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Nathan Phipps 1702-1772

Nathan PHIPPS;

FATHER: was Joseph PHIPPs son of immigrants,born in Reading, Berkshire England on the 27 June 1671 and died on the 11 November 1762 at Abington, Montgomery, Pennsylvania. the son of Joseph PHIPPS 1640-1716 and Sarah BINFIELD 1639-1725

MOTHER: Mary WOODYEAR she had been born on the 27 June 1671 in Uwchlan, Chester, Pennsylvania. and she died in 1742 at Abington, Montgomery, Pennsylvania, Mary WOODYEARs father was George WOODYEAR born 1640 in Chester, Pennsylvania and died 20 May 1717 also in Chester, Pennsylvania. Mary's mother was Mary Elizabeth born 1644 Chester, Pennsylvania and died 1717 in Somerset, Pennsylvania.

Syblings were:-

Sarah Ann Phipps b:1695 Uwchlan d:1762 France
Samuel Phipps b:1697 Uwchlan, d: 1785 in Williston, Chester, PA
Joseph Phipps 1700 1772
George Phipps 1704 1738
John Phipps 1713 1796
Aaron Phipps 1716 1791
William Phipps 1732 1763

Joseph PHIPPS 1671-1762 married again at the age of 70 on the 3 April 1742 at Uwchlan, Chester, Pennsylvania Mary HELSBY 1713-1782. This union produced one son George PHIPPS 1743-1780


Spouse: Nathan Phipps married Sarah DAVIS the daughter of David DAVIS 1880-1742 from Uwchlan, Chester, Pennsylvania. Sarah DAVIS was born 1706 in in Chester, Pennsylvania. and died in April 1772.

The marriage between Nathan PHIPPS and Sarah DAVIS took place in September 1734 at Uwchlan, Chester, Pennsylvania

children of this marriage were:-
Jonathan b:1733 Chester, Pennsylvania
Samuel b: 1 June 1735 d:5 January 1841 m. Mary MARSHALL 1738-1835
Elizabeth b:1737 Uwchlan, Chester, PA d: 1790
Margaret b:1739 Uwchlan, Chester
Ann b:1743 Uwchlan d:1790 Centre,PA.m.Aaron PACKER 1732-1790
Asenath b: 1745 Uwchlan d: ????
Damas b:1747 Uwchlan d: 1790 Centre, Pennsylvania
Mary b:1749 m. (1) MALPUS in 1868 (2) RATCLIFFE in 1870
John b:1751 Chester, PA d:1771 Uwchlan, Chester, Pennsylvania



The photograph below is Samuel Phipps 1735-1841 father of Robert PHIPPS 1790-1825


2 comment(s), latest 2 years, 3 months ago

NEW SOUTH WALES. AUCTIONEERS' LICENSES 1857

The following is a list of the persons to whom auctioneers' licenses have been granted
for the year 1857:?
Charles Adrain,
Edward Agnew,
Joel H. Asher,
Thomas W. Bowden,
Frederick Bradley,
William G. Burgis,
Ewen W. Wallace,
Henry D. Cockburn.
John G. Cohen,
Richard Cowan,
William E. Day,
William Dean,
Octavius B. Ebsworth,
Charles Frith,
James Gannon.
Herbert Gibson,
James Gordon,
Henry A. Graves.
Francis Grose,
David B. Hughes,
John Isaacs.
George Kent,
William G. Lambert.
Thomas Lister,
Charles Martyn,
John H. Miller,
John C. Molloy,
Alexander Moore,
Robert Muriel,
William Newell,
Samuel Payten,
James Pearson,
John Purkis,
Francis E. Rishworth,
Edward Salomon,
Alfred Schr?der,
Charles Teakle,
Launcelot E. Threlkeld,
John G. Valentine,
Samuel J. Wooller,

Source:
Empire (Sydney, NSW : 1850 - 1875)
Friday 28 November 1856
Page 6
Transcription, janilye 2013


Newtown Sydney NSW from settlement to 1912

This article, which I have transcribed below was written on the 12 December 1912 and appeared as part of a feature in The Sydney Morning Herald, for Newtown's Municipal Jubilee. The links I added myself. janilye

NEWTOWN'S MUNICIPAL JUBILEE. PAST AND PRESENT.

SOME EARLY HISTORY.

