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SWALE of Swale Hall

The following information is for those who are interested in the surname Swale, Swale Hall and Swaledale in Yorkshire.

The owners of Swale Hall have told us that the building as it is today dates back to the mid 16th century and that there are no visible signs of the original Swale Hall.

Walter de Gaunt became the first Lord of Swaledale; he had married Matilda the daughter of the Breton Earl of Richmond. Matilda's father gave her the whole of Swaledale as a dowry. Walter then subsequently gave the Manor of West Grinton to his nephew Alured, who adopted the surname Swale after the name of the river Swale. Swale Hall remained in the possession of this Swale family and their descendants until the days of Queen Anne. The most distinguished of this Swale family was probably Solomon Swale, a barrister, who became Member of Parliament for Aldborough, which is near Boroughbridge, North Yorkshire. This Solomon was created a baronet in 1660 and is buried at St. Martins-in-the-Fields in London. Sir Solomon Swale, the third baronet and grandson of the Solomon above, failed to renew the lease of the main part of the Swale estate and this resulted in Swale Hall being sold by auction. Sir Solomon the third baronet died in a debtors prison in 1733.

There is a pedigree titled "Pedigree of the Blood of Sir Solomon Swale, of Swale Hall, in the County of York, who was created a baronet, ad 1660." Along the foot of this pedigree is written, "Vouched- G.H.De.S.N.Plantagenet Harrison (Signed)." This pedigree may well have been prepared when the Reverend Sir John Swale, the 7th Baronet claimed the title, which had been dormant after the death of the fifth Baronet. This pedigree begins an A.D 800 with Syderic, Count of Harlebeck, Governor & Hereditary Forester of Flanders. A.D.800. It then gives Engelran? Count of Harlebeck, Governor & Hereditary Forester of Flanders. A.D 814. It then gives Odoacre, Count of Harlebeck, Governor & Hereditary Forester of Flanders. A.D 850. It would take too long to give the pedigree up to 1873 but because the pedigree was vouched by G.H.De.S.N.Plantagenet Harrison makes it dubious.

George.H.De.S.N.Plantagenet Harrison wrote a one volume History of Yorkshire that was published in London in 1879 and there is a note on the library index card in the Leeds reference library in Yorkshire that this history of Yorkshire is now considered to be semi-fictitious. It would appear that those who are familiar with any written work by George.H.De.S.N.Plantagenet Harrison consider his work as semi-fictitious and this applies to the pedigree of the blood of Sir Solomon Swale.

The Extraordinary Breach of Promise Case

These cousin Cousins have confused some, particularly when their names happened to be Richard Young.
The subject of this case was Richard Young Cousins born on the 5 March 1875 in Wellington New South Wales he was the son of William Henry Cousins 1827-1883 and his wife Martha Eliza, nee Blunden 1838-1907.
William Henry being a brother to Richard Young Cousins J.P 1819-1886. Both, along with Walter Cousins 1829-1904 and Mary Anne Chatfield, nee Cousins 1829-1896 were children of Richard Young Cousins 1798-1857 and Kezia, nee Dann 1796-1837.

The breach of promise action in which Richard Young Cousins sued
Mary Louisa Carr, nee M'Nevin, for 5000, in the Supreme Court,
Sydney, on Friday, 14 March 1902 before Mr. Justice Owen and a jury.
No evidence was offered for the defence, and the jury awarded 150 damages

It is not very often that a man sues a woman for breach of promise. Indeed,
it is probable that the number of such cases could be counted on the fingers
of one's two hands. As a rule it is the woman who sues the man, and then the
reasons are such that there is no doubt as to the desirableness of awarding heavy
damages.
The case in which Richard Young Cousins sued Mary Louisa M'Nevin, of Molong,
for such a breach was the sensation of Thursday and Friday in the No. 2 Jury Court,
Sydney. Mr. Cousins is a young man with an ambition, and Miss M'Nevin was an
elderly spinster with 50,000. Apparently everything was fixed up for their
wedding, and presumably this would have taken place had not a Mr. Carr appeared
on the scene I before the celebration of the marriage. Mr. Carr was a nice man,
with a genius for entertaining, and Mr. Cousins and he didn't grow fonder of
each other when they both thought of the fair M'Nevin. Eventually Mr. Carr got
ahead in the running as it were, and then, though everything bad been fixed for
the marriage as originally intended, the lady claimed the prerogative of her sex
in changing her mind. Briefly stated, the first intimation that Mr. Cousins had
that he and his fiancee weren't playing 'cousins' any longer, was when he received
the following letter.

"My dear Dick,
As arranged, I am now writing so that you will get this letter
about the 12th. I fear the answer will not be a favorable one. I have given
the matter due consideration, and, considering everything, I think we had
better part.
My feelings towards you are not those one ought to have to pass a life together,
and what would be the use of rendering two lives miserable? I see lots of things
of the past in a light that I did not before, so that the reflection of it
makes a difference. You know I was a bit unsettled, from things I beard before
you came down, but I thought I would let things go, and carry it through ; then
at last I found I could not do that, and the rest you know. As I felt I could not
marry you then, I cannot do so now ; the result would be the same.
I am very sorry that things should have gone like' this as far as you are concerned,
for it has placed you in an awkward position, I must admit ; but better to have
things as they are than find out afterwards we made a mistake. There would be
no undoing it then, while now it can be done.
Very often in the past you were not up to the mark, but I would not let myself
think so then, and as I said, many little items passed over then I have thought
of since, and contrasted with others. I could say more, but of what use?
The result would be the same and it cannot alter matters now. Things will get
back into a groove again, and it is only a nine days' wonder, and you may be
glad it happened so I may be, too, after all, but that remains to be seen.
You will find some one to fill the imaginary gap I have made in your affections,
and then it will be all right for you. I am writing to Alf. to tell him of my
decision, so you may hear from him. Though this breach has occurred, if you
ever need a friend I will not fail you if I possibly can. It is needless to
write more on the subject. This is sufficient; what do you intend doing?
Are you going home ?
I will close now, with best wishes.
I remain, yours affectionately.
M. L. M'NEVIN."


Subsequently Miss McNevin became Mrs. Carr, and then there was bitterness,
deep reflection, and, finally, the present action. Only the plaintiff gave
evidence, that is, so far as the two chief parties were concerned, and the whole
thing turned on the question of damages, as when he had been cross examined by
Mr. Wise the "breach" was tacitly allowed. In the cross-examination, various things
came out, the most amusing being in regard to the way Mr. Cousins relied on
Mr. Stockwell, a friendly solicitor.
On Mr. Wise asking, "After the thing was broken off, did you still retain an
affection for Miss McNevin?
The plaintiff replied " Yes, acting on Mr. Stockwell's advice,"
which brought down the house, and even made the Judge smile.
In the next breath he confessed to referring to three people as "d--d animals,"
and the lady was one, but this was under much provocation. When the judge summed up,
he said that the plaintiff was entitled to a verdict-that was a matter, of course;
As to damages, they would have to consider the circumstances. The lady was rich,
and plaintiff was to get a fourth of her estate, and on her decease the whole of it.
This he lost, because the marriage didn't come off, and, naturally, he must have been
annoyed to lose so much just as it was at his lips.
The jury considered that the plaintiff was 144,000 times as much injured as the
defendant alleged he was. That is, the latter, through her counsel, thought a farthing
sufficient compensation, but the jury found for 150, which, of course, will carry the
usual costs.

After the case described above, Richard Young Cousins 1875-1953 went on to marry Agnes Annie Smith in Wollongong in 1908. They had two daughters Lila Clair born 1909 in Ashfield Sydney, who married Francis J McEncroe in 1934 and Silvia Young born 1912 in Ashfield, Sydney who married Desmond Coleman Trainor in 1944.


Sources:
nsw.bd&m
Australian Electoral Commission
Clarence and Richmond Examiner
Grafton, NSW : 1889 - 1915
Tuesday 11 March 1902 Page 4
Transcription, janilye, 2012


The 1867 Floods in New South Wales

Much has been written about our terrible family loss in the drowning of 12 EATHER's during the June 1867 flood at Cornwallis, but little about the other poor souls who drowned or the terrible losses and hardship to the people of New South Wales in the middle of a very cold winter.

It is to be noted, the flood was not just in the Cornwallis/Windsor district, but encompassed most of the state. In all, it is probable, that thirty lives were lost in New South Wales between the 21 June and the 26th June 1867.

Firstly, I'd like to tell you about the appalling tragedy of Daniel Isaac BAKER (1814-1886) and his wife Mary Ann, nee MYERS (1824-1867). On the night of the 21 June 1867, Mary Ann and seven of her nine children died in the freezing water. Daniel and Mary lived in a hut at the junction of the Mudgee river, working as shepherds for the Blundun's at Burrandong. This isolated family was surrounded by water that rose six feet in ten minutes. At the first rush of water, they all climbed onto the table, then up to the loft and then, Daniel cut a hole in the bark and hoisted them onto the roof. Daniel held the children in his arms, dropping them as they died from the freezing cold. They remained on the roof until the water reached their mouths then they tried to swim for a tree. Only Daniel and two children, Moses 17 and Cecilia 15 survived. The children who died with Mary Ann were;

Daniel Baker 1854-1867, Henry Shadrach Baker 1856-1867, Andrew William Baker 1858-1867, Charles Frederick 1860-1867, John Isaac Baker 1862-1867, Thomas Edwin Baker 1864-1867, Mary Ann Elizabeth Baker 1866-1867.

Also in the same house was a neighbour, Frederick SMITH the son of Edward and Elizabeth Smith. He arrived at dusk to help, whilst his wife Mary Ann Smith went to find a boat. Mrs. Smith survived the flood and came about daylight the next morning. The brave Mrs. Smith could hear them cooeying for a long time but had great difficulty navigating the boat for a mile through the strong currents. She rescued Daniel , Moses, and Cecilia from the tree by the swamped shepherd's hut and took them to shore.

In Wagga Wagga on the Friday night of the 21 June 1867 the Murrumbidgee broke it's banks flooding the town, two lives were lost. One was Samuel CHATTO 1839-1867 from Sydney, working as a labourer at Henry PAUL's station. The free selectors suffered severely on the flats, many losing their homes. 100 head of cattle and 450 sheep were washed away.

On Saturday night the Denison Bridge at Bathurst was washed away and at Murchison, the railway station was completely under water. Between the Pitt Town Punt and Wisemans Ferry the water was sixteen feet deep, you could not see the telegraph poles or wires. All communication was lost.

At Penrith, the families living on the banks of the Nepean had to quickly abandon their homes and seek shelter at the police barracks, the public hospital or railway station. On Friday morning several houses were submerged, some carried away bodily. 200 houses from High Street to Proctors Lane were filled with water to the ceilings of their ground floors. The once neat and comfortable homesteads surrounded by orchards and gardens had disappeared. Hundreds of bushels of corn, hundreds of pigs and poultry, many horses and cattle were all swept away. Fowls drenched almost to death were to be seen roosting on the saddleboards of the deserted and innundated houses.

