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Peter Lalor 1827-1889 List of Killed and Wounded 1854

also those brought to trial.

I have copied this original report written by Peter Lalor after the massacre at the Eureka Stockade on 3 December 1854.
_____________________________________________
Report of the killed and wounded at the Eureka Massacre

on the morning of the Memorable Third of December, 1854

The following lists are as complete as I can make them. The numbers are well known, but there is a want of names. I trust that friends or acquaintances of these parties may forward particulars to The Times office Ballaarat, to be made available in a more lengthened narrative. P.L.

killed

John HYNES, County Clare, Ireland
Patrick GITTENS, Kilkenny, do.
______MULLINS, Kilkenny, Limerick, do.
Samuel GREEN, England
John ROBERTSON, Scotland
Edward THONEN (lemonade man), Elbertfeldt, Prussia
John HAFELE, Wurtenburg
John DIAMOND, County Clare, Ireland
Thomas O'NEIL, Kilkenny, do.
George DONAGHEY, Muff, County Donegal, do.
Edward QUIN, County Cavan, do.
William QUINLAN, Goulburn, N.S.W
names unknown. One was usually
known as "Happy Jack"

Wounded and since Dead


Lieutenant ROSS, Canada
Thaddeus MOORE, County Clare, Ireland
James BROWN, Newry, do.
Robert JULIEN, Nova Scotia
_____CROWE, unknown
_____FENTON, do.
Edward M'GLYN, Ireland
UNKNOWN,No Particulars

Wounded and Since Recovered

Peter LALOR, Queens County, Ireland
Name Unknown, England
Patrick HANAFIN, County Kerry, Ireland
Michael HANLY, County Tipperary, do.
Michal O'NEIL, County Clare, do.
Thomas CALLANAN, County Clare, do.
Patrick CALLANAN, do. do.
Frank SYMMONS, England
James WARNER, County Cork, Ireland.
Luke SHEEHAN, County Galway, do.
Michael MORRISON, County Galway, do.
Dennis DYNAN, County Clare, do.

(Signed) PETER LALOR,

Commander- in- Chief

Requiescant in pace
______________________________________________________________________
+
Lieutenant ROSS refered to was Captain Henry ROSS

*Of the approximately 120 'diggers' detained after the rebellion, thirteen were brought to trial.
They were:

Timothy HAYES, Chairman of the Ballarat Reform League, from Ireland

James McFie CAMPBELL, a black man from Kingston, Jamaica

Raffaello CARBONI was an Italian revolutionary and writer.He is the author of the ONLY eyewitness account of events.

Jacob SORENSON, a Jew from Scotland

John MANNING, a Ballarat Times journalist, from Ireland

John PHELAN, a friend and business partner of Peter Lalor, from Ireland

Thomas DIGNUM, born in Sydney

John JOSEPH, a black American from New York City

James BEATTIE, from Ireland

William MOLLOY, from Ireland

Jan VENNICK, from the Netherlands

Michael TUOHY, from Ireland

Henry REID, from Ireland

All were charged with treason, the U.S.Consul intervened and had 2 other Americans released, but not John Joseph, this brave black American also faced the court.The jury quickly pronounced them all NOT GUILTY, and the court erupted in loud cheers. The American from New York, John JOSEPH that night was carried triumphantly around the streets in a chair above 10,000 jubilant people.

Many consider 'Eureka' the beginning of true democracy in Australia.

The image below of Peter Lalor was created by Ludwig Becker in 1856
The original resides at the National Library of Australia


Peter McAlpin 1809-1898

It is said, The Singleton Argus, on 25th September 1835, when writing about Peter McAlpin 1809-1898, described him as a man with "a roaming disposition, a giant and in every sense of the term, physically and morally with high principles, lofty ideals". I have been unable to find this article. Never-the-less, he was, all of that.

Peter McALPIN Senior had taken his family out to the Hawkesbury district and set himself up as a blacksmith at Windsor after arriving with the family as free settlers on the 'General Graham' on the 29 January 1812.

Here the family lived until the end of 1815, when Peter Snr. sold his shop and two houses by auction, the family moved to Richmond early in 1816, again setting up a blacksmith shop, when young Peter was only 7.

In 1822 Peter together with his brother William Glas and Catherine (nicknamed, Kite) attended the school in Richmond for only about a year, just long enough to learn to read and write and do their sums.

In the 1825 census Peter was recorded as living at Richmond, however it was not long after the census that Peter showed his wanderlust by making a trek up north to Muswellbrook, or perhaps he was a little bit envious of his brother's wanderings.

Two years earlier in 1823, Peter's brother William known as Billy Mack at thirteen, had been one of Archibald Bell's party who, with the help of aboriginal guides marked the Bells Line of Road which was an alternative route to Blaxland, Lawson and Wentworths road across the Blue Mountains.

In the 1828 census Peter was living in Bathurst and working as a labourer for John Neville 1780-1854 and his wife Elizabeth nee Vincent, whom Peter had met in Richmond, when they were living there. They had offered him work and Peter was keen to take it.

I'm not sure how long Peter remained with John Neville and his family but John Neville moved from Bathurst to Rylstone in 1830 and Peter didn't like to stay in one place for long.

In 1831 Peter set himself up as the Blacksmith in Patrick's Plains. It's thought that Peter visited Richmond around Christmas 1831 when his little sister Catherine 'Kite' announced she was going to marry William Clark on the 16 January 1832. Of all the family Peter was closest to Kite and I don't see him missing her wedding day.

Another big wedding took place on the 1 February 1833 when brother Billy Mack married Susannah Onus 1815-1882 at Christ Church in Castlereagh. William built a brick home in 1834 in the main street of Richmond, NSW with financial help from Joseph ONUS (the father of his wife, Susannah) and set up a blacksmiths shop at the rear.

On the 9 January 1935 at a chapel in Maitland where his sister and her husband William Clark were now living Peter married Elizabeth Cole alias Harrison, a convict woman whose real name was Phebe Cole, nee Stirrup
1807-1885. Phoebe was a widow with two children.

This marriage was seen as a convenience for both parties and did not last very long. It seems Peter sold the shop bought Phoebe a house, gave her some money and then took off for Victoria. Neither one looking back or having any regrets.

It was on the 30 August 1835 that the first settlers arrived in Melbourne and commenced building along the Yarra River. This pioneering group led by Captain John Lacey with his builder from Launceston George Evans, his servant Evan Evans, carpenters William Jackson and Robert Hay Marr, the Blacksmith James Gilbert and his wife and a ploughman called Charlie Wise. In 1840 Peter McAlpin made his way there not to seek his fortune ( he could have made that in New South Wales), but for the adventure of it all.

From this point on it's not easy to track Peter. He did have a blacksmith shop in Little Bourke Street Melbourne, in 1847. In March 1851 he was shot in his left arm in the city of Melbourne at 1am by George May Smith after Peter called he and his companions some names. George May Smith was charged with assault and fined twenty shillings. Another shot in the arm in 1851 was because Peter was out of the state of nsw for so many years phoebe, had him declared dead. She married Frederick WINGRAVE 1797-1876, at Windeyer on the 31 March 1852.
Then in 1853 we see Peter at the McIvor diggings. I doubt he was digging more likely running the blacksmiths shop.

All told Peter spent thirty five years in Victoria not returning to New South Wales until 1875.