Newtown is an old town-a very old town, in fact, as towns go in Australia.
It may almost be said to have begun with the arrival of Phillip. Certain it is that the man to whom the two grants of land, totalling 210 acres, on which to-day the greater part of Newtown stands, came out to Australia with Governor Phillip in 1788.
This man was one Nicholas Devine, son of a farmer in Burrin, county Cavan, Ireland. For 25 years Nicholas Devine filled the position of principal superintendent of convicts, and he seems to have given satisfaction to his superiors, for we find his services recognised by two grants of the public land the first grant of 120 acres was given to him on January 8, 1734, by "Richard Grose, Esquire, Lieutenant-Governor of the Colony," and the second, a grant of 50 acres, was given by "John Hunter Esquire, Lieutenant-Governor of the Colony," on October 3, 1799.
And Devine settled there, and, after his native town, he called the place Burrin Farm.
The Grose grant reads, In part:-"In pursuance of the power and authority vested in me is aforesaid, I do by these presents give and grant unto Nicholas Devine, his heirs and assigns, to have and to hold for ever one hundred and twenty acres of land, to be known by the name of Burrin Farm, laying: and situated in the
district of Bulanamlng, and separated on the north side by a road of 200ft in width from the land allotted for the maintenance of a schoolmaster, without the town of Sydney. Such timber as may be growing and to grow hereafter upon the said land, "which may be deemed fit for naval purposes, to be reserved for the use of the
Crown "

The land granted to Devine by Governor Hunter was bounded on the south-west side by Page, Candells, Jenkins, and Field farm, from which it is separated by a road of 60 feet, and on the south side by an allotment granted unto Samuel Burt, the said 90 acres
of land to be known by the name of Burrin"
On these 210 acres Devine lived for many years and there he died. The land was heavily timbered, but whether any of the timber was ever requisitioned for naval purposes we do not know. We know this, however, that the heirs and assigns of Nicholas Devine who were to have and to hold it for ever, have long since ceased to have any interest in the land. Burrin Farm has ceased to be.
All the farms that once were there about have gone, and on the land are thousands of houses closely packed together, and, where once a few men bade each other the time of day, and inquired how the crops were getting on, many thousands of people-in Newtown and Erskinevllle and Camperdown, in Enmore, St Peters, and the places contiguous thereto-are living and moving in these busy times with never a thought of the old farm lands.
But at a time like this, when Newtown Is celebrating its municipal Jubilee, we may with advantage look back on some of the past history of the place, and recall some of the early life of Australia and some of the men of old. History and romance are here blended in a way that should interest all Australians.

A CELEBRATED CASE

Old hands still speak of the great Devine case- or the Newtown ejectment case as the records have it as a 'cause celebre' which lasted for many days and which was crowded with sensational incident.
In it were engaged most of the leading counsel of the day and many prominent families were concerned in it as defendants.
The date was 1857-27 years after Nicholas Devine had died. Devine went to England, it Is said, as a witness for Bligh, after the latter's deposition and there he married. He however left no issue and on his death his property passed to one Bernard Rochfort, yeoman who had become his assigned servant in 1825.
To Rochfort it is alleged he conveyed the whole of the land comprised in the two grants, and from Rochfort it was purchased in parcels of various sizes by citizens of Sydney who built fine country homes there, spending thousands of pounds. Then suddenly relatives of the deceased Nicholas Devine appeared upon the scene and laid claim to all the land. Rochfort was charged with forcing the old man's signature to the will. Moreover it was claimed that being an assigned servant he was not entitled to possess any land whatever.
The families who were now living on the estate combined to defend the case - to defend their own estates.
It was one of the longest if not the longest list of defendants in a case that this country has any record of.
We have not space to follow it further than to state that in the end proceedings were stopped by the defendants paying a certain sum to the claimant as a solatium. But the evildence given in the case-it was published afterwards in pamphlet form and may be seen in the Public Library.

It is interesting because many of the men who were witnesses lived as boys in Sydney at the beginning of the nineteenth century and told of things that happened in the old convict days. And partlcularly interesting, is it to one who wishes to preserve the old history of Newtown.
There were bushrangers at Newtown once, for in 1822 we read Nicholas Devine and his wife were beaten by bushrangers till they were almost senseless". One witness John Lucas said, "I am a native of the colony and have great recollection. I know Nicholas Devine 54 or 55 years ago. I lived on Church Hill then, and Devine lived in Bridge street and afterwards we lived near each other at Newtown. I knew him in 1800, and I recollect his being beaten by the bushrangers in 1822. He had a sap ling fence around his farm, and I used to go there to get firewood". Another witness Michael Willlam Henry said that he came to the colony in 1800 and was formerly in the Marines "The last commander that I sailed under" he said " was Lord Nelson"
There is much interesting history in these Pages but it must be passed over.

