdale-street.
Allen, Joseph Weaver, Sandridge Inn, Sanridge.
Aitcheson, George, British Hotel, Queen street.
Allen, John, Olive Branch, Stephen-street.
Annett, James, Morning Star, Little Bourke street.
Brown, Henry Donovan, Waverly, Little Collins-street.
Brownlow, Samuel, Northcote Arms, Northcote.
Boniface, Benjamin, Manchester Inn, Queen street,
Bennett, Thomas Knight, Garrick's Head, Swanston-street.
Bryant, James Mark, Parade Hotel, Wellington-parade.
Bryan, Charles, Leinster Hotel, Franklin street.
Butler, Edward, Duke of York, Collins-street
Barrows, Richard, Governor Bourke, Little Lonsdale-street
Brown, Andrew, The Rising Sun, Little Bourke-street.
Brighouse, John, Royal Park, Howard-street
Butterworth, Joseph Frank, Exchange Hotel, Swanston-street.
Blannin, William, Parliamentary Hotel. Lonsdale-street
Batch, William, Australia Felix, Bourke-street.
Bourke, George, Ship Inn. Flinders-lane.
Bignall, William, Bignall's Hotel, Victoria-street.
Bultitude, James, Harp of Erin, Madeline-street.
Barben, Robert, Newmarket Hotel, Bourke-street.
Barnfield, Thomas, Eagle Hotel, Swanston-street.
Brown, Malcolm, Buck's Head, Little Lonsdale-street.
Bancroft, Richardd, City Hotel, Madeline-street.
Boobirr, William James, Colonial Hotel, Little Bourke-street.
Conroy, William C Conroy's Hotel, Victoria-street.
Crawford, John, City Hotel. Bourke-street.
Crawford, James, Saracens Head, Bourke-street.
Cameron, Alexander, Merri Jig Hotel, Elizabeth-street.
Clifford, Henry R, Railway Refreshment rooms, Elizabeth-street.
Carroll, James, Robert Burns, Lonsdale-street.
Cleghorn, James, Caledonian Hotel, Jeffcott-street.
Cosgrave, John, Fitzroy Arms, King-street.
Cooper, James, Cooper's Family Hotel, Stephen-street.
Cooper, Richard Austin, Treasury Hotel, Queen-street,
Coates, Frederick, Parkside Hotel, Flemington-road.
Champion, Benjamin, Prince Patrick Hotel, La Trobe-street.
Cantwell, Johanna, Glenmore Hotel, Spencer street.
Chandler, Henry, Butchers' Arms, Elizabeth-street.
Chanter, John, Royal Highlander, Fliiiders-street.
Cronin, Daniel, Black Boy, Little Collins-street.
Currie, John, Hall of Commerce, Collins-street.
Chisholm, William King, Niagara Hotel, Lonsdale-street.
Cleal, Daniel, Cleal's Hotel, Swanston-street.
Clarkson, William, North Star Hotel, Abbotsford-street.
Colvin, James, Golden Cross, King-street.
Dowling, Thomas. Empire Hotel. Errol-street.
Doyle, Andrew, Ship Hotel, Sandridge.
Daley, William, Glasgow Arms, Elizabeth-street.
Dewis, Thomas, Sarsfield Inn, Little Bourke-street.
Dempster, Andrew, Sydney Hotel, William-street.
Dunnon, William, Builders' Arms, Cardigan-street,
Doyle, Patrick, Telegraph Hotel, Little Bourke-street.
Dunlop, William, Heather Bell, Flinders-lane.
Davidson, George, George Hotel, Victoria-street.
Downie, Charles Commercial Inn, Little Bourke-street.
Donne, George, Salutation Inn, Bourke-street.
Donovan, Christopher, Travellers' Home, Swanton-street
Dillon, James, Lamb Inn, Little La Trobe-street.
Dempsey, James, Ship Inn, Russell-street