Peter died on the 23 September 1898 in Singleton, New South Wales.
His death certificate states he died without issue

His grave is at the Glenridding Uniting Church Cemetery, formerly known as
the Glenridding Presbyterian Cemetery, on the Putty Road, Singleton, NSW.
The headstone reads-
PETER MCALPINE
23 Sep 1898
Age: 89y

Obituary
Singleton Argus (NSW : 1880 - 1954), Saturday 24 September 1898


Death of an Old Colonist.
"In his 90th year, Mr Peter M'Alpin, of Bulga, died in the local Hospital yesterday,
after a short illness, his death being due to senile decay.
The deceased was a native of Sterling, Scotland, but was only three years of age
when he arrived with his parents in Victoria he lived there for 35 years, when he removed
to N. S. Wales, and has since lived in this part of the colonya term of 51 years.
Mr M'Alpin was married in Maitlaud, but there was no issue to the union.
The old gentleman was well respected, and those who knew him intimately
in his earlier days retain many pleasant memories of the acquaintanceship "


Note: He arrived with parents in NSW on 29 Jan 1812.
He Lived in Victoria for 35 Years and
in NSW for a total of 51 years.


written by janilye, 2004


photo

Alfred Abraham Harris 1826 - 1890


Physicians and Surgeons 1842

The following list of Physicians and Surgeons, qualified to act in the colony of New South Wales, is extracted from a useful Pamphlet by Mr. Baker, Clerk to the New South Wales Medical Board, 4 November 1842:
A
Aaron Isaac, Kissing Point
A'Beckett, Arthur Martin, Elizabeth street, North, Sydney
Agnew, James Wilson
Aitken, John, George street South, Sydney
Alexander, A., Assistant-surgeon, 28th Regiment, (gone to the East Indies)
Allan Edward, Berrima
Anderson Colin, A. M. D.
Appleton Henry (gone to England)
Arbuckle Alexander, Clifton
Armstrong John, George-street
Auld Robert, Sydney
B
Ballow, D. K. Colonial Assistant; surgeon, Brisbane Town, Moreton Bay
Bamber Charles (gone to England)
Barker Edward, Port Phillip
Barnes George Frederick, Hinton
Barnsby George
Baylie William Kingston, Port Phillip
Beardmore Frederick Joshua, Maitland
Bell William, Windsor Bell Thomas, R. N., Braidwood
Bennett George, Elizabeth-street, Hyde Park, Sydney
Birtwhistle John (gone to England)
Black Thomas. M. D., Penrith
Blake Isidore Maurice, Campbell Town
Bland William, Pitt-street North, Sydney.
Bond Edward
Brooks George, Colonial Surgeon, New castle.
Brown William, M. D., Murrumbidgee
Brown William Spencer, M..D.
Brown William, East Maitland
Browne Joseph Browning, Cavin.
Buccanan Colin, M. D
Burby George, Colonial Assistant-surgeon, Bathurst.
C
Cadell James John, M. D. Raymond Terrace
Campbell Allen.
Campbell Francis, M.D.
Campbell John, Surgeon 28th Regiment (gone to the East Indies)
Cannan Kearsey, Elizabeth-street, Sydney.
Cartwright Robert Marsden, Goulburn
Cates John, Sydney
Churchill John.
Clarke George Thomas.
Clarke Jonathan, Port Phillip
Cluttebuck James Bennett, M. D.
Clayton Benjamin, County King
Cobb Law Blaxland (died at Sydney)
Cochrane James (died at Maitland)
Connell James Joseph, Bathurst
Cook Alexander, Castlereagh street Sydney
Cooper John Cowper Henry, Bungonia
Craigh Robert, Bathurst
Crichton John, Oven's River
Cullen Phibba White.
Cussen Patrick, M. D. Assistant Colonial Surgeon, Melbourne
Cuthill Alexander, Surgeon to the Benevolent Asylum, Parramatta-street, Sydney
D
Davis William, (gone to New Zealand)
Day Henry, Hunter-street, Sydney
De Lisle R., Assistant surgeon, 96th, Regiment.
Dobie John, R. N., Clarence River
Dorsey William M'Taggard, Limestone, Moreton Bay.
Douglas James.
Dowe Joshua, M . D. Coroner, Windsor
Drummond James.
E
Eadon Charles
Eckford James, M D., Assistant Colonial Surgeon, Liverpool.
Edye Alfred Oke, R. N., Maitland
Ellis James, R. N., Yass
Ellison Robert, surgeon, 50th Regiment (gone to the East Indies)
Enscoe John, Melbourne
F
Farquharson William
Fayle Higginson, Parramatta
Felton Maurice (died at Sydney)
Foulis John. M. D., Parramatta.
Fullerton . George, M. D., Pitt-street Sydney.
G
Galbraith R., M. D.., Assistant-Surgeon, 99th Regiment, Sydney
Gammack Alex., Assistant-Colonial Surgeon, Liverpool
Gammie Patrick, Surgeon, 80th Regt., Auckland, New Zealand
Gerard. John, Illawarra
Gilbert Jordan, Market-street, Sydney
Gill John, Broules.
Gillespie. Robert (died at the Clarence River)
Glennie Henry, George-street, Sydney
Goodwin John; Invermein
Graham Henry, Colonial Assistant-surgeon, Norfolk Island
Grant John, M. D., Pitt-street south, Sydney.
Graydon Alexander, M. D., Assistant Surgeon. 50th. Regiment (gone to the East Indies)
Green Henry, Tumut.
Gwynne Gordon, Parramatta.
H
Haig Isaac, M. D., New England.
Harford James, Sydney.
Harriett Patrick, Colonial Surgeon, General Hospital, Sydney.
Harpur Frederick, King-street west, Sydney.
Harrington Richard
Harris Richard
Hathorn Fergus, Wellington Valley
Havens Robert, Yass
Hayley William, Foxton
Hill Patrick, R. N. Colonial Surgeon, Parramatta.
Hobson Edmund Charles, Melbourne.
Holland John
Hope Robert Cuthbertson, M. D , Campbell Town.
Hosking Peter Mann (gone to England )
Houston Hugh, Apothecary to the Sydney Dispensary.
Houston William, Pitt-street, Sydney
Howitt Godfrey, M. D.
Huffington Hugh Arthur.
Hunt Thomas, Parramatta.
Huntley Robert, County of Murray.
I
Inches John, R. N (died at Maitland).
J
Jay Richard Gardiner
Jenkins William Jacob.
Jenkins Richard Lewis, Jerry's Plains
Johnson John, M. D., Colonial Surgeon, Auckland, New Zealand
Johnson Alfed Scomberg
Jones Robert, Jamison-street, Sydney.
K
Kenney William B, Campbell Town ,
King William, M. D., Mudgee
King William
Kinston William,
Kingslake Charles Woodford.
L
Lee Michael William, M D., Colonial Assistant Surgeon, General Hospital, Sydney
Lee Thomas, M. D., Colonial Surgeon, Lunatic Asylum, Tarban Creek
Ledbetter George Samuel, Port Macquarie
Liddell William
Liddell William, (gone to England)
Linderman Henry John
Little, Robert, M. D., Hunter street Sydney.
Lloyd Humphrey Thomas
Lewis, Prince street, Sydney
Lynch Henry.
M
Maberly Samuel, New Zealand
Mallon Patrick Walsh, Maitland
Mark Edward Robson Bridge-street Sydney.
Marsden Robert.
Martin Samuel
M'Donald, M, D. Auckland, New, Zealand
Maxwell Edwin Stanford, (gone to England).
M'Cartney Michael; Gummum Plains
M'Crea Farquhar M. D,' Melbourne.
M'Curdy Samuel, Port Phillip
M'Donald Allan Ronald, M. D , Berrima.
M'Donald Donald, Sydney
M'Donnell A. S., Assistant-Surgeon, 28th. Regiment, gone to the East, Indies)
M'Evoy Francis, Yass
M'Ewin Donald Macintosh, M. D.
M'Farlane John, M. D., Pitt-street South, Sydney.
M'Hattie Richard, Bathurst
M'Intosh Robert, M. D., Asst. surgn. to the Australian Agricultural Company, Port Stephens
M'Keachie David, M . D.
M'Keller Charles Kinnard, George street, Sydney.
M'Kellar Frederick, M. D., Surgeon to the Sydney Disppensary.
M'Kenzie Kenneth, Wollongong
M'Kinlay Ellar M'Kellar, Clarence Town, William's River
M'Kirdy Robert, M. D., (gone to the East Indies)
M'Lenn Daniel, (late Colonial Surgeon, died at the Lunatic Asylum, Durban Creek)
M'Nish A. C, Assistant-surgeon, 80th Regiment, (gone, to the East Indies).
Mollison Patrick, ,M. D., (late Colonial Assistant-surgeon, died at Port Macquarie)
Moran Francis, M. D., (died at Sydney)
Morton Andrew ,
Murray Alexander W., 96th Regiment, (gone to England).
N
Nathan Charles, Elizabeth-street Sydney
Neilson John, Hunter-street, Sydney
Newton William. Parramatta
Nicholson Charles, M. D., Fort-street, Sydney
Nind Isaac Scott
Norris Thomas, (died at Campbelltown).
O
O'Brien Bartholomew, M. D, Wollongong, Illawarra
O'Hara Henry Lewis, Melbourne
O'Mullane Arthur, M. D., Melbourne.
P
Palmer James Frederick, Melbourne
Park Robert, Hunters River
Parsons Thomas, Liverpool.
Patterson John, R. N., Melbourne
Pearce Thomas, (died at Parramatta)
Perrott Thomas M.
R
Reedy Maurice O'Keefe, M. D., (gone to East Indies)
Reid James, Colonial Assistant Surgeon, Norfolk Island
Richardson William, Colonial Surgeon, Port Macquacie
Richard Henry
Robertson John (gone to England)
Robertson Kinnear, Maneiro
Rodger Robert, Brisbane Water
Ronald William
Russell James Charles, Pitt-st., Sydney
Rutter Robert Champley, Parramatta
Rutter, John Yates, Sydney.
S
Savage Arthur, R. N., Health Officer, Castlereagh-street, Sydney
Scott Henry Charles (gone to England)
Scouler Arthur, Campbelltown.
Selkirk John, M'Donald River.
Shaw Forster, Geelong
Sherwin William, Mittagong.
Skinner Alexander, Patrick's Plains
Sloane David, Maitland.
Sparrow Thomas (gone to England)
Stacey John Edward, Port Macquarie
Stanford Charles John.
Stewart Bute, M. D., Parramattta.
Stewart Grigor, Surgeon, 96th Regt.
Stewart John, Elizabeth-street, Sydney
Stewart William Farquharson, Windsor
Stolworthy David, Patrick's Plains.
Street Francis Gall Snelling, Invermein
Stuart James (late Colonial Assistant Surgeon, (died at Port Marquarie)
Swaine Spillman R., Campbelltown.
Sullivan John.
T
Taylor Henry.
Thomas David John, Port Phillip.
Tierney Daniel Joseph, M. D. Wollongong.
Traill Rowland John, M. D., Clarence River.
Tripe Henry Richard Gawen .
Turnbull Robert, Surgeon, 80th Regt., (died at Sydney)
V
Vallack Adoniah, Patrick's Plains.
W
Wallace Francis L. M. D., Druitt-st, Sydney.
Wakeman Thomas Henry
Wark David, M. D., Adelaide, South Australia
Warner Charles Avory, Penrith.
Watson Henry, Port Phillip
Waugh Robert, Goulburn
Welch Robert Porter, King and Castlereagh-street, Sydney
West John Boucher, Muswellbrook.
Whittaker Lewis Duncan, Richmond.
Whittell Henry Rawes, corner of Elizabeth and Liverpool-streets, Sydney.
Wilks Stephen Geary, M. D., Clarence street, Sydney.
Williamson William, Morpeth.
Wilmot William Bryan, M. D. Coroner, Melbourne.
Woods, Charles Bourne (died at Sydney)
Wren Erasmus
Wilton William, Newcastle.
Y
Yate Benjamin Howell.

