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the children of Edmund AMYES 1852-1900 and Elizabeth nee ICK 1820-1892 NZ

The children of Edmund Amyes b:1812 Corely,Shropshire and baptised 20 March 1812 at Corely, Shropshire. Father Thomas Amyes. Mother Frances. Source-B&M&D at FamilySearch.Org. and Elizabeth ICK b:1820 at Stoke,Shropshire, England
Now found some trees that suggest Edmund's mother (Frances) maiden name also was ICK can find no documentary proof.
Now Edmund Amyes had two sons to a woman Mary Ann before he married Elizabeth ICK they were Charles AMYES b:1839 at Norely, Herefordshire. and Edmund b:1841 at Great Whitely, Worcestershire. Mary Ann born abt 1815 in Worcestershire, died in Martley, Worcestershire.

The first child of Robert Henry, was Clara AMYES was born in Hartley. I can't find a spouse for her.

The second child, Emily AMYES b:1847 in Shrawley, Worcestershire married Edmund Marriott DAWE on the 2 September 1878 at Canterbury, NZ. They had 2 children:- Laura Elizabeth Sophia Dawe 1879 Edgar Harold Selwyn Dawe 1881

The third child Alice AMYES b:1847 at Wolverhampton, Staffordshire married Robert JOHNSTONE in NZ in 1870 The children of this marriage were:-
Robert Henery Johnstone 1873 Emily Jane Johnstone 1875
Albert Edmund Johnstone 1876 Alice Johnstone 1878
Louisa Johnstone 1879 Maude May Johnstone 1882
Robert Alexander Johnstone 1884 William John Johnstone 1887

4th child Robert Henry AMYES b:June 1850 at Enville, Staffordshire, married Cornelia DAWS 18 October 1878 the children of this marriage were:-

5th Child Alfred AMYES b:Dec.1851, Wolverhampton,Staffordshire married Elizabeth Ann HANCOCK 1853-1928 on the 26 April 1882 the children of this marriage were :-
Thomas Reginald Amyes 1883 Alfred Cuthbert Amyes 1884
Arthur Edmund Amyes 1886 Mary Olive Gwendoline Amyes 1891 Constance Sylvia Amyes 1896
Alfred died on 7 October 1941 and is buried at Timaru Cemetery, NZ

6th child, Edward Burton AMYES b:Sept 1853 Wolverhampton, Staffordshire . married Maria Oxley in 1881 in NZ. children of this marriage were:-
Henry Edward Amyes 1882 Ernest Oxley Amyes 1884
Pearl Elizabeth Amyes 1887

7th child Joseph Owen AMYES b:June 1855 Wolverhampton, Staffordshire, married twice. firstly to Amy Florence White PARSONS 1876-1917 at Lyttleton, Canterbury NZ on the 9 September 1897. His second wife was Jessie Maria MCLAY whom he married at Canterbury NZ on 2 June 1921

8th Child Selina Eliza AMYES b:June 1856 at Bridgnorth, Shropshire. married Robert Kirtley OXLEY in NZ in 1876. The children of this marriage were:-
Hubert Kirtley Oxley 1877 Robert Antony Amyes Oxley 1878
Minnie Victoria May Oxley 1880 Kenderdine Owen Sidney Oxley 1887 Juanita Violet Ann Oxley 1889
Waikouaiti Collins Preece Oxley 1893 Lulu Moss Myrtle Oxley 1895 Alma Gwendoline Hidderington Oxley 1898

9th Child Sidney Herbert AMYES b:Sept 1857 at Bridgnorth, Shropshire married Maria SMART b:1861, On the 26 March 1890 at Irwell, Canterbury NZ. Children of this marriage were:-
Harold Cyril Amyes 1891 Herbert Westby Amyes 1894 Clarence Gordon Amyes 1897 Mabel Eileen Vesta Amyes 1900

10th Child, Edmund Philemore Ick AMYES b:March 1859 at Bridgnorth, Shropshire. married Annie Jane GIBB 1866-1910 at Christchurch on the 13 April 1898. Children from this marriage were:-
Stanley Leslie Edmund Amyes 1899 1957
Albert Ernest Amyes 1904 1904
Edmund died 9 February 1943 and is buried at Bromley Cemetery,Christchurch, NZ

11th child Precilla b:January 1861 at Bridgnorth Shropshire died around the end of 1862

Edmund AMYES died on the 30 November 1900 at Irwell, Canterbury, New Zealand
His wife Elizabeth died 12 March 1892 at Hornby, Canterbury, New Zealand. Both had arrived in New Zealand with their children in 1862.

3 comment(s), latest 4 years, 8 months ago

The Christopher CORNELIUS Family from Blount Alabama

Christopher Columbus Cornelius The son of William Thomas CORNELIUS 1834-1905 and Charlotte Catherine PUTMAN 1839-1910

Christopher Columbus CORNELIUS was born 1 May 1868 in Blount, Alabama and died 11 December 1945 at Oneonta,Blount Alabama

Christopher on the 1 March 1888 in Blount, Alabama married (1.) Sarah A Ryan b:3 April 1867 in Blount and d: 6 May 1895 in Blount.Sarah was the daughter of James M Ryan 1843-1908 and Mary Ann WILEMON 1841-1945

The children of this marriage were:-
1.James Loue Cornelius 1888 1956
2.Syrena Catherine Cornelius 1891-?
3.William Myrdia Cornelius 1893 1957

Christopher on the 25 September 1895 next married (2.) Hester BARNES born 1 February 1877 in St.Clair Co., Alabama and died 26 April 1896.
Hester was the daughter of Jordan Adolphus BARNES 1851-1882 and Artemecia? MOORE 1849-1911

The couple had no children.

Christopher in 1897 next married (3.) Nancy Viola THOMPSON, Nancy was born on the 26 December 1876 in Blount Alabama and died 25 April 1948 in Oneonta, Blount Alabama. The daughter od David Crockett THOMPSON 1853-1893 and Frances MOORE 1856-1945

The children of this marriage were:-

General Grant Cornelius. 18991985
Ruthie Mary Cornelius 19011993
Beatrice 'Bertie' Cornelius 19051994
Gerthia Le Ella Cornelius 1906 ?
Odus Benjamin Cornelius 19091965
Jay Pinson Cornelius 19152007
Alton Beck Cornelius 19172004
1 Living

sources all Us Census records
1870 United States Federal Census
1880 United States Federal Census
1900 United States Federal Census
1920 United States Federal Census
1930 United States Federal Census
Alabama Marriage Collection, 1800-1969
Alabama Deaths, 1908-59

The Cobcroft-Benson Wedding

All Windsor was en fete for the marriage ceremony of Miss Olive Cobcroft,
daughter of the late Mr. R. W. Cobcroft and Mrs. Cobcroft, of "Glenroy," with Mr. Walter Benson,
of Milson's Point, Sydney,
The ceremony took place precisely at 1.30 p.m. on Tuesday of last week at
St. Matthew's Church of England, the Rev. S. G. Fielding officiating.
Needless to remark, the old church was well filled with sightseers and guests from all
parts of the district, and also from Sydney.
The bride's girl friends had been busily engaged during the morning at the church. The
wedding bell and two hearts with initials were exceedingly pretty.
As the bride entered the church on the arm of Mr. Thompson, of St. Marys (an old friend of her father's),
the choir sang "The Voice That Breathed O'er Eden." She was beautifully dressed in
white glace silk, tucked and trimmed with ivory lace, the court train being a mass of tiny frills,
veilled in spotted chiffon, very prettily shirred. The yoke was of embroidered chiffon,
and the bodice was also trimmed with the same. She wore a coronet of orange blossoms and jessamine,
and a lovely embroidered veil. Also a pearl and diamond star and pearl necklace,
and carried a shower bouquet of jonquils and hyacinths (the gifts of the bridegroom).
She was attended by three bridesmaids, Misses Ruby Pateson (cousin), Carrie Cobcroft (sister),
and little Pearl Thompson.
The two older bridesmaids were dressed in smart frocks of white silk voille over
glace silk, trimmed with Paris lace and shirrings. Their hats were of cream straw,
with lace and chiffon, and they wore gold brooches, and carried posies of daffodils,
gifts of the bridegroom.
The tiny bridesmaid wore white insertion-pleated chiffon, with a tucked hat of white silk.
Mr. Eustace Pinhey acted as best man, and Mr. Reggie Butler and Master Cecil Young as groomsmen.
During the signing of the register, Miss Carlotta Young sang "O Perfect Love."
Mrs. Eather presided at the organ, and played the wedding march.
After the ceremony, Mrs. Cobcroft held a reception at "Glenroy," where the many costly
and handsome presents (93) were admired.
The wedding breakfast was served in the billiard-room, which was beautifully draped
with flags and wattle, the table having buttercup and white flowers, with maiden hair fern.
Several toasts were honored.
Mr. Fielding proposed the "Bride and Bridegroom," and Mr. Walter Benson happily responded.
Mr. Alec Hunter proposed "The Bridesmaids," which was responded to by Mr. Eustace Pinhey.
Mr. Brinsley Hall proposed the "Parents of the Bride and Bridegroom." Mr. Thompson responded
in most feeling terms of the late Mr. R. W. Cobcroft, having known that gentleman for eighteen years
prior to his death.
The "Ladies" was proposed by Mr. G. McCauley, and Mr. Clarence Pitt responded most flatteringly.
The bride received numerous telegrams during the breakfast.
Music was indulged in, and later on the whole group of visitors was photographed
by Mr. J. H. Bloome.
Mr. and Mrs. Walter Benson later on left for their home in Sydney, the bride going away
in a pale green voille frock, the skirt being shirred ; also a black lace picture hat,
and blue parasol.

Mrs. Cobcroft, black silk striped voille, with lovely insertions and tucks,
the bodice draped with embroidered chiffon threaded with black velvet bebe ribbon,
and white chiffon front embroidered in black.
Mrs. Paterson, black canvas frock and
white trimmings, black toque with green leaves
Mrs. Seymour (bridegroom's mother),
black glace silk shirred, with cream silk and lace trimmings
Mrs. T. H. Young, white silk bodice,
and black silk skirt
Miss M. A. Cobcroft, black striped
cloth and ruched with silk front
Miss Batler, black frock, trimmed
with pale blue
Miss Cranley, black spotted silk,
cream net and white lace
Mrs. Sid. Benson, pale blue linen and
white boa
Miss Connie Batler, green cashmere,
white silk and green guipure
Miss Thompson, cream voille over
glace silk and Paris lace, black pic-
ture hat
Mrs. Fielding, black frock, with
black bonnet and pink roses
Mrs. James Martin, black silk voille,
with white front and helitrope
Mrs. Jack Dunston, black voille, and
sequin trimmings
Mrs. Harry Dunston, black frock,
with beautiful maltese collar
Mrs. Callaghan, black brocaded silk
Mrs. Brinsley Hall, black striped
voille, and white chiffon front
Mrs. Paine, green flaked voille,
green glace and oriental guipure
Mrs. Jack Tebbutt, pale grey voille,
black medallions over white silk, and beautiful black hat
Mrs. W. McQuade, black silk, and
white trimmings, and floral hat
Mrs. Lobb, black silk striped voille,
silk guipure and white chiffon
Mrs. A. D. Playfair, grey silk voille,
black and white chiffon applique,
and black hat
Miss Carlotta Young, green flaked
voille, cream crepe-di-chine, and guipure trimmmings
Miss Champley, cream voille, lace
and shirrings, and ribbon sash, beautiful black hat
Miss Dolly Young, fawn silk, Irish
poplin, pale blue crepe-di-chine,
and embroidered chiffon
Miss McCauley, green flaked muslin,
cream net, pink velvet, and a very pretty blue and pink hat
Miss Callaghan, white silk blouse,
cream voille skirt with lace, white hat and pink roses
Miss Ada Ward, pale blue voille and
guipure, and black hat
Mrs. Eather, navy blue muslin, and
white valeneiennes insertions
Miss Eather, white muslin, and pretty
floral hat
Miss Hilda Toting, cream silmas
muslin, red sash and floral hat
Miss Dulcie Hall, pale blue fancy
muslin, hat to match
Mrs. Flexman, green velvet blouse,
canvas skirt, oriental embroidery over white satn
Mrs. John Hunter, black brocaded
satin, lace motifs and pale blue crepe de chine, green bonnet
Mrs. Hotten, green cloth and guipure
Mrs. Metcalf, black satin frock, velvet
Mrs. Woodhill, black frock, white
trimmings, pretty hat
Miss Dunston, white striped voille,
black hat
Miss Ruby Dunston, silk striped white
voille and net, white hat
Miss Primrose, black matalasse cloth,
gale blue brocaded silk, and medal-
lions of chantilly lace
Mrs. Law, navy blue voille, white
silk, and lace
Miss Pidgeon, cream voille and lace,
black hat with plumes
Miss Hutchinson, pretty pale blue
voille, herring-bone and lace medal-lions in guipure
Miss Louie Berckelman, black frock
and hat, gold chain with emeralds