D'Arcy, Michael, D'Arcy's Hotel, Swanston-street.
Dias, Mark, Australian Arms, Bourke-street.
Deane, Charles Edmund, Royal Charter, Bourke-street.
Dixon, Philip Garnett, Suburban Railway Refreshment-rooms, Flinders-street.
Eastwood, Henry, Prince George Hotel, Swanston-street.
Evans, Thomas South Melbourne Hotel, South Yarra.
Eager, Edward Fitzgerald, Rock of Cashel, Little Bourke-street.
Edmonds, George, Carlton Inn, Pelham-street.
Farrell, Robert, Melbourne Hotel, South Yarra.
Feinaigle, Charles Gregory, Crown Hotel, Lonsdale-street.
Feehan, Richard, City Arms, Elizabeth-street,
Filmore, Egerton J., Royal Mail, Swanston-street
Fitzgerald J-Bridget, Hibernian Hotel, Little Lonsdale-street.
Ford, Alfred, Royal Artillery, Elizabeth-street,
Flanner, William, Old White Hart, Bourke-street.
Forman, Peter, Elephant and Castle, Little Bourke-street.
Ferris, William, Royal Hotel, Flemington-road.
Gilmore, Martin, Telegraph Hotel, Little Bourke-street.
Griffiths, Thomas, Powess Arms, 99 Flinders street.
Glynn, Henry, Freemasons Tavern, Sandridge.
Gallpen, George, Haymarket Hotel, Flemington-road.
Garton, James, Pier Hotel, Sandridge.
Gallogley, George Dunn, Duke of Wellington, Flinders-street.
Gallagher,Michael, Rose of Australia, King-street.
Grant, John, Bush Inn, Elizabeth-street.
Glassbrook, Isaac Knowles, Egremont Hotel, Northcote
Geach, Thomas, Spread Eagle, Elizabeth-street.
Hayes, Michael, Barkly Hotel, Barkly-street
Hill, Richard Evans, Great Britain, Flinders-street
Henry, William, Blue Bell, Little Collins-street
Heffernan, Rody, Melbourne Tavern, Lonsdale-street.
Hamilton, David, Rose and Thistle, Lonsdale-street.
Hooper, Henry, Prince of Wales, Flinders-lane.
Hockin, William, Commercial Hotel, Elizabeth-street
Hawkins, William, Queen's Arms, Swanston-street.
Heier, Christian H., Star Hotel, Swanston-street.
Hills, Thomas, Tattersall's Hotel, Lonsdale-street
Hill, John. Erin Hotel, Bouverie-street.
Hinds, Willam, Ulster Family Hotel, Spring-street.
Hassett, John, Young Queen, Therry-street.
Holmes, Robert, Victoria Hotel, Sandridge
Holland, William, Globe Inn, Swanston-street.
Hayward, George, Bull and Mouth, Bourke-street
Jones, Jos. F., Excelsior Hotel, Bourke-street
Johnston, Waldron, Clarence Hotel, Collins-street
Jordan, John, Rainbow Hotel, Little Collins-street
Judd, Sarah Ann, Royal Oak, Queen-street
Jones, Charles George, Jones's Family Hotel William-street
James, Daniel Gray, Waterman's Arms, Nott-street Sandridge.
Jones, Charles, Colonial Bank Hotel, Little Collins-street
Johnston, James, Canada Hotel, Queensberry-street
Jenkins, Harry, Jenkins's Hotel, Swanston-street
Jones, John Yarra Family Hotel, Flinders-street
Isaacs, John Andrade, Crown Hotel, Queen-street
Isaacs, Barnet, London Tavern, Elizabeth-street
Kyle, Archibald, Cavan Hotel, Queensberry-street
Kelly, James, Reform Hotel, Bourke-street.
Kelly, Patrick, Galway Family Hotel, Flinders lane.
Kennedy, Morgan, Edinburgh Castle, Courtney-street.
Kennedy, William, Sir Walter Scott, Elizabeth-street.