And we do hereby further declare, that the several, persons, whose names are herein mentioned are entitled to be deemed "legally qualified Medical Practitioners," in terms of and according to the provisions of the said Act.
J. V, THOMPSON,
Deputy Inspector General of Hospitals,
President.
FRANCIS L. WALLACE, M.D.
CHARLES NICHOLSON, M.D


Police Incidents - Sydney 1832

The Sydney Herald (NSW : 1831 - 1842)--Thursday 7 June 1832

POLICE INCIDENTS


Monday.-Mary Madden was charged by her mistress with taking herself off on Sunday morning, for the purpose, as she boldly declared, of spending the day on the water, with a party of choice spirits like herself.
Mary denied the charge; the mistress vociferating it at the top of her lungs, and a very pretty botheration and blarney immediately ensued, which bothered the cause most mightily.
After order was restored, the Bench decided that Mary should sojourn under Mrs. Gordon's wing for fourteen days.

Sarah Dawson, possessing a considerable portion of cambric handkerchief-sensibility, was placed at the bar, charged with being found snoring a charming bass in the Shambles of the Market-place, the previous evening; during her placid slumbers she was heard ejaculating, " give me another drain, and then." -
On hearing the charge, the tears chased each other down her lilly cheeks, "like Orient Pearls at random strung." The exchequer having been previously exchequered, and not one of the bye standers having sufficient gallantry to offer to become her banker, she was fain to put up with three hours reclination in the stocks.

John M'Carthy, picked up, humming to himself, " I've been roaming, I've been roaming," - "I dare say you have" said the constable, and the burden of his song turning out true, to the letter, the Bench sent him to a cell for three days.

Thomas Hewitt, a sort of a lackadaisical visaged youth, was charged with not only getting drunk himself, but making the servants of his master also drunk; entering the parlour where his master was sitting, breaking nine squares of glass, and threatening to set fire to the house, and consign his master and all his household goods to the flames.
On the favourable representation of the master, he was only fined 5s. and discharged.

Tuesday.-William Whaling was charged with being found all the worse for wear, endeavouring to win the affections of a pretty girl, who was just beginning to feel an interest in his small talk, when malheureusement , a baton bearer stepped in and desired Whaling to accept of a lodging at the King's expense, which he wished to avoid, but without success - three days on the Mill were recommended to prevent similar exhibitions of gallantry.

Jacob Porter, a quizzical looking old codger, who, from appearances, carried his name visibly marked on his countenance, was charged with banging a poker and frying pan together through the streets the previous night, at the same time harmoniously chanting, "Hark the bonny Christ Church Bells." - To balance this small adair he enriched the poor fund with five shillings.