Mother of bride, sewing machine and house linen ;
Miss Carrie Cobcroft, silk and point lace cushion ;
Mr. and Mrs. T. H. Young (bridegroom's sister), cheque and water colorpainting of Sydney harbour ;
Mr. Thompson, cheque ;
Mr. W. J. Young and family, silver hot water kettle;
Mr. C. Gosney, silver and cut glass salad bowl ;
Mrs. Bushell, silver butter dish;
Mr. and Mrs. Burnell Jones, silver carver rests ;
Mr. E. Pinhey, unique cucumber dish;
Mrs. Brown, bread platter;
Misses Brown, glass jar ;
Mr. and Mrs. Seymour (parents of bridegroom), cheque and kitchen utensils ;
Miss Cheeseman, pair silver specimen glasses;
Mrs. Eather, salt cellars;
Miss Eather, point lace cushion ;
" Esther," silver salt cellars ;
Mr. and Mrs. Lobb, silver entree dish ;
Mr. and Mrs. B. Hall, silver salver ;
Miss Dulcie Hall, silver icing sugar bowl;
Mr. and Mrs. Paine, silver mounted bread platter;
Mr. Easy, silver cake basket;
Dr., Mrs, and Miss Callaghan, silver cake basket;
Mrs. McQuade, point lace cosy and hand painted cloth;
Miss Butler, butter and jam dish;
Mr. McCauley, ivory and silver fish carvers;
Miss McCauley, cake fork; Miss Champley, silver honey pot ;
Mr. C. M. Pitt, silver photo frame;
Mr. S. M. Pitt, silver teaspoons ;
Miss Colliss, silver salt cellars;
Mr. and Mrs. Bryant, silver card tray ;
Mr. F. Head, mirror ;
Mr. R. Simpson, mirror;
Mr. and Mrs. Beveridge, silver jam dish;
Mrs.Mullinger, pair glass vases ;
Miss A. Dunstan, specimen glasses on silver stands;
Mr. and Mrs. Playfair, afternoon tea spoons, sugar spoon, and butter knife;
Mr. Chambers, silver gong;
Appointment Branch G.P.O., silver egg cruet;
Mr and Mrs. Dunstan and family, silver ink stand and candle combination ;
Mr. and Mrs. John Hunter, pair silver backed hair brushes and comb ;
Miss Hunter, cut glass and silver topped scent bottles;
Mr. A. Hunter, handsome marble clock ;
Mr. and Mrs. O'Hehir, combination cheese and salad bowl;
Mr. and Mrs. Flexham, hall gong;
Mr. and Mrs. T. Cobcroft, celery bowl ;
Miss Robinson, cupid ornaments ;
Miss V. Robinson, silver specimen vases ;
Mr. and Mrs. Moses, silver butter dish;
Miss Moses, glass bowl :
Miss Berckelman, silver butter dish ;
the employees of the late Mr. R. W. Cobcroft, silver sugar basin ;
Mr. and Mrs. H. Dunston, afternoon cake forks;
Mr. and Mrs. Hotten, silver toast rack;
Mr. and Mrs. Woodhill, set of carvers ;
Mr. and Mrs. Metcalfe, afternoon tea forks;
Miss Gurney, Doulton vases ;
Mrs. and Miss Barnett, silver-mounted scent bottles, filled;
Miss Williams, silver book mark;
Mrs. James Martin unique silver rose bowl;
Misses Dorothy, Kathleen, and Queenie Lobb, hat pin holder, pair of d'oyleys, and cup and saucer ;
Mr. and Mrs. Ward, silver cake basket ;
Miss Ward, breakfast cruet ;
Misses Holland, silver double jam dish;
Mr. and Mrs. Harry Pateson (aunt), cutlery ;
Miss Pateson, (cousin), pearl necklet ;
Mrs. and Miss Pendergast, preserve dish;
Mr. and Mrs. F. Alderson, pair silver entree dishes ;
Miss Bushel, pair silver serviette rings and tea spoons ;
Mr. and Mrs. J. Tebbutt, silver sugar scuttle;
Mr. John Tebbutt, silver ink stand ;
Miss Jane Tebbutt, silver cake forks ;
Mr. R. and Miss Butler (cousins), silver flower pots;
Mr. and Mrs. G. Law, silver ornaments;
Miss Primrose, point lace collar ;
Mr. and Mrs. Hutchinson (aunt), silver teapot ;
Miss Ruby Pidgeon (cousin), afternoon tea spoons ;
Mrs. Davis, pair vases ;
Rev. and Mrs. Fielding, rose bowl, silver and glass;
Mr. G Podmore, silver horseshoe toast rack ;
Mr Geo. Cobcroft (uncle), pair lovely carvers ;
Mr. Harvey Cobcroft (uncle), unique silver claret jug ;
Mr. and Mrs. Daniel Hogan, handsome travelling clock;
Mr. and Mrs. Rodda, pair silver jam spoons;
Mrs. Clarke (aunt), set of pretty China jugs;
Miss Clarke (cousin), silver teapot ;
Mr. J. Ruthven, silver-mounted cut glass knife rests ;
Mr. A. Simpson, oil painting ;
Mr. P. Rigg, case preserve spoons ;
Mr. and Mrs. S. Benson (uncle and aunt), afternoon tea set ;
Mr. Butler (uncle), cheque.

The following gentlemen were present:- Messrs. Brinsley Hall, W. J. Young,
J. J. Paine, Thos. Lobb, Chambers, Podmore, Seymour, Head, Simpson, Alec. Hunter,
Ruthven, J. Tebbutt, Rev. Fielding, G. Woodhill, C. Pitt, S. Pitt, A. D. Playfair,
R. and G. Cobcroft (brothers), Harvey and George Cobcroft (uncles), Dunstan,
W. Moses, and O'Hehir.
Mr. and Mrs. Benson left by the 4.20 p.m. train amidst showers of
rice and confetti.
The bride's and bridesmaids' frocks and the trousseau were made at Mrs.
Lobb's dressmaking establishment, and reflected great credit.

Hawkesbury Herald
Windsor, NSW : 1902 - 1945
Friday 11 September 1903
Page 8
Transcription, janilye 2014