Kennon, William, Black Eagle, Lonsdale-street.
Kennedy, John, Lalla Rookh, Queensberry-street
Kelly, William Launcelot, Argus Hotel, Collins-street
Keller, William, Golden Fleece, Russell-street.
Keppel, Maurice, Old Governor Bourke, Spring-street.
Laffen, James, King's Arms, Queensberry-street.
Lecher, Richard, Seven Stars, Queensberry-Street.
Lowe, Samuel, Shakespeare, Collins-street,
Liddy, James, Adam and Eve, Little Collins-street.
Lynch, James, Golden Age, La Trobe-street.
Leyden, John, Lamb Inn, Elizabeth-street.
Mark, James, Cross Keys, Lonsdale-street
Mickle, David, Pembroke Hotel, Elizabeth-street.
M'Millan, James, Carriers' Arms, Elizabeth-Street,
Muir, Matthew, Mac's Hotel, Franklyn-Street.
M'Gregor, Alexander, Supreme Court Hotel, La Trobe-street.
Murray, George, Tam O'shanter, Lothian-street
Murray, John, Constitution Hotel, Lothian-Street.
Menzies, Archibald, Menzies' Hotel, La Trobe street
Miller, Sutherland, Southern Cross Hotel, Bourke-street.
Meaney, Daniel, Harvest Home Hotel, Flinders-street.
Mallett, David, Botanical Hotel, South Yarra.
Morris, James Nall, Ayrshire Hotel, Chetwynd-Street.
Murray, John, Harvest Home Hotel, Flinders-street.
Moore, Robert Cooke, Exchange Hotel, William-street,
Moser, Christian, Farmers' Hotel, Little Collins-street.
Merton, William, Tavistock Hotel, Bourke-street
Marris, Thomas, Lincoln Inn Cardigan-street
Murray, Margaret, Railway Hotel, Sandridge
Manuell, Henry William, Royal Oak Hotel Swanston-street.
Moran, Michael, Central City Hotel, Collins-street.
Mills, Stephen, Chusan Hotel, Sandridge.
Mendel, Henry, Black Prince Hotel Curzon-street
Mitchell, William, Foundry Hotel, King-street
M'Cowen, Thomas, Spanish Hotel, Elizabeth-street
M'Carthy, Thomas, Kerry Hotel, King-street.
M'Donald, Augustus, Tavistock, Hotel, Queen-street.
Muir, William, Corkscrew Hotel, King-street.
Maroney, James, Carriers' Arms, Elizabeth-street
M'Guire, James, Clarendon Hotel, Collins-street
M'Gregor, John, Rose, Thistle, and Shamrock, Elizabeth-street.
Metzger, Martin, Albert Hotel, Stephen-street.
Norman, Patrick, Clare Castlea, Stephen-street.
Maher, Thomas, Railway Hotel, King-street.
M'Lean, Jolm, Scotch Thistle, Northcote.
M'Girr, William Peter, Railway Refreshment rooms, Sandridge.
Nicholson, Robert, Governor Arthur, Little Bourke-street.
Nutter, Edward, Hotham Arms, Leveson-street.
Neeson, John, Paddington! Hotel, Little Collins-street
Nissen, George, Royal George, Bourke-street.
Nunn, Thomas, Nunn's Hotel, Bourke-street.
Nealer, James, Railway Hotel, Swanston-street.
Orknoy, James, Sir C. Hotham Hotel, Flinders-street
O'Halloran, Dennis, Union Hotel, Bourke-street.
Oakley, Charles, Temple-court Hotel, Queen-street.
O'Callaghan, Owen, Woolpack Inn, Queen-street
O'Brien, James, Madeline Hotel, Madeline-street.
Ottaway, George, Queen's Head Hotel, Queen-street.
O'Connor, Patrick, Mansion House Hotel, Stanley-street.
Orkney, Thomas, Duke of Rothesay Hotel, Elizabeth-street.
Ollis, Charles, Apollo Inn, Little Flinders-street.
