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Mail Contracts New South Wales January 1861

Particulars for the contracts entered into for the conveyance of Post Office Mails, from 1st January 1861.
The + symbol signifies Per Week.

WESTERN ROADS.
John Hilt, Parramatta, Baulkham Hills, Rouse Hill, and Windsor, six days per week, for £200.
James Connolly, Windsor, Pitt Town, Wiseman's Ferry, and St. Alban's, two days, +£90.
Edward Croft, Wiseman's Ferry, and Mangrove Creek, one day, + £16.
Thomas Crisford, Windsor and Richmond, six days, + for £55.
Charles Bowen, Windsor, Wilberforce, Sackville Reach, and Portland Head, via Ebenezer, three days, + for £70.
Thomas Crisford, Richmond, North Richmond, and Wheeny Creek (Lamrock's Inn), three days, + for £35.
H. J. Kirwan, Sackville Reach and Lower Portland,three days, + for £30.
Edward Crisford, Richmond and Camden, via Castlereagh, Penrith, Mulgoa, and Greendale, three days, + for £198.
William Crane and J. J. Roberts, Parramatta Railway Terminus, and Post Office and Penrith, twice a day; Penrith, Hartley, and Bathurst, six days; Bathurst and Sofala, three days; Hartley and Mudgee, six days; with branch Post from Kean's Swamp to Rylstone, three days, and Bathurst, Guyong, and Orange, six days, + for £3250.
John Beard, Sofala and Tambaroora, one day, + for £190.
James Falconer, Mudgee, Cobbora, and Mundooran, one day, + for £175.
Edward Duckett, Mundooran and Coonamble, one day, + for £200.
David McCullough, Coonamble and Merri Merri by Bimbleyom, Bundy, Ningey, and Coanbone, one day, + for £99.
George O'Shea, Mudgee, Merrindee, and Wellington, one day, + for £180.
Edwin J. Greenwood, Mudgee and Cassilis, one day,+ for £200.
John Smith, Mudgee and Long Creek via Avisford, Grattai, Louisa Creek, Windeyer, and Campbell's Creek, two days, + for £275.
Hugh Wright, Orange and Wellington via Stoney Creek, Ironbarks, Moombla Hill, and Black Rock, three days, + for £795.
Edward Nicholls, Orange and Molong, three days, + for £285.
Thomas O'Brien, Molong and Black Rock, three days, + for £200.
Joseph Morris, Molong and South Wangan, one day, + for £115.
John Gardner, Molong and Obley, one day, + for £49.
D. L. Dalziell, Obley und Algullah, one day, + for £100.
Alexander White, Wellington and Dubbo, two days, + for £150.
James McCubbin, Dubbo and Cobbora, one day, + for £99.
Edward Duckett, Dubbo, Drungalee and Cannonbah, one day, + for £200.
John Minehan, Bathurst and Carcoar, three days, + for £348.
Thomas Walsh, Carcoar and Canowindra via Cliefden and Cowra, three days, + for £420.
Thomas Walsh, Cowra, South Wangan, Bundaburra, and Condobolin, one day, + for £360.
Thomas Grace, Condobolin and Lang's Crossing-place, one day, + for £560.
James James, Bathurst, Lagoons, and Rockley, two days; Rockley and Tuena, one day; Rockley and Swatchfield, one day ; Bathurst, Caloola, and Long Swamp, one day; Bathurst and O'Connell, two days; and O'Connell and Fish River Creek, via Mutton's Falls, one day, + for £400.

SOUTHERN ROADS.
William Crane and J. J. Roberts, Railway Terminus and Post Office, Campbelltown and Camden, via Narellan and Campbelltown and Goulburn, six days, + for £825.
W. B. Campbell, Campbelltown, Riversford, Douglass Park, and Picton, six days, + for £150.
Philip Reily, Camden and Oaks, via Brownlow Hill, and Lowe's Hill, six days; and Oaks and Burrogorang, three days, + for £145.
John Wallace, Berrima and Sutton Forest, six days, + for £70.
Charles Loseby, Berrima and Bong Bong, six days, + for £40.
James Waterworth, Bungonia and Marulan, three days, + for £50.
James Woods, Campbelltown, Appin, Woonona, Wollongong, and Dapto, six days, + for £600.
Edward Graham, Dapto and Shellharbour, two days, + for £30.
Joseph Howard, Dapto, Jamberoo, Kiama, Geringong and Shoalhaven, six days, + £500.
Christopher and William Murray, Shoalhaven, Sassafras, Nerriga, and Braidwood, one day, + for £230.
William Murray, Shoalhaven and Nowra, via Greenhills, three days, + £25.
John Allen, Shoalhaven, Nowra, and Ulladulla, via Greenhills, two days, + for £133 6s. 8d.
Philip Murray, Shoalhaven, Nowra, and Ulladulla, via Greenhills, one day, + for £66 13s. 4d.
Alfred Moult, Ulladulla and Bateman's Bay, two days, + for £120.
Mary Coffee, Bateman's Bay and Moruya, two days, + for £68.
Thomas Moran, Goulburn and Braidwood, via Boro, six days; Boro, Bungendore, and Queanbeyan, six
days; and Queanbeyan and Cooma, six days, + for £900.
David Wilson, Braidwood and Major's Creek, via Bell's Creek and Bell's Paddock, three days, + for
£120.
David Wilson, Braidwood and Little or Mongarlowe River, two days, +for £75.
Thomas Moran, Bungendore and Molonglo, three days, + for £84.
Thomas McGee, Nelligen (Clyde River), and Braid- wood, two days, + for £250.
John Doughty, Major's Creek, Oranmore and Stoney Creek, via Ballalaba, two days, + for £58.
P. Heffernan, Braidwood, Araluen, Mullenderree, and Moruya, via Reidsdale, two days, + for £225.
C. J. McGregor, Moruya, Bodalla, Bega, Merimbula, and Pambula, one day, + for £160.
John Otton, jun., Moruya, Bodalla, Bega, Merimbula, and Pambula, one day, + for £180.
J. J. Roberts, Goulburn, Collector, Gundaroo, Gin- ninderra, and Queanbeyan, two days, + for £220.
Thomas Moran, Queanbeyan and Lanyon, two days, + for £68 12s.
Thomas Moran, Cooma, Adaminiby, Russell's and Kiandra, one day, + for £228 11s. 6d.
J. J. Roberts, Cooma, Adaminiby, Russell's and Kiandra, two days, + for £600.
William McGregor, Adaminiby and Cathcart, one day, + for £300.
William Roohan, Cooma and Buckley's Crossing Place, via Woolway and Jejizrick, one day, + for £138.
David Delves, Cooma and Bombala, two days, + for £350.
Edward Jones, Bombala and Delegate, two days, + for £110.
Charles Robertson, Bombala, Cathcart, Pambula, and Eden, via Big Jack's, one day, + for £210.
Charles Robertson, Pambula and Eden, two days, + for £55.
J. M. Munoz, Goulburn and Kenny's Point, via Bangalore, one day, + for £69.
James Martin, Goulburn, Tarlo, and Taralga, via Chatsbury, one day, + for £58.
Isaac Pratton, Goulburn, Laggan, and Tuena, one day, + for £160.
George Evans, Goulburn and Binda, via Mummell, Pomeroy, Gullen, and Wheo, two days, + for £160.
George Webster, Binda and Tuena, two days, for £80.
W. Henry Smith, Binda and Bigga, one day, + for £37. 10s.
James Maloney, Wheo, Reid's Flat, and Cowra, one day, + for £126 6s. 4d.
William Crane and J. J. Roberts, Goulburn, Gunning, and Yass, daily, + £531 4s.
James Garry, Yass, Binalong, and Burrowa, two days, + for £240.
Patrick Forbes, Yass and Gundaroo, two days, + for £80.
Jacob Marks, Binalong, Murrumburrah, and Wagga Wagga, via Dacey's and the Levels, two days, + for £600.
Allan Hancock, Burrowa, and Reid's Flat, via Hovell's Creek and Phil's Creek, one day, for £60.
Daniel Crottay, Burrowa and Cowra, via Marengo, and Bumbaldrie, one day, + for £135.
Thomas West, Marengo and Morangarell, one day, + for £100.
John Sheehan and Laurence Garry, Yass and Albury, three days, + for £2,285 3s. 2d.
Robert Elliott, Yass and Albury, three days, + for £2,400.
Edward Doyle, Gundagai and Tumut, three days, + for £210.
Edward G. Brown, Tumut and Kiandra, one day, + for £480.
C. W. Crawley, Tumut and Adelong, three days, + for £100.
Frederick Abbott, Tarcutta and Adelong, three days, for £285.
Alexander Bruce, Adelong, Upper Adelong, Tumberumba, and Ten Mile Creek, with a branch post to and from Copabella, Jingillack, and Welaregane, one day, + for £350.
James Gormley, Tarcutta and Wagga Wagga, one day, + for £95.
James Gormley, Tarcutta and Wagga Wagga, two days; Wagga Wagga, Gillinbah, Lang's Crossing Place, and Balranald, one day, + for £852 12s. 8d
James Gormley, Wagga Wogga, Gillenbah, Lane's Crossing Place, and Balranald, one day, +for £685.
James Gormley, Wagga Wagga and Deniliquin, one day, + for £470.
James Gormley, Wagga Wagga and Deniliquin, one day, + for £487 1s. 2d.
James Clifford, Lang's Crossing Place and Deniliquin. one day, + for £228 11s. 6d.
Richard Bill, Lang's Crossing Place and Deniliquin, two days; and Deniliquin and Moama, three days, + for £925.
Ralph Powell, Albury and Deniliquin, one day, + for £220.
Bevan and Co,, Deniliquin and Moama, three days, + for £260.
William Burgess, Deniliquin, Moulamein, and Balranald, one day, +for £250.
Thomas Pain and Robert Driscoll, Wentworth and Mount Murchison, once a fortnight, for £600.