The inquest on the body of Sarah Brown, one of the
victims to the collision between the Bonnie Dundee and
Barrabool, was concluded yesterday, the jury finding a
verdict of manslaughter against the captain and mate of
the Bonnie Dundee. The inquest was commenced on the
12th instant, and that day's evidence we published, but the
following day the Coroner made an order against the pub-
lication of the evidence until the conclusion of the inquiry,
so we were unable to record the evidence from day to day.
The following are the statements of the witnesses, with the
exception of those taken on the 12th, which we have
already published :-
Dr. Owen Spencer Evans deposed that on Tuesday he was
called to a house in Darling-street, Balmain, and there saw
the dead body of a woman, about fifty years of age, which
he recognised as that of a woman known to him by the
name of Sarah Brownhe examined tho body and found
no direct marks of violence ; froth was oozing from the
mouth and nostrils, and the body generally presented the
usual appearances of death by drowning; witness was of
opinion that death had been so caused.
Thomas Crawford deposed that he was chief officer of the
lost steamship, Bonnie Dundee, a screw steamer, trading
between Sydney and the Manning River; she left
Sydney at forty minutes past 1 o'clock on Monday
afternoon, the 10th instant, her destination being
the Manning River: when the vessel got clear
of the heads her course was shaped N. by E. half
E.; the weather was fine and clear, a light breeze blowing
from the northward and eastward until tho evening, when
the wind fell and it became calm; witness took charge of
the deck at 6 o'clock; the vessel was then steering the same
course; shortly after 6 o'clock the coloured side lights and
white masthead light were lit and slipped in their usual
places; the steamer was then going at the rate of seven or
eight knots, and was about two or two and a half miles off
the land; the vessel had not a full cargo and was not deep
in the water; she answered her helm readily; about half
past 7 o'clock witness saw a masthead light, bearing about
north by east and about two and half miles distant ; at the
same time that witness saw the light, the look-out man on
the forecastle reported "a vessel a-head; the strange
vessel appeared to be steering a S. S. W. course; at this time
the moon was up a little, and the night was fine and clear,
with smooth water and little or no wind; a few minutes
after the look-out man reported the vessel, witness saw her
red light; he then ordered the man at the wheel to keep the
vessel off a point, and her course was accordingly changed
to north-east by north; the Bonnie Dundee kept on this
course until witness saw the green light of the approaching
steamer, about five minutes after he saw the red light; at
this time the captain of the Bonnie Dundee was on the
bridge on deck, witness was also on the bridge; the quarter-
deck of the Bonnie Dundee was raised about two feet above
the main deck; her deck was about 120 feet in length, and
her tonnage was 130 tons; at the time the strange steamer
was approaching, the Newcastle light was in sight about 15
miles on the port bow of the Bonnie Dundee; immediately
on seeing the green light of the approaching steamer,
witness gave the order to put the helm hard-a-starboard, and
then when the two vessels got to within half-a-length of each
other, he saw that the stranger had altered her course, so
that her red light was again showing; the captain, who
was on the bridge at the time, ordered the man at the wheel
to keep the helm as it was, and then he gave the order to
stop the engines and go full speed astern, but by that time
the stranger was close on to them on the starboard side,
and immediately afterwards struck the Bonnie Dundee
amidships; the water began to pour in on the main deck,
and the vessel heaved ovor heavily to port; witness saw
some of the men jump on board the other steamer, and he
had tho ship's hoat lowered, and took charge of it; the
Bonnie Dundee sank almost at once, foundering about four
minutes after the collision; there were four lady pas
sengers on board the Bonnie Dundee; one of them was a
Mrs. Brown, whose dead body witness viewed on Wed-
nesday, in a house in Balmain, in the presence of
the Coroner and jury; after the Bonnie Dundee had
foundered, witness's boat was pulled alongside the
strange vessel, which was then ascertained to be
the Barrabool, and witness was taken on board,
after assisting in recovering the body of Mrs. Brown;
(witness here expressed a wish to make a correction in his
former evidence: when the mast-head light of the Barra-
bool came in sight, the Bonnie Dundee was steering
N.N.E.;) at the time of the collision, the engines of the
Bonnie Dundee were going astern, but the vessel had still
a little way on, probably about two knots an hour; witness
could not say exactly at what rate the Barrabool was
going when she struck the Bonnie Dundee, but she was
going at great speed, and she struck with great force;
witness did not hear any order given on board the Barra
pool; in his opinion, after the collision, everything that
could possibly be done to save life was done by both ships.
To Mr. Rogers: Witness did not see the green light of the
Barrabool first, but the red one; when ships met in a line
the rule was to keep red light to red light, or green to
green; when the ships met end on, each ship ported her
helm. To a juror: Witness held a certificate of master in
a coasting vessel from the Marine Board; when the captain
was on deck, the charge of the ship devolved on him.
;John Alexander Stewart stated that he was master of the
BonnieDundee which left Sydney on Monday afternoon for
the Manning River: the Bonnie Dundee was 121 tons register,
an 45-horse power; her length was about 20 feet, and her
full power of steaming 8 knots an hour; witness went on
deck about 6 o'clock in the evening, and at about a quarter
to 8 he heard the officer of the watch, who was on the bridge,
sing out to the man at the wheel "hard a starboard;"
witness rushed up on the bridge and saw a vessel's green
light; he then asked the man at the wheel how his helm
was, and the reply was that it was hard a starboard, and
witness ordered the seaman to keep it so; very shortly after-
wards the green light of the approaching vessel disappeared,
and the red light became visible; on perceiving this,
witness gave orders to stop the engines, and this was done,
and about a minute afterwards the stranger having ap-
proached to within fifty yards of the Bonnie Dundee, the
engines were reversed full speed astern; very shortly after
this the stranger struck the Bonnie Dundee amid-
ships on the starboard side cutting about four feet
into the deck and smashing the starboard life-boat;
at once a number of the crew rushed to the part
of the deck where the collision took place and climbed up
the bows of the Barrabool; witness, not knowing exactly
the extent of the damage sustained by his vessel, ordered
the engines full speed ahead in order to try and reach the
beach which was about two and a-half miles distant; after
giving this order he perceived the uselessness of such an
attempt, and stopping tho engines, gave orders to lower
a boat which was promptly done; by this time
the lady passengers, four in number, were on the
bridge with witness and he, cutting away the lifo buoys
gavo them to the ladies; as soon as the boat touched the
water and got rid of the tackling, the stewardess, who had
a child in her aims, threw it into the boat, and immediately
afterwards the vessel went down with witness and the four
women on the bridge, all the others having left the ship
either in the boat or by climbing up the bows of
the Barrabool. Between three and four minutes elapsed
from the time of the collision until the vessel went down;
there were 21 hands on board all told at the time of the
collision; witness did not know, there was a vessel in sight
until he heard the mate give the order "hard a starboard;'
it was not the duty of the officer of the watch to report a
vessel in sight, to witness unless he thought there was
danger; when witness first saw the light of the Barrabool
she must have been about 300 or 400 yards distant, and the
Bonnie Dundee was going at the rate of 7 knots an hour
when the collision occurred, the Barrabool was, in witness's
opinion, going at a speed of about 3 knots.
To Mr. Sly: In witness's opinion the vessel was properly
handled after the light of the Barrabool had been sighted
the steam whistle was not used; it was not customary to use
it on a clear night like that on which the collision occurred
when the red light of the Barrabool was sighted, it was too
late to port the helm of the Bonnie Dundee, as the former
vessel was almost on top of her; at the exact time of the
collision the Bonnie Dundee was almost stationary; there
was no time to get the passengers into the boat before the
vessel went down.
To Mr. Rogers: The Bonnie Dundee was heading about
north-west when she was struck; everything was done by
the Barrabool people to save life.
To Mr. Manning: Witness did not think, under the cir
cumstances, that there was any occasion for the chief officer
(to communicate with him before allowing the ships to come
so close together if the green light of the Barrabool had
continued in sight; witness had given the Herald news
paper a report of the occurrence; - he was in bed when the
reporter came, and the chief officer was in the room; wit
ness was the only man left on board the vessel when she
went down.
Henry Dose, able-bodied seaman of tho Bonnie Dundee
joined tho vessel on Monday last; he was at the wheel at
the time of the collision with the Barrabool; he went to
the wheel about 6 o'clock, when about twelve or fifteen miles
south of Newcastle; the vessel's course was thena north
by east half east; about 7 o'clock witness was directed
by the mate to change the course to N.N.E.; the
vessel had passed Bird Island when that order was given;
the N.N.E. course was continued until the red light of a
steamer, afterwards found to be the Barrabool, was sighted
about four miles distant, and bearing about north on the
port bow; on seeing the red light, the mato gave the order
to keep the vessel off a little, and accordingly witness kept
her off another point, her course then being north-east by
north; that course was kept until the Barrabool, when
nearly abreast of the Bonnie Dundee, showed her green
light; the mate then gave the ordor, "Hard a starboard,'
and witness brought the vessel round till her head was
about north-west; the Barrabool was then almost on top of
them, and showing her red light, and immediately after
that she struck the Bonnie Dundee on the starboard side;
the captain went on the bridge about 10 minutes before the
collision took place; when the vessel waa struck, the captain
shouted, "look out for yourselves;" if the Barrabool
had not altered her course there was sufficient room for her
to have passed between the Bonnie Dundee and the land.
John Petersen, seaman of the Bonnie Dundee, was look-
out man on the forecastle when the collision occurred; he
went on the lookout about 6 o'clock; between 7 and 8
o'clock, while on the lookout, he sight a bright masthead
light, which appeared to be straight ahead; about five or
ten minutes after sighting the masthead light the red light
of the vessel came in sight; witness reported the light to
the officer in charge of the deck, and he said " All right:"
witness continued on the lookout on the forecastle, and soon
afterwards, when the vessels began to near one another the
red light disappeared and the green light came in sight
almost immediately after the green light of the approaching
vessel come in sight she ran into the Bonnie Dundee; when
first witness sighted the masthead light it was about two or
three miles off.
To Mr. Rogers: Witness did not notice whether the
Bonnie Dundee slackened speed; he could not tell that,
being forward.
To Mr. Monning: Witness did not see the red light of
the Barrabool a second time; he was looking at the Barra-
bool from the time she showed the green light until the
collision occurred; he climbed the bows of the Barrabool
after the collision.
To the Coroner: Witness heard the steam-whistle
sounded on board the Bonnie Dundee; there was so much
confusion and excitement that he could not tell whether a
bell was rung or a whistle sounded on board the Barrabool;
but he was quite certain that the whistle sounded on board
the Bonnie Dundee.
Thomas Crawford, recalled, deposed that when he first
saw the green light of the Barrabool it was on the port bow
of the Bonnie Dundee, nearly straight ahead; he lost the
red light, and a minuto or two afterwards saw the green
light; from the position the steamers were in to one
another, a slight movement of the helm would have caused
the change of lights; when he first saw the green light the
Barrabool was about her own length off; there was nothing
in the relative positions of the two vessels that would have
led witness to apprehend danger until he saw the green
light of the Barrabool.
John Charles Simmons, chief engineer of the Bonnie Dundee,
was attending, to the engines of the vessel when the collision
took place on Monday night; about a quarter to 8 o'clock
that evening he received an order by telegraph to stop, and
then "full speed astern" ; he obeyed both orders without
any delay; about a minute after he received the latter
order he felt a shock, and almost immediately afterwards
received the order "full speed ahead," quickly followed by
"stop"; after stopping the second time he went on deck,
and found the vessel sinking.
Henry Dose rocallcd: When he first saw the Barrabool
he saw the red light and the mast-head light.
To a juror: At the time he first saw the red light he did
not see the green light; when the mate saw the red light he
told witness to keep off a little, and witness then ported his
helm, which would have the effect of showing the red light
more; about a quarter of an hour elapsed between the time
witness first saw the red light, and the timo he received the
order "hard a starboard" he did not see the greenlight till
he got the order, "Hard-a-starboard;" if the Bonnie
Dundee had kept the course she was on before that order
had been given the Barrabool would have struck her on the
port bow; witness did not hear the lookout man sing out,
but that would be accounted for by the fact that he
(witness) was standing alongside the steam funnel, and the
noise from that would probably drown the shout of the
lookout man; witness got on board the Barrabool by the
Hercules Dalzell, one of the seamen of the Bonnie
Dundee, first saw the Barrabool's masthead light bearing
on the port bow about two points and about three miles
distant; he next saw the red light and some time after-
wards the green light almost abreast of the Bonnie Dundee;
as soon as he saw the green light, he heard the order given
by the mate, "Hard-a-starboard," and directly afterwards
the Barrabool ran into the Bonnie Dundee, which sank
about three minutes after the collision.
To Mr. Want: The first time that the vessel's helm was
shifted it was to starboard; witness was sure that it was
not ported before it was put to starboard; he could not say
whether the helm was not ported when the Barrabool's
red light was first sighted; it might have been at that time
without his noticing it.
To Mr. Sly: After the vessel's helm had been put to
starboard witness again saw the Barrabool's red light before
the collision.
To Mr. Manning: When the Barrabool's green light first
came in sight witness was forward on deck; if no other
change had been made from that time in the course of either
vessel, witness did not think there could have been a colli-
sion; after he first saw the green light of the Barrabool the
latter vessel appeared to change her course, and then her
green light came in sight; he heard the look-out report the
masthead light.
John Redmond Clarke deposed that he was master of the
screw steamer Barrabool trading between Melbourne,
Sydney, and Newcastle; she left Newcastle on the evening
of Monday, the 10th instant, clearing Nobby's Head at
half-past 6 ; it was a beautiful clear, moonlight night, with
a light north-easterly, wind blowing and the water
smooth; after clearing Nobby's the vessel's course
was shaped S.S.W. by compass, and that course
was kept until half-past 7, when it was changed
to S. by W. three-quarters W.; when the course was
altered the vessel had gone about ten miles; a quarter-of'
an-hour after leaving Newcastle the second mate took
charge of the deck; witness also was on deck; about twenty
minutes to 8 o'clock a masthead light was reported; witness
looked over the side and saw a masthead light about two
points on the starboard bow, and about 3 miles distant; a
few minutes afterwards he sighted a green light
he then spoke to the mate asking him if that
was not a green light the stranger was showing, the
mate replied in the affirmative, and witness then ordered the
man at the wheel to starboard the helm a little; the order
was hardly given, and was not executed, when the mate
drew witness's attention to the fact that the approaching
steamer (which afterwards turned out to be the Bonnie
Dundee) was showing her red light; witness then counter
maned his former order to the steersman, and gave the
order " hard-a-port," which was immediately obeyed
the light of the Bonnie Dundee, now about half
a mile distant, disappeared across the Barrabool's
bow; witness telegraphed to engine-room, "Stop her," and
directly afterwards, from the position of the Bonnie Dun
dee's light, thinking that they were going all clear, he was
about to telegraph to the engine-room to start her ahead
again, when suddenly the green light of the Bonnie Dundee
came in sight, and all three lights were in sight, revealing
that the vessel was bearing down right upon the Barrabool
witness instantly telegraphed the engineer, "Full speed
astern," and proceeded to blow the steam-whistle, several
times, at the same time the red light of the Bonnie Dundee
went out of sight, showing that she was bearing up towards
the bow of the Barrabool; immediately afterwards the
vessels collided, and witness gave orders to lower a boat
which was done without any delay; the boat was manned
by the chief mate and two seamen, who were instructed to
pull with all speed to the Bonnie Dundee, then in a sinking
condition on the starboard bow of tho Barrabool; witness
ordered the engines to go slow ahead, and when
his vessel had approached to within fifty yards
of the Bonnie Dundee, the latter went down; the
Barrabool was then stopped among the wreckage, and three
life buoys and some cork fenders were thrown overboard in
case there should be any person in the water; the boat of
the Barrabool, accompanied by that of the Bonnie Dundee
soon came alongside, and witness shouted out to them to
know if all hands were saved; receiving no answer
he went on the main deck, and hearing someone say there
had been four women on board, looked over the rail and in
quired if there were any women in the boats; the reply
was "no," and witness ordered the chief mate to go
back and see if he could find any one floating; the Bonnie
Dnndee's boat was also ordered away for the same purpose;
soon the chief mate of the Barrabool returned with a lady in
his boat; she was got on board, and though she appeared
to be quite inanimate, efforts were made to endeavour to
restore animation for more than an hour and a half, but
without avail: after bringing the lady on board, the boat
returned to search among the wreckage, but no one else was
found and witness asked Captain Stuart if he thought there
was any use staying longer; Captain Stuart replied that he
thought everv thing possible had been done, and after the
damage which had been done to the Barrabool's bow had
been repaired as well as could be under the circumstances,
the vessel proceeded on her course to Sydney; about a
hour and a half elapsed between the foundering of the
Bonnie Dundee and Barrabool's resuming her voyage to
Sydney. To Mr. Want: The look-out man of the Barra
bool was on the top-gallant forecastle, and to prevent any
mistake being made by the look-out man, the signals were
given by bells; there was nothing to interrupt witness's
view-nor that of the mate, the look-out man, or the man at
the wheel; there were passengers on board the Barrabool,
two of them-Mr. and Mrs. Lovell-were on the saloon
deck; when two bells, the signal of the Bonnie Dundee
coming in sight, were struck, Mr. Lovell asked
if that was 8 o'clock, and witness replied
"No, it is a light on the starboard bow;"
when first the Bonnie Dundee was sighted, if each
vessel had kept on her course they would have cleared each
other by a good half-mile; witness gave the order "star-
board a little to clear them a little more, but before the
order was obeyed the red light of the Bonnie Dundee came
in sight (here the models were again brought into use, and
at this time and throughout the remainder of his evidence
the witness explained the positions and manoeuvres of the
two vessels by their aid); seeing that the red light of the