Mary Thompson was charged with being picked up the previous afternoon, on the Parramatta road, waving her hand, and exclaiming to a young man, who was getting through the pannel of the fence into the bush, "false, perjured, fleeting Charley." As it appeared that she was a bolter, and was frequently in the habit of making herself scarce, the Bench sent her to the 3 C. for a month.

Mary Macmanus, a regular touch and go lady, with the temper of a Volcano, that was constantly in eruption whenever any thing crossed her, was charged with solacing John the footman the night before, with some comfortable liquors, and a good feed. -1 month Gordon seminary. On hearing the sentence she looked unutterable things and threatened a violent explosion, but the guardians of the peace muzzled her instanter.

Wednesday.-Eliza Ross was charged with absconding with her Mistress's child, and at ten o'clock at night both were brought home drunk. 6 weeks, 3rd class.

Mary Ann Clany, mugging herself with hot punch, as she described it, to rectify the disorganized state of her internals, and when wound up, with flying off at a tangent, refusing work, and all that sort of thing - 1 month, 3rd class.

Ann Carr, for giving her mistress due notice that she intended to quit, as her grub was not of that quality she had been in the habit of feeding upon, was sent to try Mrs. Gordon's fare for 1 month.

William Hervey was charged with being picked up in the streets, rolling over and over, Hervey declared that it was a touch of the Cholera that possessed him, the Bench considering that it might be the gin-cholera, sent him to the stocks for three hours.

John Kerwen was charged with being found on the Race Course, on one knee to a lady of the pave, whom he was thus pathetically addressing
" Oh me, can thus thy forehead lour,
And know'st thou not who loves thee best ;
Oh Sally dear, oh more than dearest.
Say is it me thou hat'st, or fear'st,
Come lay thy head upon my breast,
And I will kiss thee into rest."
The devil, exclaimed the irreverent constable, what's all this palaver about, come with me, my lad, and he was conveyed to the lock-up.
The Bench, to curb these sort of pranks, sent him to take three days exercise on the mill.

Ann Armstrong, who was admonished and discharged only the previous day, was charged, that when she arrived at home, she clapped her arms a-kimbo, and swearing she would nolens volens on the part of her mistress, be Lady of the ascendant.


The Sydney Herald (NSW : 1831 - 1842)--Thursday 19 July 1832

MONDAY.Maria Carney was placed at the bar to answer for bolting, amalgamating, and sundry
other amusements.
BenchWhat have you to say Maria for such
tricks.
MariaOh, nothing, my mistress is one of the best in the Colony, and I hope I may serve my lagging with her.
BenchI fear not; how long have you to serve?
MariaOnly a streaky bit, say three years.
BenchThen, you will have to serve one month more by taking the air at Mrs. Gordon's for a month.
Maria wished now to say something about bad feedqueer wittles, &c, but the constabulary, very politely, handed her from the bar.

Adam Bond, for threatening to make his mistress smell h-ll, by setting fire to the house, was ordered 14 days on the mill.

Winefred Doyle, a lushington, was placed at the bar on that charge.
BenchPrisoner, will you promise to reform.
WinefredI must have my morning, my leavener and my night cups.
BenchSix weeks 3 C.

William Gorman, was charged with being drunk and skylarking.
Bench Were you drunk
Gorman IndubitablyYes
Bench Five shillings to the poor.
GormanThat's meI'm poor.
BenchThree hours stocks.
GormanI wish you were alongside of me just now, see how I'd sarve you-
The Charley's were obliged to remove him vi et-armis, as Gorman, who is a bit of a sledge hammer hitter, wished to show fight.

John Eaton, Thomas Green, and John Tierney were charged with being musically lushey, and while in that state, with singing through the streets, the Glee of "Gently tolls the evening Chimes."
The Bench sent them to chime on the mill for seven days.

Henry Willis, for making free with a pair of fie- for-shames, belonging to the Governor of the gaol, was ordered into his custody, until delivered by due course of law.

Patrick Ryan, with a phiz resembling the back of a lobster when parboiled; a jest leering in his eyecurling on his lipand mantling and diffusing itself over his whole visage, was charged for not having the fear of the mill before his eyes, but being moved and seduced by the rum bottle, which he swigged at so heartily, that he was picked up as stiff as a poker, but the application of an oak sapling, well applied, made him quite supple. Seven days Devil's barrel organ.

TUESDAY.Mary Perkins, when allowed to stroll for an hour, was charged with taking six, which she declared was what she understood by compound interest.
The Bench ordered her for this, to obtain a more correct knowledge of arithmetic at Mrs. Gordon's academy.
" Carry me out, bury me decently" said Mary, as she bounced from the bar.

Mary Carr, with a taste for the sublime and beautiful, was charged with returning home the previous day in a queer state, seizing a knife, and having flourished it over her mistress' head, for a few minutes, exclaimed, "here's into your bread basket," and attempted to put her threat into execution, when she was fortunately prevented. 2 mos. 3 C.

Charles Phillips, an impertinent young dog, was charged with phoo-phooing whenever ordered to do any work. Master would say, "Charles do this," "phoo, phoo," master Charles would reply, "don't you wish you may get it." Seven days mill to teach him manners.

Thomas Darby, rolling through the streets at 12 o'clock at night, singing out,
" Talk of the cordial that sparkled for Helen, Her cup was a fiction, but this is reality."
At the same time flourishing a bottle of grog round his head, and he gave the Charleys the choice of a broken head or the contents of the bottle, they preferred the chance of the former, and after demolishing his bottle, secured him. Darby refused to come down with the ready, and consequently was handed to the stocks.


1 comment(s), latest 3 years, 1 month ago

Posthumous to Adelaide 1849

The 390 tons barque Posthumous left Plymouth on 13 March 1849 and arrived in Adelaide on 20 June 1849 under the guidance of Captain Davison and carrying 157 Passengers.

Passengers : Messrs. F and E. Duffield, J. Parr, W. Colman, and Mrs Colman and child, Mr Atatyar, Mr Darwent, and Mr E. R. Bower, surgeon superintendent, in the cabin ;

Messrs Nelson de Coursey, C. Schwabe, G. E. Bowley, and J. Clearson in the intermediate;