Punch, Richard, Leinster Arms, Lonsale-street
Perritt, William, Freemasons' Hotel, Swanston-street.
Pemberton, Thomas Lloyd, Royal Hotel Sandrldge.
Power, James, White Hart Hotel, Little Bourke-street.
Paynter, Robert, Mechanics' Arms, Little Collins-street.
Pitt, William, Olympian Hotel, Lonsdale-street.
Pierce, Elisha, British Queen, Nicholson-street.
Phelan, Michael, Farmers' Arms, Swanston-street
Purneil, Thomas, Royal Saxon, Elizabeth-street
Prendergast, Patrick, Assembly Hotel, Bourke-street.
Penglese, Elizabeth, London Hotel, Market-street.
Plomer, John, University Hotel, Grattan-street.
Price, Thomas, Leinster Arms, Lonsdale-street.
Boss, William Alfred, Princess's Hotel, Spring-street.
Reed, Ellen, Limerick Castle, Elizabeth-street
Robertson, Lachlan, Queensberry Hotel, Madeline-street
Richards, Thomas, United States Hotel, Sandridge.
Ryan, Michael, Windsor Castle, Little Bourke-street,
Ryan, John, Joiners' Arms, Queensberry-street.
Rahilly, Patrick, Olive Branch, Little Collins-street
Richardson, John Frederick, Western Port Hotel, Queen-street.
Ryan, Rody, Loughnan Castle, Leveson-street
Ryan, Andrew, Britannia Hotel, Queen-street.
Rigby, Edward, Council Club Hotel, Queen-street.
Rupprecht, Charles, Sabloniere Hotel, Queen-street
Richardson, Richard, Royal Hotel, Victoria-street.
Short, Hugh, Australian Hotel, Bourke-street.
Stephens, Thomas, King's Arms Hotel, Madeline-street.
Simpson, George, Royal Charter Hotel, Bourke-street.
Simpson, James, Mercantile Hotel, Flinders-street.
Sheahan Thomas, Bouverie Hotel, Bouverie-street
Swannie, David, Howard Hotel, North Melbourne.
Southwood, William Stocker, Stork Hotel, Elizabeth-street
Stirling, John, Beehive., Hotel, Blackwood-street.
Shields, William, James Watt Hotel, Spencer-street.
Spray, Henry, Stratford Arms, Drummond-street.
Seymour, James, Friend-in-Hand Hotel, Little Collins-street.
Salway, Benoni, Williams's Hotel, Elizabeth-street
Spiers, Felix William, Royal Hotel, Bourke-street.
Scott, Edwaid, Port Phillip Club Hotel, Flinders-street
Simms, George, Bay View Hotel, Sandridge-street.
Sheedy, Michael, Plough Inn, Bourke-street.
Schadowsky, Henry Gustav, Imperial Hotel, Elizabeth-street.
Spence, Francis, Spanish Hotel, Elizabeth-street
Taylor, Henry, Waterloo Hotel, Little Collins-street
Tookey, Patrick, Kilkenny Hotel, King-street.
Taylor, William, All Nations Hotel, Sandridge.
Walley, James, Mistletoe Hotel, M'Kenzie-street.
Wheeler, James, Royal Railway Hotel, Elizabeth-street.
Watson, John. Albion Hotel, Bourke-street.
Wedel, Charles, Criterion Hotel, Collins-street.
Wright, Walter, Marine Hotel, Sandridge.
Wallack, Joseph, Original Scottish Hotel, Bourke-street,
Woodward, James, Leicester Hotel, Leicester-street
Washford, Edward, Exford Arms Hotel, Russell-street.
Walker, John, Britannia Hotel, Swanston-street.
Wood, William, Duke of Kent Hotel, La Trobe-street,
Witcomb, George, Waterman's Arms, Little Collins-street.
Wilson, Hugh, Metropolitan Hotel, William-street.
Wilson, Robert, Cornwall Arms, Bourke-street.