Bonnie Dundee was on the starboard bow of the Barrabool
it was the duty of the latter to keep clear, and accordingly
witness had the helm put to port aud stopped the engine
and supposing they had gone on as they were then, they
would have passed each other quite clear; the green light
of the Bonnie Dundee, however, then came into sight; the
evidence of some of those on board the Bonnie Dundee had
stated that the green light of the Barrabool was seen
by them after they sighted her red light, but that was
quite impossible, as the Barrabool was on her port
helm after it was first ported; it was not true that after
showing her red light to the Bonnie Dundee the Barrabool
came across and showed her red light; when the
vessels collided, the Barrabool's speed was under a mile an
hour; the Bonnie Dundee was going about five or seven
miles; if the Bonnie Dundee had stopped her engines
the same time as the Barabool did there would have been
no collision, as the two vessels would not have reached one
another; the damage to the Barrabool was on the port bow,
about 20 inches from the stern, and was caused by the
Bonnie Dundee tearing across the Barrabool's bow; if the
Bonnie Dundee had not been going so fast she would not
have made the hole in the Barrabool's bow that she did.
To Mr. Sly: The Bonnie Dundee was about 3 miles
distant when witness first sighted her masthead light, and
about a mile distant when her green light was first seen
witness would positively swear that, at the time of the
collision, the Bonnie Dundee was going at a rate of about 5
knots an hour, and the Barrabool was going at a rate of less
than one mile an hour; immediately after the collision the
Barrabool had stern way on; when first the red light of the
Bonnie Dundee was sighted the vessels were about three
quarters of a mile apart.
To Mr. Manning: The masthead lights of each vessel
would probably have been sighted by the other at about the
same time, but the Bonnie Dundee would most likely have
sighted the side lights of the Barrabool before her own
lights could have been visible to the latter, as the moon was
rising and was putting the Bonnie Dundee's lights in the
shade; witness had heard the examination of the mate
the Bonnie Dundee; he (the mate of the Bonnie Dundee)
did port his helm in the first instance, and then after showing
a red light put his helm hard-a-starboard, and as a
matter of fact the helm of the Barrabool was first put a little
a-starboard and then hard-a-port; if the mate of the Bonnie
Dundee was right in saying that when he first sighted the
Barrabool, she was two miles on his port bow, that would
put the Bonnie Dundee about a mile further out to sea than
she really was; the Barrabool was about three miles out
from land when she first sighted the Bonnie Dundee.
To a juror: The Barrabool's full speed is ten knots an
hour; after giving the order to stop, if the engines were
reversed full speed astern, she would go about one-third of a
mile before she stopped altogether; there was a rule of the
road that when ships are meeting end-on, all lights being
in view, each vessel must port; that was the only case in
which that rule held good; when witness gave the order to
stop the engines immediately before the collision, it was
not, he considered, an error of judgment; if he had not
dono so the Bonnie Dundee would have run into the Barra-
bool; when witness gave the order "stop" the Barrabool
was going about 10 knots an hour; he did not think he
could have got ahead of the Bonnio Dundee by going full
speed ahead; when the Bonnie Dundee's red right was on
the Barrabool's starboard bow, it was the Barrabool's duty
to give way, and the Bonnie Dundee should have held on
her course.
Arthur Nelson Pidcock, second mate of the Barrabool,
with a master's certificate, was in charge of the deck when
the masthead light of the Bonnie Dundee was reported;
on looking at the light he saw it was bearing two
points on the starboard bow, and about 4 miles distant;
about 10 minutes after sighting the masthead light
of the Bonnie Dundee, the green light became visible ;
Captain Clarke who was on deck asked what lights
the steamer was showing, and witness replied, " Green, but
burning indistinctly ;" the captain replied, "Yes, oh yes,"
and then gave orders to the man at the wheel to starboard a
little; this order was scarcely given before the Bonnie
Dundee showed a red light; witness mentioned the fact to
the captain, who immediately had the helm put hard-a-port,
and gave the ordor to stop the engines; very soon after the
engines had been stopped the Bonnie Dundee showed both
her lights, but the red light soon went out of sight and the
green light showed close on the starboard bow of the Barrabool,
which at that time was going very slowly; shortly
afterwards the two vessels collided; tho Bonnie Dundee
appeared to have a pretty good speed; when the collision
took place the Barrabool's boat was lowered and sent away
to render assistance; after being absent someo time, the
boat returned with the body of the deceased Mrs. Brown;
after hanging about the scene of the wreck for over an hour
the vessel continuod on her course to Sydney.
To Mr. Waut: From the position of the Bonnie
Dundee when first she was sighted, it would have
been impossible for her to have seen the red light of the
Barrabool, and if the mate of the Bonnie Dundee had stated
that the gresn light of the Barrabool was the one first
sighted he would be correct; witness had read a report in
the Echo of the 11th instant, with reference to the mate's
statement about his seeing the green light of the Barrabool
first-that was correct; if the Bonnie Dundee had not
ported, the two vessels would have passed one another about
half a mile distant; t was only the Bonnie Dundee star-
boarding after her porting that brought her across the bows
of the Barrabool; it was untrue that the Barrabool after
porting her helm ever showed her green light to the Bonnie
Dundee; the Barrabool had not more than half a knot way
when the collision took place; the Bonnie Dundee appeared
to be going over four knots.
To Mr. Sly: Witness did not hear the Bonnie Dundee
blow her whistle at all; when first the green light of the
Bonnie Dundee came in sight the two vessels were about a
mile distant; the engines of the Barrabool were stopped on
the red light of the Bonnie Dundee becoming visible; witness
was of opinion that, according to the regulations of the
Navigation Act, the Bonnie Dundee was the vessel which
should have kept on her course while the Barrabool was the
giving way vessel, consequently the Bonnie Dundee should
not have altered her course.
Thomas Crawford recalled, in answer to a question as to
whether he had given a report of the occurrence to a reporter
of the Echo newspaper, stated that some persons had come
to him two or three hours after he arrived in Sydney,
and he gave them some account about the ships; he did not
know what he said to them; he could not say whether they
told him they were reporters for a paper; he could not say,
so far as he was aware of, that he gave the statement to the
reporters that appeared in the Echo of March 11th, he never
saw any account of the occurrence in the Echo.
To Mr. Sly: Witness was in the Caledonian Hotel when
they came and asked him some questions; he gave them no
written account ; it is not a fact that he first saw the green
light; he could not possibly have said so to a reporter ; he
did not say so; he could not say whether an account
appeared in the Evening News about the same time; ho did
not take notice of any newspapers; he was quite sober when
he made the statement in the Caledonian Hotel.
John Tucker, able seaman on board the Barrabool, went
to the wheel a few minutes after clearing Nobby's Head;
about an hour afterwards witness saw the mast-head light
of a steamer on the starboard bow, which had been signalled
by the lookout; she appeared to be running an opposite
course to that of the Barrabool; some time afterwards the
mate reported the green light of the steamer, and the
captain gave tho order, "starboard a little" ; witness was
just obeying that order when the mate reported a red light,
and the captain ordered the helm "hard a-port"; witness
obeyed the order, and, as he did so, saw the red light of the
Bonnie Dundee on the starboard bow; when the Barrabool
came round in answer to her helm, both the side-lights of
the Bonnie Dundee came in sight, and the red one disap-
pearing, she crossed the bows of the Barrabool; the captain
ordered the engines to stop, and a minute after gave "full
speed astern "; before the Barrabool had completely lost her
way, she struck the Bonnie Dundee amidships.
To Mr. Want: The helm was not put astarhoard at all
after it was ported; if any of the witnesses on board the
Bonnie Dundee had sworn that they saw the green light
of the Barrabool after having seen the red light, they
would have stated what was untrue; witness thought
that the Bonnie Dundee had more way on at the
time of the collision, but he would not swear to it;
it was about two or three minutes from the time witness
first saw the red light of the Bonnie Dundee until he saw
both lights, and about the same time between when the two
lights first showed and the collision.
William Lovell deposed that he was a passenger on
board the Barrabool at the time of the collision; he was on
the saloon deck of the Barrabool when the Bonnio Dundee
was first sighted, and on hearing the bell struck asked
if it were 8 o'clock, but the captain replied that it
was a vessel on the starboard bow; tho captain then
went to the starboard side of the vessel and look-
ing over said, "she is showing a green light;"
and then gave the order to the steersman "starboard a
little;" shortly after the mate on the bridge reported that
the vessel was showing a red light in place of the green,
and Captain Clarke gave the order "hard a port;" a few
minutes subsequently someone said that the vesssel was
showing a green light again, and the captain said "where
is she coming to ?" a few minutes after that the collision
took place; witness saw the white mast-head light of the
Bonnie Dundee when it was reported, and very soon after-
wards saw the green light; it was immediately after the
Bonnie Dundee showed the red light that the Barrabool's
engines were stopped.
To Mr. Want: He never heard any order given to star-
board the helm after the order to port it had been given ;
when he first saw the light of the Bonnio Dundee he had
no fear of a collision; there was no confusion on board the
Barrabool; Captain Clarke was very calm and cool, and
appeared to be exercising his judgment calmly.
Charles Wilson, able seaman on board the Barrabool, was
on the look out when the collision occurred; he saw the
masthead light of the Bonnie Dundee and reported it by
striking two bells, which signalled "a light on the starboard
bow;" when he first sighted it the light was two points
on the starboard bow and about four or five miles
distant; the vessel appeared to be steering in an
opposite direction to the course of the Barrabool;
about seven minutes after the masthead light was
sighted the green light became visible; several minutes
after the green light first came in sight, it disappeared, and
the red light took its place; Captain Clarke then sang out
"Hard a-port," and the Barrabool went round until the
red light of the Bonnie Dundee was on her port bow;
directly after that, both the Bonnie Dundee's side-lights
became visible, and then the red light disappeared, and the
Bonnie Dundee crossing the bows of the Barrabool, was
struck amidships, and shortly afterwards sank.
To Mr. Sly: The Barrabool was forging ahead very
slowly when the two vessels collided.
To the Foreman: The Bonnie Dundeo must have been
going at a rate of 4 or 6 knots an hour when she was crossing
the bows of the Barrabool.
Thomas Ashford, an able seaman belonging to the Barrabool,
was on the after part of the saloon deck when the
Bonnie Dundee's light was signalled; directly after the
light was signalled witness looked at the time and saw it
was twenty minutes to 8; shortly afterwards the officer on
the bridge reported a red light, and then witness went to the
assistance of the man at the wheel, and caught sight of the
red light bearing about two points on the starboard bow; as
soon as the mate announced the red light the captain gave
the order "hard-a-port;" the helm was put hard-a-port
and kept so until the collision took place.
To the Foreman: The Bonnie Dundee seemed to be going
very fast when she crossed the Barrabool's bows.
Isaac Wagland, second engineer of the Barrabool, was in
charge of the engine room when the collision occurred,
the chief engineer being off duty at that time; some time
between half-past seven and a quarter to 8 o'clock the
telegraph signalled "slow"; witness obeyed the order,
and then the telegraph signalled "stop" and "full speed
astern " in one order; the engines were at once stopped and
reversed, and about two minutes afterwards there was a
shock as if the vessel had struck something.
To Mr. Sly: If the Barrabool were going full speed
ahead, and the engines were stopped and reversed, it would
take two or three minutes before tho steamer would be
William H. Dick, a reporter on the staff of the Sydney
Morning Herald, remembered hearing a rumour on the
night after the 10th instant that the Barrabool and Bonnie
Dundee steamers had collided; and in consequence of this
rumour he made inquiries to ascertain the truth of the
report; he saw the man before the Court, who
gave his name as Thomas Crawford; he stated
that be was the chief officer of the Bonnie Dundee;
the man giving his name as John Stewart was
present when witness interviewed the chief officer;
they were in the bedroom of an hotel, and Stewart,
who stated that he was the master of the Bonnie
Dundee, was lying on a bed; witness got the mate's state-
ment, which was to the effect that he was in charge of the
vessel at the time of the collision, that he saw the green
light about two miles ahead, and that he steered his vessel
so os to show his own green light: that suddenly he saw a
red light exhibited, and that soon after that Bonnie
Dundee was 'struck amidships on the starboard, the
captain was present when the mate made the statement
and did not contradict it in any way.
To Mr. Want: Witness reduced the mate's ?? to
writing; he went back a second time (after he to??
of the mate's statement), in company with the ??
reporter, in order that he might heur the stat ??
had a greater knowledge of nautical matters ??
was possessed of; the same statement was made and
time as had been on the first occasion; which he took
down the statement in shorthand and t?? it
into writing; he saw it afterwards in print it
was correct; the fifth paragraph after the ??
of the occurrence in the Echo of March ll, citing
" The chief officer of the Bonnie Dundee states, ??
ing with the words " escaping the suction,' was ??
ment made to witness by the mate; the same ??
wards appeared in the Herald of March 12th; ??
never asked to contradict these statements, nor ever
heard of any complaints about their being incorrect took
down the mate's statement in shorthand; ??
sitting in the same room with the captain; ??
very little about shipping matters, and the ??
to him what the three lights were.
To Mr. Manning: The mate did not appear under
the influence of liquor.
Thomas Crawford recalled : Had been ??
Sydney and the north for about 10 years; he ??
course steered by the Bonnie Dundee ??
particular occasion; it was the course generally used
in fine weather; the Bonnie Dundee was bound for the
Manning River, and had gone the same trips ??
18 months: when witness first saw the Barrabool ??
light she was about 225 yards off ; if he had seen ??
light on his port bow it would have been his duty ??
on his course, but he did not see her green light ??
bow; he saw it almost ahead; the Barrabool ??
been 1 or 2 points on the port bow when she ??
her red light; sometimes a couple of minutes ??
tween the time of losing one light and sighting the other;
it was a fact that the losing of one light necess??
immediate picking up of the other; when the ??
was first sighted it was ahead, but was if anything ??
on the port bow; as soon as witness saw the green he
put his helm to starboard; Witness had had no ??
the captain; there was no confusion or quarrelling on board
the Bonnie Dundee before she left the wharf; as ??
captain had heard the order 'hard-a-starboard," ??
up on the bridge and took charge; witness never ??
sounding the steam whistle; if he had not given ??
"hard-a-starboard," he believed the Barrabool would have
run into them on the port side.
John Alexander Stewart, recalled, stated that he had
been trading to the north for about twelve ??
course the Bonnie Dundee steered was, under the circum
stances, the proper course to steer; had heard ??
the Herald reporter, give his evidence; was present on the
11th instant when the chief officer gave him an account of
the collision; the report in the Echo of the llth instant
was not a correct report of what the mate told the reporter;
the orders that witness gave-"Stop her," " ??
astern "-wereo given, the one immediately after that.
To. Mr. Manning: When the reporter came witness was
too unwell to notice what took place; he did not ??
the mate said to the reporter, but he knew that he ??
say what afterwards appeared in the Echo.
To Mr. Want: There was no break between the orders,
"Stop her" and "Full speed astern;" witness ??
ously sworn there was a break of a minute between;
he did not consider that when the order "hard-a-starboard"
was given it was a serious thing, although he had previously
stated it was; there was no great probability ??
when the helm was starboarded; there might have been a
little danger.
To Mr. Want: The Bonnie Dundee was steering ??
close in to shore to avoid currents; she kept within ??
or three miles from the coast, and went from point ??
it was the general practice for coasting steamers going
south to go outside steamers going north; if witness ??
miles from Bird Island, and had the Barrabool been ??
out he would stand a pretty good chance of seeing ??
The foregoing being all the evidence that was ??
anent the collision, the Coronor stated that previous ??
jury retiring to consider their verdict they would be
addressed by Mr. Manning, the legal rcpresentative of the
Crown. It had hitherto been his custom not to permit any
lawyers to address the jury, but in the present case
would follow the precedent offered lately in England ??
inquest on the body of the victims in the collision of Her
Majesty's yacht Misletoe, when the Crown Prosecutor
summed up and addressed the jury. Mr Manning accordingly
proceeded to review the evidencee,
and summed up greatly against the officers of
the Bonnie Dundee. He remarked that, in that
place, the jury were to consider whether the collision was
the fault of the Bonnie Dundee or the Barrabool. Accord-
ing to the evidence of the officers and crew of the Barra-
bool, the Bonnie Dundee was entirely to blame for the
occurrence, for she had twice offended against the regula-
tions of the Navigation Act in not holding to her course
when her green light, was to the Barrubool's green light,
and, subsequently, when red light was to red light,
of which positions she should have hold on her course. He
also pointed out that even by the showing of the Bonnie
Dundee's own men, she was in fault in crossing the Barra-
bool's course the second time. If the jury took the view
that the Bonnie Dundee committed a breach of the regula-
tions, they must further decide who was actually to
blame for the act, and return a verdict accordingly.
The jury were then left to consider their verdict
and after a deliberation of an hour and a half
returned the following verdict:-" We find that
the deceased, Sarah Brown, came by her death
on the night of the 10th instant by drowning, the result of a
collision between the steamer Bonnie Dundee and
the steamer Barrabool, in the former of which she was at the
time a passenger, which collision was brought about by the
gross negligence of the first mate of the Bonnie Dundee,
Thomas Crawford, and Captain John Alexander Stewart
of the same vessel; and we consequently return a verdict of
manslaughter against the said Thomas Crawford and John
Alexander Stewart." The Coroner accordingly proceeded
to commit the prisoners to take their trial at the next sittings
of the Central Criminal Court. Bail was allotted to
each prisoner in 300, with two sureties of 150 each.
Before the Court broke up the Coroner, in the warmest
terms, expresscd his thanks to the jury for the ??
careful, and intelligent way in which they had investigated
the case. He entirely concurred with them in their verdict
and he had much pleasure in stating his conviction that
was as good and true a verdict as could have been given
The Sydney Morning Herald
Saturday 22 March 1879
Page 6
Transcription, janilye
NOTE: This newspaper article is badly creased down the
right hand side; for the parts
unreadable I've used question marks.
Mrs. Sarah Brown wife of David Brown of Balmain was 53 and
came from County Derry,