NORTHERN ROADS.
James Cole, Sydney, Lane Cove, and Gosford, via Peat's Ferry, one day, + for £129.
Peter Fagan, Sydney, Lane Cove, and Gosford, via Peat's Ferry, one day, + for £100.
Peter Fagan, Gosford and Kincumber, one day, + for £16.
Morris Magney, Newcastle Wharf, the Post-office, and Railway Terminus, twice or oftener daily, for £100.
Morris Magney, Newcastle Post-office, and Branch Office at Lake Macquarie Road and the Junction, twice or oftener, daily, for £48 11s. 6d.
Thomas Baker, Raymond Terrace and Stroud, four days, + for £178.
John Williams, Stroud and Tinonee, two days, + for £245.
Robert Summerville, Tinonee and Wingham, two days, + for £27.
G. M. Fitzpatrick, Tinonee and Redbank, two days, + for £32 10s.
Reuben Richards, Tinonee and Port Macquarie, two days, + for £210.
Thomas Carney, Port Macquarie and Huntingdon, one day, + for £28.
Henry McCabe, Tinonee, Taree, Candleton, and Jones' Island, two days, +for £35.
Christopher Felton, Port Macquarie, Rolland's Plains, and Kempsey, two days, + for £108.
Otho O. Dangar, Kempsey and Frederickton, one day, + for £36 11s. 6d.
Otho O. Dangar. Kempsey and Armidale, once a fortnight, for £73.
Robert Hyndes, Post Office and Railway Station, West Maitland, twice or oftener, daily, for £52.
Alexander McGilvray, West Maitland, East Maitland, and Morpeth, seven days, for £49.
Alexander McGilvray, Railway Station and Post Office, East Maitland, Morpeth, and Hinton, seven days, for £67.
Lawrence Arnold, Hinton, Seaham, Clarence Town, Brookfield, and Dungog, three days, + for £145.
Thomas Irwin, Dungog and Bandon Grove, three days, + for £28.
Robert Lloyd, East Maitland, Largs, and Paterson, seven days, for £125.
William Shearwood, Paterson and Gresford, three days, + for £35.
Francis Randall, Gresford and Eccleston, one day, + for £20.
Patrick McCloy, Gresford and Lostock, two days, + for £25.
Thomas Moore, East Maitland and Mount Vincent, one day, + for £24.
Thomas Moore, Maitland, Millfield, and Wollombi, three days. + for £180.
John Gill, Railway Terminus and Post Office, Lochinvar, and Singleton, seven days ; and Singleton and Murrurundi, four days. + for £1844 5s.
John Gill, Singleton and Murrurundi, two days; and Murrurundi Land Armidale, three days ; + for £3450.
Joseph Clark, Singleton and Fordwich, two days.+ for £85.
Thomas Howard, Singleton and Jerry's Plains, -via Cockfighter's Creek, and in time of flood via Thorley's, three days.+ for £77.
Patrick Ward, Muswellbrook, Merton, Merriwa, and Cassilis, three days.+ for £777.
William Acheson, Cassilis, Coolan, and Coonabarabran, one day.+ for £142.
James M'Cubbin, Coolah, Denison Town, and Cobbora, one day,+ for £90.
J. A. Johnstone, Coolah and Gulligal, one day. for £149.
Seymour Denman, Wallgett and Coonabarabran, via Kienlry, &c, one day.+ for £179.
John Gill, Murrurundi, Tamworth, Bendemeer, and Armidale, three days. + for £3980.
Joseph Taggart, Murrurundi and Oakey Creek, one day.+ for £120.
John Gill, Murrurundi, Breeza, and Gunnedah, one day, for £159.
John Gill, Murrurundi and Gunnedah, via Warra, Breeza, and Carroll, one day; and Gunnedah, Gulligal, and Wee Waa, one day. + for £550.
Abraham Johnstone, Gulligal and Warialda, one day.+ for £168.
William M'clelland, Goonoo Goonoo and Nundle, via Bowling Alley .Point, two days. + for £175.
A. S. Bourke, Goonoo Goonoo and Nundle, via Bowling Alley Point, one day, + for £71 8s. 7d.
John Gill, Armidale and Drayton, two days ; Tamworth, Warialda, and Calandoon, one day; Warialda and Wee Waa, one day ; Tamworth, Carroll, and Gulligal, one day: Wallgett. Caidmurra, and Callandoon, one day ; Wee Waa and Wallgett, one day; Warwick and Ipswich, via Cunningham's Gap. one day; Wallabadah and Quirindi, one day ; Uralla and Rocky River, three days ; + for £3900.
James Keating, Walgett and Fort Bourke, once a fortnight, for £350.
William Sly, Fort Bourke and Mount Murchison, travelling either side of the Darling, once a fortnight, for £275.
W. M. Stevenson and William Martin, Armidale and Grafton, and Bendemeer and Bundarra, one day, + for £390.
W. M. Stevenson, Armidale and Walcha, one day ; and Bendemeer and Walcha, two days, for £232.+
Gabriel Wardrope, Armidale, Byron, and Frazer's Creek, via Moredun, Paradise Creek, Newstead, Inverell, Buckalla, one day. for £150.
Edward M. Wright, Tenterfield and Frazer's Creek, one day, + for £144.
Charles Tuckwood, Tenterfield, Tabulan, and Grafton, one day, + for £288.
Ellen Thompson, Lawrence and Casino, one day ; Grafton and Casino, one day, + for £400.
Henry Sheldon, Lawrence Tabulam, and Tooloom, via Pretty Gully, one day + for £200.
James Duffy, Casino and Richmond River Heads, one day. + for £150.
John Brown, Casino and Brisbane, one day, for £265.