On the night of the 21st, to the north, on the Wollombi, people took shelter in the Church of England and at the Court House as the freezing waters rose to their highest level in history, indeed, at midnight on the 21st the water was six inches into the church of England. But, for the promptness of the Police Magistrate Mr. Doppling and his dingy, the Rev. Mr. SHAW would have drowned whilst trying to save his stock. Few people escaped some loss at Wollombi, the Wesleyan Chapel and the homes of Mr. WHITEMAN and Mr. BOURNE were completely washed away and the Catholic Church had fifteen feet of water in it.

As the town flooded at Fordwich, Joseph CLARK 1817-1889 watched in horror as his store and the post office was carried down the street in a river of water.

Whilst over in Lochinvar on the night of the 22nd Mr. P GREEN at Kaludah, saw a seven knot an hour river race through and destroy his grapevines. Mr J.F.DOYLE, vineyard owner, with his own boat, tirelessly, rescued a dozen families even though he needed the boat at his own place to save his belongings.

Of Course, Windsor and surrounds suffered greatly. From Thursday at 11:00am when the water was over the banks at South Creek and in Windsor it was up to the bank and as it rained all Thursday night with gale forced winds the people were in imminent danger. With the few private boats available people were being taken from the roofs of their houses in Wilberforce and Cornwallis. By the afternoon of Friday the 21st the river had risen by forty eight feet, three feet higher than during the flood of 1864. The only parts of the town habitable were the upper portion of George Street, the water on the lower portion was three feet high. The Catholic church and McQuades Corner were above water. The Reverend C F GARNSEY's residence "Fairfield", was not overly large, but still managed to squeeze in two hundred people. The residence of Mr. William WALKER 1828-1908 local solicitor and MLA was also above water and crowded with the refugees. Everything else was out of sight in the town, but for the chimneys on the higher houses. Two thousand homeless sufferers crowded around the School of Arts, The Catholic Church and above the floodline in the Wesleyan, and The Courthouse. The Rev.Henry Carleton Stiles at St.Matthew's Anglican lay dying when the great flood was at its highest, and from his deathbed he gave orders to throw the church doors open and admit the crowds of homeless sufferers.
Everybody, whose house was above the floodline threw open their doors to the victims. The Reverend C F GARNSEY said, at a meeting chaired by Mr. WALKER MLA on the 2 July to devise a means of relief for the sufferers, " No one, unless he had been an eyewitness to the scene could have believed what had happened. There were only two small necks of land left to bring the comfortless people and he knew, as the waters rose, there were many who looked with anxious eyes and thoughts of where they might next take themselves for safety". The houses of the settlers had been razed to the ground and in many instances, not a stick, not an article of clothing had been left to the sufferers. The government boats from Customs and the water police did not arrive from Sydney until Friday night, by then, too late for most. As the waters subsided it was noted that, from the Windsor Ferry to the township of Wilberforce and also along Freeman's reach to the Highlands, no more than eight houses were left standing and all were badly damaged.

Amongst the tragedies there were many, many hero's and several very lucky escapes. One, very lucky to be alive was Alfred NORRIS 1837-1875 and his family, Here is his story;

Alfred took his family to a large willow tree and lashed his wife and two of their children to the highest branches. The third child he held in his arms. There were few boats available, and in the dark the rescuers had a very difficult time finding the people who had sheltered in the trees. By 4:30 pm Friday 21st the rivers had risen by forty eight feet, three feet higher than the 1804 flood. The water, had almost swamped Alfred. He was exhausted from holding the child and on the point of collapse when a boat found him and took Alfred and his family to safety.

Written by Janilye 2010

Inquest on six bodies of the Eathers lost in the Flood
Wednesday 26 June 1867.
Commercial Hotel, Windsor, New South Wales

A coroners inquiry was held on Wednesday 26 June 1867, at the Commercial Hotel, Windsor before Mr. Laban White and a jury, on the bodies of Catherine Eather, Mary Ann Eather, Catherine Eather the younger, Charles Eather, Emma Eather and Annie Eather. The wives and children of William and Thomas Eather of Cornwallis, whose mournful fate will never be forgotton in this district.

Thomas Eather, having been duly sworn deposed: I am a farmer and resided in Cornwallis, my family consisted of my wife Emma, aged 36 years, and four girls and two boys of the several ages of sixteen, fourteen, twelve, ten, eight and three. The last time I saw six of them alive(the eldest son of Thomas Eather the deponent, was fortunately from home and not in the flood) was on Friday night. Yesterday my oldest daughter Annie was brought into Windsor, the body having been seen floating near the place where she was drowned; today the body of my wife Emma was found. On Friday afternoon the waters had risen and continued to rise, very rapidly; we were all obliged to fly to the ridge pole of the house hoping to be rescued by some boat; we remained some hours in awful suspense till the violence of the wind and the waves swept the building and the whole of us into the water. I came up from the water and found myself in the branches of a cedar tree; I looked round after my wife and children, but could see none of them; in about an hour after I was rescued by three men in a boat. I told them what had happened. They landed me at Mr. Arthur Dight's, Clarendon. There must have been twenty feet of water where my family was drowned.

William Eather, being duly sworn deposed: I am a farmer and resided at Cornwallis; my family consisted of my wife Catherine Eather aged 37 and my children, Mary Ann, Catherine, Charles, Clara and William, of the respective ages of 11, 9, 6, 3 and 1; on last Friday night I saw them alive; they were then on top of a house of my brother, George Eather, having gone there for safety; I was with them; we were about 200 yards from my brother Thomas's; we had been there from Thursday night; on Friday night, I was about taking my oldest boy into my arms, when I was washed away by the waves; I saw a tree close by, after I surfaced and managed to make for it. I heard the screams of my wife and children, but I could not see them; I fastened myself to a tree and in a short time was rescued by a boat specially sent by Mr Arthur Dight; I believe my wife and three of my children have been brought to Windsor dead.

Phillip Maguire, having been duly sworn deposed: I am a farmer and live at Nelson, and a brother in law of Mrs. William Eather; I went with Charles Eather, Thomas Eather and Charles Westall in search of bodies; yesterday (Tuesday) about 2 o'clock in the afternoon we found Thomas Eather's eldest daughter Annie, floating about 40 yards from where the family had been carried away; this morning we found four more bodies; the dead bodies of which the coroner and jury have had to view, I recognise as the remains of Catherine Eather, wife of William Eather, and Mary Ann, Catherine and Charles the children of William Eather, also Emma, the wife of Thomas Eather and Annie, his eldest daughter.

The jury returned a verdict of accidental drowning. Boats have been out all day searching for other bodies, but have returned unsuccessful.


transcribed by janilye from a report in the Sydney Morning Herald 1 July 1867.


6 comment(s), latest 4 years, 6 months ago

The Barque Princess Royal - South Australia 1847

Tuesday, March 16 1847 The barque Princess Royal, 540 tons, Charles Louis Von Zuilecom, master, from London and Plymouth.
Passengers
Mr John Sandland, lady, and 3 children, Mr James Elton, Mr Lynn. Mr Kay, and
Dr Kelly, surgeon superintendent, in the cabin ; Phillimore and wife, Martha Burry, Jane Franklin, Mary Ann Franklin, Bethia Franklin, Emma Franklin, Mary Davies, Elizabeth White, Esther White, Elizabeth Grant, Jane Grant, Mrs Oswald, Jane Eastway, Mary Ann Magor, Mary Ann Spargo, Jane Magor, Louisa Magor, Mary Ann Mitchell, Nancy Jeffery, Jane Mitchell, Elizabeth Turner, Mary Ann Wilkins, Jane Sleep, Ann Sleep, Mary Jacob and child, Honor Burgess, Mary Mashford and child, Mary Ann Mashford, Elizabeth Mashford, Elizabeth Squires, Kezea Williams, Sarah Williams, Jane Richards, Eliza Coombe, Mary Battershill, Mary Millman, Isaac Franklin, wife, and three children, Thomas Sims, wife, and infant, Martin Nicholls, wife, and three children, Stephen Farr, wife, and three children, Job Gillett, wife, and two children, Charles Burden, wife, and two children, George Crane, wife, and three children, James Smith, wife, and two children, Wm. Hendy, wife, and two children, William Roberts and wife, Henry Magor, wife, and two children, John Magor, senior, wife, and child, Isaac Turner, wife, and infant, William Boundy, wife, and child, William Jose, wife, and two children, James Harris, wife, and child, Thomas Richards, wife, and child, George Arthur, wife, and child, Thomas Coombe, wife, and two children, James Coombe, wife, and four children, Richard Eade, wife, and two children, Stephen Brown, wife, and three children, William Spargo, wife, and two children, John Lane, wife, and three children, William Dunstone, wife, and four children, Edward Moyle and wife, Stephen Goldsworthy, and wife, George Gould and wife, John G. Williams and wife, Thomas Reed, wife and child, Absalom Bennett and wife, James Hamlyn, Agnes Partridge, Thomas Dunstone and wife, Thomas Davey, wife, and three children; John Sincock and wife, Alice Allen, and child ; Isaac Mitchell, William Coombe, James Coombe, John Coombe, John Boundy, Richard Heywood, Joseph Pryor, Athanarius Pryor, Nicholas Lean, Richard Williams, William Dunstone, Robert Peake, Henry Hiscock, William Hiscock, Edmund Lee, Joseph Merritt, William Henry Franklin, Thomas Withers, George Ross, William Ross, John McArdle, Thomas Kirby, Charles Blade, Sheringham Pank, Jacob White, Thomas White, Jonathan White, Thos. Macklin, James Giddings, Martin Nichols, James N. Hall, Philip Roberts, William May, William Sanders, John Major, John Spargo, Walter Williams, George Roberts, John Mashford, George Mashford, Josiah Mashford, John Hamlyn, Oliver Rowe, John Rowe, Susan Partridge, Eliza- beth Lane, Hannah Huxtable, Amelia Pawley, John Weare, George Roberts, James Nuttall, Edmund Blackler, Thomas Hamlyn, wife, and six children ; William Nosworthy, wife, and four children ; William Goldsworthy, wife, and three children ; Richard Jasper and wife, John Major and wife.

SOURCE:
South Australian Register
Wednesday 17 March 1847
page 2
transcription janilye 2013

The Charlotte Gladstone arrival 1866 - Passenger List

Transcribed from

The South Australian Register of June 18 1866 , Adelaide

THE CHARLOTTE GLADSTONE 1866 departed Plymouth, Devon, England with 394 government immigrants, arrived Glenelg, South Australia on April 16, 1866 CHARLOTTE GLADSTONE - PASSENGER LIST, as recorded at SA State Records [66/4 GRG 35/48
The above ship is a capital specimen of the Commissioner's selection, and there can be no doubt but that it is preferable to pay a little more to secure such spacious 'tween decks and ample recreation surface, although in this case those matters have not entirely prevented the appearance of sickness.
She is a new vessel on the first voyage, commanded by Captain Fraser, and superintended by Dr. Crane, whose long experience in the transport of people eminently qualifies him for the post.
His task on the present occasion has been rather more onerous than usual, from hooping-cough existing when the ship left Plymouth.
There were but two mild cases, but unfortunately the epidemic was communicated to others, and a large number were treated for the same, five of whom died, aud the remainder had partially recovered, leaving but two on the Surgeon's list on arrival.