Below is The steamer Barrabool in Duke's Dock after the collision.

The distortion of Irish Surnames

In 1957 Edward MacLysaght published in the Irish Academic Press a series of papers entitled Irish Families (Their Names, Arms & Origins)
As a matter of interest to historians and genealogists I've extracted this part of his publication dealing with the distortion of Irish surnames.

Even in Ireland, where there is a genealogical tradition, it is quite common for people to be uncertain of their ancestry for more than three generations. Consequently a man in these circumstances whose name is, say, Collins or Rogers, to take two common in Ireland, cannot assert with certainty that he bears a native Irish surname. However, if he is a Collins, born and living in Dublin perhaps, whose people came from West Cork the odds are very strongly in favour of the true name being the Gaelic Ó Coileáin. Smith, the commonest surname in England, comes high up in the Irish list - fifth in that given by Matheson. There can be no doubt that many of our Irish Smiths are the descendants of English settlers and traders, but it is equally probable that at least eighty per cent of the Smiths of County Cavan are of native stock, being MacGowans or O'Gowans who, under pressure of alien legislation or social influence, accepted the translated form and have used it ever since.

Many of the dual origin surnames are translations, like Smith and Oaks, or more often pseudo-translations such as Kidney and Bird. Some indeed of the latter are very far-fetched, even ridiculous, as for example the grotesque transformation of Mac Giolla Eoin into Monday from a fancied resemblance of the last part of that name to the Irish word "Luain".

So far we have been considering English names which in Ireland may conceal those of genuine Gaelic families. In a smaller number the converse obtains. Such names as Moore, Hart, Hayes and Boyle, which are, of course, genuinely Irish and are often regarded as exclusively so, are also found as indigenous surnames in England. So here again there is no certainty in the absence of an authentic pedigree, or at least of a well-founded tradition, as a guide. It has been pointed out for example that Guinness, which stout has made world-famous as an Irish name, and is in that case probably rightly derived from Magennis or MacGuinness of County Down, occurs in English records of some centuries ago in the rural county of Devonshire.

Probably the most reliable and scholarly work on English surnames is that of Professor Weekley. Yet he includes in his lists, without any mention of Ireland, several like Geary, Garvin, Grennan and Quigley: typical Gaelic-Irish surnames which, while they are no doubt occasionally found with the French or Anglo-Saxon background he indicates, when met in England at the present time are much more likely to have been brought there by Irish immigrants.

Apart from these surnames of possible English origin there are many indisputably Irish surnames not indigenous in England which assumed in their anglicised form a completely English appearance. What, for example, could be more English in appearance than Gleeson, Buggy, Cashman, Halfpenny and Doolady, to cite only a few examples. All of these are genuine Gaelic surnames and surprisingly numerous.

Once again the converse of this is also true. No one unacquainted with the subject would doubt that such very Irish sounding names as Gernon, Laffan, Gogan, Henebry and Tallon, and even O'Dell, all quite common in Ireland, are Irish, yet none of them is of Gaelic origin. This list, however, is not so long.

Some Gaelic surnames in their modern anglicised form have acquired an equally un-Irish guise but have a foreign rather than an English look. Coen, a variant of Coyne, and Levy, a common abbreviation of Dunlevy, suggest the Jew; I know a Lomasney who is always refuting the erroneous belief that he is of French origin, and I expect Lavelles and even Delargys and Delahuntys may have the same difficulty; Hederman and Hessian have rather a German sound, while Nihil, well known in County Clare, and Melia, synonym of O'Malley, might be Latin words. Most of this class, however, are occasional variants, such as Gna and Gina for (Mac) Kenna or Manasses for Mannix, or rare surnames like Schaill, Thulis and Gaussen.

In some cases the anglicisation process has had very unfortunate results. The beautiful name Mac Giolla Íosa, for example, usually rendered as MacAleese, takes the form MacLice in some places. The picturesque and heroic Ó Dathlaoich in County Galway ridiculously becomes Dolly and the equally distinguished Sealbhaigh which is anglicised Shelly in its homeland (Co. Cork) is Shallow in Co. Tipperary. Schoolboys of these families, unless they use the Irish form, need no nicknames; Grimes, too, is a miserable substitute for its Gaelic counterpart Greachain, which has also Grehan as a more euphonious anglicised form.

These corruptions, of course, are due to the influence of the English language, the spread of which in Ireland was contemporary with the subjection and eclipse of the old Catho1ic Irish nation: names of tenants were inscribed in rentals by strangers brought in to act as clerks, who attempted to write phonetically what they regarded as outlandish names; in the same way Gaelic speaking litigants, deponents and witnesses in law cases were arbitrarily dubbed this and that at the whim of the recording official. It was not until the nineteenth century that uniformity in the spelling of names began to be observed, but the seventeenth century was the period during which our surnames assumed approximately the forms ordinarily in use in Ireland today.

The corruptions we have noticed above have been cited as examples of the tendency to give Irish names an English appearance. Most of them have at least some phonetic resemblance to their originals or else were frankly translations or supposed translations. There is, too, a large class of Irish surnames anglicised in a way which makes them quite unrecognisable. Often these distortions are aesthetically most unpleasing, as Mucklebreed for Mac Giolla Bride and Gerty for Mag Oireachtaigh.

Citing only official registrations with the Registrar-General, Matheson notes a particularly flagrant example, viz. a family of O'Hagans in County Dublin who have actually become Hog, which in the absence of his testimony one would naturally assume to be simply the well-known English surname of Hogg (O'Hagan is unlucky in this respect. According to Woulfe the very English and plebian-sounding Huggins is one of its synonyms in Ireland). Rather less cacophonous is Ratty for Hanratty. Forker for Farquhar (in County Down) may perhaps be regarded as comparable to the contraction in England of Cholmondeley to Chumley and Featherstonehaugh to Fanshawe in less aristocratic circles, these of course being phonetic spellings. The most curious instances of phonetic abbreviation recorded by Matheson is the birth registration of a Dalzell child at Dundalk "tout court" as "D.L.", that being the peculiar pronunciation of Dalzell in its native Scotland. The commonest of all Irish surnames, though not aesthetically objectionable, is a good illustration of decadence, for Murphy is a far cry from MacMurrough and 0'Morchoe, as is Dunphy from its synonym O'Donoghue. My own name, which I am glad to say is a true Dalcassian (Co. Clare) one, is an excellent example of the distortion we are considering, for no one would readily connect MacLysaght, especially when shorn of its Mac, with Mac Giolla Iasachta. The seventeenth century officials did at first render it as McGillysaghta, etc. in documents in English, but this proved too much of a mouthful to last long.

This name is also an example of that fairly numerous class in which the initial letter (excluding the prefix) is misleading. The L of Lysaght and of Leland derives from the gioLLa. The origina1 L of Lally on the other hand is to be found in the MaoL of the original. In the same way the C of Clancy, the K of Keogh and the Q of Quaid are from MaC; the G of Gaynor and Gorevan from the MaC prefix (Mag is a form of Mac frequently used with names beginning with a vowel), while the Il of Ilhenny can again be traced to the gIOLla of the Gae1ic form.

Another tendency in the anglicisation of Irish surnames is the absorption of uncommon names in common ones. Blowick, for example, tends to become Blake, Kildellan is merged in Connellan, Cormican in McCormick, Sullahan in Sullivan, Kehilly and Kilkelly in Ke1ly, and so on. Certain well-known family names such as Courtney, Conway and Leonard have gobbled up in the course of time, not one, but half a dozen or more minor ones. We must presume that this was a result of the general Gaelic depression, part of the same indifference and hopelessness which acquiesced in the lopping off of the Mac and O from so many old Irish surnames.

I have said that the mutilation and corruption of Irish surnames took place in the seventeenth and to a lesser extent in the eighteenth centuries. It must be admitted, however, that even today, fifty years after the foundation of the Gaelic League, the gradual re-gaelicization of names resulting from its influence is to some extent counterbalanced by the opposing forces of de-nationalisation. This is found more in pronunciation than in spelling: though even in this official registration age pronunciation does tend to affect spelling. A notable example of what I have in mind is the internal H. The English seem unable to cope with this sound which presents no difficulty to an Irishman: for Mahony they say Mah-ney (or, as they would write it, Marney, since the internal R is also dead in England). Now Dublin and suburbs with over 650,000 people contains more than one fifth of the population of the Republic and one seventh of the whole country; and Dublin for a11 its genuine political nationalism is in most ways more English, or perhaps it would be more accurate to say, more cosmopolitan, in character. The contrast between Connacht and Dublin is as marked as that between Dublin and England. Of course the good old Dublin accent has lost none of its distinctive raciness, but it is only to be heard in the mouths of one section of the citizens. The gradual disappearance of regional Irish accents is much to be deplored: it is due to a number of causes including the B.B.C., the cinema, the much increased intercourse with England resulting from the recent mass emigration to that country, and perhaps I may add the "refinement" aimed at in convent education. However, I must not allow myself to go off at a tangent on this interesting topic, which is irrelevant except in so far as it is concerned with the pronunciation of surnames.

In America the distortion of the name Mahony takes a different form, for it is often mispronounced Ma-honey, just as the wrong vowel is stressed in Carmody and Connell. In Ireland one does not hear Ma(r)ney for Mahony or Clossey for Cloghessy, but boggling at the internal H has come to Dublin now. I know a family in Dublin named Fihilly: the parents insist quite rightly that there are three syllables in the word, but the younger generation are content to answer to "Feeley" and so pronounce the name themselves; Gallaghers in Sydney, after a long losing battle with Australian philistinism, have had to accept "Gallagger" with the best grace they could. This, however, may be partly due to the ocular influence of the middle G. There is another difference in these two cases, besides the fact that the Fihilly deterioration took place in Ireland itself: Feeley has actually become a recognised way of spelling that name. Similarly there are Dawneys who were originally Doheny.