O'CONNELLTOWN AND "THE NEW TOWN"

Sydney has grown greatly in the last hundred years the city has expanded, large suburbs have grown up and where once the blacks had corroborees and bushrangers held men up, we have a metropolis with a population of nearlv three quarters of a million. Newtown like so many of our other suburbs has grown from small things to big things It is in fact, the busiest of all our suburbs today.
But before Newtown was O'Connelltown, (called after Sir Maurlce O'Connell, who lies burled In the old Camperdown Cemetery near St. Stephen's Church) was flourishing and though, the name has now gone, some of the old inhabitants still say they live in O'Connelltown.
Exactly how Newtown got its name is not quite clear. But years ago - many years ago- there were half a dozen small cottages situated between Beehag's block (where Hatters' Arcade now stands) and Eliza street and the records of the Wesleyan Church show that services were held in one of these old cottages in 1838.
Probably they were built about 1830. There was a big break from St. John's Tavern (now the Shakespeare Hotel, at the corner of King and Hordern streets) to Beehag's property Then, in addition to the cottages referred
to, there were brickworks, surrounded by a number of old huts, on what is now known as the Gowrie Estate, at the rear of Newtown Markets. In all probability this group of buildings came to be called "the new town," and so the place got its name. There are some who tell us, however, that a small vlllage sprang up at St. Peters, and that it used to be referred to as "New Town."
Many of the streets in Newtown are named after the men of the early days. O'Connell street, for instance, is named after Sir Maurice Charles O'Connell, a cousin of the celebrated Daniel O'Connoll. He landed in Sydney in 1809, In command of the 73rd Regiment, and bearing a commission as Lieutenant-Governor of New South Wales and its dependencies and immediately after his arrlval he married Mrs. Putland, the brave and dutiful daughter of Governor Bligh. He died in Sydney on May 25, 1818, and his remains were the first to be interred in the Church of England cemetery at Newtown-known as the old Camperdown Cemotery. It was in Sydney that his no less distinguished son, Sir Maurlce Charles O'Connoll (President of legislatlve Council of Queensland, and four times Actlng-Governor of Queensland), was born. Bligh-street, Newtown, reminds us that the land on the west side of King-street, from Forbes street down to Missenden-road, comprised the grant to Bligh, and in the forties and fifties it was all practically vacant land.

THE OLD TOLL BARS.

There have been great changes since then, and there is scarce a vacant piece of land there now. The old tollbars have gone, and the railway and tramway run through the land where the old farms were. There were three gates on what was then known as Cook's River-road-one at Forbes-street (tho entrance from the city), one on what is now the Newtown railway bridge, and one at the dam, Cook's River. By paying at one of them the traveller was given a pass to clear the others for the same day only. The road, being one of the main roads, was vested in the Cook's River-road trust. Before it was taken over by the trust it was one of the worst out of the city, but a couple of years afterwards it was acknowledged to be the best in the colony. The gates were leased or sold for three-year periods, and the first to take charge was G A. Davis, an old resident of the district. The trust could only raise money by the sale of the tollbars; It had no power to tax anyone save those who went through the gates.
It was near the old toll-bar, and between King-Street and Bligh-street, that Dr. Samson's acadamy for boys and young men stood, and many of his scholars became prominent business men in the city.
Close by, in Bligh street, was the residence of "Parson" Kemp, who was the first minister of St Stephen's. The old house is still standing. At the bottom of Nelson-street, now called Little Queen street, was Gough's College Hotel, afterwards known as "Gough's Folly," because It was built off the main road, with no population near at the time. It certainly did seem an out-of-the-way place for an hotel but probably Gough was a far-seelng man. "I do not think he was mad," said an old resident to a "Herald reporter, "because there was a lot or building going on about there, and he opened his house to catch the trade. More over, the University was being built, St. Paul's College, St. John's College, and several smaller places. " From which It would appear that Mr. Gough expected to do a big trade with the University!
It is not without Interest to note. In those skyscraper days, that the first three-story building in Newtown was put up in King street by a Mr, Peden, who was connected with one of the city banks, and used as a private residence. To-day it is a pastrycook's shop.

WHEN THE TOWN WAS INCORPORATED.

When Newtown was incorporated there were only about 15 buildings on the east side of King-street, extending from Forbes-street to the railway bridge. Mr. Hordern, who laid the foundations of the firm of Hordern Brothers, is said to have lived on the corner of Fitzroy-street. Lower down, on the Cook's River-road, was Dent's large block. It ran from Short-street to Holt-street
The Hon. Thomas Holt, M.L.C., built a very large mansion there, and it was afterward.
used as the Camden College, with the Rev. S. C. Kent as the principal. Many prominent men of the city were educated there, among them the late Mr. Samuel Hordern and his brother Anthony, Dr. A. Watson, and Dr. Knaggs. Mr. Holt also built Camden-terrace, end portion of this terrace is still standing. He is also remembered for having built what was then the largest mansion in the colony. This was at Marrickville, and it was known as "The Warren." He imported a thousand rabbits, and stocked the land, and made it a rabbit run, and is now blamed for the rabbit pest in this country. This property was later occupied by the Carmelite nuns, but it is now unoccupied, and its castle-like character makes it an object of much interest.
The principal business places of Enmore are situated on what was once the "Josephson block."
Joshua Frey Josephson owned a great area of the land thereabouts, and lived in a mansion on the spot where the Enmore tram terminus now is. He was one of our early Judges, and In 1848 was Mayor of Sydney. Another of our Judges who lived out here, in "Stanmore House." was Sir George Long Innes. Still another famous place in this locality was 'Reiby House' once belonging to Mary Reiby