Ewart Mehruta, B. Edmondson, Mr Williams, F. Federel, J. Watkinson, Alfred Watkinson, Wm. Watkinson, Wm. Matts, Edwin Laff, Henry Laff, Wm. Edwards, wife and child, Sarah Tiffen, Josh. Betts, John Miskin, Henry James, James King, Louis Alex. Perdusal, Charlotte A. Bull Bryant, Wm. Harris, Charles Crawford, G. C. Foat, John Papple, Chas. Rooks, Josh. Wicker, Ann, Nehemiah, Josh., Alfred, and Henry Wicker, G. Wicker, infant, Jas. Fielder, Mary Fielder, Frances Hall, Eliz. Beechin, Harriet Beechin, G. Hamlin, J. Salmon, Henry Heath, S. Baird, J. Botterell, M. Baird, Walter Scott, T. Noble, J. Clarke, W. Ramsdedn, T. Evans, J. Neates, Josiah Oldfield, E. Bryant, Eliza Ann, Eliz. Jane, T. Frances, and W. C. Bryant, infant. W. Lewellen, John Edwin Smyth, W., and Mary, Emma Maslin, Eleanor, Harriet, Mary Hannah, John, Susannah, W. and Martha Cook, C. Hodson, T. Hall, wife and seven children, R. M. Wray, T. Hopkinson, R Walker Emma, Sea, Mary Ann G. Hoye, Rosina Gale, Mrs Biggs, Sarah Taylor, John, Geo., Mary Ann, Eliza, Susan, and Margaret Murray, James Jordon, wife and three children, J. Treeman Notts, wife and two children, J. J. Walker, Wm. Southgate, Henry Elborough, Sarah Elborough, J. Hammon, R. G. Dur ham, wife and six children, Susan Duncan, Susan Duncan, Walter Ransome, S. B. Pitt, C. Webb Sarah Webb, Henry, Rebecca, Eliza, and Frances Baker, Alex. Wood, Wm. Andrew, Eliz. Colts, Ulrich Spikly, Alex. Sim, John, Susan, Eliz. and Emma Harvey, Alex.J.L.F.Chanmout, Wm. Braceide and wife, Miss Morris and child, Mr Morris, wife and son Louisa Ransome, Louisa Chalmers, Wm. Akhurst wife and infant, James Coumbe, wife and six children, David Wheeler and wife, Augustus Raymond and wife, Henry, Mary Ann, Henry, Kate, Geo. and Mary Ann Gove, infant, Robt. Thompson, wife and three children, Alex. Anderson, Mr Moyle, wife and three children, Jean F. Amiet, and Louis Amiet, in the steerage.

Primary and Secondary Sources

Many people have asked me about sources and the difference. There is a lot of information about sources on the internet but some people are still confused.

Primary Sources
A primary source is something that comes from the time that the historian is studying.
For instance if a historian is studying the First World War, then letters and diaries written by the soldiers, the uniforms and the weapons are the primary sources. If a soldier who fought in the trenches wrote his memories of the war a long time after the war it is still a primary source.

Secondary Sources
Secondary sources are sources which do not come from the time the historian is studying. These sources have got their information from other sources. Books about the first world war by historians or school textbooks about the First World War, are examples of secondary sources.

with the exception of the 1911 census, returns are not primary sources, they are secondary sources. The information they contain may have been transferred through several people. The individual's details given to head of the house; the head of the house who wrote out the Householders Schedule which was then handed to the enumerator, who then transferred it to the CEB, which itself was subjected to the rules of the census particularly over the classification of occupations. Finally the Census Office clerks may have made alterations. There were mistakes.



I think the diagram shown below, of the various sources historians can use, will make it easier to understand.


Princess Atahoe daughter of Pip-pa-hee

Transcribed from ;
The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser Saturday 3 March 1810

Family Notice

DIED.

On Sunday morning last, at four o'clock, at the house of Mr. Francis McKuan, in Sydney, a Princess of New Zealand, and daughter of Pip-pa- hee, whose first name was Atahoe, but which at the age of 14 was changed to that of Mary Bruce by her marriage with an European of that name who had resided several years in her father's dominions, from whence he went for India in the General Wellesley, accompanied by his royal bride.
From India Mr.and Mrs. Bruce arrived lately here in the Union, on their return to New Zealand, for the valuable purpose of collecting & cultivating the flax, to which that soil is so extremely favourable; at the same time that the no less essential object was in view of improving the good understanding that has hitherto subsisted between our whalers and the native chiefs, which may hereafter prove of considerable interest to this Colony.
In this intention Mr. Bruce has been encouraged by the countenance of His Excellency the Governor, and the aid of several gentlemen of character and opulence, whose minds are capable of speculating on a universal matter than on a private benefit; and that their united efforts may become successful is most sincerely to be wished. - The deceased Princess has left a fine Infant, which Mr. Bruce intends to take with him in the Experiment.

Provisions for the First Fleet bound for New South Wales.

The First Fleet of ships to carry convicts from England to Botany Bay sailed from Portsmouth, England, at 3 am on 13 May 1787. It arrived at Botany Bay on 18 January 1788. When that place proved unsuitable for a settlement the fleet made its way a short distance up the coast and on 25 January 1788 entered what is now known as Sydney Harbour and anchored in Sydney Cove.
There were eleven ships of the FIRST FLEET Two, the Sirius and Supply were naval warships to guard the fleet six were transports for the convicts and three were storeships..The six transports and three storeships were supplied by shipping contractor William RICHARDS. In addition to the ships the contractor supplied, the sailors, all food and water and medicines for both soldiers and convicts. This charter cost the government 49,487 pounds.

List of Livestock and Provisions taken to the Colony of New South Wales on the First Fleet.
10 Forges
175 Steel Hand Saws
700 Iron Shovels
700 Garden Hoes
700 West Indian Hoes
700 Grubbing Hoes
700 Felling Axes
700 Hatchets
700 Helves for Felling Axes
747,000 Nails
100 Pairs of Hinges and Hooks
10 Sets of Cooper's Tools
40 Corn Mills
40 Wheel Barrows
12 Ploughs
12 Smith's Bellows
30 Grindstones
330 Iron Pots
6 Carts
4 Timber Carriages
14 Fishing Nets
14 Chains for Timber Carriages
5,448 Squares of Crown Glass
200 Canvas Beds
62 Chauldrons of Coal
80 Carpenter's Axes
20 Shipwright's Axes
600 lbs of Coarse Sugar
1001 lbs of Indian Sago
1 Small Cask of Raisins
61 lbs of Spices
3 Hogsheads of Vinegar
2 Barrels of Tar
1 Dozen Tin Saucepans
1 Printing Press
Type Fonts for DO
3 Dozen Flat Irons
Candlesticks
3 Snuffers
48 Spinning Brasses
7 Dozen Razors
Bible Prayer Book etc.
6 Bullet Moulds
9 Hackies for Flax
9 Hackies Pins
3 Flax Dresser Brushes
127 Dozen Combs
18 Coils of Whale line
6 Harpoons
12 Lances
Shoe Leather
305 Pairs of Women's Shoes
40 Tents for Women Convicts
6 Bundles of Ridge Poles
11 Bundles of Stand Poles
2 Chests of Pins ans Mallets
1 Portable Canvas House (Gov. Philip)
18 Turkeys
29 Geese
35 Ducks
122 Fowls
87 Chickens
Kittens
Puppies
4 Mares
2 Stallions
4 Cows
1 Bull
1 Bull Calf
44 Sheep
19 Goats
32 Hogs
5 Rabbits
Gov. Philip's Greyhounds
Rev. Johnson's Cats
Mill Spindles with 4 Crosses
2 Cases of Mill Bills and Picks
1 Case of Mill Brashes
589 Womens Petticoats
606 Womens Jackets
121 Womens Caps
327 Pairs of Womens Stockings
250 Womens Handkerchiefs
700 Steel Spades
175 Claw Hammers
140 Augurs
700 Gimlets
504 Saw Files
300 Chisels
6 Butchers Knives
100 Pairs of Scissors
30 Box Rules
100 Plain Measures
50 Pickaxes
50 Helvers for DO
700 Wooden Bowls
700 DO Platters
5 Sets of Smith's Tools
20 Pit Saws
700 Clasp Knives
500 Tin Plates
60 Padlocks
50 Hay Forks
42 Splitting Wedges
8,000 Fish Hooks
48 Dozen Lines
8 Dozen lbs of Sewing Twine
12 Brick Moulds
36 Masons Chisels
6 Harness for Horses
12 Ox-Bows
3 Sets of Ox Furniture
20 Bushels of Seed Barley
1 Piano
10 Bushels of India Seed Corn
12 Baskets of Garden Seed
Coarse Thread (Blue/White)
Transport Jack
Ventilators for Water and Wine
Hoses
Windsails
24 Spinning Whorls
1 Set of Candlestick Makers
Carbins
Bulkheads
Beds
Hammocks
Marines Clothes
Fig Trees
Bamboos
Sugar Cane
Quinces
Apples
Pears
Strawberries
Oak and Myrtle Trees
135 Tierces of Beef
165 Tierces of Pork
50 Puncheons of Bread
116 Casks of Pease
110 Frinkins of Butter
8 Bram of Rice
10 Pairs of Handcuffs and Tools
1 Chest of Books
5 Puncheons of Rum
300 Gallons of Brandy
15 Tons of Drinking Water
5 Casks of Oatmeal
12 Bags of Rice
140 Womens Hats
1 Machine for Dress Flax
252 Dozen lbs of Cotton Candles
168 Dozen lbs of Mould Candles
44 Tons of Tallow
2 Millstones Spindles etc.
800 Sets of Bedding
1 Loom for Weaving Canvas
2,780 Woollen Jackets
5,440 Drawers
26 Marquees for Married Officers
200 Wood Canteens
40 Camp Kettles
448 Barrels of Flour
60 Bushels of Seed Wheat
381 Womens Shifts