The surnames Hehir and Cahir in Thomond are still dissyllables, but the latter when denoting the town of that name in Co. Tipperary has become immutably "Care". This again prompts a long digression on place names: but that subject, so full of pitfalls for all but the most learned, would be out of place in this text.

The internal H is not the only stumbling-block for English people and anglicised Dubliners. They pronounce Linnane as Linnayne and Kissane Kissayne. Our "ane" sound, which is intermediate between the English "Anne" and "aunt", is not heard in English speech. Similarly O'Dea is called O'Dee. These emasculated pronunciations sound like affectation to people who come from the places where those names originated and still abound. This is not to deny that there is actually a name O'Dee, but that is not a Clare name, as O'Dea emphatically is.

Some English inspired innovations fortunately do not last. During the first World War a neighbour of mine in Co. Clare named Minogue joined the British army; in due course he returned as Capt. Minogue - Captain "Minnow-gew", if you please, not "Minnoge"! He may have got the idea from the mistake of a fellow soldier but he adopted the monstrosity and even insisted on it.

One of the most irritating of the examples of capitulation to English influence is the adoption of the essentially Saxon termination "ham" for the Irish "ahan", "ann", etc. This is not confined to surnames: the Gaelic word "banbh", called bonnive in English in the less anglicised counties, is bonham in most places. Rathfarnham, recte Rathfarnnan, is the best known place so anglicised; while on our own ground we have the very English-looking Markham, a Clare surname of which the normal version should be, and indeed formerly was, Markahan (cf. the place name Ballymarkahan in Co. Clare).

In the same way, but less noticeably, the final S so dear to English tongues degaelicizes Higgin(s), while the addition of an unnecessary D has somewhat the same effect on Boland. This D seems to have been a matter of chance for Noland is almost as rare as Bolan.

Quite often the anglicisation of a Gaelic surname resulted in the adoption in English, whether consciously or not, of one which carried a certain social cachet like D'Evelyn for the usual Devlin, Molyneux for Mulligan or Delacour for Dilloughery. Montague for MacTadgh or Mactague probably arose in the same way, the sound Montag at some period giving way to Montagew through the ocular influence of the spelling. The cognate Minnogew for Minogue was just "swank". We may assume that the good captain's descendants have gone back to plain Minnoge, as it is only a matter of pronunciation in their case.

There are other examples of this tendency which cannot be shed so easily. When Mulvihil has thus become Melville and Loughnane Loftus, resumption of the true patronymic necessitates (in practice, though not in strict law) certain legal formalities. - am told that there are people whose name was originally Mullins (Maolain) using the form de Moleyns. I have not met a case myself. According to Burke's peerage the best known family of the name, the head of which is Lord Ventry, are not true Irish Mullinses at all, and they presumably had justification for assuming the form de Moleyns in place of Mullins, a step which they took in 1841.

Some people with Mac names insist on the Mac being written in full, others prefer Mc, and formerly M' was quite usual. It is hard to understand why any objection should be taken to Mc or even M', since these are simply abbreviations of Mac. The practice of some indexers, notably in the Century Cyclopaedia of Names, of differentiating between Mac and Mc is to be deplored, since the reader must seek the name he wants in two places - in the Macs, which are interspersed among such words as Maccabees and Macedonia, and in the Mcs many pages further on. It is impossible to differentiate satisfactorily. Take MacGillycuddy for example: it appears in the work in question as MacGillycuddy's Reeks, yet the Chief of the Name always subscribes himself McGillycuddy of the Reeks. The idea that Mac is Irish and Mc Scottish is just another popular error. Mcc, however, may fairly be called an affectation, being merely the perpetuation of a seventeenth century scribe's slip of the pen.

The most prevalent of peculiarities in the spelling of names - the use of two small f's for a capital F - would seem to have arisen not through snobbery but from ignorance: the originators of this now carefully treasured blunder were probably unaware of the fact that in seventeenth century documents the normal way of writing F was ff, a symbol almost indistinguishable from f f.

The Irish Information website an excellent website with many free resources also has a page on the Origin of Irish Names


A scandal has been caused by the disappearance of the
Rev. Albert Knight, Vicar of Christ Church Hunslet, Yorkshire.
Mrs. Knight stated that her husband fell from the cliffs at Flamborough Head,
which are 450ft. high, but other persons stated that he was seen later walking on
the headland..
The chief constable of Leeds states that the Rev. Mr. Knlght has sent a message
to him, stating that he was not dead, but had left the country under an assumed
name. It is believed that he has gone to Australia.
The missing clergyman was a popular cricketer, footballer, and boxer.
He had lately, treated his wife violently, and behaved queerly.
On January 18 he compelled her to accompany him to Bridlington, where
they camped, and then walked six miles through rain and fog to a dangerous cliff
at Flamborough Head. He told her that he intended to disappear, carefully prepared,
the scene of his disappearance, left his umbrella and camera on the cliff,
and left, after instructing his wife to go to the nearest farm-house and tell
the story that she had seen him fall over, the cliff. She was terrorised, and
obeyed him.
It is believed that he sailed by the R.M.S. Ballarat, accompanied by a school
teacher, both travelling under assumed names. His wife knew nothing of his
intentions or of his relations with,the school teacher.
The missing man is described as a highly strung, emotional preacher of the
revivalist type, who had raised his congregation from 20 to 600.
The marked attentions he had paid to the school teacher, whose name was
Fanny Grimes, had caused gossip, and divided the congregation into two groups.
It has been ascertained that Knight went from Flamborough Head direct to a
farm in Sussex, where he had been staying since October with the object
of learning poultry farming prior to emigrating. On January
22 he had his hair cut unusually short, Miss Grimes participated in a crusade
which Knight waged against ihe white slave traffic, her position in a clothing
factory being useful for the purpose.

The arrival of the steamer Port Lincoln was anxiously awaited yesterday,
not only because she had nearly 600 nominated and assisted immigrants
for Victoria, but because among these were the Rev. Albert Knight
and Miss Grimes. The cables have kept the Australian public informed
of the circumstances under which this pair left England.
Mr. Knight, was vicar of Christ Church, Hunslet, Leeds.
On January 18th he and his wife visited Bridlington. Lincoln, Yorkshire,
walked six miles over muddy roads and in foggy weather, and were seen
in Flamborough Village together at 4 o'clock.
The vicar was an amateur photographer, and clambered down the steep
cliff of Flamborough Head.
From that moment he disappeared, and it was , reported that he
had met with a fatal accident.
A little later three men. who were described as trustworthy by their employers,
stated that they saw Mr. Knight about half an hour after the time at which
the accident was reported to have happened.
A reward of £10 was offered for the recovery of his body, and the
curate of the church, not only preached a memorial sermon, but
inserted some affecting notes in the "Church Monthly Journal."
Various circumstances afterwards, came to light, as the result of
which Mrs. Knight was interviewed. She then admitted that she knew
that her husband had hot been killed. but; that he had gone away with
a Miss Grimes, a school teacher with whom it was known that he had
formed a friendship.
Further investigations showed that he had booked two-assisted
passages, at the Victorian Government Agency for a Mr. and Mrs. Herbert
Knight He also lodged with Sir John Taverner some £370 for transmission
to Melbourne, stating that he was going on the land. This news was
conveyed to the captain of the Port Lincoln, upon which the pair sailed,
by wireless message. It was only communicated, however, to the chief steward.
The couple occupied a double berth cabin.
Upon arrival at Capetown the local journals published full particulars of
the facts and the general passengers were therefore informed of them.
On the voyage to Capetown Mr. Knight had made himself exceedingly popular,
singing at the ship's concerts, taking the chair at one, and making a
speech whenever it was necessary.
After leaving Capetown a number of the passengers held aloof from the
couple, but with the others they remained as popular as ever. They were
not so much in evidence, but at a mock Parliament which was promoted,
Mr. "King" made a speech in support of a Woman's Suffrage Bill, which
had been introduced by the "Government of the Day." His eloquence was
so great that the Bill was carried with hardly a dissentient voice.
For the most part, however. he kept himself to himself, conversing only
with Miss Grimes and with another passenger who had had agricultural
experience. Mr. Knight took something like daily lessons in the art of farming.
The Port, Lincoln was not signalled until 9.20 a.m. She came up the bay
by the south channel, and anchored off the Gellibrand Lighthouse about
1 o'clock.'
The first Australians to board any incoming vessel are
the quarantine officers. No one is-allowed to board or to land, from
the vessel until these have granted her pratique. The inspection of
the 700 or 800 persons on board, occupied about an hour and a half.
At the end of that time Mr. Bramwell, the chief boarding officer of
the Immigration Department, went off to her in a launch.
He saw Mr. Knight and told him that the Government had decided that
if the difference between the assisted passages and the full fares
was paid that he and Miss Grimes would be allowed to land
where and when they liked, but that otherwise he had instructions to
keep them on board. Mr. Knight at once paid the amount they had been
advanced by the Agent-General £10.
The Immigration Department then washed its hands of the couple.
Permission had been given by the agents of the ship for them to
leave before the Port Lincoln was taken up the river, and they
immediately went ashore in the launch carrying the doctors, and
were landed at Williamstown. Their subsequent destination was not stated.
On leaving the ship, Mr, Knight was dressed in a pepper and salt suit,
and a dark bowler hat.
During the voyage he had grown, a fair moustache which, however, had
not made much headway. Miss Grimes was gowned in a navy blue tailor
made dress trimmed with green facings. She also wore a toque trimmed
with a white feather and purple velvet bow.
As the launch put off from the side they waved their handkerchiefs and
kissed their hands to those remaining on board, appearing quite cheerful
and happy.
Miss Grimes is rather handsome, and apparently about 30 years of age.
According to the passengers Mr. King was very popular on the voyage.
Before leaving the boat, Knight in a statement to the captain, said
that Miss Grimes had done great work in respect to rescuing girls in
Leeds. The records of the National Vigilance Association would show
that for his work in this connection he had been specially
thanked. He had in cooperation with Miss Grimes, saved a very large
number of women and girls from a terrible fate.
The nature of this work, and Miss Grimes' co-operation with him,
was in a sense compromising that slanderous tongues began to work.
Eventually he was told that his work in this direction must cease,
or that his capacity for good work in the Church would be ruined.
This was conveyed to him indirectly from the Church authorities,
and the ruin of their reputation so weighed upon him that it overcame
all other considerations, and to prevent the impending ruin he took
the step he had taken.
If he carries out his original intentions the ex-vicar will breed poultry.
To the Agent-General in London he called himself Mr. King. and wrote
from a poultry farm of a somewhat extensive character and of undoubted
He satisfied the officers of the Emigration Department that he had been an
industrious student of poultry farming for a fairly long period, and backed
up his confidence in his capacity to follow that occupation in Victoria by
offering to put down a cash deposit of between £300 and £400.
Both Mr. King and Mrs. King attended at the office personally, and by
their appearance and demeanor convinced the officers of the Emigration
Department that they were of an eminently respectable class and of
exceptional physical and general qualifications.
Medical certificates were insisted upon according to the regulations
and these certificates being, of course, satisfactory,
there was no hesitation on the part of the Agent General's Department
in giving, an assisted passage to emigrants who were not only able to
supply evidence of their practical experience of poultry farming, but
were able to furnish substantial guarantees in the form of a £350 deposit.

Now a word from the press
Thursday. 13 March 1913
Mr. and Mrs. Herbert King, said to be known at Leeds as the Rev. Mr. Knight and Miss Grimes,
arrived by the Port Lincoln, at Melbourne, on Monday. On demand by a Government official the
amount paid to them as assisted immigrants was refunded, and the couple landed in a separate
motor launch.
From an English newspaper just to hand we take the followinig reference to the disappearance
Saturday. 15th March. 1913
It is believed that the Rev. Albert Knight and Miss Fanny Grimes, who arrived by
the s.s. Port Lincoln on Monday, have taken lodgings in a quiet street in South Yarra.
Much of their time is apparently spent indoors. They appear to have made some friends, who visit them.

Even the New Zealand papers picked up the story
Otautau Standard and Wallace County Chronicle, Volume VIII, Issue 412, 8 April 1913, Page 7.

In an interview at Bolton (Lancashire) with Mrs Knight's parents the latter made some interesting revelations connected with the elopement of their son with the woman Grimes. The father stated that on December 20 last his son and daughter-in-law came to Bolton to see him on his 70th birthday. They went back on the Saturday night, and nothing further was heard of them until Sunday, January 19, when the following telegram was received from Mrs Knight:
Albert and I here for day yesterday. Albert had serious accident. Let parents know. Writing.
Rose Knight.