THE OLDEST HOUSE

The Old White Horse, built about 1838 on Cook's River-road, and standing opposite Pat tinson's grocer shop, is the oldest house in Newtown to-day. It Is built of laths and plaster, and so dates back to very early times. The hotel was one of the old-time wayside places that stood back some distance from the road.
It had one of the old colonial water troughs-the trunk of a tree hollowed out in the front. It was kept in the early days by a man named Isaac Titterton and afterwards by James Richards who was one of the first bus propietors plying between Newtown and Sydney. This man drove in one morning to town and reported that gold had been found in Newtown and there was a rush at once, all sorts of fancy prices being paid to the busmen to take people out. The gold was alleged to have been found out in Garsod's brickyards, now known as the Gowrie Estate.
Gold, it is true, was found there, but only a few grains of it, and the old hands state that "Jimmy Richards found it to make business for his hotel and his 'buses." Hundreds of people joined in the "rush."

There was a well at the hotel, and the top of it was left off one night, with the result that a woman with a child in her arms fell in. It was in the days of the crinoline, and so the woman kept afloat until she was taken out, but the child was drowned.
The City Bank building was originally erected by John Donohoe as an hotel, but an iron monger named Matthew Harrison, who had his place a little lower down, offered a big rent, with a long lease, and it was accepted, and the place was never opened as a hotel.
On the same site, before this place was built, there was an old slab hut built with a bark roof, occupied by an old man, known as "Billy the Bull," so called because he used to work an old bull in the shafts of a dray as others worked a horse. He was a hawker and wood carter.

The Bank of Australasia once stood on the site of Ralph Mason's old smithy shop. Then the bank bought it.
Up to that time the price paid was the highest given for land in Newtown. The Bank of Australasia first started opposite where the Bank Hotel is now.

"GOING, GOING-"

One by one those old houses - the owners of many of which figured as defendants in the Devine case - have disappeared, and the large grounds in which they stood have been sub divided and sold to meet the demands of our modern life. The last to go was "Thurnby." It was the home of T. C. Brellatt, leading flour-miller in the colony at that time, and the first returning officer in Newtown. After living there for many years he sold the property to Mr. Foster, who afterwards became Judge Foster, and represented Newtown in Parliament for some years.
The old place was recently pulled down, and the ground is now nearly all built on. But a few of the old houses that figured in the Devine case are still standing-Reiby House, in Statlon street; Donohoe's old cottage, in Ersklnevllle road (now part of a cordial factory); two shops on Cook's River-road, now occupied by a pawnbroker; and "The Retreat," at the corner of Burrin and Wilson Streets.

There has, indeed, been a transformation since the days when Nicholas Devine lived upon his farm. Life is far swifter now than in the days when the mailman drove leisurely through the place, blowing the old-fashioned horn. Time is far more precious than it was when a large boiler (now in the possession of Mr. Macquarie Walker, of Wells-street) burst, and went rolling with a thunderous noise along King-street, Newtown, and the driver and fireman of a train that had pulled up at the station left their train to go and see what all the commotion was about.

A suggestion has been made to the committee in charge of the celebrations that steps be taken to make the oldest residents guests
of honour at some of the functions. It is a suggestion that will probably be acted upon.

The Newtown Project for the Sydney Archives


4 comment(s), latest 5 years, 2 months ago

No words needed

This 1920 photograph tells the whole story.


6 comment(s), latest 5 years, 8 months ago

Norseman Western Australia. Cemeteries

Administration centre in Dundas. for Norseman area.

Lonely Graves:

Balladonia: J COOK, A E CROCKER, MCINERNY, PONTON, NO NAME. and N MAHOMET (Afghan Rocks)
Balbinya Station: E H BROOKS and J P BROOKS
Bedomia: J J DIMER 10 miles west
Caiguna: J BAXTER
Circle Valley: G K HARRIS, A LEWIS
Eucla: FAIRIE, WOOLIE (North) unnamed grave half mile east between cliff and sea at a soak and well.
Eyre: 2 unnamed graves
Frazer Range Station: T FOWLER, E HARRIS, W MEAD, S NEWMAN
Lady Mary Goldmining Lease: (about 3 miles south of Norseman) one grave of a man killed in mining accident about 1910 (can't read name)
Lake Cowan: a grave between Norseman and Buldania
Lake Dundas: an unidentified grave with part of a saddle beside it. A hollow log close by used as a 'Long Tom" not much wash beside it.
Mundrabilla: A STEWART (on the coast about 20 miles from Mundrabilla Station
Nanambinia: Baby DIMER, T DIMER
Norseman: (6 miles south) James DENNIS (photo below), headstone on side of road to Kalgoorlie. WHALEGO alias NALGAR
Pine Hill: A KOLODZEIT, J MCCOY
Pioneer: C F COGDON
Princess Royal North Mine: baby CUNNINGHAM
Rawlinna: J C HAMMELL (about 55 miles south)
Trans Australian Railway Line: J COCHRANS, alias J EWART
Two Mile Rocks: An American Negro (no name)
Wongabilla: one unidentified grave near Eyre
Woorlba Station: J W BRANCH