Anthony Forster 1813-1897

Of Anthony Forster 1813-1897
little known outside of South Australia, he was never afraid to call a spade a spade which is certainly a trait I most admire in human beings.

As part of his varied career, he was newspaper editor of the South Australian Register, he wrote the following column entitled 'Military Settlers', declaring his stand against military settlement of New Zealand and Colonel Pitt's recruitment which Anthony Forster saw as little more than a scam.


Colonel Pitts mission to the Australian Colonies in quest of military settlers for New Zealand was first entered upon in May 1864.
The scheme was then introduced under the guise of enrolling volunteers to meet a serious emergency in New Zealand. Immediate assistance was required, additional troops were demanded, and, as the crisis was evidently a severe one, the call for volunteers was not unreasonable. But nothing was said at that time about family emigration The demand was for single men, and the exigencies of the war seemed to justify Colonel Pitt's demand upon the colonies. Even then, however, the Victorian Government saw that the volunteers were required for something more than to meet an emergency.

The Treasurer of the colony, in reply to a request from Sir George Grey that the Government would assist Colonel Pitt, recorded the opinion of the Ministry in a minute, which ran as follows : ?
"I observe that Colonel Pitt proposes not only to enlist militia for a temporary purpose, but also to secure permanent settlement. While desirous of aiding the New Zealand Government by allowing the removal of the troops, and indeed in every legitimate way, it appears to me that to encourage the settlement of Victorian colonists in another country is inconsistent with the policy of the Government and injurious to the advancement of the colony. I cannot, therefore, undertake that any extraordinary facilities will be rendered to Colonel Pitt in exporting military settlers to New Zealand. I trust I need not say that if there were insufficient troops in New Zealand to hold the Maories in check until reinforcements arrive, I should hold it to be the duty of the Government to aid the colonists of New Zealand at any sacrifice; but this does not appear to be the case."

Thus, as far back as August last, when this minute was made, it was held that the troops in New Zealand were quite numerous enough to protect the colonists. Since that time the forces have been largely increased, and battles have been fought which appear to have almost put an end to the war. What, then, can be the fresh cause which now induces Colonel Pitt to apply to South Australia for military settlers. If, in the height of the crisis, there was no emergency which justified such an appeal, there can certainly be none now.

It is not pretended that the British settlers are out numbered, that they are at the mercy of the natives, and that they want assistance to maintain their ground. The chances of war have been altogether in their favour, the Maories have been conquered, and what Colonel Pitt now wants is population to occupy the country. If this scheme of military settlement had been submitted at the time of its origin to the Britsh public, it would probably have induced many emigrants to turn their attention to New Zealand, especially if it had been shown that the Home Government approved of it.
But, what prospect is there that useful settlers who have already made themselves homes in these colonies will be inclined for the sake of a few acres of land to undertake the work of holding the conquered territory of New Zealand? Besides, there are onerous duties to be performed before the volunteer even sees the land which he is to possess.

Mr Dillon Bell, who dispatched the first detachment of military settlers from Victoria, said, in the course of his public address?"Remember that as soon as you land in New Zealand you are soldiers, as amenable to military laws as we who are already in arms there".
It ought to be known, too, that the land which is offered to military settlers does not belong to the Government except by right of conquest, and that the native owners, though scattered and disheartened, are still in possession. On this point Mr. Bell, whilst repudiating the idea that the New Zealand Government had no power to fulfil their contract with the volunteers, said :- "One thing, indeed, is quite true, that the Government has not at this moment in possession the land which is offered to you. The land is still in the hands of rebel natives, and we trust to you and your military comrades to hold by the force of your arms that territory which will be hereafter allotted to you by the Government".
He further explained that nothing short of this system of military colonization would protect the wives and children of peaceful settlers, and that the scheme had received the full approval of Sir George Grey.

These particulars will give our readers some idea of what military settlement in New Zealand will be. The volunteers are to hold land in the midst of a subjugated race of war like and revengeful disposition, who have themselves been driven from that land. The beginning of such a settlement will be the commencement of a series of outrages and retaliations which will last as long as the natives themselves exist. We may be certain that there will be more fighting than farming for many years to come, though in the end the scheme will be successful if the supply of settlers be large enough.
But South Australia is not the right place to seek for them. We have no large migratory population from which Colonel Pitt can hope to get suitable recruits. The class of men whom he wants are either already settled or can become so on easier terms than are offered in New Zealand. But the Auckland authorities are evidently of opinion that the agricultural element which they want in their proposed settlements is most likely to be obtained in South Australia, and so they send here after having tried the other colonies.

That the volunteers who were enrolled in Victoria included but a very small proportion of men suited to rural occupations will be seen from the following list of registered trades or callings in one of the com panies of the Auckland battalion :? 29 clerks, 1 custom-house officer, 3 surveyors, 1 seeds man, 4 farmers, 3 builders, 1 cabinetmaker, 14 carpenters, 2 shipwrights, 1 boatbuilder, 1 painter, 1 grainer, 1 mason, 2 bricklayers, 5 blacksmiths, 1 tinsmith, 2 bootmakers, 2 printers, 1 storeman, 1 storekeeper, 1 grocer, 1 chemist, 2 carters, 4 labourers, 2 teachers, 1 photographer, 1 keeper of lunatic asylum, 3 gentlemen, 8 servants, 1 ostler, and 2 without either trade or calling.