In consequence of this the Assistant forbade communication till Dr. Duncan's visit of inspection; and with praise worthy zeal for the service, that gentleman was early in attendance and mustered the people. From the surgeon's and master's opinion with the general appearance of the immigrants some slight idea may be formed of their suitability for colonial purposes; and it is but fair to remark on the good order and observance of routine manifested.
This resulted from stringency at commencement, which ripened into cheerful obedience at the close. By far the majority are assisted passage certificate holders, imported to the order of friends here, and doubtless many recognitions of familiar faces will occur in the course of the day, for it is unlikely any quarantine regulations will be enforced. The cleanliness in the single females department is very creditable to the feminine part of the floating community, and the same will apply to the married folks, though the number of juveniles is rather against its remaining in strict order long.
The single men have more space than any others, for on the stowage of the hammocks the apartment extends from side to side without obstruction.
As regards the dis tiller and ventilator, Dr. Crane is in favour of both, but recognises the necessity of some modification in the latter, in order more thoroughly to clear the 'tween decks from impure air.

Subjoined are the names of the immigrants

English:
James, Louisa, Elizabeth, Louisa, James, Emma, and Frederick Allen, Jesse, Elizabeth, Adeline, Rosalinde, and Sylvia Aubris, Mary J. Bailey, William Benny, Richard Best, William, Elizabeth, Annie, Samuel, William, and Kate Biles, Isaac, Mary J and Ellen J. Blackmore, Eli Hannah, Sarah, and James Bradbury, Samuel Brand, George, Ann, and George Butter, James and Rachel Bye, William, Harriet, John, and Daniel Cannon, William, Mary, Sarah, Mary, and William Carnail, Marshall, Martha, Fred., and Benj. Carter, Richard and Emma Carter, William Chapman, Charles Curnow, Thomas, Mary T., and William Clarke, Thomas and Selina Davis, Richard Dawe, Miss E. Duffey, Edward, Mary, Ann, Mary, Bertha, and Edward Dingle, James, Emma, James, and Jane Draper, Mark and Sarah Fishlock, Eliza Forrestall, Sarah Forster, Alice Foskett, Lewin, Mary, George, and Anne E. Fry, William George, George, Hope, Edith, and Annie Gibbons, Stephen, Mary A., and Anne Gibbons, Anne Gingall, Thomas Guest, William, Elizabeth, Mary A., and Elizabeth Harris, John and Margaret Harvie, John Hatherby, George and Mary Hearny, Mark N. Hillier, Emanuel, Caroline, Eliza, Elizabeth, Ketty, and Angelina Hellier, Charles and Mary Higgs, Joseph Honniball, John Ingram, David Jones, Joseph Kingston, John Knight. George Lane, Sarah A. Lanthias, Anna Lee, Jane McKeon, Thomas, Charlotte, and Ernest Matthews, Wm. Medland, Daniel Megins, Wm. Merrifield, Richard Nicholls, Henry Osmond, Thomas Page, William Parsons, James Raines, Anty Retallach, James and Alfred Richards, William and Susan Rodda, William G. Roskilly, John, Anna, Sarah, William, Fanny, John, Asenok, and Elijah Smart, Charles Smith, Richard Sahey, John Stocker, Edward Townsend, Thomas Tripconey, Thomas Tuckey. Harry Turpin, Mary A. Welsford, Chas. Wheeler, Mary. A. Wilcocks, Sophia, William, Mary, and Mary Williams.

Scotch:- Mary J ,George, and Robert Anderson, Roderick and Catherine Beaton, William Cameron, Donald Campbell, Ann Campbell, Wm. Fraser, Louis Grant, Alexander Gullard, Robert Hardie, Thomas McDonald, John McKenzie, William Moir, Thomas, Elizabeth, Agnes, and Christina Robertson. Thomas Robertson, Hugh Ross, Mary Ross, Thos. Russell, Albert, Margaret, and Jessie Skirving, John Souter, Jane Stoudart, James Sutherland, William Taylor, Wm. Turnbull, James Watson.

Irish:- Sarah and Elizabeth Abbott, Mary A. Aitchison, Henry and John Allan, Ellen, William, and Hamilton Armstrong, Johanna Bannan, Robert Breaden, Johanna Brown, William Burns. Mary, Bridget, and Margaret Casey, Mary, Catherine, and Margaret Casey, Edmund Casey, William and James Casey, Betchley Cerry, Catherine Comerford. Michael Comerford, Bridget Considine, Mich. Consadine, Mary Conway, Bridget Crowe, Ann Culhiran, Bridget Currnean, James Daly, Maria Daly, John and Daniel Daly, Pat Dillon, Francis Dillon, Mary Dillon, Johanna and Mary Dillon. Pat Doulan, Mich Donnellan, John Donoghue, Honora Doody, William Dowler. Mary A. Eagan, Elizabeth and Anne Eakins. Sarah Eakins, Alexander and James Eakins, Pat Egan. T. J. Ewart, Margaret Farrell, T. Farrell, Mich Farty, Thomas Flanagan. Elizabeth and Margaret Fleming, Peter, Catherine. Mich., Mary, and John Francis. John Francis, Margaret Francis, John and Connor Francis, Kate Francis, Pat, Honora, John, Mich., and Mary Francis, Pat Grady, Eilen Giltemane, Thomas Gleeson, Ellen Green, Mary A. and Margaret Greer, James, Mary. Henry, and Emily Greer, John Greinason, Mary Guthrie, Bridget Guthrie, Edward Halloran. James Hanlan, Mich. Healy, Bridget Healy, Hannah Healy, Bridget Hehir, John and Pat. Hehir, William Henderson, Jane Henderson, Mary Hogan. Thomas Hogan, Margaret Howard, Mary Hynes, Sarah Hynes, William and John Jones, Samuel A. Jones, James and John Keane, Bridget Keef, Anne Keogh, John Keogh, Robert and Thomas Kemp, Elizabeth Kemp, Biddy Kerin. Michael and Margaret Kerin, Dennis and Michael Kerin, James Kerr, Margaret Kiely, Honora Kitt, Ellen and Johanna Leary, Cornelius Leary, Pat. Lee, Mary Lineham, Martin and Mary Lineham, Pat Lunard, Thomas Lucas, Mary Lynch, John, Ellen, John, and James Lynch, James and Catherine Lynch, Margaret Lyons, Pat. and Michael Lyons, Rose Mackill, Pat. Madden. John Madjan, Catherine Mann, Bridget Markham, John McGrath. Mary, Bridget, Catherine, and Catherine McMahon, Julia McGrath, Betty McGaun, Anorah McCormick, Rose McNally. Mich., James, and Pat. McMahon, Thomas Molan, Thomas Moloney, Mary Molloy, Margaret and Margaret Morrissey, Margaret Morissey, Alice Mullen, James, John, and Pat. Murphy, Thomas Murphy, Julia, Margaret, and John Murphy, John, Harriet, Cornelius, Maurice, and Eliza Murphy, Ann O'Brien, William O'Brien. Margaret O'Brien, Mick O'Connell, Edmund O'Donnell. Margaret O'Donnell, Kate O'Loughlin, Terence, John, Thomas, Pat, and John O'Loughlin, Mary O'Neil, Ellen Paterson, Joshua, Mary A., George, William, Ellen, and Eliza Pratt, Bridget Ready, James Ready, John Roach, Bridget Rodgers, Pat. Russell, Margaret Ryan, John, Mick, and Timothy Ryan, Thomas Ryan, James, Martha, Catherine, Thomas, and James Shannon, John and Margaret Sheahan, Bridget, Helen, and Margaret Sheady, Dennis and Margaret Sheady, James and John Sheady, Mick, Mary, John, Pat. Kate, and Mick Shein, James, Isabella, and John Stevenson, Ann Stokes, Michael Stokes, John Stimon, Thomas Sweeney, Bridget Sweeney, Sally Tierney, Thomas Tilson, Catherine Torney, Robert Tweedy, Mary Welsh, Johanna and Hannah Whelan, Nancy, Margaret Bridget, Kate, and Ann Whelan, Hannah and Mary Whelan, Dominick Whelan, Pat, Margaret Catherine, and Mary White, John Wilson, and John Woods.

Summary.:-
Married men, 42;
Married women, 43;
single men, 155;
single women, 129.
Children between 1 to 12:
Boys, 31;
Girls, 35.
Children under 1:
Boys, 6;
Girls, 2.

Total, 443 equal to 402 statute adults

2 comment(s), latest 3 years, 4 months ago

the children of Edmund AMYES 1852-1900 and Elizabeth nee ICK 1820-1892 NZ

The children of Edmund Amyes b:1812 Corely,Shropshire and baptised 20 March 1812 at Corely, Shropshire. Father Thomas Amyes. Mother Frances. Source-B&M&D at FamilySearch.Org. and Elizabeth ICK b:1820 at Stoke,Shropshire, England
Now found some trees that suggest Edmund's mother (Frances) maiden name also was ICK can find no documentary proof.
Now Edmund Amyes had two sons to a woman Mary Ann before he married Elizabeth ICK they were Charles AMYES b:1839 at Norely, Herefordshire. and Edmund b:1841 at Great Whitely, Worcestershire. Mary Ann born abt 1815 in Worcestershire, died in Martley, Worcestershire.

The first child of Robert Henry, was Clara AMYES was born in Hartley. I can't find a spouse for her.

The second child, Emily AMYES b:1847 in Shrawley, Worcestershire married Edmund Marriott DAWE on the 2 September 1878 at Canterbury, NZ. They had 2 children:- Laura Elizabeth Sophia Dawe 1879 Edgar Harold Selwyn Dawe 1881

The third child Alice AMYES b:1847 at Wolverhampton, Staffordshire married Robert JOHNSTONE in NZ in 1870 The children of this marriage were:-
Robert Henery Johnstone 1873 Emily Jane Johnstone 1875
Albert Edmund Johnstone 1876 Alice Johnstone 1878
Louisa Johnstone 1879 Maude May Johnstone 1882
Robert Alexander Johnstone 1884 William John Johnstone 1887

4th child Robert Henry AMYES b:June 1850 at Enville, Staffordshire, married Cornelia DAWS 18 October 1878 the children of this marriage were:-

5th Child Alfred AMYES b:Dec.1851, Wolverhampton,Staffordshire married Elizabeth Ann HANCOCK 1853-1928 on the 26 April 1882 the children of this marriage were :-
Thomas Reginald Amyes 1883 Alfred Cuthbert Amyes 1884
Arthur Edmund Amyes 1886 Mary Olive Gwendoline Amyes 1891 Constance Sylvia Amyes 1896
Alfred died on 7 October 1941 and is buried at Timaru Cemetery, NZ

6th child, Edward Burton AMYES b:Sept 1853 Wolverhampton, Staffordshire . married Maria Oxley in 1881 in NZ. children of this marriage were:-
Henry Edward Amyes 1882 Ernest Oxley Amyes 1884
Pearl Elizabeth Amyes 1887

7th child Joseph Owen AMYES b:June 1855 Wolverhampton, Staffordshire, married twice. firstly to Amy Florence White PARSONS 1876-1917 at Lyttleton, Canterbury NZ on the 9 September 1897. His second wife was Jessie Maria MCLAY whom he married at Canterbury NZ on 2 June 1921