What they forgot


1 comment(s), latest 3 years, 10 months ago

PUBLICANS' LICENSES 1851 New South Wales

Published Saturday 10 May 1851 in The Sydney Morning Herald
THE following is a list of applications for Publicans' Licences considered by the Session of Justices held for that purpose.
Those applications to which no remark is appended have been granted.
It will be seen that two are open for a hearing on Monday next.

1. Edward Robertson, Harbour View Hotel, George-street.
2. Louisa Wood, Commercial Hotel, George-street North
3. Edward Hancock, King's Head, George-st.
4. William Howell, King's Arms, George-st.
5. Thomas Waldock Smith, Observer Tavern, George-street
6. James Chapman, Marine Hotel, George-st.
7. William Sullivan, New York Hotel,George-street
8. Robert White Moore, Fortune of War,George street
9. Isaac Moore, Patent Slip, George-street
10. John Henry Humphreys, Land we live in, George-street
11. Charles Hargrave Salmon, Australian Hotel, George street
12. Abraham Levy, American Hotel, George-street
13. Richard Hawkins, Rose of Australia, George-street
14. John Reed Harman, Blue Posts, George-street
15. William Livingston, Glasgow Arms, George-street. Applicant deceased. The Session agreed to
recommend the case to his Excellency the Governor, as one in which he might exercise his power
of granting a license to the widow.
16. Nicholas Bray, Liverpool Arms, George-street
17. William Cankett, Vine Tavern, George-street
18. Hugh M Lachlan, Crooked Billet, George-street
19. Charles Bath, St. John's Tavern, George and Bridge streets
20. George Scott, Castle Tavern, George and Bridge streets
21. Thomas Moore, City Wine Vaults, George-street
22. Richard Kenyon King, Forth and Clyde,George and Jamison streets
23. Donald Munro, General Washington, George-street
24. George Skinner, Skinners' Hotel, George and Hunter streets
25. Archibald Menzies, Star Hotel, George-st.
26. Robert Rowland, Golden Fleece, George and King streets
27. William Edward Rider, Black Boy, George and King streets
28. John Holman, White Horse, George-st.
29. John Sparke, Royal Hotel, George street
30. Michael Farrell, Farriers' Arms, George-street
31. Henry Robberts, Crown and Anchor,George and Market streets
32. Isaac Titterton, White Horse Cellar, George and Market streets
33. James Cunningham, Bull's Head, George-street
34. George Wilkie, London Tavern, George st.
35. Benjamin Palmer, Swan with Two Necks, George and Park streets
36. William Aitkenhead, Emu Inn, George-st.
37. Refused
38. Refused
39. John Daly, Friendship Inn, George-street
40. Thomas Leary, Currency Lass, George st.
41. Edward Conyngham, Dublin Tavern, George-street
42. Thomas Lee, St. John's Tavern, George and Liverpool streets
43. Thomas Johnson, Crown, George-street
44. Henry Harris, Jew's Harp, George-street
45. Philip Whelan, Britannia Arms, George and Goulburn streets
46. Charles Adrain, Fountain of Friendship, George and Goulburn streets
47. Michael Daly, Golden Fleece, George st.
48. John Francis, Square and Compass, George-street
49. Refused
50. James Stewart, Woolpack, George-street
51. Andrew Byrne, Peacock, George street
52. John Wright, Omnibus Inn, George-st.
53. Abraham Marcus, Steam Engine, George-street
54. John Dishington, Odd Fellows' Hall, George-street
55. George Coulton, Black Swan, George-st.
56. Peter Hanslow, Dog and Duck, George-st.
57. David Roberts, Farmer's Home, George-street
58. David Taylor, Wheat Sheaf, George-st.
59. Thomas Parkinson, Wellington Inn,George street
60. William Ford, Rising Sun, George-street South
61. George Simpson, Currency Lass, Pitt and Hunter streets
62. Matthew Mullaney, Fortune of War, Pitt-street
63. Maria Kelk, Spread Eagle, Pitt-street
64. Denis Kearney, Brougham Tavern, Pitt-st.
65. Joseph William Roche, Rainbow Tavern, Pitt and King streets
66. Edward Samuell, Liverpool Arms, Pitt-and King streets
67. John Alheit, Elephant and Castle, Pitt and King streets
68. Stephen B. Murrell, Sir Richard Bourke, Pitt-street
69. John Mullen, William the Fourth, Pitt-st.
70. Joseph Wyatt, Victoria Hotel, Pitt-street
71. Joseph Faris, Shakspeare, Pitt-street
72. Mary Stone, King's Arms, Pitt-street
73. Edward Borton, Cricketers' Hotel, Pitt and Market streets
74. Thomas Spencer, Toogood's Hotel, Pitt and Market streets
75. John Somerville, Fermanagh Hotel, Pitt-street
76. Refused ; but to be reconsidered on Mon-day next.
77. John Smith, Nags' Head, Pitt-street
78. Michael Cohen, Glasgow Hotel, Pitt-st.
79. John Dane, Railway Tavern, Pitt and Bathurst streets
80. Sarah Doran, Edinburgh Castle, Pitt and Bathurst streets
81. Matthias Hooper, Cottage of Content, Pitt and Bathurst streets
82. George Chambers, Curriers' Arms, Pitt-st.
83. John McCabe, North Star, Pitt and Liverpool streets
84. George Turner, Brown Bear, Pitt and Goulburn streets
85. James Oatley, Sportsman, Pitt and Goul-burn streets
86. Withdrawn
87. James Davison, Settlers' Arms, Castlereagh-street
88. Thomas Martin, Commercial Hotel, Castlereagh and King streets
89. Henry Peter Hook, Painters' Arms, Castlereagh-street
90. Louisa Watkins, Globe Tavern, Castlereagh and Market streets
91. Roger Murphy, Travellers' Rest, Castlereagh and Market streets
92. Edward Borton, jun., Sydney Arms, Castlereagh-street
93. Edward Canter, Barley Mow, Castlereagh and Park streets
94. William Tunks, Curriers' Arms, Castlereagh and Bathurst streets
95. Robert Collins, Cherry Tree, Castlereagh and Bathurst streets
96. George Clayton, Dungate Inn, Castlereagh and Liverpool streets
96. William Windred, Painters' Arms, Castlereagh and Goulburn streets
97. Baron Burnett Cohen, Nelson Hotel, Castlereagh and Campbell streets
98. Emanuel Crabb, Golden Fleece, Castlereagh-street
99. James Turley Jones, Crown and Kettle,York-street and Barrack-lane
100. John Hawkins, Original Hope Tavern, York-street and Barrack-lane
101. James Entwiste, Masonic Hall, York-st.
102. John O'Dowd, Forbes Hotel, York and King streets
103. William White, Garrick's Head, York and King streets
104. John Malcom, Adelphi Hotel, York-st.
105. Joshua Hutchinson, Harp and Shamrock, York-street
106. John Ward, Redfern Inn, York street
107. Sarah Kilpatrick, Harp of Erin, York-st.
108. John Nobbs, Gardeners' Arms, York-st.
109. Christopher Somerville, Erin-go-Bragh, York-street
110. Thomas Buck, Lamb Inn, Clarence-street North
111. Thomas Thorn, White Hart, Clarence-st.
112. Abraham J. Levy, Solomon's Temple, Clarence-street
113. Joseph Davis, Crispin Arms, Clarence-st.
114. James Cavanagh, Australian Inn, Clarence-street
115. Joseph Spinks, White Hart, Clarence and King streets
116. Michael Blakeney, Leinster Arms Clarence and King streets
117. James Holloway, Blue Lion, Clarence and Market streets
118. Saul Solomon, Australian Hotel, Clarence-street
119. Patrick Conlan, Tradesman's Arms Clarence-street
120. William Wells, Lord Nelson Hotel, Kent and Argyle streets
121. Ralph Benjamin, Dumbarton Castle, Kent-street
122. Andrew Goodwin, Lord Rodney, Kent-st.
123. William Davis, Gas Hotel, Kent-street
124. James Gomme Stanes, Steam Navigation Inn, Kent-street
125. Joseph Kelp, Steam-boat Inn, Kent-street
126. David Fernandez, Green Dragon, Kent and Erskine streets
127. Dulcibella Beath, Masonic Arms, Kent and Erskine streets
128. James Prescott, City Inn, Kent street
129. William Murphy, Wollongong Hotel, Kent and King streets