Private Cemetery
Mundrabilla: T KENNEDY, A MCGILL

Public Cemeteries
Buldania, Dundas (Whitehead SA) Eucla, Norseman, including Aboriginal and Pioneer


This work, part of the Western Australian Burial Location Index was collated by Yvonne and Kevin Coates and published by the Western Australian Genealogical Society Inc.


5 comment(s), latest 5 years, 9 months ago

NURSES EXAMINATION PASSES NSW 1930

The following is a list of names of the candidates who were successful in passing the examination held by the Nurses' Registration Board on 18, 19 and 20 November 1930.

The list is as follows:
GENERAL.
METROPOLITAN.

Auburn District Hospital:? Freda Mary Eliza Dowdle, Violette Helen Macgregor.

Balmain and District Hospital: Gertrude Gladys Giersch, Amy Josephine Hayes, Ellen Harken Needs.

Braeside Private Hospital: Clare Aileen O'Connell.

Coast Hospital: Hazel Anderson, Diana Ferguson Breckenridge, Elizabeth Stuart Brennan, Noreen Mary Brophy, Helen Little Clarke, Jeane Edna Cruickshank, Mabel Elizabeth Alice Douglas, Eileen Frost, Myee Alice Hartley, Cicely Josephine Longhurst, Enid Eliza Looke, Mabel Wakeham Meathrel, Elizabeth May Moppett, Monica Honnorah O'Neill, Claire Hannan O'Reilly, Elizabeth Edna Solling, Doris Mabel Mackintosh Stewart, Catherine Sullivan, Gertrude Evelyn Tully, Clarice Irene Wright.

Lewisham Hospital: Marie Therese Howard.

Mater Misericordiac Hospital (North Sydney):? Phyllis Margaret Corkhill, Elizabeth Margaret Croghan, Margaret Carmen McCrone, Lorna Isabel Riley, Reta Magdalen Schrader, Julia Patricia Smith.

Parramatta District Hospital: Mary Eileen Connors, Millicent Irene Crutch, Violet Adelaide Quick.

Royal Alexandra Hospital for Children:? Myrtle Isabella Aynsley, Aphra Winifred Black, Muriel May Cowdery, Winifred Joan Drummond, Helen Haviland Evans, Ada Dorothy Weeks Gale, Alexandria Kathleen Goudge, Thelma Elsie Grills, Elizabeth Lee Gunn, Janet Isabella Hunter, Freda Mavis Shaw, Florence Dora Souter, Olive Margery Spen- cer, Enid Jessie Stewart, Katharine Spears Stobo, Ethel Alice Seavington Stuckey, Nita Maud Thomson.

Royal Prince Alfred Hospital:?Evelyn Ada Angwin, Winifred Edith Bate, Ina Phyllis Bayliss, Lucy Jean Caldwell, Beryl Thelma Dickson, Yvonne Cecilia Evens, Miriam Blanche Gardner, Gwendoline Alice Green, Hazel Mary Harris, Edith Phyllis Kemmis, Agnes Mary Lions. Yolande Mary Pain, Emmie Thelma Hope Roberts, Audrey Scott-Young, Thelma Inez Squire, Margaret May Stanwell, Evelyn Sydenham Styche, Hannah Thomas, Evelyn Ward, Doreen Edna Watson, Charlotte Ann Brough Williams, Janet Doreen Wrightson.

Royal North Shore Hospital:? Kathleen Elizabeth Conway, Nellie Marshall, Kathleen Mary Moore, Noeline Ellen Sheehy, Doris Alice Ruby Walsh.

Royal South Sydney Hospital: Ruby Kathleen Betts

Scottish Private Hospital:Jean Edna Reardon.

St George District Hospital: Vallery Nina Beahan, Kathleen Mary Payne.

St Joseph's Hospital, Auburn: Mary Elizabeth Kearney, Annie Veronica Marsden, Amy Theresa Spencer.

St. Luke's Private Hospital: Dorothy May Hayes.

St. Vincent's Hospital: Naomi Margaret Annear, Mary Bridget Anthony, Dorothea Ormonde Bourke, Eugenie Patricia Burke, Sylvia Clancy, Margaret Joy Egan, Joan Mullins, Eileen Elizabeth Phelan, Eileen Isabel Quinnell, Frances Ryan, Helen Jessie Thomas.