8th Child Selina Eliza AMYES b:June 1856 at Bridgnorth, Shropshire. married Robert Kirtley OXLEY in NZ in 1876. The children of this marriage were:-
Hubert Kirtley Oxley 1877 Robert Antony Amyes Oxley 1878
Minnie Victoria May Oxley 1880 Kenderdine Owen Sidney Oxley 1887 Juanita Violet Ann Oxley 1889
Waikouaiti Collins Preece Oxley 1893 Lulu Moss Myrtle Oxley 1895 Alma Gwendoline Hidderington Oxley 1898

9th Child Sidney Herbert AMYES b:Sept 1857 at Bridgnorth, Shropshire married Maria SMART b:1861, On the 26 March 1890 at Irwell, Canterbury NZ. Children of this marriage were:-
Harold Cyril Amyes 1891 Herbert Westby Amyes 1894 Clarence Gordon Amyes 1897 Mabel Eileen Vesta Amyes 1900

10th Child, Edmund Philemore Ick AMYES b:March 1859 at Bridgnorth, Shropshire. married Annie Jane GIBB 1866-1910 at Christchurch on the 13 April 1898. Children from this marriage were:-
Stanley Leslie Edmund Amyes 1899 1957
Albert Ernest Amyes 1904 1904
Edmund died 9 February 1943 and is buried at Bromley Cemetery,Christchurch, NZ

11th child Precilla b:January 1861 at Bridgnorth Shropshire died around the end of 1862

Edmund AMYES died on the 30 November 1900 at Irwell, Canterbury, New Zealand
His wife Elizabeth died 12 March 1892 at Hornby, Canterbury, New Zealand. Both had arrived in New Zealand with their children in 1862.

3 comment(s), latest 5 years, 1 month ago

The Christopher CORNELIUS Family from Blount Alabama

Christopher Columbus Cornelius The son of William Thomas CORNELIUS 1834-1905 and Charlotte Catherine PUTMAN 1839-1910

Christopher Columbus CORNELIUS was born 1 May 1868 in Blount, Alabama and died 11 December 1945 at Oneonta,Blount Alabama

Christopher on the 1 March 1888 in Blount, Alabama married (1.) Sarah A Ryan b:3 April 1867 in Blount and d: 6 May 1895 in Blount.Sarah was the daughter of James M Ryan 1843-1908 and Mary Ann WILEMON 1841-1945

The children of this marriage were:-
1.James Loue Cornelius 1888 1956
2.Syrena Catherine Cornelius 1891-?
3.William Myrdia Cornelius 1893 1957

Christopher on the 25 September 1895 next married (2.) Hester BARNES born 1 February 1877 in St.Clair Co., Alabama and died 26 April 1896.
Hester was the daughter of Jordan Adolphus BARNES 1851-1882 and Artemecia? MOORE 1849-1911

The couple had no children.


Christopher in 1897 next married (3.) Nancy Viola THOMPSON, Nancy was born on the 26 December 1876 in Blount Alabama and died 25 April 1948 in Oneonta, Blount Alabama. The daughter od David Crockett THOMPSON 1853-1893 and Frances MOORE 1856-1945

The children of this marriage were:-

General Grant Cornelius. 18991985
Ruthie Mary Cornelius 19011993
Beatrice 'Bertie' Cornelius 19051994
Gerthia Le Ella Cornelius 1906 ?
Odus Benjamin Cornelius 19091965
Jay Pinson Cornelius 19152007
Alton Beck Cornelius 19172004
1 Living


sources all Us Census records
1870 United States Federal Census
1880 United States Federal Census
1900 United States Federal Census
1920 United States Federal Census
1930 United States Federal Census
Alabama Marriage Collection, 1800-1969
Alabama Deaths, 1908-59

The Cobcroft-Benson Wedding

BENSON-COBCROFT.
All Windsor was en fete for the marriage ceremony of Miss Olive Cobcroft,
daughter of the late Mr. R. W. Cobcroft and Mrs. Cobcroft, of "Glenroy," with Mr. Walter Benson,
of Milson's Point, Sydney,
The ceremony took place precisely at 1.30 p.m. on Tuesday of last week at
St. Matthew's Church of England, the Rev. S. G. Fielding officiating.
Needless to remark, the old church was well filled with sightseers and guests from all
parts of the district, and also from Sydney.
The bride's girl friends had been busily engaged during the morning at the church. The
wedding bell and two hearts with initials were exceedingly pretty.
As the bride entered the church on the arm of Mr. Thompson, of St. Marys (an old friend of her father's),
the choir sang "The Voice That Breathed O'er Eden." She was beautifully dressed in
white glace silk, tucked and trimmed with ivory lace, the court train being a mass of tiny frills,
veilled in spotted chiffon, very prettily shirred. The yoke was of embroidered chiffon,
and the bodice was also trimmed with the same. She wore a coronet of orange blossoms and jessamine,
and a lovely embroidered veil. Also a pearl and diamond star and pearl necklace,
and carried a shower bouquet of jonquils and hyacinths (the gifts of the bridegroom).
She was attended by three bridesmaids, Misses Ruby Pateson (cousin), Carrie Cobcroft (sister),
and little Pearl Thompson.
The two older bridesmaids were dressed in smart frocks of white silk voille over
glace silk, trimmed with Paris lace and shirrings. Their hats were of cream straw,
with lace and chiffon, and they wore gold brooches, and carried posies of daffodils,
gifts of the bridegroom.
The tiny bridesmaid wore white insertion-pleated chiffon, with a tucked hat of white silk.
Mr. Eustace Pinhey acted as best man, and Mr. Reggie Butler and Master Cecil Young as groomsmen.
During the signing of the register, Miss Carlotta Young sang "O Perfect Love."
Mrs. Eather presided at the organ, and played the wedding march.
After the ceremony, Mrs. Cobcroft held a reception at "Glenroy," where the many costly
and handsome presents (93) were admired.
The wedding breakfast was served in the billiard-room, which was beautifully draped
with flags and wattle, the table having buttercup and white flowers, with maiden hair fern.
Several toasts were honored.
Mr. Fielding proposed the "Bride and Bridegroom," and Mr. Walter Benson happily responded.
Mr. Alec Hunter proposed "The Bridesmaids," which was responded to by Mr. Eustace Pinhey.
Mr. Brinsley Hall proposed the "Parents of the Bride and Bridegroom." Mr. Thompson responded
in most feeling terms of the late Mr. R. W. Cobcroft, having known that gentleman for eighteen years
prior to his death.
The "Ladies" was proposed by Mr. G. McCauley, and Mr. Clarence Pitt responded most flatteringly.
The bride received numerous telegrams during the breakfast.
Music was indulged in, and later on the whole group of visitors was photographed
by Mr. J. H. Bloome.
Mr. and Mrs. Walter Benson later on left for their home in Sydney, the bride going away
in a pale green voille frock, the skirt being shirred ; also a black lace picture hat,
and blue parasol.

DRESSES.
Mrs. Cobcroft, black silk striped voille, with lovely insertions and tucks,
the bodice draped with embroidered chiffon threaded with black velvet bebe ribbon,
and white chiffon front embroidered in black.
Mrs. Paterson, black canvas frock and
white trimmings, black toque with green leaves
Mrs. Seymour (bridegroom's mother),
black glace silk shirred, with cream silk and lace trimmings
Mrs. T. H. Young, white silk bodice,
and black silk skirt
Miss M. A. Cobcroft, black striped
cloth and ruched with silk front
Miss Batler, black frock, trimmed
with pale blue
Miss Cranley, black spotted silk,
cream net and white lace
Mrs. Sid. Benson, pale blue linen and
white boa
Miss Connie Batler, green cashmere,
white silk and green guipure
Miss Thompson, cream voille over
glace silk and Paris lace, black pic-
ture hat
Mrs. Fielding, black frock, with
black bonnet and pink roses
Mrs. James Martin, black silk voille,
with white front and helitrope
Mrs. Jack Dunston, black voille, and
sequin trimmings
Mrs. Harry Dunston, black frock,
with beautiful maltese collar
Mrs. Callaghan, black brocaded silk
Mrs. Brinsley Hall, black striped
voille, and white chiffon front
Mrs. Paine, green flaked voille,
green glace and oriental guipure
Mrs. Jack Tebbutt, pale grey voille,
black medallions over white silk, and beautiful black hat
Mrs. W. McQuade, black silk, and
white trimmings, and floral hat
Mrs. Lobb, black silk striped voille,
silk guipure and white chiffon
Mrs. A. D. Playfair, grey silk voille,
black and white chiffon applique,
and black hat
Miss Carlotta Young, green flaked
voille, cream crepe-di-chine, and guipure trimmmings
Miss Champley, cream voille, lace
and shirrings, and ribbon sash, beautiful black hat
Miss Dolly Young, fawn silk, Irish
poplin, pale blue crepe-di-chine,
and embroidered chiffon
Miss McCauley, green flaked muslin,
cream net, pink velvet, and a very pretty blue and pink hat
Miss Callaghan, white silk blouse,
cream voille skirt with lace, white hat and pink roses
Miss Ada Ward, pale blue voille and
guipure, and black hat
Mrs. Eather, navy blue muslin, and
white valeneiennes insertions
Miss Eather, white muslin, and pretty
floral hat
Miss Hilda Toting, cream silmas
muslin, red sash and floral hat
Miss Dulcie Hall, pale blue fancy
muslin, hat to match
Mrs. Flexman, green velvet blouse,
canvas skirt, oriental embroidery over white satn
Mrs. John Hunter, black brocaded
satin, lace motifs and pale blue crepe de chine, green bonnet
Mrs. Hotten, green cloth and guipure
Mrs. Metcalf, black satin frock, velvet
cape
Mrs. Woodhill, black frock, white
trimmings, pretty hat
Miss Dunston, white striped voille,
black hat
Miss Ruby Dunston, silk striped white
voille and net, white hat
Miss Primrose, black matalasse cloth,
gale blue brocaded silk, and medal-
lions of chantilly lace
Mrs. Law, navy blue voille, white
silk, and lace
Miss Pidgeon, cream voille and lace,
black hat with plumes
Miss Hutchinson, pretty pale blue
voille, herring-bone and lace medal-lions in guipure
Miss Louie Berckelman, black frock
and hat, gold chain with emeralds