SUBURBAN.
Peter Fagan. Sydney, St. Mark's, Waverley, and Watson's Bay, six days for £99.
G. H. Stevens, Sydney and St. Leonard's, twice a day, + for £40.
Robert Gannon, Sydney and St. Peter's, twice a day, for £12.
John Grice, Sydney and Randwick, twice a day, for £20.


Major General Kenneth William Eather, CB, CBE, DSO ED 1901-1993

The son of William Senior Eather 1870-1961 and
Isabella Theresa Lees 1869-1962
Spouse: Adeline Mabel Lewis 1901-1966 Married 1923

Kenneth William EATHER was born on the 6 June 1901 at Balmain, a suburb of Sydney. The only son and eldest of three children.

Ken's father moved to Papua to manage a plantation and the family lived in Port Moresby.
As a boy Ken was sent to board and be educated at Abbotsholme College in Wahroonga, New South Wales, an elite boarding school which was also attended by future prime ministers Harold Holt and William McMahon.

Ken Eather left school at 14 to become an apprentice dental mechanic. He had been in the army cadets since the age of 12 and when he turned 18 he joined the Conscript Militia, now called the Army Reserve. When war was declared in 1939 Ken sold his dental practice to form and assume command of the 2/1st Battalion in the AIF which he led with distinction in Bardia, Australia's first battle of WWII.

As officer in Command of the 25th Brigade, 7th. division, in the Markham Valley and Lae Campaign in New Guinea during the second world war, Kenneth was dubbed "Phar Lap" because of his speed with which he pushed his men down the Markham Valley.

On the 3 July 1941 Awarded Distinguished Service Order 'For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty during the attack on BARDIA during the period from 2 Jan 41 to 5 Jan 41.

On the 1 November 1943 awarded the United States Distinguished Service Cross 'For extraordinary heroism in action in New Guinea, during the Papuan campaign, July 23, 1942, to January 8, 1943. As Commander 25th Infantry Brigade, Australian Army

On 23 December 1943 at St.James Palace, London made Commander of the Order of the British Empire

August 1945 promoted from Brigadeer to Major General

At the end of the war he was selected to lead the Australian contingent which marched in the Victory Parade in London in June 1946.

Ken Eather retired from the Army on 18 September 1946 and became a poultry farmer in Penrith, New South Wales He became active in the Primary Producer's Association of New South Wales and was elected its president in 1953, a position he held for the next five years.

However, the death of his son Ken in a motorcycle accident at Bathurst led him to reconsider life as a farmer.

In 1958, he became the head of the Water Research Foundation of Australia, an organisation that dispensed funding to researchers investigating water related issues.

Adeline died in Sydney in 1966 and in 1968 Ken married Kathleen Carroll. Kathleen's son, Owen took the name EATHER and Ken treated him as his own son.

When Owen Eather, returned from the Vietnam war as a captain. Ken was very upset at the way the Vietnam veterans were being treated. He made it a point from then on to lead the Sydney Anzac Day marches with Owen by his side.

Major General Eather continued to lead Anzac Day marches through Sydney until 1992.

Ken Eather's grandson Eamon, joined the Australian Army Reserve and served with the International Force in East Timor.

Kenneth William Eather died at a nursing home in Mosman, New South Wales on 9 May 1993.

As the last surviving Australian general of World War II, he was given a military funeral at St. Andrew's Cathedral, Sydney Three companies of the 3rd Battalion, Royal Australian Regiment provided an honour guard and an oration was given by General Sir Francis Hassett. Some 1,000 veterans lined George Street, Sydney to pay their last respects to Eather, who was cremated at the Northern Suburbs Crematorium.

There are many stories about Ken Eather. I do recommend the biography. 'Desert Sands, Jungle Lands'. by Steve Eather


2 comment(s), latest 7 years ago

Marbles


1 comment(s), latest 6 years, 8 months ago

Margaret Seymour 1823-1889 & James Walker 1823-1899

Margaret SEYMOUR was born in Dunagh, County Monaghan, Ireland, in 1823. ( family researcher 'Jaet' has pointed out that DUNAGH is a transcription error and the town is in fact DONAGH).
She married James WALKER in Tyrone, Ireland on 14 May 1845.
James WALKER b: 1823 in Aughnaclay, Ireland was the son of John WALKER 1806-1881 and Isabella IRVINE 1801-1906.