Sydney Hospital: Alice Agnes Louise Andersen, Jean Anderson, Leigh Allison Dowell, Laura Elizabeth Kienzle, Nancy Leake, Agnes Bertha Lien, Constance Gertrude Read, Marjorie Cecilia Wilkinson.

Sydney Sanitarium: Myrtle Louisa Brandstater, Laura Vivian Brumby, Clara Olive Melita Dudd, Viola Mary Eardley, Doris Myrtle Felsch, Dorothy Martin, Marjorie Louie Mills, Jean McKean, Gladys Aileen Tiedeman, Reinetha Scholtz Van Wyk, Edna Mabel Wadman.

War Memorial Hospital: Ethne Mary Cutts, Jean Madeline Higgins, Beatrice Mary James, Alice Vera Pearson, Annie May Watt.

Western Suburbs Hospital: Barbara Mary Estella Mockler.

Wootton Private Hospital: Margery Heather Moore.

Hospitals Outside the State: Peggy Jean Clark, Elsie Hilda Farrell, Josephine Claudia Lloyd.

COUNTRY.

Broken Hill and District Hospital: Victoria Ivy Bennett, Agnes Bootes, Rita Mavis Egan, Bianka Bertha Mathilda Kretschmer, Lydia Ottilie Noack, Emily Elsie Simper.

Albury District Hospital: Harriet Lucas, Annie Margaret Martin.

Armidale and New England Hospital: Minna Doralice Drinan.

Bathurst District Hospital: Mary Gladys Ellis, Gwendoline Darcie Shillabeer.

Cessnock District Hospital: Dorothea Mary Cullen, Mary Ellen Drane, Beatrice Ruby Jones, Catherine Mary Vaisey.

Cootamundra District Hospital: Kathreen Isabell Harvey.

Corowa Public Hospital: Mary Veronica Sophia Dormer, Millicent Hilda Jones, Winifred Alvera Jones.

Dubbo District Hospital: Grace Bailey, Margaret Maud Gibson, Amy Josephine McManus.

Goulburn District Hospital: Agnes Gibbs.

Grafton District Hospital: Harriet Elizabeth Anderson, Gwendolen Florence James, Beatrice Laura Palmer, Violet Marjory Paulin, Alice Isabel Shannon.

Leeton District Hospital: Margaret Grace Playford.

Lismore District Hospital: Rebecca Jean Armstrong, Thelma Linda Bannister.

Lithgow District Hospital: Mary Genevieve Roach, Gwendoline Mabel Tydeman.

Maitland District Hospital: Annie Somerset Davidson, Jessie McDonald.

Manning River District Hospital (Taree): Mary Carey, Hilda Knight.

Mater Misericordiae Hospital (Waratah): Mary Damien Houston, Mary Berchmans Howard.

Moree District Hospital: Helen Amy Allison, Melita Jane Francis.

Newcastle General Hospital: Marjorie Alice Braithwaite, Isabel Beatrice Bryce, Lenore Mowbray Connolly, Florence Cramp, Thelma May Crew, Marjorie Weston Galton, Lola Vivian Caroline Kelly.
Barbara Mosbacher, Blanche McGuigan, Edna May Russell, Dorothy May Waddell.

Orange District Hospital: Alma Clarice Ray.

Sacred Heart Hospital (Young): Mary Gordon.

Tamworth District Hospital: Mary Brigid Freemen, Jessie Adelaide Glasser, Annie McIlveen.

Wagga District Hospital: Janet Victoria Saunderson.

Wallsend Mining and District Hospital: Elizabeth Crittenden, Alma Vera Halse, Ilma Gertrude Herron.

Wollongong District Hospital: Jean Emily Ferguson, Gwen Jones, Iris Gwendoline Marks, Leila Dorothy Stanton, Marjorie Edna Dolores Whittle.

MIDWIFERY.