PRESENTS.
Mother of bride, sewing machine and house linen ;
Miss Carrie Cobcroft, silk and point lace cushion ;
Mr. and Mrs. T. H. Young (bridegroom's sister), cheque and water colorpainting of Sydney harbour ;
Mr. Thompson, cheque ;
Mr. W. J. Young and family, silver hot water kettle;
Mr. C. Gosney, silver and cut glass salad bowl ;
Mrs. Bushell, silver butter dish;
Mr. and Mrs. Burnell Jones, silver carver rests ;
Mr. E. Pinhey, unique cucumber dish;
Mrs. Brown, bread platter;
Misses Brown, glass jar ;
Mr. and Mrs. Seymour (parents of bridegroom), cheque and kitchen utensils ;
Miss Cheeseman, pair silver specimen glasses;
Mrs. Eather, salt cellars;
Miss Eather, point lace cushion ;
" Esther," silver salt cellars ;
Mr. and Mrs. Lobb, silver entree dish ;
Mr. and Mrs. B. Hall, silver salver ;
Miss Dulcie Hall, silver icing sugar bowl;
Mr. and Mrs. Paine, silver mounted bread platter;
Mr. Easy, silver cake basket;
Dr., Mrs, and Miss Callaghan, silver cake basket;
Mrs. McQuade, point lace cosy and hand painted cloth;
Miss Butler, butter and jam dish;
Mr. McCauley, ivory and silver fish carvers;
Miss McCauley, cake fork; Miss Champley, silver honey pot ;
Mr. C. M. Pitt, silver photo frame;
Mr. S. M. Pitt, silver teaspoons ;
Miss Colliss, silver salt cellars;
Mr. and Mrs. Bryant, silver card tray ;
Mr. F. Head, mirror ;
Mr. R. Simpson, mirror;
Mr. and Mrs. Beveridge, silver jam dish;
Mrs.Mullinger, pair glass vases ;
Miss A. Dunstan, specimen glasses on silver stands;
Mr. and Mrs. Playfair, afternoon tea spoons, sugar spoon, and butter knife;
Mr. Chambers, silver gong;
Appointment Branch G.P.O., silver egg cruet;
Mr and Mrs. Dunstan and family, silver ink stand and candle combination ;
Mr. and Mrs. John Hunter, pair silver backed hair brushes and comb ;
Miss Hunter, cut glass and silver topped scent bottles;
Mr. A. Hunter, handsome marble clock ;
Mr. and Mrs. O'Hehir, combination cheese and salad bowl;
Mr. and Mrs. Flexham, hall gong;
Mr. and Mrs. T. Cobcroft, celery bowl ;
Miss Robinson, cupid ornaments ;
Miss V. Robinson, silver specimen vases ;
Mr. and Mrs. Moses, silver butter dish;
Miss Moses, glass bowl :
Miss Berckelman, silver butter dish ;
the employees of the late Mr. R. W. Cobcroft, silver sugar basin ;
Mr. and Mrs. H. Dunston, afternoon cake forks;
Mr. and Mrs. Hotten, silver toast rack;
Mr. and Mrs. Woodhill, set of carvers ;
Mr. and Mrs. Metcalfe, afternoon tea forks;
Miss Gurney, Doulton vases ;
Mrs. and Miss Barnett, silver-mounted scent bottles, filled;
Miss Williams, silver book mark;
Mrs. James Martin unique silver rose bowl;
Misses Dorothy, Kathleen, and Queenie Lobb, hat pin holder, pair of d'oyleys, and cup and saucer ;
Mr. and Mrs. Ward, silver cake basket ;
Miss Ward, breakfast cruet ;
Misses Holland, silver double jam dish;
Mr. and Mrs. Harry Pateson (aunt), cutlery ;
Miss Pateson, (cousin), pearl necklet ;
Mrs. and Miss Pendergast, preserve dish;
Mr. and Mrs. F. Alderson, pair silver entree dishes ;
Miss Bushel, pair silver serviette rings and tea spoons ;
Mr. and Mrs. J. Tebbutt, silver sugar scuttle;
Mr. John Tebbutt, silver ink stand ;
Miss Jane Tebbutt, silver cake forks ;
Mr. R. and Miss Butler (cousins), silver flower pots;
Mr. and Mrs. G. Law, silver ornaments;
Miss Primrose, point lace collar ;
Mr. and Mrs. Hutchinson (aunt), silver teapot ;
Miss Ruby Pidgeon (cousin), afternoon tea spoons ;
Mrs. Davis, pair vases ;
Rev. and Mrs. Fielding, rose bowl, silver and glass;
Mr. G Podmore, silver horseshoe toast rack ;
Mr Geo. Cobcroft (uncle), pair lovely carvers ;
Mr. Harvey Cobcroft (uncle), unique silver claret jug ;
Mr. and Mrs. Daniel Hogan, handsome travelling clock;
Mr. and Mrs. Rodda, pair silver jam spoons;
Mrs. Clarke (aunt), set of pretty China jugs;
Miss Clarke (cousin), silver teapot ;
Mr. J. Ruthven, silver-mounted cut glass knife rests ;
Mr. A. Simpson, oil painting ;
Mr. P. Rigg, case preserve spoons ;
Mr. and Mrs. S. Benson (uncle and aunt), afternoon tea set ;
Mr. Butler (uncle), cheque.

The following gentlemen were present:- Messrs. Brinsley Hall, W. J. Young,
J. J. Paine, Thos. Lobb, Chambers, Podmore, Seymour, Head, Simpson, Alec. Hunter,
Ruthven, J. Tebbutt, Rev. Fielding, G. Woodhill, C. Pitt, S. Pitt, A. D. Playfair,
R. and G. Cobcroft (brothers), Harvey and George Cobcroft (uncles), Dunstan,
W. Moses, and O'Hehir.
Mr. and Mrs. Benson left by the 4.20 p.m. train amidst showers of
rice and confetti.
The bride's and bridesmaids' frocks and the trousseau were made at Mrs.
Lobb's dressmaking establishment, and reflected great credit.

Source:
Hawkesbury Herald
Windsor, NSW : 1902 - 1945
Friday 11 September 1903
Page 8
Transcription, janilye 2014

The COLLISION BETWEEN the BARRABOOL and BONNIE DUNDEE.