James, Margaret, with daughter Ann Jane age 3 arrived on the 'Sea' as assisted immigrants on the 29 September 1849 and went to live in Kiama, NSW

The children of James WALKER and Margaret nee SEYMOUR were:-

1. Ann Jane WALKER b:12 February 1846 in Dunagh, Ireland d:12 March 1916 at Jerrara,Kiama, NSW m. William BARBER 1840-1904 in 1868 at Kiama.
The children of this marriage were:-
Margaret Jean BARBER 1869 ? 1931 William Henry BARBER 1871 ? 1909

Mary A b: V18471043 32A/1847 WALKER MARY A JAMES MARGARET

3. John WALKER b: 17 October 1850 at Jerrara d:9 May 1919 at Jamberoo, NSW m. (1.)Isabella Rachel GRAY 1853-1899 at 'Hawthorn Glen'Jamberoo on 15 Jan.1879
The children of this marriage were:-
Robert Henry WALKER 1880?1933 John Thomas WALKER 1882?1945
William James WALKER 1884?1963 Alexander Ernest WALKER 1885?1963 Lindsay Frederick WALKER 1887?1959 Isabella Florence WALKER 1891?1972 Maria Elizabeth WALKER 1893?1972 Leslie WALKER 1899?1960
m. (2) Mary Isabella ARMSTRONG 1864-1950 at Kiama in 1900. one child Victoria WALKER b:1901


4. James WALKER b:17 March 1854 at Jamberoo d:22 Nov.1923 Albion Park, NSW. m. Hannah TATE 1857-1896 at Kiama on 17 October 1881.

The children of this marriage were:-
John WALKER 1882?1952 Henry WALKER 1885?1977
Hannah WALKER 1885? ? Irene WALKER 1888?1948
Eleanor WALKER 1891?1894 Grace Walker 1893?1981



5. William Harper Walker b: 4 Aug. 1856 Jerrara d:21 April 1931 at Singleton, NSW m. Jesse ALLAN 1880-1932 at Singleton in 1907.

The children of this marriage were:-
William Harper WALKER 1908?1942 Edith Hannah WALKER 1909 ?
Lindsay Irivin WALKER 1910?1923 Albert Lewis WALKER 1912?1978
James Ronald WALKER 1913?1972 Allan Douglass WALKER 1917?1941
Belle Marie WALKER 1918 ? 1975

6.Robert H WALKER 8396/1859 WALKER ROBERT H JAMES MARGARET KIAMA

7. Thomas WALKER 8315/1861 WALKER THOMAS JAMES MARGARET KIAMA

James WALKER died at Kiama on 16 August 1899 his wife Margaret, nee SEYMOUR died at Kiama on 10 March 1889. Both are buried at the Jamberoo General Cemetery, Drualla Road, Jamberoo, NSW in the Anglican Section Row B.


5 comment(s), latest 5 years, 7 months ago

Martha Needle 1863-1894

On the 13 June 2011, I stood outside the premises at 137 Bridge Road, Richmond in Melbourne. These premises once belonged to a saddler called Louis Juncken who lived with his brother Otto and just across the road at 124 is the building, where the Toole Brothers had their grocery store and where Martha bought her rat poison, namely "Rough On Rats".

Martha NEEDLE was beautiful, manipulative and ruthless. She poisoned her husband and her three little girls. She watched as they died excruciatingly painful deaths. When she couldn't get what she wanted using her good looks she turned to rat poison. Martha Needle was insane.
She was born Martha CHARLES on the 9 April 1863 on the Murray River near Morgan in South Australia, she was raised in a violent household, her father, a mystery, but registered as Joseph Henry Charles, had left the marital home sometime in 1861, May Charles, nee Newlands had been drawing rations for herself as a destitute and applied to the court for funds to bury year old baby Dina in 1862. The couple had parted at Julia Creek, near Anlaby. When there Mrs. Charles accused her husband of an attempt to poison her. She told him that she was ill, and that she suspected him, as she had discovered that some poison, which was kept in the place for destroying dogs, had been taken away. She states that he did not deny the charge, and remarked that as they were living so unhappily she could expect nothing else. The separation lasted about twelve months, when a reconciliation was effected and they lived together at Kapanda, but only for a few months, when they again parted, this time on account of the husband once more threatening his wife, who then went to Mr. Glen's North-west Bend Station, on the River Murray, where seven months after the second separation Martha (Mrs. Needle) was born. It is my view that when Joseph Henry Charles left this last time he also took with him his children, William b: 1854, Mary b: 1856, and Ellen b: 1859 as there is no mention of them being with mother, May at all.
About 1865 May Charles hooked up with soldier from the 40th, 2nd Somersetshire regiment of foot, Daniel Foran an Irishman from near Limerick, whom she later married on the 15th March 1870. Thus began a series of dreadful abuse for the young Martha Charles.
At the age of 12 she went into domestic service at Port Adelaide. She met and married Henry Needle 1857-1889, a carpenter, some years her senior at North Adelaide in 1882.
Three children were born of the marriage, Mabel 1882-1885, Elsey 1883-1890, and May 1886-1891, and the family moved to Melbourne.

During the first years in Melbourne living at Cubitt Street Richmond, Needle and his very attractive wife were apparently happy in each other's company, and their neighbours looked upon them as a comfortably situated and well-matched couple. When a year or two had passed, however, the relations were noticed to be less cordial. Mrs Needle went out more often unaccompanied by her husband than had formerly been her practice, and Needle became jealous and morose.

On the 28 February 1885 one of the children, Mabel, sickened and died. She was attended by a local doctor in his capacity as physician to one of the lodges of the Independent Order of Oddfellows, of which Needle was a member. About the time of the death of the child, Needle went to Sydney in search of employment, but he did not remain long away, and when he returned the relations of the husband and wife were, it is said, less happy than they had been before.

A few months later Henry Needle was seized with sickness, and he, too, was attended by the lodge doctor. His illness did not last long, but it was remarkable for a circumstance set down by the doctor to irritability and obstinacy on the part of the patient. He refused to take any nourishment handed to him by his wife. Anything she offered to him he would wave aside, or when pressed into anger would dash it over the floor or against the wall. The reason of this was not known. Some friends of Mrs. Needle, who helped her in the nursing, remarked it as peculiar, but the dying man gave no explanation, and it was believed to be due to his ill- temper and his irritable disposition. Its effect was certainly disastrous, for as he only took nourishment when asked to do so by strangers, he was not sufficiently fed, and he died ultimately, as the doctor's certificate set forth, of "subacute hepatitis, enteric fever, and exhaustion due to obstinacy in not taking nourishment. In plainer language, the patient died from inflammation of the liver and of the intestines, and from exhaustion due to lack of nourishment.

Upon Needle's death Mrs Needle obtained the services of The Trustees, Executors, and Agency Company to administer for her. A sum of ?60 odd was paid to her as her third share of the ?200 of the life policy, less expenses. The balance was invested by the company for the benefit of the two children then living.

On the 9th December, 1890, Elsie, one of the children, died. She was six years old, and she died after a three weeks' illness from "gangrenous stomatitis and exhaustion." Mr Hodgson attended her. After Elsie's death Mrs Needle received the child's share of the ?200?about ?60.