130. William Brinkley, St. Andrew's Tavern, Kent and King streets
131. Hugh F. O'Donnell, Australian, Kent and Market streets
132. George John Jilks, Union Inn, Kent-st.
133. John Lonergan, Ship Inn, Kent-street
134. John Smedley, Brisbane Inn, Kent-street 135 Refused
136. Jane Woodriffe, Macquarie Inn, Kent and Bathurst streets
137. Andrew Scotland, Hunter River Inn, Sussex-street
138. William Carss, Clarence River Inn, Sussex street
139. Duncan McLennon, Ship Inn, Sussex-st. 140 Refused
141. Robert Henderson, Dove Inn, Sussex and Erskine streets
142. Thomas Stewart, Royal Oak, Sussex and Erskine-streets
143. Patrick Casey, Toll Bar Inn, Botany Road
144. James Maxwell, Saracen's, Head, Sussex and King streets
145. William Stevens, Patent Slip, Sussex and King streets
146. James Yied, Commercial Hotel, Sussex and King streets
147. Henry Linden, Woolpack, Sussex-street
148. James Clarke, Governor Bourke, Sussex-street
149. Cornelius Murray, Cheshire Cheese, Sussex-street
150. Cornelius O'Neal, Darling Harbour Inn, Sussex-street
151. Matthew Charlton, Charlton's Hotel, Market Wharf
152. George Coleson, George and Dragon, Market Wharf
153. George Spears, New Inn, Sussex-street
154. Matthew Hezlett, Labour in Vain, Sussex-street
155. Susan Leggatt, Hope and Anchor, Sussex-street
156. John Kirkman, Lancashire Arms, Sussex-street
157. Alexander Gray, Light House Hotel,Sussex-street
168. Daniel Bissland, Sir Walter Scott, Sussex-street
159. James Smail, Robert Burns, Sussex-street
160. Eliza Boyle, Builders' Arms, Sussex-street
161. Patrick Comerford, Angel and Crown, Sussex-street
162. William Harrison, Butchers' Arms, Susex-street
163. Patrick Lee, Harp of Erin, Sussex-street
164. Jane Coulson, Whitehaven Castle, Sussex-street
165. William Cole, Bee Hive, Prince and Arglye streets
166. Edwin Marlow, Neptune Inn, Prince st.
167. Thomas Buxton, Glenmore Cottage, Prince-street
168. James Casey, Rock of Cashel, Cumberland-street
169. Edward T. McDonald, Forth and Clyde, Cumberland street
170. John Hurley, Coach and Horses, Cumberland-street
170.Charles James Bullivant, Three Crowns,Cumberland-street
171. John Sims, Whalers' Arms, Gloucester-street
172. William Andrews, Ship and Mermaid, Gloucester-street
173. Richard Wild, Black Dog, Gloucester st.
174. John Bruffell, Ship Inn, Gloucester-street
175. John Rochester, Erin-go-Bragh, Cambridge street
176. Margaret Brown, Rose and Crown, Argyle-street
177. Jonathan Brown, Hero of Waterloo, Fort and Windmill streets
178. William Ford, Napoleon Inn, Windmill-street
179. James Merriman, Whaler's Arms, Miller's Point
180. John Pomroy Bond, Royal Oak, Miller's Point
181. Lawrence Kearney, Captain Cook, Miller's Point
182. Refused
183. George Clarke, Clarke's, Hotel, Circular Quay
184. William Collie, Circular Quay Hotel, Circular Quay
185. Henry Barnett, Royal Admiral, Macquarie-place
186. George Pike, Custom House Hotel, Macquarie-place
187. John Henderson, Dolphin Hotel, Bridge-street
188. Henry Webb, Captain Cook, Spring andBent streets
189. George Snell Clarke, Horse and Jockey, O'Connell and Hunter streets
190. Refused
191. John Raynor, Star Inn, Phillip and Hunter streets
192. Robert Edward Heaney, Lord Nelson Inn, Phillip and Hunter streets
193. Anthony Tuohy, Lemon Tree, Phillip-street
194. William Baxter, Sir Maurice O'Connell, Elizabeth and Hunter streets
195. Richard Driver, Three Tuns, Elizabeth and King streets
196. Durell De la Faste, Cricketers' Hotel, Elizabeth street
197. Mountford Clarkson, Spread Eagle, Elizabeth-street
198. Charles Roberts, Crown Inn, Elizabeth and Goulburn streets
199. William A. Cahill, Albion Hotel, Elizabeth-street
200. Joseph Coquelin, Cheshire Cheese, Elizabeth street
201. James Kelly, Friendship Inn, Bathurst-st.
202. Robert Maxwell, Sir William Wallace, Bathurst street
203. Sarah Wallis, Hand and Heart, Liverpool and Dixon streets
204. Timothy Alfred Cowell, Builders' Arms, Liverpool and Charles streets
205. Thomas Quigley, St. Patrick's Inn, Goulburn-street
206. Arthur Walker, Picton Arms, Campbell-street
207. Maurice Walsh, Bee Hive, Campbell-st.
208. Philip Hart, Harp, Campbell-street
209. Richard Loseby, Pack Horse, Campbell-street
210. Elizabeth Benham, Museum Hotel, Woolloomoolo
211. Michael O'Keefe, Richmond Hotel, Woolloomooloo
212. Charles Shaw, Boomarang, Woolloomooloo
212. John Walpole Ireland, Cottage of Content, Woolloomooloo-street
213. Joseph Carter, Dublin Castle, Crown-st.
214. William Ebbetts, Fitz Roy Hotel, William and Palmer streets
215. Frederick Thompson, Riley Arms, Woolloomooloo and Riley streets
216. Thomas Baker, Woolloomooloo Inn, William-street, Woolloomooloo
217. Zachariah S. Moore, Sir Maurice O'Connell, Riley-street, Woolloomooloo
218. Charles Morris, Willow Tree, Victoria-street, Woolloomooloo
219. Joseph Brady, Shamrock, Woolloomooloo and Crown streets
220. Daniel Clarke, White Conduit House, Rushcutter Bay
221. Alexander Kyle, Terrace Inn, South Head Road
222. Thomas Blake, Robin Hood, South Head Road
223. Anthony Finn, Pelican Hotel, South Head Road
224. Robert Steel, Rising Sun, South Head Road
225. James Teare, Eagle Tavern, South Head Road
226. William Osborn, Half Moon Inn, South Head Road
227. Christina McDonald, Downshire Arms, South Head Road
228. Stephen Newby, Sportsman's Arms, South Head Road
229. Jane Elizabeth Allison, Queen's Arms, South Head Road
230. Jeremiah Healey, Victoria Inn, South Head Road
231. Thomas Taylor, Happy Vale, South Head Road
232. Benjamin Haigh, Rose and Crown, Glenmore Road
233. Margaret Canavan, Greenwood Tree, South Head Road
234. Michael Newman, Odd Fellows' Arms, South Head Road
235. Isabella Gilchrist, Greenwood Tree, South Head Road
236. John Wilson, Sir William Wallace, South Head Road
237. Thomas Hopkins, Prince Albert Inn, South Head Road
238. Jane Beard, Paddington Inn, Paddington
239. Elizabeth Marshall, Waverley Hotel, Waverley
240. Thomas Newell, South Head Hotel, South Head
241. George Francis Baker, Green Isle, Bourke street, Surry Hills
242. Joseph Benjamin Oliffe, Cookatoo Inn, Bourke-street, Surry Hills
243. John Barlow, Pine Apple, Cross-street, Surry Hills
244. James Bluck, Bluck's Family Hotel, Surry Hills
245. John Robinson, Boundary Stone, Surry Hills
246. Thomas Curtis, Bristol Inn, Crown and Campbell streets
247. Emanuel Martin, Madeira Inn, Devonshire-street
248. Thomas Wheeler, Strawberry Hill Inn, Strawberry Hill
249. William Walsh, Napoleon Inn, Kensington-street
250. David Armstrong, Crown Inn, Chippendale
251. Daniel Hickey, Old Rock of Cashel, Chippendale.
252. William Ryan, Railroad Inn, Chippendale
253. John Doyle, Stirling Castle, Chippendale
254. John Maillon, Chippendale Hotel, Chippendale
255. Michael Williamson, Belfast Wine Vaults, Botany Road
255. Patrick Casey, Toll Bar Inn, Botany Road
256. James Chamlis, Redfern Inn, Redfern
257. Daniel Toole, General Gough, Botany Road
258 Refused ; leave given to make application on Monday next for re-hearing.
259. Honora Simes, Pilot Inn, Parramatta and Harris streets
260. William Sullivan, Erin's Green Isle, Parramatta street
261. Thomas Bass, Britannia Inn, Parramatta-street
262. William R. Green, Wellington Inn, Parramatta-street
263. John C. Webb, Red Bull, Parramatta-st.
264. Thomas Clune, Clare Castle, Parramatta-street
265. Joseph Holder, Albert Inn, Parramatta-street