Such are the motley materials of the volunteer force which was enroled in Victoria. (see notes)

To convert these into good settlers for an agricultural country would be difficult, and probably this is the reason why Colonel Pitt has now been instructed to call for volunteers in South Australia. The fact that twenty-nine clerks can be found to enrol to every four farmers shows that the inducements to become agriculturists in a country where the land must first be wrested from the Maori, and then held at the point of the bayonet, are looked upon as of no great value by persons who are most competent to judge for themselves. To obtain a free grant of land, when the natives have been expelled, would be only a small compensation for the trouble and risk of having to keep possession of it afterwards.

The scheme, then, is not likely to meet with much favour in this colony, or to withdraw any portion of our settled population. At the same time, we have as much right to complain of the attempt of the New Zealand Government to import immigrants from South Australia as though that attempt were likely to be successful. As yet it does not appear that the imperial authorities know anything about the scheme, and we hardly think they would sanction it if they were aware of its true character.
The sole authority for the action of Colonel Pitt appears to be a notice published in the New Zealand Gazette ; and from the speeches of Mr. Dillon Bell we are led to infer that the idea of employing military settlers originated with the colonists of New Zealand, for he states that it has received 'the approval' of Sir George Grey.
Thus, the scheme apparently embodies the policy of the Local Government for permanently settling the country, and has little or nothing to do with the management of the war. Undoubtedly, the idea is a clever one, but the required settlers will not be found in South Australia.

The matter of Colonel Pitt's proceedings must be taken up by the Government and the colonists. We should be sorry to offer the slightest impediment to the emigration of colonists to assist the colonists of New Zealind in circumstances of pressing necessity, but we protest against the right of any person, supposed to be under the direction of imperial authority, to come to this colony and draft off by bribes of land persons brought here at considerable expense, for the mere purpose of saving New Zealand from the cost of maintaining a standing army.
If settlers are wanted for such a purpose they should be sought for in England, where they could readily be obtained at the expense of the New Zealand Government.

Notes:-

Colonel Pitt was sent to Victoria and given letters of credit by the New Zealand Government for around ? 70,000. However, the Melbourne banks would only advance ? 10,000 against the letters. Thomas Maxwell Henderson of Henderson and McFarlane was in Melbourne at the time on business and when he heard of Pitt's predicament. he went to the banks and offered them his firms guarantee of credit for another ? 15,000. He transfered the moneys so that Colonel Pitt's so called Victorian 'regiment' could sail for New Zealand aboard the company vessels. janilye

The Argus described the sight at Spencer-Street Station when the volunteers left as:
...crowded during the morning with people, desirous of seeing the volunteers start. The departure was rendered tolerably lively. Although the volunteers included may specimens of the genus 'loafer', they were altogether a fine body of men. It is a creditable fact that, ...not a single case of drunkenness was to be noticed.

In the book 'Australians leave for the Waikato War in NZ' (1863). By Scott Davidson he states;
"the man responsible for recruiting in the Australian Colonies, Lieutenant Colonel George Dean Pitt If the recruits lost their land, Pitt," assured, then so did he and that there would be no doubt of the outcome of this war. Pitt was in the colonies not just to recruit but to instill confidence in the land for service offer and by doing so, justify the Waikato War. The men wanted assurances, and received them, that the land would be there in three years time but the press and local governments of the Australian colonies had other concerns."

The photograph below shows Anthony Forster standing in the centre with journalist of the Register.


Anyone can be a Genealogist !!!

Anyone can be a genealogist!

These days it seems, to call yourself a genealogist, all you have to do is learn to spell 'genealogist', or find an old photo of your grandfather when you moved the fridge.

If you're thinking of hiring a 'genealogist' note that Certification and accreditation are not a requirement for genealogists who wish to accept clients.