The inquest on the body of Sarah Brown, one of the
victims to the collision between the Bonnie Dundee and
Barrabool, was concluded yesterday, the jury finding a
verdict of manslaughter against the captain and mate of
the Bonnie Dundee. The inquest was commenced on the
12th instant, and that day's evidence we published, but the
following day the Coroner made an order against the pub-
lication of the evidence until the conclusion of the inquiry,
so we were unable to record the evidence from day to day.
The following are the statements of the witnesses, with the
exception of those taken on the 12th, which we have
already published :-
Dr. Owen Spencer Evans deposed that on Tuesday he was
called to a house in Darling-street, Balmain, and there saw
the dead body of a woman, about fifty years of age, which
he recognised as that of a woman known to him by the
name of Sarah Brownhe examined tho body and found
no direct marks of violence ; froth was oozing from the
mouth and nostrils, and the body generally presented the
usual appearances of death by drowning; witness was of
opinion that death had been so caused.
Thomas Crawford deposed that he was chief officer of the
lost steamship, Bonnie Dundee, a screw steamer, trading
between Sydney and the Manning River; she left
Sydney at forty minutes past 1 o'clock on Monday
afternoon, the 10th instant, her destination being
the Manning River: when the vessel got clear
of the heads her course was shaped N. by E. half
E.; the weather was fine and clear, a light breeze blowing
from the northward and eastward until tho evening, when
the wind fell and it became calm; witness took charge of
the deck at 6 o'clock; the vessel was then steering the same
course; shortly after 6 o'clock the coloured side lights and
white masthead light were lit and slipped in their usual
places; the steamer was then going at the rate of seven or
eight knots, and was about two or two and a half miles off
the land; the vessel had not a full cargo and was not deep
in the water; she answered her helm readily; about half
past 7 o'clock witness saw a masthead light, bearing about
north by east and about two and half miles distant ; at the
same time that witness saw the light, the look-out man on
the forecastle reported "a vessel a-head; the strange
vessel appeared to be steering a S. S. W. course; at this time
the moon was up a little, and the night was fine and clear,
with smooth water and little or no wind; a few minutes
after the look-out man reported the vessel, witness saw her
red light; he then ordered the man at the wheel to keep the
vessel off a point, and her course was accordingly changed
to north-east by north; the Bonnie Dundee kept on this
course until witness saw the green light of the approaching
steamer, about five minutes after he saw the red light; at
this time the captain of the Bonnie Dundee was on the
bridge on deck, witness was also on the bridge; the quarter-
deck of the Bonnie Dundee was raised about two feet above
the main deck; her deck was about 120 feet in length, and
her tonnage was 130 tons; at the time the strange steamer
was approaching, the Newcastle light was in sight about 15
miles on the port bow of the Bonnie Dundee; immediately
on seeing the green light of the approaching steamer,
witness gave the order to put the helm hard-a-starboard, and
then when the two vessels got to within half-a-length of each
other, he saw that the stranger had altered her course, so
that her red light was again showing; the captain, who
was on the bridge at the time, ordered the man at the wheel
to keep the helm as it was, and then he gave the order to
stop the engines and go full speed astern, but by that time
the stranger was close on to them on the starboard side,
and immediately afterwards struck the Bonnie Dundee
amidships; the water began to pour in on the main deck,
and the vessel heaved ovor heavily to port; witness saw
some of the men jump on board the other steamer, and he
had tho ship's hoat lowered, and took charge of it; the
Bonnie Dundee sank almost at once, foundering about four
minutes after the collision; there were four lady pas
sengers on board the Bonnie Dundee; one of them was a
Mrs. Brown, whose dead body witness viewed on Wed-
nesday, in a house in Balmain, in the presence of
the Coroner and jury; after the Bonnie Dundee had
foundered, witness's boat was pulled alongside the
strange vessel, which was then ascertained to be
the Barrabool, and witness was taken on board,
after assisting in recovering the body of Mrs. Brown;
(witness here expressed a wish to make a correction in his
former evidence: when the mast-head light of the Barra-
bool came in sight, the Bonnie Dundee was steering
N.N.E.;) at the time of the collision, the engines of the
Bonnie Dundee were going astern, but the vessel had still
a little way on, probably about two knots an hour; witness
could not say exactly at what rate the Barrabool was
going when she struck the Bonnie Dundee, but she was
going at great speed, and she struck with great force;
witness did not hear any order given on board the Barra
pool; in his opinion, after the collision, everything that
could possibly be done to save life was done by both ships.
To Mr. Rogers: Witness did not see the green light of the
Barrabool first, but the red one; when ships met in a line
the rule was to keep red light to red light, or green to
green; when the ships met end on, each ship ported her
helm. To a juror: Witness held a certificate of master in
a coasting vessel from the Marine Board; when the captain
was on deck, the charge of the ship devolved on him.
;John Alexander Stewart stated that he was master of the
BonnieDundee which left Sydney on Monday afternoon for
the Manning River: the Bonnie Dundee was 121 tons register,
an 45-horse power; her length was about 20 feet, and her
full power of steaming 8 knots an hour; witness went on
deck about 6 o'clock in the evening, and at about a quarter
to 8 he heard the officer of the watch, who was on the bridge,
sing out to the man at the wheel "hard a starboard;"
witness rushed up on the bridge and saw a vessel's green
light; he then asked the man at the wheel how his helm
was, and the reply was that it was hard a starboard, and
witness ordered the seaman to keep it so; very shortly after-
wards the green light of the approaching vessel disappeared,
and the red light became visible; on perceiving this,
witness gave orders to stop the engines, and this was done,
and about a minute afterwards the stranger having ap-
proached to within fifty yards of the Bonnie Dundee, the
engines were reversed full speed astern; very shortly after
this the stranger struck the Bonnie Dundee amid-
ships on the starboard side cutting about four feet
into the deck and smashing the starboard life-boat;
at once a number of the crew rushed to the part
of the deck where the collision took place and climbed up
the bows of the Barrabool; witness, not knowing exactly
the extent of the damage sustained by his vessel, ordered
the engines full speed ahead in order to try and reach the
beach which was about two and a-half miles distant; after
giving this order he perceived the uselessness of such an
attempt, and stopping tho engines, gave orders to lower
a boat which was promptly done; by this time
the lady passengers, four in number, were on the
bridge with witness and he, cutting away the lifo buoys
gavo them to the ladies; as soon as the boat touched the
water and got rid of the tackling, the stewardess, who had
a child in her aims, threw it into the boat, and immediately
afterwards the vessel went down with witness and the four
women on the bridge, all the others having left the ship
either in the boat or by climbing up the bows of
the Barrabool. Between three and four minutes elapsed
from the time of the collision until the vessel went down;
there were 21 hands on board all told at the time of the
collision; witness did not know, there was a vessel in sight
until he heard the mate give the order "hard a starboard;'
it was not the duty of the officer of the watch to report a
vessel in sight, to witness unless he thought there was
danger; when witness first saw the light of the Barrabool
she must have been about 300 or 400 yards distant, and the
Bonnie Dundee was going at the rate of 7 knots an hour
when the collision occurred, the Barrabool was, in witness's
opinion, going at a speed of about 3 knots.
To Mr. Sly: In witness's opinion the vessel was properly
handled after the light of the Barrabool had been sighted
the steam whistle was not used; it was not customary to use
it on a clear night like that on which the collision occurred
when the red light of the Barrabool was sighted, it was too
late to port the helm of the Bonnie Dundee, as the former
vessel was almost on top of her; at the exact time of the
collision the Bonnie Dundee was almost stationary; there
was no time to get the passengers into the boat before the
vessel went down.
To Mr. Rogers: The Bonnie Dundee was heading about
north-west when she was struck; everything was done by
the Barrabool people to save life.
To Mr. Manning: Witness did not think, under the cir
cumstances, that there was any occasion for the chief officer
(to communicate with him before allowing the ships to come
so close together if the green light of the Barrabool had
continued in sight; witness had given the Herald news
paper a report of the occurrence; - he was in bed when the
reporter came, and the chief officer was in the room; wit
ness was the only man left on board the vessel when she
went down.
Henry Dose, able-bodied seaman of tho Bonnie Dundee
joined tho vessel on Monday last; he was at the wheel at
the time of the collision with the Barrabool; he went to
the wheel about 6 o'clock, when about twelve or fifteen miles
south of Newcastle; the vessel's course was thena north
by east half east; about 7 o'clock witness was directed
by the mate to change the course to N.N.E.; the
vessel had passed Bird Island when that order was given;
the N.N.E. course was continued until the red light of a
steamer, afterwards found to be the Barrabool, was sighted
about four miles distant, and bearing about north on the
port bow; on seeing the red light, the mato gave the order
to keep the vessel off a little, and accordingly witness kept
her off another point, her course then being north-east by
north; that course was kept until the Barrabool, when
nearly abreast of the Bonnie Dundee, showed her green
light; the mate then gave the ordor, "Hard a starboard,'
and witness brought the vessel round till her head was
about north-west; the Barrabool was then almost on top of
them, and showing her red light, and immediately after
that she struck the Bonnie Dundee on the starboard side;
the captain went on the bridge about 10 minutes before the
collision took place; when the vessel waa struck, the captain
shouted, "look out for yourselves;" if the Barrabool
had not altered her course there was sufficient room for her
to have passed between the Bonnie Dundee and the land.
John Petersen, seaman of the Bonnie Dundee, was look-
out man on the forecastle when the collision occurred; he
went on the lookout about 6 o'clock; between 7 and 8
o'clock, while on the lookout, he sight a bright masthead
light, which appeared to be straight ahead; about five or
ten minutes after sighting the masthead light the red light
of the vessel came in sight; witness reported the light to
the officer in charge of the deck, and he said " All right:"
witness continued on the lookout on the forecastle, and soon
afterwards, when the vessels began to near one another the
red light disappeared and the green light came in sight
almost immediately after the green light of the approaching
vessel come in sight she ran into the Bonnie Dundee; when
first witness sighted the masthead light it was about two or
three miles off.
To Mr. Rogers: Witness did not notice whether the
Bonnie Dundee slackened speed; he could not tell that,
being forward.
To Mr. Monning: Witness did not see the red light of
the Barrabool a second time; he was looking at the Barra-
bool from the time she showed the green light until the
collision occurred; he climbed the bows of the Barrabool
after the collision.
To the Coroner: Witness heard the steam-whistle
sounded on board the Bonnie Dundee; there was so much
confusion and excitement that he could not tell whether a
bell was rung or a whistle sounded on board the Barrabool;
but he was quite certain that the whistle sounded on board
the Bonnie Dundee.
Thomas Crawford, recalled, deposed that when he first
saw the green light of the Barrabool it was on the port bow
of the Bonnie Dundee, nearly straight ahead; he lost the
red light, and a minuto or two afterwards saw the green
light; from the position the steamers were in to one
another, a slight movement of the helm would have caused
the change of lights; when he first saw the green light the
Barrabool was about her own length off; there was nothing
in the relative positions of the two vessels that would have
led witness to apprehend danger until he saw the green
light of the Barrabool.
John Charles Simmons, chief engineer of the Bonnie Dundee,
was attending, to the engines of the vessel when the collision
took place on Monday night; about a quarter to 8 o'clock
that evening he received an order by telegraph to stop, and
then "full speed astern" ; he obeyed both orders without
any delay; about a minute after he received the latter
order he felt a shock, and almost immediately afterwards
received the order "full speed ahead," quickly followed by
"stop"; after stopping the second time he went on deck,
and found the vessel sinking.
Henry Dose rocallcd: When he first saw the Barrabool
he saw the red light and the mast-head light.
To a juror: At the time he first saw the red light he did
not see the green light; when the mate saw the red light he
told witness to keep off a little, and witness then ported his
helm, which would have the effect of showing the red light
more; about a quarter of an hour elapsed between the time
witness first saw the red light, and the timo he received the
order "hard a starboard" he did not see the greenlight till
he got the order, "Hard-a-starboard;" if the Bonnie
Dundee had kept the course she was on before that order
had been given the Barrabool would have struck her on the
port bow; witness did not hear the lookout man sing out,
but that would be accounted for by the fact that he
(witness) was standing alongside the steam funnel, and the
noise from that would probably drown the shout of the
lookout man; witness got on board the Barrabool by the
bows.
Hercules Dalzell, one of the seamen of the Bonnie
Dundee, first saw the Barrabool's masthead light bearing
on the port bow about two points and about three miles
distant; he next saw the red light and some time after-
wards the green light almost abreast of the Bonnie Dundee;
as soon as he saw the green light, he heard the order given
by the mate, "Hard-a-starboard," and directly afterwards
the Barrabool ran into the Bonnie Dundee, which sank
about three minutes after the collision.
To Mr. Want: The first time that the vessel's helm was
shifted it was to starboard; witness was sure that it was
not ported before it was put to starboard; he could not say
whether the helm was not ported when the Barrabool's
red light was first sighted; it might have been at that time
without his noticing it.
To Mr. Sly: After the vessel's helm had been put to
starboard witness again saw the Barrabool's red light before
the collision.
To Mr. Manning: When the Barrabool's green light first
came in sight witness was forward on deck; if no other
change had been made from that time in the course of either
vessel, witness did not think there could have been a colli-
sion; after he first saw the green light of the Barrabool the
latter vessel appeared to change her course, and then her
green light came in sight; he heard the look-out report the
masthead light.
John Redmond Clarke deposed that he was master of the
screw steamer Barrabool trading between Melbourne,
Sydney, and Newcastle; she left Newcastle on the evening
of Monday, the 10th instant, clearing Nobby's Head at
half-past 6 ; it was a beautiful clear, moonlight night, with
a light north-easterly, wind blowing and the water
smooth; after clearing Nobby's the vessel's course
was shaped S.S.W. by compass, and that course
was kept until half-past 7, when it was changed
to S. by W. three-quarters W.; when the course was
altered the vessel had gone about ten miles; a quarter-of'
an-hour after leaving Newcastle the second mate took
charge of the deck; witness also was on deck; about twenty
minutes to 8 o'clock a masthead light was reported; witness
looked over the side and saw a masthead light about two
points on the starboard bow, and about 3 miles distant; a
few minutes afterwards he sighted a green light
he then spoke to the mate asking him if that
was not a green light the stranger was showing, the
mate replied in the affirmative, and witness then ordered the
man at the wheel to starboard the helm a little; the order
was hardly given, and was not executed, when the mate
drew witness's attention to the fact that the approaching
steamer (which afterwards turned out to be the Bonnie
Dundee) was showing her red light; witness then counter
maned his former order to the steersman, and gave the
order " hard-a-port," which was immediately obeyed
the light of the Bonnie Dundee, now about half
a mile distant, disappeared across the Barrabool's
bow; witness telegraphed to engine-room, "Stop her," and
directly afterwards, from the position of the Bonnie Dun
dee's light, thinking that they were going all clear, he was
about to telegraph to the engine-room to start her ahead
again, when suddenly the green light of the Bonnie Dundee
came in sight, and all three lights were in sight, revealing
that the vessel was bearing down right upon the Barrabool
witness instantly telegraphed the engineer, "Full speed
astern," and proceeded to blow the steam-whistle, several
times, at the same time the red light of the Bonnie Dundee
went out of sight, showing that she was bearing up towards
the bow of the Barrabool; immediately afterwards the
vessels collided, and witness gave orders to lower a boat
which was done without any delay; the boat was manned
by the chief mate and two seamen, who were instructed to
pull with all speed to the Bonnie Dundee, then in a sinking
condition on the starboard bow of tho Barrabool; witness
ordered the engines to go slow ahead, and when
his vessel had approached to within fifty yards
of the Bonnie Dundee, the latter went down; the
Barrabool was then stopped among the wreckage, and three
life buoys and some cork fenders were thrown overboard in
case there should be any person in the water; the boat of
the Barrabool, accompanied by that of the Bonnie Dundee
soon came alongside, and witness shouted out to them to
know if all hands were saved; receiving no answer
he went on the main deck, and hearing someone say there
had been four women on board, looked over the rail and in
quired if there were any women in the boats; the reply
was "no," and witness ordered the chief mate to go
back and see if he could find any one floating; the Bonnie
Dnndee's boat was also ordered away for the same purpose;
soon the chief mate of the Barrabool returned with a lady in
his boat; she was got on board, and though she appeared
to be quite inanimate, efforts were made to endeavour to
restore animation for more than an hour and a half, but
without avail: after bringing the lady on board, the boat
returned to search among the wreckage, but no one else was
found and witness asked Captain Stuart if he thought there
was any use staying longer; Captain Stuart replied that he
thought everv thing possible had been done, and after the
damage which had been done to the Barrabool's bow had
been repaired as well as could be under the circumstances,
the vessel proceeded on her course to Sydney; about a
hour and a half elapsed between the foundering of the
Bonnie Dundee and Barrabool's resuming her voyage to
Sydney. To Mr. Want: The look-out man of the Barra
bool was on the top-gallant forecastle, and to prevent any
mistake being made by the look-out man, the signals were
given by bells; there was nothing to interrupt witness's
view-nor that of the mate, the look-out man, or the man at
the wheel; there were passengers on board the Barrabool,
two of them-Mr. and Mrs. Lovell-were on the saloon
deck; when two bells, the signal of the Bonnie Dundee
coming in sight, were struck, Mr. Lovell asked
if that was 8 o'clock, and witness replied
"No, it is a light on the starboard bow;"
when first the Bonnie Dundee was sighted, if each
vessel had kept on her course they would have cleared each
other by a good half-mile; witness gave the order "star-
board a little to clear them a little more, but before the
order was obeyed the red light of the Bonnie Dundee came
in sight (here the models were again brought into use, and
at this time and throughout the remainder of his evidence
the witness explained the positions and manoeuvres of the
two vessels by their aid); seeing that the red light of the