On the 27th August, 1891, the little girl May, aged 4 years and 11 months, died from "tubercular meningitis.''
In January, 1892, Mrs Needle became house keeper to the two Junckens, Otto and Louis, at Bridge road, Richmond, where Louis carried on the business of a saddler. The family came from Lyndoch, South Australia. In April of that year she became engaged to Otto, but Louis said he objected to his brother marrying any person who exhibited such frightful outbursts of temper as she displayed. The mother also objected by letter on the ground of Mrs Needle's weak health. Louis appears to have been first poisoned on August 18, 1893, and was ill for 10 or 13 days, but as he consented to the marriage, he was given another chance until April 1894, when the same symptoms of violent and unexplained vomiting came on. A relative came to attend him, and he speedily got better, until she left on May 10. The same night, about 7.30, Mrs Needle went to a shop and purchased a box of Rough on Rats. The following morning she prepared breakfast, and Louis was again seized with the same vomiting fits. He died on May 15, and Dr McColl stated in his certificate of death that it was due to exhaustion and inflammation of the stomach and membranes of the heart.

The next step was the arrival of Louis and Otto?s brother, Hermann Juncken and his mother from South Australia, and as the mother refused to agree to the marriage, and Hermann backed her up and said Mrs Needle and Otto had better part, the removal of Hermann became a part of the criminal's programme. Arsenic was again used. Strange to say not one of the medical men who attended the various victims of Martha Needle had suspected her of being a poisoner. Luckily Dr Boyd was sharper than the general run of his brethren, and the woman was caught by the police in the very act of offering a cup of tea containing 10 grains of arsenic to Hermann.

Later the bodies of Henry Needle, and the prisoner's two children were exhumed, and traces of poison were found in all except that of May, who had been too long dead to allow of analysis. Detectives WHITNEY and FRYER disinterred Louis JUNCKEN's body from the cemetery of Lyndoch in South Australia and 34 grains of arsenic were found.
As to her conduct since her condemnation to death at the end of 1894 a Melbourne newspaper of that time said:?"None of those who are thrown into contact with Martha Needle can fathom her character. The condemned woman's mask of impenetrable reserve has confessedly baffled the governor of the gaol. Dr Shields, the Government medical officer, and both her spiritual advisers (Mr H. F Scott, Church of England chaplain, and Mrs Hutchinson, of the Salvation Army). Even to these experienced eyes the extraordinary woman is as inscrutable as the Sphinx. No hope of a reprieve has been expressed by her at any time in fact she has firmly stated that she prefers death. This sentiment does not appear to be, as is so often observed in prisoners similarly situated, the outcome of religious conviction. Mrs Needle has not manifested any of the fervency which distinguished Mrs Knorr and the young man Knox, who were recently hanged in the Melbourne Gaol. She is, notwithstanding, taking some interest in matters spiritual, as is evidenced by her choice of a Bible, a prayer book, and hymn book for regular reading.

Her only reference to the crimes for which she has been condemned is the oft-repeated and unfaltering statement that she is entirely innocent, and she expresses the conviction that she will go to heaven."

Martha Needle after a four day trial before Mr. Justice HODGES at the Melbourne Criminal Court was pronounced GUILTY.
She was hanged on Monday the 22 October 1894 at Old Melbourne Gaol.

Oddly enough Martha spent most of the insurance money on an elaborate grave for her family, which she visited almost every day.

Otto JUNCKEN stuck by Martha throughout saying," She didn't know what she was doing".

In her Will, made five days before the date of death and was witnessed by the sub-matron of the gaol and a law clerk. After the customary introduction the testatrix says, " I give, devise and bequeath all my real and personal property to Otto Juncken, of Bridge Road, Richmond, for his own absolute use. I appoint the said Otto Juncken sole executor of this my will." The only property left by the deceased is an amount of ?25 payable under a policy of insurance on the life of the deceased by Citizens' Life Assurance Co.
Below is the letter written by Martha to Otto penned a few hours before her execution, which he received the next day.

Melbourne Gaol, Monday, 4 o'clock.
"My Darling? As you wished me to write I will do so, but truly I do not know what to say to you on this my last morning on earth. In a few hours I shall be free from all sorrow, but you, dear Otto, must live on for as time. It may be a very long time or it may not, but whichever way God wishes it will be. But, never mind try to bear up under the very sad blow. Rest assured we shall meet again where there is no parting. Your good father, also poor Louis and my dear little ones will welcome you. You know, dear, Elsie and May loved you on earth they will do so in heaven. Think how they will all welcome you to our happy home on high. I must ask you not to think unkindly of me for saying what I did last night to Mr Scott. I think it right that you should know what that man did say about you but I want you to thoroughly understand that I did not believe that you ever did say so to him, and I told him so. You must not think what he said upset me, for it did not, only it annoyed me to think that such a man would tell an untruth. True, he may think he was doing right we must hope he did think so. Now you will want to know what sort of a night I have had ? fairly good. You and all dear ones have been in my thoughts and prayers, dear Otto. Please read the 139th Psalm from the 7th to the 13th verse, as I have asked God to forgive me anything that I have done to displease Him, and trust to His forgiveness, so do I forgive all that have ever done me any sort of unkindness, for I know that they are very sorry now for me, be the wrong little or big. Give my everlasting love to all enquiring friends. I must now say good-by to you for a time. When you receive this you can think of me as being in a happy home with my loved ones waiting and watching for you. I know, dear Otto that you will get ready for that happy meeting with us all. With love and sympathy from your loving
Martha."


In June 1894 Martha's mother Mrs FORAN formerly CHARLES who had re married David FORAN in Port Lincoln in South Australia, in 1870 told a reporter at the Melbourne Argus.
"Of the first marriage six children were born?four girls and two boys. Only three of the girls are living?namely, in order of age Mary, wife of James Hall, who resided at or near Hoyleton, Ellen, wife of Joseph Lee, who resides at Marrabel, and Martha (Mrs Needle). The boys died young. The father is said to have frequently told his wife that he was heir to some property in Chancery, and he promised to take her to his friends in England. The couple parted at Julia Creek, near Anlaby/Kapunda.
Whilst there, Mrs Charles accused her husband, Joseph of an attempt to poison her. She told him that she was ill, and that she suspected him, as she had discovered that some poison which was kept in the place for destroying dogs, had been taken away. She states that he did not deny the charge, and remarked that as they were living so unhappily she could expect nothing else. The separation lasted about 12 months, when a reconciliation was effected and they lived together at Kapunda, but only for a few months, when they again parted, this time on account of the husband once more threatening his wife, who then went to Mr Glen's North-west Bend Station, on the River Murray where seven months after the second separation Martha was born. About four months after the birth of this daughter Mrs Charles removed to Port Lincoln, and had her daughter living with her until, when about 12 years of age, she went into the service of Mrs Drew at Port Adelaide.
Mrs FORAN complains bitterly of Martha's treatment of her, and says that she was cruel and headstrong, with an ungovernable temper. She accuses her also of threatening her life, and inciting her half-brother to join her in most cruel acts towards her mother.