The following day (Monday) there arrived a letter from Mrs Knight. This(with certain matters of a private nature omitted) was as follows:
My dear mother, daddy, and all,
You will have got my telegram telling you of Albert's accident. But how can I tell you the worst? Yesterday we came over to Bridlington and Flamborough for the day, to look round, thinking we would bring Sonny over for a few days, and, as Albert has suffered so much with his head and dizziness lately, and I have had a severe cold and a touch of bronchitis, we thought a few days would set us all up before Lent came and Sonny began school again. We went over to the cliffs, as Albert wanted to take a flashlight photograph of the sea and cliffs, and after having done so, when turning, he either slipped or turned dizzy, and fell over, and oh, mother and daddy how can I tell you ? â we have not found him yet. It is the most dangerous part of the cliffs down here, and drops sheer down into the sea. I am nearly beside myself wondering about little Sonny at home, and know not what to do for the best. . . . I feel I cannot tear myself away from this place. It is foggy out at sea, and the sound of the foghorns nearly drives me mad. Try to be brave, mother and daddy, for you know he would wish that, and perhaps you will come to me at Leeds when I let you know I am home again.
Your brokenhearted daughter,
P.S. This time at Bridlington nothing has been heard.

Subsequently there came a telegram asking the family to "go to Leeds. This they did, and on the following Saturday the father and his son and daughter again journeyed to Leeds, ahd attended the memorial service. Meanwhile Mrs Albert. Knight had been seen by a doctor and a detective, and had confessed that her story about her husband's fall over the cliffs was false. She was advised to tell the family, and at the week-end they again went from Bolton to Leeds. After tea she called Mr Knight, sen., into another room, and said, "It is a long tale, but I must tell you. Don't be vexed with me. I could not help it. But Albert is not dead. He is alive, and gone to Australia," Asked why she did not tell sooner, she said, " I was afraid to do so." Her husband, she said, had attempted to take her life a time or two. After that she told the rest of the family, who were at the vicarage.
In the course of doing so, Mrs Knight said she related how her husband went down the cliffs and up the other side, and so got away. She waited half an hour to give him a start. He waved his hand to her, and she acknowledged it. It was further stated that the vicar's box had been packed quite a week prior to his departure. His parents knew nothing absolutely as to his mental derangement, but he had led such a good life, and done such good work, that they could not possibly think of any other cause for such peculiar actions. His father says that Mr Knight had behind his head a big dent, caused by the motor accident some five years ago. When he was last in Bolton he was lively enough, but his eyes seemed set and strange. He was not in any financial trouble. The mother said she said to Mrs Knight, (Rose), "We love you as one of our own. Why didn't you tell us before?" But apparently there was no reply. The mother added: "I made up my mind when they were married that I would be a mother to her, and not a mother-in-law.
A Whited Sepulchre.
It now transpires that a couple of months before the flight, it was some time last summer, Mr Knight was actually confronted with allegations of wrong-doing by his own church officials, but his "reply was that he supposed it all arose out of his efforts to stop the evils of the white slave traffic. He declared that Miss Grimes was simply helping him in his work, by taking notes of the conditions existent m the factories. "This explanation,"said the people's churchwarden " was accepted, but not unanimously."
Particeps Criminis.
Questioned as to Mr Knight's relationship with Fanny Grimes, Miss Suffield declared that she had been Fanny's friend and confidant for eight years, and she implicitly believed that there was nothing wrong between the vicar and her chum before the girl left Leeds. They Avere a great deal m one another's company, I know, because I was very often with them. She seemed to think a great deal about him, but I don't believe she was m love with him. He treated me just as he treated her, and I was not' m love with him, although I esteemed and honored him highly. She went to Bridlington on her doctor's orders. That is true. But after she went down to Ashurst there was a change. I corresponded with her, and addressed my letters to her as Mrs King, care of Mr Hodges, Knowle Poultry Farm, Heathfield. I revived many letters from her, and I know that he was living with her there as his wife. Meanwhile, Mrs Knight was at Nottingham. At weekends he came home to perform his duties. During the week he did not go, as was supposed, to visit his wife! Indeed, he could not, and as a matter of fact he went to Ashurst. When he was in Leeds Fanny sent her letters for him enclosed in/envelopes addressed to me, and he came and met me so that I could give him them. I have had a terrible time. Mrs Knight and myself were the only two people who knew the true story, and with everybody talking about it, it has 'nearly driven me crazy. Only last night, in the car, I heard people talking and saying that Fanny's chum ought to say what she knew, as she was bound to know all about it. Even now that I have told the truth I feel afraid. I wish I had never known anything about it at all.
Cruel Taunts in the Workshops
The Vicar of Leeds (Dr Bickersteth), preaching, at the Good Shepherd Mission Church on February 2, said he well knew the storm of ridicule and taunts to which many of those present were being exposed at workshops and factories owing to the terrible occurrence in connection with the neighboring parish, of Christ Church, Meadow Lime. Sorrow and sin invariably brought out the worst and the best in human nature; and it might well strengthen some young lad or girl to bear bravely reproach for Christ's sake and the sneers directed against Christians, if he told them that he personally, had been more touched than he could, say at the expressions of sympathy which had reached him during the last 24 hours from all kinds and conditions of men and women in Leeds. From the Lord Mayor of Leeds, the Vice-Chancellor of the University, the President of the Free Church Council, and other leading men of the city down to many a humble neighbor had come the assurance of true sympathy with the Church. In particular the President of the Leeds Congregational Council had written him the following letter, which had reached him : We desire to express through you to the clergy of Leeds our real sympathy in the sorrow which has befallen you. We sympathise with you very deeply in this defection, which brings distress not to you only but to all who are jealous for the honor of the Church of Christ. We assure you that very many today feel for you in this sad situation, and desire to extend to you their brotherly sympathy. Many outside your own communion will pray for you.

The Family of Ann Elizabeth EATHER (1793-1865)and Joseph ONUS (1781c-1835)

Joseph ONUS, who married Ann EATHER, was the son of Thomas HONESS and Sarah FIELD he arrived on the 'Glatton' from Kent on 11th. march 1803. His was a success story, for, starting from a 25acre farm near Richmond, he was able,in about 1820 to build the fine two-story house on the north side of Francis St. Richmond and referred to in tourist brochures as "The Farmhouse". It is situated on a knoll on the outskirts of the town.
In Partnership with his wife's brother-in-law, Robert WILLIAMS, he began to send cattle across the mountains to the Hunter River district where they established a run of 1,000 acres near the junction of Wollombi Brook and Parson's Creek.In the Bulga area.
Before long, they extended their interests far northward to the Liverpool Plains and there established a station known as "Boorambil" on a creek which received the name Onus's Creek.
Separately from his partnership with Robert WILLIAMS, Joseph Onus accumulated much landed property in his own right, principally at Wollombi and Howe's Valley (on route from Richmond to Bulga). Eight months before his death he purchased four allotments at Bulga running back onto the land of his brother-in-law Thomas EATHER.He died on the 22nd.June 1835.His widow continued to interest herself in land on the Wollombi and at Howe's Valley until she remarried, to William SHARP at Windsor in February 1837.

Joseph and Elizabeth's children:
1. Elizabeth, b:1st.January 1811. Married John TOWN.
2. Mary Ann, b:1813.d:1897 married John EATON
3. Susannah,B:1815 d:1882 married William Glas McALPIN in 1833.
4. Joseph, b:1818 d:1895 married (i) Emma POWELL (ii) Clara HUNT.
5. Thomas, b:1820 d: 1855 married Elizabeth EATHER.
6. William, B:1822 D: 1855 married Ann HOUGH.

The eldest son, Joseph, was a prominent resident of Richmond,an alderman of the first municipal council in 1872. In the 1880's he built 'Josieville' a two-story mansion on the corner of Francis and Chapel Sts. linked by an avenue of Plane trees with 'Hobartville' the the residence of his daughter, Emma Mrs. Andrew TOWN
In 1891, on the occasion of the golden jubilee of the consecration of St. Peter's Church, Richmond, he presented the stained glass windows at the eastern end of the church.
The two younger sons Thomas and William, both married into old Hawkesbury families in the same year, 1842, and they died only six weeks apart in 1855, whereupon both widows took to inn-keeping as a means of support. Thomas's widow Elizabeth (who was his first cousin, daughter of Thomas Eather), backed by her father and brother , conducted the 'Queen's Arms'at Richmond until her marriage to Joseph Hirons RUTTER, son of Dr.R.C.RUTTER of Parramatta on 13th May 1857. This was an even shorter lived union for J.H.RUTTER died in July 1861, aged 31. William ONUS's widow (formerly Ann HOUGH) kept the 'Prince of Wales Hotel' at Windsor until she married William REID of Parramatta on 27th. May 1857.
The second daughter, Mary Ann, married John EATON at St.Mathew's Windsor, on 17th. January 1831 and they also moved to the Hunter River district.

John EATON, being such an interesting and successful character, he deserves his own journal. Which is my next project.

*credit for a lot of the above information belongs to The Eather Family Newsletter and the Society of Australian Genealogists.

The Family of Richard Norris 1776-1843

Richard NORRIS, was born in Dublin, Ireland 1776. As an adult he was 5'6" (167.6 cm) in height and had a fresh complexion and hazel eyes. On his lower left arm he had the tattoo of a mermaid.
An Irish rebel convicted and sentenced to death for Robbery in Dublin in 1797, the sentence was commuted in 1798 and he was transported to Australia on the conditon that he never return to Ireland. Richard arrived fron Cork to the Colony of New South Wales aboard the ship "Minerva" on 11 January 1800.

As early as 1801, he was granted a provisional ticket of leave which was common because farming was proving to be a major problem in the Colony and farmers were needed.

In 1802 he found a wife in Mary WILLIAMS. She had arrived on the ship "Nile" on 14 December 1801. She had been born at Bath in Somerset England about 1778, Mary was convicted at the Wells Assizes, Somerset Summer Circuit on the 16 August 1800 for stealing 4 muslin handkerchiefs and 3 check aprons the property of Elizabeth Ann COX Widow, Hestor CATTERSON Spinster, and Frances MOUNTEREY Spinster' in the parish of Stone Easton and sentenced to 7 years.

Richard and Mary's first child, John, was born at Cornwallis in the Hawkesbury district in 1803. There does not appear to be a baptism record for him, but when the general census was taken in November 1828, John stated that he was 25 years of age.

By 1805, when the muster of convicts was held, Richard NORRIS was renting Barrington's Farm of about 8 acres near Green Hills. He had the whole of the farm under wheat, and he had three pigs. In storage were 6 bushels of wheat and 2 of maize. Mary WILLIAMS, who had arrived on the ship "Nile", was described as his housekeeper, and they had two children.

1806 NSW General Muster shows Richard had a ticket of Leave and his occupation was that of farmer.

It's believed that Richard and Mary were married by the Reverend Samuel MARSDEN when he visited Windsor in 1806

When the general muster was held in 1814, Richard NORRIS was described as a landholder. Mary WILLIAMS was his wife and the number of their children had increased to six. At that time, Richard had two convicts, Patrick McGUINIS and Thomas HEWITT, assigned to him.

At the 1822 Muster, Richard NORRIS was a landholder with a farm of 50 acres near Windsor. At that time 20 acres were under maize, 16 under wheat, 4 under barley, and he had 2 acres of potatoes. He also had a herd of 24 cattle, and owned 4 horses and 60 pigs. He was doing well with his farming pursuits and had in storage 200 bushels of maize and 20 of wheat. He and Mary then had a family of 11.
The age of their eldest son John was recorded as 20, but it is more likely that he was 19. According to NORRIS family records, Richard NORRIS owned two 30 acre farms (one that had been originally granted to Michael DOYLE, and the other originally granted to Jane EZZY at Cornwallis, and also a town allotment in Brabyn Street, Windsor as a place of refuge in time of flood.

On 3 May 1838 at the Sydney Supreme Court, Richard with two very successful farms and a house in Windsor pleads 'not guilty' to a charge of stealing his neighbour's pig.- He was found guilty and sentenced to death - later commuted to 'life' on Norfolk Island. He was transported on "Phoenix" where his crime is recorded as "robbery.

Mary and Richard Norris had 14 children; 11 boys & 3 girls; and about 92 grandchildren.

On the 19 February 1843 at the Norfolk Island General Hospital Richard NORRIS died. He is buried in the cemetery by the beach at Kingston. The grave is unmarked.