Bonnie Dundee was on the starboard bow of the Barrabool
it was the duty of the latter to keep clear, and accordingly
witness had the helm put to port aud stopped the engine
and supposing they had gone on as they were then, they
would have passed each other quite clear; the green light
of the Bonnie Dundee, however, then came into sight; the
evidence of some of those on board the Bonnie Dundee had
stated that the green light of the Barrabool was seen
by them after they sighted her red light, but that was
quite impossible, as the Barrabool was on her port
helm after it was first ported; it was not true that after
showing her red light to the Bonnie Dundee the Barrabool
came across and showed her red light; when the
vessels collided, the Barrabool's speed was under a mile an
hour; the Bonnie Dundee was going about five or seven
miles; if the Bonnie Dundee had stopped her engines
the same time as the Barabool did there would have been
no collision, as the two vessels would not have reached one
another; the damage to the Barrabool was on the port bow,
about 20 inches from the stern, and was caused by the
Bonnie Dundee tearing across the Barrabool's bow; if the
Bonnie Dundee had not been going so fast she would not
have made the hole in the Barrabool's bow that she did.
To Mr. Sly: The Bonnie Dundee was about 3 miles
distant when witness first sighted her masthead light, and
about a mile distant when her green light was first seen
witness would positively swear that, at the time of the
collision, the Bonnie Dundee was going at a rate of about 5
knots an hour, and the Barrabool was going at a rate of less
than one mile an hour; immediately after the collision the
Barrabool had stern way on; when first the red light of the
Bonnie Dundee was sighted the vessels were about three
quarters of a mile apart.
To Mr. Manning: The masthead lights of each vessel
would probably have been sighted by the other at about the
same time, but the Bonnie Dundee would most likely have
sighted the side lights of the Barrabool before her own
lights could have been visible to the latter, as the moon was
rising and was putting the Bonnie Dundee's lights in the
shade; witness had heard the examination of the mate
the Bonnie Dundee; he (the mate of the Bonnie Dundee)
did port his helm in the first instance, and then after showing
a red light put his helm hard-a-starboard, and as a
matter of fact the helm of the Barrabool was first put a little
a-starboard and then hard-a-port; if the mate of the Bonnie
Dundee was right in saying that when he first sighted the
Barrabool, she was two miles on his port bow, that would
put the Bonnie Dundee about a mile further out to sea than
she really was; the Barrabool was about three miles out
from land when she first sighted the Bonnie Dundee.
To a juror: The Barrabool's full speed is ten knots an
hour; after giving the order to stop, if the engines were
reversed full speed astern, she would go about one-third of a
mile before she stopped altogether; there was a rule of the
road that when ships are meeting end-on, all lights being
in view, each vessel must port; that was the only case in
which that rule held good; when witness gave the order to
stop the engines immediately before the collision, it was
not, he considered, an error of judgment; if he had not
dono so the Bonnie Dundee would have run into the Barra-
bool; when witness gave the order "stop" the Barrabool
was going about 10 knots an hour; he did not think he
could have got ahead of the Bonnio Dundee by going full
speed ahead; when the Bonnie Dundee's red right was on
the Barrabool's starboard bow, it was the Barrabool's duty
to give way, and the Bonnie Dundee should have held on
her course.
Arthur Nelson Pidcock, second mate of the Barrabool,
with a master's certificate, was in charge of the deck when
the masthead light of the Bonnie Dundee was reported;
on looking at the light he saw it was bearing two
points on the starboard bow, and about 4 miles distant;
about 10 minutes after sighting the masthead light
of the Bonnie Dundee, the green light became visible ;
Captain Clarke who was on deck asked what lights
the steamer was showing, and witness replied, " Green, but
burning indistinctly ;" the captain replied, "Yes, oh yes,"
and then gave orders to the man at the wheel to starboard a
little; this order was scarcely given before the Bonnie
Dundee showed a red light; witness mentioned the fact to
the captain, who immediately had the helm put hard-a-port,
and gave the ordor to stop the engines; very soon after the
engines had been stopped the Bonnie Dundee showed both
her lights, but the red light soon went out of sight and the
green light showed close on the starboard bow of the Barrabool,
which at that time was going very slowly; shortly
afterwards the two vessels collided; tho Bonnie Dundee
appeared to have a pretty good speed; when the collision
took place the Barrabool's boat was lowered and sent away
to render assistance; after being absent someo time, the
boat returned with the body of the deceased Mrs. Brown;
after hanging about the scene of the wreck for over an hour
the vessel continuod on her course to Sydney.
To Mr. Waut: From the position of the Bonnie
Dundee when first she was sighted, it would have
been impossible for her to have seen the red light of the
Barrabool, and if the mate of the Bonnie Dundee had stated
that the gresn light of the Barrabool was the one first
sighted he would be correct; witness had read a report in
the Echo of the 11th instant, with reference to the mate's
statement about his seeing the green light of the Barrabool
first-that was correct; if the Bonnie Dundee had not
ported, the two vessels would have passed one another about
half a mile distant; t was only the Bonnie Dundee star-
boarding after her porting that brought her across the bows
of the Barrabool; it was untrue that the Barrabool after
porting her helm ever showed her green light to the Bonnie
Dundee; the Barrabool had not more than half a knot way
when the collision took place; the Bonnie Dundee appeared
to be going over four knots.
To Mr. Sly: Witness did not hear the Bonnie Dundee
blow her whistle at all; when first the green light of the
Bonnie Dundee came in sight the two vessels were about a
mile distant; the engines of the Barrabool were stopped on
the red light of the Bonnie Dundee becoming visible; witness
was of opinion that, according to the regulations of the
Navigation Act, the Bonnie Dundee was the vessel which
should have kept on her course while the Barrabool was the
giving way vessel, consequently the Bonnie Dundee should
not have altered her course.
Thomas Crawford recalled, in answer to a question as to
whether he had given a report of the occurrence to a reporter
of the Echo newspaper, stated that some persons had come
to him two or three hours after he arrived in Sydney,
and he gave them some account about the ships; he did not
know what he said to them; he could not say whether they
told him they were reporters for a paper; he could not say,
so far as he was aware of, that he gave the statement to the
reporters that appeared in the Echo of March 11th, he never
saw any account of the occurrence in the Echo.
To Mr. Sly: Witness was in the Caledonian Hotel when
they came and asked him some questions; he gave them no
written account ; it is not a fact that he first saw the green
light; he could not possibly have said so to a reporter ; he
did not say so; he could not say whether an account
appeared in the Evening News about the same time; ho did
not take notice of any newspapers; he was quite sober when
he made the statement in the Caledonian Hotel.
John Tucker, able seaman on board the Barrabool, went
to the wheel a few minutes after clearing Nobby's Head;
about an hour afterwards witness saw the mast-head light
of a steamer on the starboard bow, which had been signalled
by the lookout; she appeared to be running an opposite
course to that of the Barrabool; some time afterwards the
mate reported the green light of the steamer, and the
captain gave tho order, "starboard a little" ; witness was
just obeying that order when the mate reported a red light,
and the captain ordered the helm "hard a-port"; witness
obeyed the order, and, as he did so, saw the red light of the
Bonnie Dundee on the starboard bow; when the Barrabool
came round in answer to her helm, both the side-lights of
the Bonnie Dundee came in sight, and the red one disap-
pearing, she crossed the bows of the Barrabool; the captain
ordered the engines to stop, and a minute after gave "full
speed astern "; before the Barrabool had completely lost her
way, she struck the Bonnie Dundee amidships.
To Mr. Want: The helm was not put astarhoard at all
after it was ported; if any of the witnesses on board the
Bonnie Dundee had sworn that they saw the green light
of the Barrabool after having seen the red light, they
would have stated what was untrue; witness thought
that the Bonnie Dundee had more way on at the
time of the collision, but he would not swear to it;
it was about two or three minutes from the time witness
first saw the red light of the Bonnie Dundee until he saw
both lights, and about the same time between when the two
lights first showed and the collision.
William Lovell deposed that he was a passenger on
board the Barrabool at the time of the collision; he was on
the saloon deck of the Barrabool when the Bonnio Dundee
was first sighted, and on hearing the bell struck asked
if it were 8 o'clock, but the captain replied that it
was a vessel on the starboard bow; tho captain then
went to the starboard side of the vessel and look-
ing over said, "she is showing a green light;"
and then gave the order to the steersman "starboard a
little;" shortly after the mate on the bridge reported that
the vessel was showing a red light in place of the green,
and Captain Clarke gave the order "hard a port;" a few
minutes subsequently someone said that the vesssel was
showing a green light again, and the captain said "where
is she coming to ?" a few minutes after that the collision
took place; witness saw the white mast-head light of the
Bonnie Dundee when it was reported, and very soon after-
wards saw the green light; it was immediately after the
Bonnie Dundee showed the red light that the Barrabool's
engines were stopped.
To Mr. Want: He never heard any order given to star-
board the helm after the order to port it had been given ;
when he first saw the light of the Bonnio Dundee he had
no fear of a collision; there was no confusion on board the
Barrabool; Captain Clarke was very calm and cool, and
appeared to be exercising his judgment calmly.
Charles Wilson, able seaman on board the Barrabool, was
on the look out when the collision occurred; he saw the
masthead light of the Bonnie Dundee and reported it by
striking two bells, which signalled "a light on the starboard
bow;" when he first sighted it the light was two points
on the starboard bow and about four or five miles
distant; the vessel appeared to be steering in an
opposite direction to the course of the Barrabool;
about seven minutes after the masthead light was
sighted the green light became visible; several minutes
after the green light first came in sight, it disappeared, and
the red light took its place; Captain Clarke then sang out
"Hard a-port," and the Barrabool went round until the
red light of the Bonnie Dundee was on her port bow;
directly after that, both the Bonnie Dundee's side-lights
became visible, and then the red light disappeared, and the
Bonnie Dundee crossing the bows of the Barrabool, was
struck amidships, and shortly afterwards sank.
To Mr. Sly: The Barrabool was forging ahead very
slowly when the two vessels collided.
To the Foreman: The Bonnie Dundeo must have been
going at a rate of 4 or 6 knots an hour when she was crossing
the bows of the Barrabool.
Thomas Ashford, an able seaman belonging to the Barrabool,
was on the after part of the saloon deck when the
Bonnie Dundee's light was signalled; directly after the
light was signalled witness looked at the time and saw it
was twenty minutes to 8; shortly afterwards the officer on
the bridge reported a red light, and then witness went to the
assistance of the man at the wheel, and caught sight of the
red light bearing about two points on the starboard bow; as
soon as the mate announced the red light the captain gave
the order "hard-a-port;" the helm was put hard-a-port
and kept so until the collision took place.
To the Foreman: The Bonnie Dundee seemed to be going
very fast when she crossed the Barrabool's bows.
Isaac Wagland, second engineer of the Barrabool, was in
charge of the engine room when the collision occurred,
the chief engineer being off duty at that time; some time
between half-past seven and a quarter to 8 o'clock the
telegraph signalled "slow"; witness obeyed the order,
and then the telegraph signalled "stop" and "full speed
astern " in one order; the engines were at once stopped and
reversed, and about two minutes afterwards there was a
shock as if the vessel had struck something.
To Mr. Sly: If the Barrabool were going full speed
ahead, and the engines were stopped and reversed, it would
take two or three minutes before tho steamer would be
stopped.
William H. Dick, a reporter on the staff of the Sydney
Morning Herald, remembered hearing a rumour on the
night after the 10th instant that the Barrabool and Bonnie
Dundee steamers had collided; and in consequence of this
rumour he made inquiries to ascertain the truth of the
report; he saw the man before the Court, who
gave his name as Thomas Crawford; he stated
that be was the chief officer of the Bonnie Dundee;
the man giving his name as John Stewart was
present when witness interviewed the chief officer;
they were in the bedroom of an hotel, and Stewart,
who stated that he was the master of the Bonnie
Dundee, was lying on a bed; witness got the mate's state-
ment, which was to the effect that he was in charge of the
vessel at the time of the collision, that he saw the green
light about two miles ahead, and that he steered his vessel
so os to show his own green light: that suddenly he saw a
red light exhibited, and that soon after that Bonnie
Dundee was 'struck amidships on the starboard, the
captain was present when the mate made the statement
and did not contradict it in any way.
To Mr. Want: Witness reduced the mate's ?? to
writing; he went back a second time (after he to??
of the mate's statement), in company with the ??
reporter, in order that he might heur the stat ??
had a greater knowledge of nautical matters ??
was possessed of; the same statement was made and
time as had been on the first occasion; which he took
down the statement in shorthand and t?? it
into writing; he saw it afterwards in print it
was correct; the fifth paragraph after the ??
of the occurrence in the Echo of March ll, citing
" The chief officer of the Bonnie Dundee states, ??
ing with the words " escaping the suction,' was ??
ment made to witness by the mate; the same ??
wards appeared in the Herald of March 12th; ??
never asked to contradict these statements, nor ever
heard of any complaints about their being incorrect took
down the mate's statement in shorthand; ??
sitting in the same room with the captain; ??
very little about shipping matters, and the ??
to him what the three lights were.
To Mr. Manning: The mate did not appear under
the influence of liquor.
Thomas Crawford recalled : Had been ??
Sydney and the north for about 10 years; he ??
course steered by the Bonnie Dundee ??
particular occasion; it was the course generally used
in fine weather; the Bonnie Dundee was bound for the
Manning River, and had gone the same trips ??
18 months: when witness first saw the Barrabool ??
light she was about 225 yards off ; if he had seen ??
light on his port bow it would have been his duty ??
on his course, but he did not see her green light ??
bow; he saw it almost ahead; the Barrabool ??
been 1 or 2 points on the port bow when she ??
her red light; sometimes a couple of minutes ??
tween the time of losing one light and sighting the other;
it was a fact that the losing of one light necess??
immediate picking up of the other; when the ??
was first sighted it was ahead, but was if anything ??
on the port bow; as soon as witness saw the green he
put his helm to starboard; Witness had had no ??
the captain; there was no confusion or quarrelling on board
the Bonnie Dundee before she left the wharf; as ??
captain had heard the order 'hard-a-starboard," ??
up on the bridge and took charge; witness never ??
sounding the steam whistle; if he had not given ??
"hard-a-starboard," he believed the Barrabool would have
run into them on the port side.
John Alexander Stewart, recalled, stated that he had
been trading to the north for about twelve ??
course the Bonnie Dundee steered was, under the circum
stances, the proper course to steer; had heard ??
the Herald reporter, give his evidence; was present on the
11th instant when the chief officer gave him an account of
the collision; the report in the Echo of the llth instant
was not a correct report of what the mate told the reporter;
the orders that witness gave-"Stop her," " ??
astern "-wereo given, the one immediately after that.
To. Mr. Manning: When the reporter came witness was
too unwell to notice what took place; he did not ??
the mate said to the reporter, but he knew that he ??
say what afterwards appeared in the Echo.
To Mr. Want: There was no break between the orders,
"Stop her" and "Full speed astern;" witness ??
ously sworn there was a break of a minute between;
he did not consider that when the order "hard-a-starboard"
was given it was a serious thing, although he had previously
stated it was; there was no great probability ??
when the helm was starboarded; there might have been a
little danger.
To Mr. Want: The Bonnie Dundee was steering ??
close in to shore to avoid currents; she kept within ??
or three miles from the coast, and went from point ??
it was the general practice for coasting steamers going
south to go outside steamers going north; if witness ??
miles from Bird Island, and had the Barrabool been ??
out he would stand a pretty good chance of seeing ??
light.
The foregoing being all the evidence that was ??
anent the collision, the Coronor stated that previous ??
jury retiring to consider their verdict they would be
addressed by Mr. Manning, the legal rcpresentative of the
Crown. It had hitherto been his custom not to permit any
lawyers to address the jury, but in the present case
would follow the precedent offered lately in England ??
inquest on the body of the victims in the collision of Her
Majesty's yacht Misletoe, when the Crown Prosecutor
summed up and addressed the jury. Mr Manning accordingly
proceeded to review the evidencee,
and summed up greatly against the officers of
the Bonnie Dundee. He remarked that, in that
place, the jury were to consider whether the collision was
the fault of the Bonnie Dundee or the Barrabool. Accord-
ing to the evidence of the officers and crew of the Barra-
bool, the Bonnie Dundee was entirely to blame for the
occurrence, for she had twice offended against the regula-
tions of the Navigation Act in not holding to her course
when her green light, was to the Barrubool's green light,
and, subsequently, when red light was to red light,
of which positions she should have hold on her course. He
also pointed out that even by the showing of the Bonnie
Dundee's own men, she was in fault in crossing the Barra-
bool's course the second time. If the jury took the view
that the Bonnie Dundee committed a breach of the regula-
tions, they must further decide who was actually to
blame for the act, and return a verdict accordingly.
The jury were then left to consider their verdict
and after a deliberation of an hour and a half
returned the following verdict:-" We find that
the deceased, Sarah Brown, came by her death
on the night of the 10th instant by drowning, the result of a
collision between the steamer Bonnie Dundee and
the steamer Barrabool, in the former of which she was at the
time a passenger, which collision was brought about by the
gross negligence of the first mate of the Bonnie Dundee,
Thomas Crawford, and Captain John Alexander Stewart
of the same vessel; and we consequently return a verdict of
manslaughter against the said Thomas Crawford and John
Alexander Stewart." The Coroner accordingly proceeded
to commit the prisoners to take their trial at the next sittings
of the Central Criminal Court. Bail was allotted to
each prisoner in 300, with two sureties of 150 each.
Before the Court broke up the Coroner, in the warmest
terms, expresscd his thanks to the jury for the ??
careful, and intelligent way in which they had investigated
the case. He entirely concurred with them in their verdict
and he had much pleasure in stating his conviction that
was as good and true a verdict as could have been given
Source:
The Sydney Morning Herald
Saturday 22 March 1879
Page 6
Transcription, janilye
NOTE: This newspaper article is badly creased down the
right hand side; for the parts
unreadable I've used question marks.
Mrs. Sarah Brown wife of David Brown of Balmain was 53 and
came from County Derry,
Ireland.