Otto Johann Wilhelm YUNCKEN 1865-1945 was the son of Danish born Otto YUNCKEN 1826-1890 and Irish born Margaret Mary FITZGERALD 1835-1913. He had 5 brothers Herman, Louis, Charles, Franz Thomas and Albert. and three sisters, Augusta Amalia, Emma Louisa and Anna Ellen. Their father emigrated from Schleswig in 1855, then a duchy of Denmark though predominantly German-speaking. Their mother emigrated from Mitchelstown, County Cork, in Ireland at about the same time.

Otto married Bertha ABRECHT 1880-1949 on the 31 July 1901 in Melbourne.
The name YUNCKEN was always reported as JUNCKEN but it seems the family spell it with a 'Y'
"Otto Johann Wilhelm Juncken changed the spelling of his name to "Yuncken" about the time of the First World War but the South Australian Junckens generally still retain the original spelling."
Source: grandson, Andy Yuncken

Henry NEEDLE born in 1860 at Weedon, Northamptonshire, the son of Thomas Wilson NEEDLE b:1823 and Hannah Margaret BRAIN 1822-1908. They arrived on Ship "Forfarshire" with 5 children, Fanny, Martha, Caroline, Thomas and Henry.

Martha's mother was born Mary/May NEWLAND/NEWLANDS daughter of Duncan NEWLAND married her first husband Joseph Henry CHARLES on the 5 December 1853 at Inverbrackie, South Australia.
I believe Joseph Henry CHARLES died about 1865.

May Foran with her husband Daniel were well known to the police. Both spent time locked up for drunkeness and the children put into care.
From the SA Register 13 July 1876: Mary Foran, married, woman, was charged with leaving her son Daniel, aged 10, without means of support. Mrs Foran was ordered to be imprisoned for one calendar month with hard labour, and her two children (the other a boy of five years) are to be sent to the Industrial School till they are 12 yoars of age.
From the SA Register 3 April 1875: Mary Foran, married woman, was similarly punished for a like offence and mulcted in 20s. for uttering foul words, on March 31, in Sussex-street.
From the SA Register 15 March 1877: Mary Foran, an old offender, for a similar offence was fined 10s. and was sent to prison and kept at hard labor for two calendar months for being an habitual drunkard.

The second husband Daniel FORAN was born Caherconlish, Limerick, Ireland we have to go by military records in 1826 and arrived in Australia with the 2nd Somersetshire Regiment of Foot. He deserted 3 times and each time had a 'D' tatooed under his arm FORAN had two 'D' tatoos. He lived with May Charles till he married her in Port LIncoln on the 15 March 1870. He died on the 9 January 1927 telling people he was over 100 years old. He was charged and went to gaol for two years for indecently assaulting Martha when she was 13.
notes
British Army Soldiers guilty of desertion were branded with the letter "D" (until 1871). Originally the branding was done by the drum major using needles and gun powder. In 1840 marking instruments were used and it became more like a tattoo. Daniel Foran had at least 2 such marks.

Here is a bit more info regarding Daniel Foran's assault of Martha Needle. From: the South Australian Advertiser Tues 4 April 1876 Daniel Foran, who was charged with indecently assaulting his stepdaughter, Martha Charles, aged 13 years, at Adelaide, in December, 1875, and found guilty, was next brought up for sentence. His Honor alluded to the enormity of the crime of which prisoner had been found guilty, and sentenced him to the full term allowed by the Act, viz., two years with hard labor. two years? she should have given him a dose of Rough on Rats.

According to police reports, Mrs Foran was "addicted to drink and has many convictions for drunkenness, indecent language and wilful damage recorded against her" From the SA Register 13 July 1876: Mary Foran, married, woman, was charged with leaving her son Daniel, aged 10, without means of support. Mrs Foran was ordered to be imprisoned for one calendar month with hard labour, and her two children (the other a boy of five years) are to be sent to the Industrial School till they are 12 yoars of age. From the SA Register 3 April 1875: Mary Foran, married woman, was similarly punished for a like offence and mulcted in 20s. for uttering foul words, on March 31, in Sussex-street. From the SA Register 15 March 1877: Mary Foran, an old offender, for a similar offence was fined 10s. and was sent to prison and kept at hard labor for two calendar months for being an habitual drunkard.

PUBLISHED IN The Advertiser (Adelaide, SA) Thursday 22 March 1900

Mary Foran, aged 63. who said she was a Highland Lady, was charged by M.C. Wells with being idle and disorderly. The evidence showed she was frequently drunk, and earned a small living by knitting and telling fortunes. She was sent to gaol for two months. Daniel Foran, aged 31, was charged with a similar offence, and was sent to gaol for one month.

Martha's half brother also named Daniel Foran a chronic alcoholic died in a cell at Wallaroo, South Australia on the 29 March 1902.


THE ADVERTISER 31 MARCH 1902 PRISON CELL MYSTERY.

Wallaroo, March 29.

Daniel Foran was brought into Wallaroo yesterday from Alford, and handed over to the police. He was acting strangely, and ' Dr. Fulton attended him in the police cell this morning, in the presence of the police and Mr. James Malcolm, who came to hold an enquiry.

Some time afterwards Foran died, and an inquest will be held tomorrow. Dr. Fulton at the request, of Mr. Malcolm will conduct a post-mortem examination this afternoon.

Deceased was at times a heavy drinker. He called at Mr. Mudge's Farm, Tickera, and told them he wanted to give himself up to the police. The last words he mentioned this morning were, "I did not do it."



FROM THE ADVERTISER 1st APRIL 1902 INQUEST AT WALLAROO.

Wallaroo, March 30.

On Sunday morning Mr. James Malcolm held an inquest at Wallaroo on the body of Daniel Foran. John St. Jagor Mudge, of Wiltunga, said he recognised the body as that of a man he handed over to Mr. McKee. He came to his farmhouse about 2 a.m. on Friday last. Witness said the man was a lunatic, and took care of him.'

When daylight came he started with him to Wallaroo, and meeting Mr. Wm. McKee, handed him over to him. He did not notice any sign that deceased had been drinking. William McKee deposed to taking charge of the deceased and handing him to the police at Wallaroo. He saw at once that the man was a lunatic.

Thomas Kensington Fulton, M.D., said he visited deceased on Friday and Saturday last. He made no complaint, but witness saw he was insane. He had in the cell all that he required. He was a complete wreck. Some of the wounds were on his body on Friday, and were nearly healed.

He made a post mortem examination, and found that the body was very filthy and emaciated. There were evidences of failure of the heart's action, also of alcoholism, self-abuse, and reckless living. Mounted Constable Joseph Richard Jemison said Mr. McKee had taken the deceased to the station on Friday morning. The man appeared to be insane. He locked him up on a charge of lunacy, and gave him his dinner about 1 p.m. Dr. Fulton examined him for lunacy, and witness saw him at intervals, and attended to him, giving him meals. On Saturday morning he went into the cell with some gentlemen, and found deceased in a sitting position. He was either fainting or dying. He gave him some water and brandy, but the man expired before the doctor arrived. He had every care and attention.