Royal Hospital for Women: Ada Annie Allen, May Neville Bartholomew Baillie, Myrtle Isabel Marie Bath, Nellie Barker, Ethel Mary Barnes, Jessie Maude Adele Boulton, Edith May Candish, Elma Jean Cannons, Fanny Elsie Clark, Olive Cole, Elizabeth McLaren Crawford, Hope Croll, Ivy Mary Crothall, Mary Estelle Crowe, Mary Violet Curran, Phyllis Isobel Maud Dalrymple, Eileen Doris Davison, Alice Kathleen Delsorte, Margaret Elizabeth Donald, Ethel Lillian Erhardt, Elizabeth Grace Flett, Edna Mary Green, Daphne Linda May Hearps, Ina Edith May Hourigan, Annie Isabel Hyland, Dorothy Enid Annie James, Gladys Kathleen Eunice Johnson, Ethel Catherine Alice Jordan, Lily Jullie, Mary Lucy Keenan, Jessie Hannah Kerr, Martha Alice Lear, Agnes Marjorie Lee, Annie Henderson Levick, Lena Mary Lewin, Madge Mary Lyons, Kathleen Maguire, Martha Moncrieff, Katherine Isabelle Mooney, Blanche Vere Mowle, May Rebecca Murphy, Annie Gillan McAllister, Daisy Bishop Neilsen, Selena Ellen Newbigging, Olive Cecilia Parrish, Jessie Paterson, Edith Emily Pugh, Catherine Amelia Regan, Doree Hinda Revelman, Mildred Ila Richards, Doris Mabel Roberts, Jane Edith Roweth, Mabel Eileen Scanes, Elizabeth Marjorie Schofield, Phylis Ruth Skardon, Ivy Jean Slennett, Sylvia Gwendoline Sly, Olive Caroline Sonnadere, Thelma Elizabeth Sorensen, Bessie Tipping, Irene Maud Turner, Gladys Mary Vance, Kathleen Ellen Jane Walsh, Mary Greer Watson, Mabel Grace Went, Gertrude Mail Whibley, Selina Mary Jean White, Mary Wilmot.

Royal North Shore Hospital: Vida Blackwell, Maisie Olga Deignan, Violet Frances Winifred Harvey, Florence Gertrude Lees, Edna Elizabeth Matthews, Jeannie Muriel Muir, Isabel Mary McAllan.

South Sydney Women's Hospital: Marie Heise, Florence Elsie Jeffrey, Frances Mary Lawson, Ethel Monica McDonald, Elizabeth May Ogilvie, Alice May Wilkinson, Eva Martha Keevil Williams.

St. George District Hospital: Minnie Elizabeth Austen, Helen Boulton, Ada Lillian Flanagan, Winifred May Passmore, Noreen Tunnicllffe Whitlow.

St. Margaret's Hospital: Margaret Theresa Daniel, Mary Mavis Dowie, Margaret Mary Goodwin, Mavis Annabel Greenaway, Caroline Slader Hays, Agnes Isabel Healy, Ruby Ellen Hill, Lillian Elizabeth Leach, Marie Bernardene Maher, Ada Josephine Noland, Norah O'Hanlon, Maud O'Sullivan, Grace Anne Sheridan,
Elsie Josephine Tarlinton.

Women's Hospital: Ettie May Basham, Florence Biggs, Eileen Mary Breckenridge, Coralene Maude Brodie, Myra Isabel Brook-Smith, Veronica Clara Byrne, Charlotte Minnie Cody, Zita Catherine Duffy, Eileen May Errington, Margaret Elsie Fisk, Eileen Ada Giffin, Doris Hartnett, Katharin Ross Henson, Kathleen Doris Hollway, Bertha Ibbitson, Maisie Lillian Jarman, Helen May Kentwell, Vera Muriel Kilkenny, Phillis Bertha Lampe, Annie Larkin, Millie Amy Lillian Lawless, Theresa Lawliss, Annie Euphemia McColl, Ellen McGahan, Evelyn Mary Quinlan, Doris Mary Richards, Dorothy Mary Emelie Rodgers, Winifred Grace Rodgers, Dorothy Muriel Rogerson, Mary Margaret Ryan, Edith Clara Schrock, Elizabeth Edith Daphney Searle, Una Iona Selby, Helen Staley, May Alice Thorney- croft, Dorothy Mary Edith Todd, Ethel Walsh, Veronica Anne Weber, Ellen Elizabeth Westacott, Ruth Elizabeth Wiley, Edith Ellen Wood.

Hospitals outside the State: Ellen Bennett, Minnie Ida Caroline Darknell, Marion Gardiner, Catherine Hickey, Daisy Lee.

MENTAL.
Broughton Hall, Leichhardt: Bruce Henry Dulin, William Henry Hearn, William Charles Ruder,
Nina Patricia Stuart.

Callan Park Hospital: Edna Myrtle Schofield, Roy Frederick James Thompson.

Orange Mental Hospital: Rosa Grace West.

Parramatta Mental Hospital: Marjarie Frances Allester, Eacie Josephine Dalton, Winifred May Eddy, Amy Helmers.

Stockton Mental Hospital: Elizabeth Stella Cromarty, Florence Rachel Ann Davies, Catherine
Dorrington, Eleanor Hart.

INFANTS.
Renwick Hospital. Sophie Chessell, Edna Muriel Clifton, Phyllis Coles, Jessie Roberton MacFarlane Thomson.


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130 comment(s), latest 2 years, 3 months ago

ON THE DEATH OF THE ABORIGINAL CRICKETER, JOHN TAYLOR. 1847-1875

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people should be aware that this document contains names of people who have since passed away.

Farewell to all the games on earth,
Where honestly thou play'dst thy part,
Then let me sing the native worth
Of Jackey Taylor's cricket art.