Mary NORRIS, nee WILLIAMS died on 26 January 1863 at Cornwallis and is buried at the Windsor Catholic Cemetery.
The Inscription reads

In Memory of
Mary Norris- Died 18 8 1854
Weep not for me children dear
For I am not dead but sleeping
Now buried in the deep cold clay
For is a debt we all must pay
May she rest in peace Amen

The children of Richard NORRIS and Mary, nee WILLIAMS were:-

1. John NORRIS b:1803 Cornwallis, NSW d:26 Sept. 1864 at Sally's Bottoms. m. Rachel EATHER 1807-1875 on 17 Dec. 1823 at St.Mary's Roman Catholic Church, Sydney, New South Wales.
The children of this marriage were:-
1. Maria NORRIS 18241903 m. (1) Patrick DUNN 1823-1850 (2) Peter PAGE 1816-1878
2. Harriet NORRIS 18281841
3. Michael John NORRIS 18321909 m. (1) Jane COLBRAN 1838-1875. (2) Barbara Ellen GRUBB 1842-1895
4. Elizabeth NORRIS 18341894 m. Cornelius MCMAHON 1824-1894
5. Thomas NORRIS 1836 1903 m. Catherine LONDON 1843-1911
6. Rachael NORRIS 18391915 m. John Michael COLBRAN 1836-1914
7. Ann NORRIS 18421931 m. Henry GREEN 1839-1916
8. Rebecca NORRIS 18441936 m. John COOK 1843-1915
9. Stephen NORRIS 18461888 m. Ellen MCGUINESS 1855-19--
10.Susannah Mary NORRIS 18521940 m. (1) Isaac COOK 1846-1895 (2) Alfred T DRUITT 1859-1934

2. Thomas NORRIS b:1805 Cornwallis d: 16 January 1890 at Old Cullen m. Elizabeth Sarah CONNOR 1810-1876 at Cornwallis 4 April 1826.
The Children from this marriage were:-

Elizabeth Maria NORRIS 18271891 Richard William NORRIS 18291905 Mary NORRIS 18311891 John William Joseph NORRIS 18331887 Sarah NORRIS 18361838 Harriet NORRIS 18381915 Maria NORRIS 1841 Michael NORRIS 18421928
Esther NORRIS 18451890 Anne NORRIS 18481858 Caroline Annie NORRIS 18501923

3. Richard NORRIS b:1807 Cornwallis d:11 April 1868 Windsor m. Mary Ann COSTELLO 1815-1853 at Sydney on 3 September 1835.
The children of this marriage were:-

Julia Ann NORRIS 1836 ? Mary NORRIS 1837 ?
Ellen Ester NORRIS 18391927 Richard NORRIS 18401877
Louisa Mary NORRIS 18451918 John Jeremiah NORRIS 18491921
Albert Joseph NORRIS 18511918 Infant NORRIS 18531853

4. James NORRIS b:1810 Cornwallis d: 7 March 1875 Windsor m.Ann BROWN 1818-1883 in 1834.
The children of this marriage were:-

William NORRIS 18351885 Rachael NORRIS 18361930
James NORRIS 18411845 Edward NORRIS 18431876
Mary Ann NORRIS 1845? James NORRIS 18471926 David NORRIS 18501893 Emma NORRIS 1852 1874
Charles NORRIS 18561858 Elizabeth NORRIS 1856 ?

5. Christopher NORRIS b:6 December 1811, Cornwallis d: 18 May 1898 at Orange m. (1) Mary CRABB/SHRIMPTON 1814-1854 in 1834.
The children of this marriage were:-

Joseph NORRIS 18351899 Thomas NORRIS 18361899
Jane NORRIS 1838 1902 James NORRIS 18401893
Maria Matilda NORRIS 18421892 Robert NORRIS 18461924
Charles NORRIS 1848? Mary A NORRIS 1850 ?

(2) Mary Jane GIBBONS, nee DOUGLASS 1806-1856 at ST Matthews Catholic Windsor 1855 NO children

6. William NORRIS b:18 Nov.1813, Cornwallis. d:25 September 1843 Windsor. m. Lucy UPTON, nee BROWN 1814-1876 at Windsor in 1836 Lucy had been married to Jesse UPTON 1806-1872 and after Williams death went on to marry Laban WHITE 1794-1873.
The children of this marriage were:-

Alfred James NORRIS 18371875 Jane Emma NORRIS 18381916
Emma Amelia NORRIS 1840? William NORRIS 18401887
Henry NORRIS 18431876

7. Harriet NORRIS b: 6 Oct.1815 Cornwallis d: 17 August 1894 Nelson, NSW. m. Samuel MASON 1806-1880 at Windsor on 15 May 1831.
The children of this marriage were:-

Sarah MASON 18321833 William MASON 18331833
Samuel MASON 18361909 Frances MASON 18391839

8. Maria NORRIS b:1818 Cornwallis d:10 September 1853 Cornwallis. m. William Henry MELLISH 1809-1858 at St.Matthews Catholic church Windsor on the 2 August 1835.
The children of this marriage were:-

Maria MELLISH 18371909 Caroline MELLISH 18401902
William Henry MELLISH 18441922 Francis Charles MELLISH 18461905 John Frederick MELLISH 18481935 Edward MELLISH 18501913
Samuel MELLISH 18531854

9. Michael NORRIS b:1820 Cornwallis d:25 September 1854 Cornwallis. m. Margaret DONNELLY 1820-1838 at Windsor on 27 August 1837

10. Ann NORRIS b: 14 September 1821 Cornwallis d:2 March 1906 at Bulli, NSW m.Andrew Alexander FRAZER 1817-1886 at Ebeneza on the 13 Feb. 1837.
The children of this marriage were:-

Elizabeth FRAZER 18381881 Andrew A FRAZER 18401922
George FRAZER 1843? James Christopher FRAZER 18451938
Sarah FRAZER 1846? John Thomas FRAZER 18481917
Richard FRAZER 1850? Ann FRAZER 1853 ?
Francis Stephen FRAZER 18551950 Amelia Jane FRAZER 18571912 Alice Maria FRAZER 18591932 Emily Unah FRAZER 18621948

11. Francis Stephen NORRIS b:14 September 1821 Cornwallis. d: 9 October 1901 at Windsor. m. Mary Ann ELLIOT 1821-1903 at St.Matthews Catholic Church on 14 June 1845.
The children of this marriage were:-

Christopher John NORRIS 18461925 Harriet NORRIS 18481919
Maria NORRIS 1850? Francis NORRIS 18531903
Stephen Francis NORRIS 1853? Patrick Joseph NORRIS 18551930
William NORRIS 18571864 John NORRIS 18601879

12. Patrick NORRIS b:1823 Cornwallis. d:9 March 1890 at Windsor. m. Eliza WILSON 1826-1905 at Windsor on 27 October 1845.
Children of this marriage were:-
Stephen NORRIS ?-? Maria NORRIS 18441891

13. Paul NORRIS b:12 December 1826 Cornwallis d: 19 Feb. 1827 Cornwallis

14. Joseph NORRIS b:1835 Cornwallis d:4 February 1899 at Kogarah, Sydney, New South Wales

8 comment(s), latest 2 years, 7 months ago

The First Fagin

If you are a member of The Female Convict Research Centre you will have already been notified;
but if not, and you're interested I'd like to let you know of a new doco-drama film 'The first Fagin' .
I don't usually promote films but this is Aussie research at it's very best with only a small budget.
The story of Isaac 'Ikey' Solomon filmed in Tasmania is a very special film, which traces his life from London to New York and on to Tasmania.
Here's a preview The First Fagin

Here's my quick Bio. Here's a better one
Born: Isaac Solomon 1785 in Gravel Lane Houndsditch, London, England
Married: Hannah (Ann) Julian 1786-1877 on 7 January 1807 at Great Synagogue, Duke's Place, London
Had 5 children:- John Solomon 1807 1889 Moses Julian Solomon 1810 1896
David Solomon 1818 1860 Ann Nancy Solomon 1821 ?, Sarah Solomon 1823 1882

At the time of his marriage he was a jeweller in Bell's Lane, considered a front for receiving stolen goods

First Conviction: 6 June 1810 with JOEL JOSEPH indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 17th of April, from the person of Thomas Dodd , a pocket book, value 4 s. a thirty pound bank note, a five pound bank note, a two pound bank note, three one pound bank notes &c, &c.

Second Conviction: 25 April 1827 for theft and receiving a pile of stolen goods, Sentenced to Newgate.

30 April 1827, Escaped on the way to Newgate Prison. Managed to get himself to Denmark, from there to the United States and then on to Rio de Janeiro where he sailed in the 'Coronet' to Hobart, travelling under the assumed name of Slowman

1829 Arrested in Hobart and returned to England under guard via the vessel 'Prince Regent'

8 July 1830, Tried for eight charges of receiving stolen goods, found guilty on two, and sentenced to transportation for fourteen years.

1 November 1831 arrived back in Tasmania on the vessel'William Glen Anderson'

1835 Granted a ticket-of-leave on the condition that he lived at least twenty miles from Hobart.

DIED 3 September 1850 in Hobart. Wife Ann died in Carlton, Melbourne on the 30 Nov 1877

BURIED at the Jewish Cemetery, Harrington Street, Hobart Tasmania

His Estate was worth just £70

The first Kingswell - Malta

The first 'Kingswell' in Malta was James Kingswell a civil engineer born in Deptford, Kent about 1782 and died in Westminster, London in 1847
He married Lydia Payne 1779-1835 in Westminster on the 15 September 1805.
The couple after their first six children were born went to Malta about 1820 James taking up the position of Block Maker at the Naval Arsenal. They then had two more children born in Malta.

Here is some info on the children of James and Lydia Kingswell:
Lydia Ann Kingswell b:1807 Deptford, Kent d: 1898 Lancashire, England m. Thomas RAMPLEY
Maria KINGSWELL b: 1809 Kent d: 1880 m. James MURRAY
Mary Anne KINGSWELL b: 1811 England m. Edward BEER
Sarah KINGSWELL b: 1813 Deptford d:1904 Wooloowin, Brisbane Queensland m. Samuel RANSLEY 1796 1843 of the Royal Navy. Their daughter Lydia Ransley married into the Australian OXENHAM family
James Kingswell b: 1816 Deptford. d: 1827 Malta
John KINGSWELL b: 1820 Deptford d: 1882 ?
William Kingswell b: 1823 Malta d: 1825 Malta
George Kingswell b:1825 Malta. d: 1902 a wardroom Steward with the Royal Navy m. Concetta Micaleff 1851 Malta
Edward Frederick KINGSWELL 1827

From Malta Family History
Edward Frederick KINGSWELL, born 28th January 1827, the son of James and Lydia Kingswell, Block Maker in Naval Arsenal

George KINGSWELL, born 29th May 1825, the son of Lydia and James Kingswell, Block Maker in Naval Arsenal

James KINGSWELL, born 9th July 1816, the son of Lydia and James Kingswell, Block Maker in Naval Arsenal

James KINGSWELL, buried 10th October 1827, aged 11 years

John KINGSWELL, born 31st December 1820, the son of Lydia and James Kingswell, Block Maker in Naval Arsenal

John KINGSWELL, living at 8 Strada del Carmine, Cospicua, electoral list 1852

Lydia Ann KINGSWELL, 21+, spinster, of St.Nicholas Parish, Deptford, Kent, married 20th April 1830, to Thomas RAMPLEY, 21+, bachelor, of St.Lawrence Parish, Norwich

Maria KINGSWELL, born 16th September 1809, the daughter of Lydia and James Kingswell, Block Maker in Naval Arsenal

Maria KINGSWELL, of Kent, married 4th June 1826, to James MURRAY, 95th Regiment

Mary Anne KINGSWELL, born 5th August 1811, the daughter of Lydia and James Kingswell, Block Maker in Naval Arsenal

Mary Ann KINGSWELL, married 27th October 1829, to Edward BEER, Corporal, 95th Regiment

Sarah KINGSWELL, born 3rd October 1813, the daughter of Lydia and James Kingswell, Block Maker in Naval Arsenal

Sarah KINGSWELL, of Kent, married 29th June 1829, to Samuel RANSLEY, Colour-Sergeant, Rifle Brigade

William KINGSWELL, born 23rd February 1823, the son of Lydia and James Kingswell, of the Naval Arsenal

William KINGSWELL, buried 25th June 1825, aged 3 years, son of James and Lydia Kingswell

London, England, Marriages and Banns, 1754-1921
about Lydia Payne
Name: Lydia Payne
Spouse Name: James Kingswell
Record Type: Marriage
Event Date: 15 Sep 1805
Parish: Paddington St James
Borough: Westminster
Register Type: Parish Register

1861 England Census
about George Kingswell
Name: George Kingswell
Age: 37
Estimated Birth Year: abt 1824
Relation: Ward Room Steward (Ward)
Gender: Male
Where born: Malta
Civil parish: Vessels
Town: Malta
County/Island: Royal Navy
Country: England
Street Address:
Occupation: Ward Room Steward
Registration district: Royal Navy
Sub-registration district: Royal Navy
ED, institution, or vessel: Hiberhin
Neighbors: View others on page
Household schedule number: 1
Piece: 4440
Folio: 178
Page Number: 2

Malta as a Naval Base

Image below, navy hospital in the background fort ricasoli vittoriosa and dockyard
courtesy of www.carto.net