The jury returned the following verdict:-"The said Daniel Foran came to his death by failure of the heart's action, accelerated by self abuse and reckless living." The coroner commended the police for their great kindness to deceased while in the cell.




Below is a photograph of Martha NEEDLE nee CHARLES 1864-1894


16 comment(s), latest 3 years, 3 months ago

Martin KINSELA 1793 - 1860 Wexford to Windsor

Martin KINSELA was born in Wexford, Ireland in 1793 and that's about all I know about his beginnings.
Martin died on the 13 October 1860 at Windsor, New South Wales

In 1819 in Dublin, Ireland Martin married Ellen HENDLING born in 1794 in Wicklow, Ireland.
The couple had two children;
1.Catherine 1820-1896 and
2.Thomas born in 1822, both in Wicklow. Unfortunately I have not as yet been able to trace Thomas.

7th February 1824 Martin KINSELA, ploughman, was tried and convicted in Dublin, Ireland and sentenced to 7 years transportation. Description: Origin: Wexford, Ireland. Height 5'6", complexion fresh and freckled, brown hair and dark grey eyes.
In 1819 in Dublin, Ireland Martin married Ellen HENDLING born in 1794 in Wicklow, Ireland.

Martin, aged 32 sailed from the Cove of Cork on the "Ann and Amelia" under the command of William Ascough on the 8th September 1824.

On Muster held on 3rd January 1825 in Sydney Cove the prisoners declared that they had been well treated. The Muster records 197 men + 3 men in hospital; the arrival of the full complement of 200 convicts on embarkation in Ireland.

Martin was assigned to Lane (Windsor) as a labourer.
His Ticket of Leave was recorded on the Microfilm No. 914/5/6 Ticket of Leave Butts 1827-75.

Martin petitioned the Governor to allow his family to come to New South Wales and on the 6 August 1833 Ellen and her daughter Catherine arrived in Port Jackson from Cove of Cork on board the vessel 'Caroline' which was carrying 120 female convicts and 13 of their children. In addition, there were 14 wives and their children sailing 'free' to join their convict husbands in the colony.

By this time Martin has settled at the small village of Agnes Banks which runs alongside the Nepean River between Richmond and Penrith.
Martin and Ellen Had four more children;
3.Mary Agnes Kinsela 1834 – 1888
4.John Martin Kinsela 1835 – 1917
5.Ann Amelia Kinsela 1838 – 1917
6.Dorothy Kinsela 1839 – 1915

Martin's wife Ellen died on the 17 November 1862 at Windsor, New South Wales

1. Catherine KINSELA on the 11 October 1838 at Windsor, NSW married Samuel DEAN, born in 1811 at Whitechapel, London the eldest of seven children born to Samuel DEAN 1785 a butcher and his wife Susannah DUCK 1787 living in St.Osyth, Essex.

Samuel as a 15 year old errand boy was transported for breaking and entering. He arrived in the Colony on the 19th April 1833 on the 6th voyage of the ship "Mangles" leaving London on 14th December 1832. The ship's Master was William Carr. When Samuel DEAN was tried he was described as 4'11" and when he gained his Ticket of Leave on the 13 January 1840, he was 5'6".

Samuel And Elizabeth were farmers at Kurrajong and together had twelve children:-
George Dean 1839–1883
Susanna Dean 1841–1884
Ellen Catherine Dean 1842–1923
Thomas Dean 1844–1931
Samuel Dean 1846–1918
John Dean 1848–1910
William Dean 1851–1925
Mary Ann Dean 1853–1931
Martin Dean 1856–1946
Emma Dean 1858 – 1935
Elizabeth Dean 1860–1931
James Dean 1862–1934

Samuel and Catherine left Kurrajong about 1863 and went over the Blue Mountains by bullock dray and settled Greghamstown near Blayney with some of their children.
Catherine DEAN nee KINSELA died at Greghamstown on the 11 July 1896.
Her Husband Samuel died on the 4 November 1899.
---------------

2. Thomas KINSELA b:1822-UNKNOWN
---------------

3.Mary Agnes KINSELA married John MADDEN in Penrith in 1850. John was born in Parramatta, New South Wales in 1828, the son of Dublin born convict John MADDEN 1778-1852 and Elizabeth BIDWELL EVANS 1798-1856.
The children of Mary Agnes and John MADDEN were:-

Elizabeth Madden 1850 –
Mary A Madden 1852 –
John Malcolm Madden 1857–1931 m Charlotte KIRK
Alfred E Madden 1859-1922
Linder Agnes Madden 1866–
Frederick Martin Madden 1869–1941 m. Catherine BRADY
Mary Agnes MADDEN, nee KINSELA died at her home in Hancock Street, Balmain, Sydney on the 22 May 1888. She was buried on the 24th at Rookwood.
John MADDEN died on the 29 January 1901 and is buried with Mary Agnes at Rookwood.
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4. John Martin KINSELA was born at Agnes Banks on the 25th August 1835.
John Martin married Martha BURRELL in Sydney in 1857. Martha was born on the 17 February 1838 at Castlereagh, NSW, the daughter of John BURRELL 1798-1884 and Mary HORTON 1806-1876.
Children of John Martin KINSELA and Martha BURRELL were:-
Martha Kinsela 1859 – 1900
Mary Ann Kinsela 1859 – 1940
Ellen M Kinsela 1862 –
John Martin Kinsela 1864 – 1937
George Henry Kinsela 1866 – 1941
James Reuben Kinsela 1869 – 1955
Bernard Mark Kinsela 1872 – 1940
Dora Kinsela 1875 – 1952
William Joseph Kinsela 1877 –

Martha KINSELA, nee BURRELL died on the 10 October 1894 at Manildra, NSW and John Martin Kinsela died on the 12 November 1917 at Manildra. Both are buried at Molong General Cemetery, Cemetery Rd, Molong, New South Wales, Australia
-----------

5.Ann Amelia KINSELA was born 0n the 19 April 1838. Ann Amelia married Alfred SMITH on the 11 October 1854 at St.Matthews Catholic Church, Windsor. Alfred was born on the 13 July 1831 at Hobartville, the illegitimate son of Adelaide Eliza de la Thoreza who was born in Madrid, Spain in 1808 she married John MASTERS 1811-1869 in Richmond in 1836.
The children of Ann Amelia KINSELA and Alfred SMITH were:-

Dora Smith
Eleanor Theresa Smith 1855 – 1920
Mary Elizabeth Smith 1861 – 1945
Alfred Adolphus Smith 1864 – 1942
George M Smith 1868 –
Clarence John Smith 1871 –
Frederick Thomas Smith 1874 –
Francis Joseph Smith 1878 –
Eugenie Agnes Smith 1881 –

Ann Amelia Smith nee KINSELA died on the 6 October 1917 at North Sydney Alfred followed on the 24 December 1917
---------------
6.Dorothy KINSELA always called Dora was born in Windsor, NSW in 1839. Dora married George EATHER on the 17 April 1860 at St. Matthews Catholic Church, Windsor. George was born in Richmond in 1834 the son of Charles EATHER 1800-1891 and Ann GOUGH nee CAIN 1797-1871.