The willow-bat he handled well,
And urged afar the flying ball ;
His bowls dead on the wicket fell—
Best all-round player of them all.

We'll miss him at his wonted place,
When the next Wagga match is play'd ;
And see no more the Darkey's face
When friendly after-feast is laid.

Now sports he's in another land—
Perchance a spirit fair and bright
As any of the chosen and—
Among the happy sons of light.

Within the many-mansion'd hall
I feel there is a place for thee ;
Blackfellow of the white man's fall
Thou'lt rise as sure and fair as he.
June 29 1875
DEATH OF JOHNNY TAYLOR 1847-1875
THE following article and lines on the death of John Taylor,
a native of Gininderra, have been handed to us for publication,
and are taken from the Tumut and Adelong Times


"Taylor was brought up on the
station of Mr Davis, of Gininderra, in
the Queanbeyan district, where he remained
till he was thirteen years of age.
He then came to Tumut, and
entered the service of Mr E. G. Brown,
of Blowering , in whose employ he was
till within a month of his death.
He was well tended but, like all his race,
the moment sickness overtook him, his
physical energies became paralysed—
he had no power, did not even "make
an effort to shake himself up," but
quietly lay down and died.
In a cattle muster, in a drafting-yard,
or in travelling with stock he was perfectly
at home, and his services always valuable.
Besides, he was thoroughly trustworthy —so much so,
indeed, that Mr Brown has frequently given him
charge of a mob of cattle, and even empowered
him to sell.
In all athletic exercises he excelled ; few could beat
him in a foot-race, and he was the best
all-round cricketer in the district. His
funeral, which took place on Monday,
was attended by fifty or sixty respectable people,
not ashamed to pay the last tribute of respect to a
fellow being, though his skin was black. Not
the least affecting sight at the funeral
was the solitary representative of the
male aboriginals in the district following as chief mourner.
There was no deception about his grief ; he could
not hide it, and lacked the policy to feign it.
The Rev. Mr. Jones read the impressive funeral service.
We hope to see a move among the townspeople
to erect some simple memorial over his grave."

nsw.bd&m.
DEATHS
TAYLOR JOHN 387/1875 187500387 159AGE 28 YEARS DIED TUMUT

Our First Farmer - Colony of New South Wales

The claim on the headstone of James Ruse 1760-1837 that he sowed the first grain in the Colony is not accurate. Ruse certainly was the first person to cultivate the ground for his own benefit, but he was not our first farmer. That distinction belongs to Henry Edward Dodd, Governor Phillip's servant, who was instructed by him to cultivate an area of ground near Sydney Harbour on part of the present Botanical Gardens, called Farm Cove to the present day. That was during 1788.
The Farm Cove attempt failing, Phillip turned his attention to Rose Hill, afterwards called Parramatta, and Dodd was instructed to commence operations west of the present town. This area became known as the Government Farms, and was situated between Westmead and Wentworthville. Here was gathered the first harvest in the colony during December, 1780, It consisted of two hundred bushels of wheat, sixty bushels of barley, and a small quantity of flax corn and oats. This was a few weeks after Ruse entered into possession of his grant and twelve months before he reaped his first harvest.
This, of course, does not detract from the credit due to Ruse as the first to cultivate the ground on his own behalf, but it is not an historical fact to assort that he sowed the first grain.
Henry Edward Dodd died in 1791, and is buried in St. John's Cemetery, Parramatta, his grave being marked by a large flat stone inscribed with his name and the year of his death.
In "The History of New South Wales" we read, "The first farm in the colony was at Farm Cove, whence its name." And there nine acres were laid in corn soon after the settlement was formed. But nine acres were not enough, and Phillip had to explore the country for bettor soil. The only available land he found, was at a place which he had named Rose Hill, not knowing at the time that the native name was Parramatta. Here in November, 1788, he commenced operations on a large scale, In a foot note to page 142 we read that Phillip, "had luckily brought out with him. from England a man servant who, joined to much agricultural knowledge a perfect idea of the labour to be required from and that might be performed by the convicts. This man was said to be the only free person in the colony who had any knowledges of farming."
Thirty years ago I often found military buttons, old coins, portions of old farming tools, and, on one occasion, a pair of leg irons in the paddocks just west of Hawkesbury Road, Westmead, when part of this area was cultivated by the late Richard Houison (d:1922). Subsequently the timber on the portion near the railway line was cut down by my old friend, the late William Garner.
In the early records reference is made to the sufferings of the convicts working at Toongabbie. Large numbers died every week from overwork, exposure, and insufficient food, I remember many years ago a round flat stone being found close to the railway at Wentworthville, which had been the floor of one of the sentry boxes, and there is a similar stone near tho railway close to the bridge in Parramatta Park, east of Westmead.

Source:
William Freame
Nepean Times
Saturday 21 January 1933
Page 5
Transcription, janilye 2012