On page 3

266. James Harris, Golden Anchor, Parramatta-street
267. George Williams, Australian Inn, Parramatta-street
268. Margaret Onan, Victoria Inn, Parramatta-street
269. Phil Macdermott, Sportsman, Parramatta-street
270. Peter Brenan, Coopers' Arms, Pyrmont
271. Thomas Burdon, Edinburgh Castle, Pyrmont
272. John Clissold, Foresters' Arms, Glebe
273. Edward Cadden, Glebe Tavern, Glebe
274. James Simpson, Lady of the Lake, Glebe
275. Michael Doyle, Captain Cook, Botany
276. William Beaumont, Sir Joseph Banks, Botany
277. Andrew Guy, Sportsman's Arms, Newtown
278. Thomas Gettens, Robin Hood, Newtown
279. James W. Corbett, Antrim Arms, Newtown
280. Joseph Blackstone, White Horse Inn, Newtown
281. Robert Bates, St. John's Tavern, Newtown
282. George Rose, Pulteney Hotel, Cook's River
283. Michael Gannon, Union Inn, Cook's River
284. William Trinby, Bold Forester, Cook's River
285. Evan Evans, Man of Kent, Cook's River
286. John File, Canterbury Arms, Canterbury
287. Refused 288 Refused
289. William James Stack, Sugar Loaf Inn, Canterbury
290. Thomas Collins, Omnibus Inn, Parramatta Road
291. Richard Williams, Sir Richard Bourke, Parramatta Road
292. William Walker, Union Inn, Camperdown
293. Thomas Perren, Victoria Inn, Camperdown
294. William O'Brien, Royal Oak, Camperdown
295. John Lucas, Patriot, Camperdown 296 Refused
297. George Shirbin, Red Lion, Parramatta Road
298. Not entertained ; applicant being an uncertificated insolvent
299. Thomas Weedon, Cherry Gardens, Parramatta Road
300. Charles Hearne, Baldfaced Stag, Parramatta Road
301. Robert Oliver, Woolpack Inn, Parramatta Road
302. John Jones, Wheelwrights' Arms, Parramatta Road
303. William Henson, Norwood Inn, Parra-matta Road
304. James Clifton, Union Inn, Parramatta Road
305. Jane Hill, Cheshire Cheese, Parramatta Road
306. Lawrence Ryan, Wheat Sheaf, Liverpool Road
307. Charles Whitney, Cottage of Content, Liverpool Road
308. George Davis, Bark Huts, Liverpool Road
309. Mary Aiton, Unity Hall, Balmain
310. Thomas Rostrow, Shipwrights' Arms, Balmain
311. James Barr, Balmain Hotel, Balmain
312. William Carter, Marquis of Waterford, Balmain
313. William Roberts, Burnbank Hotel, Balmain
314. Thomas Redgrave, Fig Tree Cottage, North Shore
315. Susannah Lavender, Macquarie Inn, North Shore
316. William Dind, Lily of St Leonard's, North Shore
317. Isabella Beirne, Union Inn, North Shore
318. Daniel Gallagher, Traveller's Home, Lane Cove
Note.An application was made by Samuel Taylor, of Canterbury, that a license might be granted to a house occupied by him, to be called the Rising Sun, but having been lodged with the Chief Constable a day too late it was not published with the other applications. It is believed that application will be made for the welfare of the magistrates that it is one of those special applications which the Governor may grant with advantage to the public.