Of course certification or accreditation does help you to know that these individuals have had their competence as genealogical researchers thoroughly tested by their peers and not just any individual who knows how to find the Mormons Family Search on the internet. Which is the first online site we all find during our first steps into trying to find where the rellies all hailed from.

Professional Genealogist: - This title generally applies to any genealogist with knowledge and experience of proper genealogical research methods and techniques, and who supports and upholds high standards in the field of genealogy. People who call themselves professional genealogists are usually either certified or very experienced, but this is not always the case. Anyone can use the title "professional," so be sure to inquire about their education, experience, and references.

Do you think that the genealogical profession is one that you will enjoy? Follow these simple steps to see if you have the necessary skill, experience, and expertise to offer your services to others on a fee basis.

Below I've added some tips by Kimberly Powell for those thinking they may be able to earn a bit of extra change in the field of genealogy.

How To Become a Professional Genealogist

By Kimberly Powell, source- About.com Guide

HERE'S HOW::

1. Read and follow the code of ethics of the Association of Professional Genealogists and the Board for Certification of Genealogists.

2.Consider your experience. A genealogist must be familiar with the various types of genealogical records available and know where to access them, as well as know how to analyze and interpret evidence. If you are unsure about your qualifications, enlist the services of a professional genealogist to critique your work and offer guidance.

3. Consider your writing skills. You must be knowledgeable of the proper format for source citations and have good grammar and writing skills in order to communicate your findings to clients. Practice your writing constantly. Once you have it polished, submit an article or case study for possible publication in a local genealogical society newsletter/journal or other genealogical publication.

4. Join the Association of Professional Genealogists. This society exists not only for practicing genealogists, but also for people who desire to further their skills.

5. Educate yourself by taking genealogy classes, attending seminars and workshops, and reading genealogical magazines, journals, and books. No matter how much you know, there is always more to learn.

6. Volunteer with a local genealogical society, library or group. This will keep you in touch with a network of fellow genealogists, and help to further develop your skills. If you have the time, start or join a transcribing or indexing project for additional practice at reading genealogical documents.

7. Make a list of your goals as a professional genealogist. Think about what types of research interests you, the access you have to necessary resources and the profitability of doing research as a business. What do you want to do? Professional genealogists don't all do client research - some are authors, editors, teachers, heir searchers, bookstore owners, adoption specialists and other related fields.

8. Develop your business skills. You cannot run a successful business without knowing about accounting, taxes, advertising, licenses, billing and time management.

9. Get a copy of Professional Genealogy: A Manual for Researchers, Writers, Editors, Lecturers, and Librarians. This book by Elizabeth Shown Mills is the bible for genealogy professionals and those who want to become professional. It offers advice and instruction on everything from abstracting to setting up a business.

10. Consider applying for certification or accreditation. The Board for Certification of Genealogists (BCG) grants certification in research, as well as in two teaching categories, and the International Commission for the Accreditation of Professional Genealogists offers accreditation in specific geographical areas. Even if you decide not to become certified or accredited, the guidelines offered by these testing programs will help you objectively evaluate your genealogical skills.

If you are in Australia,The Society of Australian Genealogists has a formal course and examination, resulting in a Diploma in Family Historical Studies (Dip. F.H.S.).


Tips:
1.Practice your research skills every chance you get. Visit courthouses, libraries, archives, etc. and explore the records. Get as much experience as you can before working for others.

2.Don't stop researching your own family history. It is most likely the reason you fell in love with genealogy in the first place and will continue to provide inspiration and enjoyment.



Kimberly Powell is a member of the Association of Professional Genealogists, the National Genealogical Society, the International Society of Family History Writers and Editors, and several local genealogical societies. She has been writing about genealogy for About.com since 2000, and her work has also appeared in several genealogy magazines.


6 comment(s), latest 6 years, 6 months ago

Anzac Commemorative Medallion

Do you have a relative who was entitled to the Anzac Commemorative Medallion?
Every Anzac soldier who served on the Gallipoli Peninsula, or in direct support of operations there - or his family if he did not survive until into the late 1960s - was entitled to be issued with the Anzac Commemorative Medallion.
(shown below).