The children of George EATHER and Dora were:-

Louisa Eather 1861 – 1950 m. Arthur Frederick Carr
Arthur G Eather 1862 – 1901 m Florence Hunt
Ellen Theresa Eather (registered as Helen)1864 – 1936 m. 1. Edward Leopold Perry. (divorced) 2. Charles Baldwin
Walter Leslie Eather 1865 – 1940
James William Eather 1867 – 1949 m. Sarah Wright (divorced).
Ambrose M Eather 1869 – 1941
Emma M Eather 1872 – 1961 m. Allan McNiven
Florence Ann (Pop) Eather 1873 – 1901
George Raphael Eather 1875 – 1877
Henry V Eather 1877 – 1878
Dorothy May Eather 1879 – 1924 m. Richard Fahy
Charles George Eather 1881 – 1881
Margaret Veronica Eather 1883 - 1927 m. Simmons

George EATHER died on the 17 May 1912 at Richmond NSW and
Dorothy EATHER nee KINSELA died on the 23 August 1915 at her daughter's home 44 Despointes St, Marrickville.


Mary Balderston

Do you ever wonder about places and things in time that could have changed your life.
Going through old newspapers, I often do.

This notice below made me think about Mary Balderston Mackenzie and wonder if she was ever found.

Did she or her children see it? Were they in New South Wales? Was she still alive? Did she die rich or poor?

The Sydney Morning Herald, Friday 5 December 1873
N O T I C E.
The late DAVID BALDERSTON, of 49, Regent street, Greenock, having, by his trust, disposition, and settlement, left a LEGACY to Mrs. MARY BALDERSTON, or MACKENZIE, his Sister. Widow of WILLIAM MACKENZIE, sometime Blacksmith in Glasgow, who left Scotland many years ago, and failing her, to her children. Notice is hereby given, that the said Mrs. Mary Balderston, or Mackenzie, if alive or if dead, her children : are required to claim the said bequest, and to establish their right thereto within two years from the 24th day of February, 1873, the date of the said David Balderston's death, and that if she or they fail to do so, Mr. Balderaton's trustees will proceed to pay over the said legacy to the other residuary legatees, as directed by the said trust, disposition, and settlement, and codicils thereto.
Communications on the subject to be addressed to JOHN MACDONALD, Solicitor, Mansion House, Greenock, Scotland.

With all the clues above and with what's available online today we could probably find this family in two shakes of a lamb's tail.. unless

1 comment(s), latest 6 years ago

Mary GALE and Edward MILLER marriage

Pallot's Marriage Index for England: 1780 - 1837 Record for Mary Gale
*see photo below.married 1936 St.Pancras

In the 1851 England Census her Edward and children in March, Cambridgshire:-
Name: Mary Miller
Age: 38
Estimated Birth Year: abt 1813
Relation: Wife
Spouse's Name: Edward Miller
Gender: F (Female)
Where born: Hartford, Huntingdonshire, England

Civil parish: March
County/Island: Cambridgeshire
Country: England
Household Members: Name Age
Edward Miller 40 born at March, Cambridgshire. occupation hard to read
looks like Brewer and ??
Mary Miller 38
Charles Miller 13 March, Cambridgshire
Fred Miller 10 "
Mary E Miller 3 "
Frances Mary Miller 1 "
Sarah Dacher 24 Servant
Mary Ann Sutton 18 Servant


Matilda Sarah EATHER 1858-1941

Matilda Sarah EATHER, the sixth child and third daughter of Charles EATHER 1827-1891 and Eliza nee HOUGH 1825-1870, was born at North Richmond on 28 April 1858 and baptised at St Peter's Church, Richmond on 9 June 1858. She was still a small girl when her family moved to "Henriendi". On 23 November 1880 she married Alexander Munro COUSINS at Muswellbrook. Alexander Munro COUSINS had been born in 1853, the son of Walter COUSINS and his wife Harriet (nee MUNRO).

Walter COUSINS had been born in 1829 at Heytesbury, Wiltshire, England and had married Harriet MUNRO at Bathurst, New South Wales in 1853. Harriet was the foster/adopted daughter of Alexander MUNRO 1812-1889 and his wife Sophia, nee LOVELL 1812-1889. Her 'father', Alexander MUNRO 1812-1889 , the first Mayor of Singleton, had been born at Campbelltown in Scotland on 18 July 1814, the son of George MUNRO and Isobel MAIN. He had arrived in New South Wales in 1831 and had purchased land in Singleton and had become an hotel-keeper. In due course he had engaged in a number of pastoral investments in the north-west of the colony and became quite wealthy. He built a fine home at Singleton and named it "Ardersier House", and by the time his grandson married Matilda Sarah he was involved in grape growing and wine-making on a large scale.

During the 1880's Matilda and Alexander had four sons: Glencairn, born in 1883 at Patrick's Plains (Singleton); Royston, born 1885 at Patrick's Plains; Alexander, born 1887 at Muswellbrook; and Ardarsier, born 1889 at Singleton. Patrick's Plains was the original name for the Singleton district, so from the birthplaces of their children we can gather that Matilda and her husband resided in the Hunter Valley until at least the year 1890. The youngest of their four sons was named after his great-grandfather's home Singleton.

In their later years Matilda and Alexander resided at Narrabri. They both died there, Alexander in 1923 and Matilda in 1941. Their son Royston had died in infancy. Sons Glencairn and Ardersier both married during the 1920's.
Children from this marriage were:

Glencairn Munro COUSINS was born in 1883 in Patricks Plain, Singleton, NSW, Australia and died in 1941 in Mosman, Sydney, NSW, Australia at age 58.
Glencairn married Ruby Ada Beryl DUNSTAN in 1924 in Quirindi, NSW, Australia.

Royston C COUSINS was born in 1885 in Patricks Plain, Singleton, NSW, Australia and died in 1885 in Newtown, Sydney, NSW, Australia.

Alexander Munro COUSINS was born in 1887 in Muswellbrook, NSW, Australia and died in 1946 in Narrabri, NSW, Australia at age 59.
Alexander married Marjorie Agnes R TOWNSEND (b. 1907) in 1941 in Manly, Sydney, NSW, Australia.

Ardersier Munro COUSINS was born on 3 Oct 1889 in Singleton, NSW, Australia and died on 10 Dec 1963 at age 74.
Ardersier married Gladys Elvina DENNE (b. 1892, d. 1961) on 12 May 1921 in Sydney, NSW, Australia.

Harriet Munro's birth parents were Thomas and Catherine Phillips
V1837521 121A/1837 PHILLIPS HARRIET THOMAS CATHERINE
Thomas and Catherine Phillips had two other children Thomas 1838 and Mary A 1839 I have not researched this Phillips Family

Alexander Munro had no biological children