The medallion was issued in 1967, and as a result
MANY HAVE NEVER BEEN CLAIMED.

For Australian Soldiers' Medallions

If you are the descendant of an Anzac soldier, you MAY still be entitled to claim the medallion.

Mailing address for all Medals applications
Directorate of Honours and Awards
T-4
Department of Defence
PO Box 7952
CANBERRA BC ACT 2610

Email www.defence.gov.au/medals
Website: http://www.defence.gov.au/medals
Toll-free Medals Inquiry Phone line:
1800 111 321 (Operating Hours: 8:30am-5:00pm, Monday to Friday)


Include as many details as possible regarding the soldier on whose behalf you wish to claim the medallion.
Full name, rank and unit, and service number
are generally required

For New Zealand Soldiers' Medallions

For claiming the Anzac Commemorative Medallion for a New Zealand soldier,
write to:

Staff Officer Medals,
New Zealand Defence Force,
Private Bag 905,
Upper Hutt, New Zealand.

______________________________

OBTAINING A COPY OF THE SOLDIER'S DOSSIER (New Zealand)

For a copy of a soldier's WW1 service dossier, contact the Personnel Archives of the New Zealand Defence Force (Te Ope Kaatua O Aotearoa). The cost for this service varies depending upon how much material must be photocopied, up to a maximum of $28.00 NZ.

All Requests Must Be In Writing (letter or fax: [04] 527 5275) to:


Personnel Archives / Enquiries & Medals
Trentham Camp, NZDF
Private Bag 905
UPPER HUTT
NEW ZEALAND

Include the following information in your request:

Enquirer's details:
Mr/Mrs/Miss/Ms:
Name:
Address:
Phone number:

Soldier's Details:
Supply as many of the following details as possible

Surname:
Full Given Names:
Any other names known by:
Date and place of birth:
Living or deceased:
Service Number:
Rank:
Unit:
Period of service:
Next-of-kin at time of enlistment:
Address at time of enlistment:
Occupation at time of enlistment:

REMEMBER - This is to receive a copy of the soldier's service file - NOT the Medallion.

DIGITAL COPIES OF SOLDIERS' DOSSIERS (Australia)

If you would like more information on the soldier, digitised individual's service dossiers are available from
National Archives. You will need to log in and then conduct a Search.



_____________________________________________________________________


A little background reading...

Statement by the Prime Minister [of Australia],
the Rt. Hon. Harold Holt,
in the House of Representatives

16th March, 1967
The Minister for Defence announced that it had been decided by the Australian Government, in consultation with the New Zealand Government, to issue a medallion and lapel badge to the veterans of the Gallipoli Campaign.

I am glad to be able to announce that arrangements have now been completed for the production of the medallion and badge. The Minister for the Army will be arranging distribution to those wishing to receive them as soon as possible.

The Government hopes that production of the medallion and lapel badge will be sufficiently advanced to permit at least some of them to be distributed by Anzac Day.

The medallion (with the name of the recipient inscribed) will be issued to surviving members of the Australian Defence Force who served on the Gallipoli Peninsula, or in direct support of the operations from close off-shore, at any time during the period from the first Anzac Day in April, 1915, to the date of final evacuation in January 1916. Next of kin or other entitled persons will be entitled to receive the medallion on behalf of their relatives, if their relative died on active service or has since died.

For surviving members, a lapel badge will also be available for wearing. This will be a replica of the obverse (or front) of the medallion and will be about 1" high and 2/3" wide, the same size as the R.S.L. badge.

The medallion is the work of Mr. Raymond Ewers, the well-known Australian artist, based on a suggestion by Mr. Eric Garret, a staff artist with the Department of Army. It has been endorsed by both the Government of New Zealand and ourselves. It will be approximately 3" high and 2" wide. The obverse of the medallion depicts Simpson and his donkey carrying a wounded soldier to safety. It will be bordered on the lower half by a laurel wreath above the word ANZAC. The reverse (the back) shows a map in relief of Australia and New Zealand superimposed by the Southern Cross. The lower half will be bordered by New Zealand fern leaves.

The medallion will be cast in bronze and the lapel badge will be a metal of bronze colour


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