Below is The steamer Barrabool in Duke's Dock after the collision.


The distortion of Irish Surnames

In 1957 Edward MacLysaght published in the Irish Academic Press a series of papers entitled Irish Families (Their Names, Arms & Origins)
As a matter of interest to historians and genealogists I've extracted this part of his publication dealing with the distortion of Irish surnames.


Even in Ireland, where there is a genealogical tradition, it is quite common for people to be uncertain of their ancestry for more than three generations. Consequently a man in these circumstances whose name is, say, Collins or Rogers, to take two common in Ireland, cannot assert with certainty that he bears a native Irish surname. However, if he is a Collins, born and living in Dublin perhaps, whose people came from West Cork the odds are very strongly in favour of the true name being the Gaelic Coilein. Smith, the commonest surname in England, comes high up in the Irish list - fifth in that given by Matheson. There can be no doubt that many of our Irish Smiths are the descendants of English settlers and traders, but it is equally probable that at least eighty per cent of the Smiths of County Cavan are of native stock, being MacGowans or O'Gowans who, under pressure of alien legislation or social influence, accepted the translated form and have used it ever since.

Many of the dual origin surnames are translations, like Smith and Oaks, or more often pseudo-translations such as Kidney and Bird. Some indeed of the latter are very far-fetched, even ridiculous, as for example the grotesque transformation of Mac Giolla Eoin into Monday from a fancied resemblance of the last part of that name to the Irish word "Luain".

So far we have been considering English names which in Ireland may conceal those of genuine Gaelic families. In a smaller number the converse obtains. Such names as Moore, Hart, Hayes and Boyle, which are, of course, genuinely Irish and are often regarded as exclusively so, are also found as indigenous surnames in England. So here again there is no certainty in the absence of an authentic pedigree, or at least of a well-founded tradition, as a guide. It has been pointed out for example that Guinness, which stout has made world-famous as an Irish name, and is in that case probably rightly derived from Magennis or MacGuinness of County Down, occurs in English records of some centuries ago in the rural county of Devonshire.

Probably the most reliable and scholarly work on English surnames is that of Professor Weekley. Yet he includes in his lists, without any mention of Ireland, several like Geary, Garvin, Grennan and Quigley: typical Gaelic-Irish surnames which, while they are no doubt occasionally found with the French or Anglo-Saxon background he indicates, when met in England at the present time are much more likely to have been brought there by Irish immigrants.

Apart from these surnames of possible English origin there are many indisputably Irish surnames not indigenous in England which assumed in their anglicised form a completely English appearance. What, for example, could be more English in appearance than Gleeson, Buggy, Cashman, Halfpenny and Doolady, to cite only a few examples. All of these are genuine Gaelic surnames and surprisingly numerous.

Once again the converse of this is also true. No one unacquainted with the subject would doubt that such very Irish sounding names as Gernon, Laffan, Gogan, Henebry and Tallon, and even O'Dell, all quite common in Ireland, are Irish, yet none of them is of Gaelic origin. This list, however, is not so long.

Some Gaelic surnames in their modern anglicised form have acquired an equally un-Irish guise but have a foreign rather than an English look. Coen, a variant of Coyne, and Levy, a common abbreviation of Dunlevy, suggest the Jew; I know a Lomasney who is always refuting the erroneous belief that he is of French origin, and I expect Lavelles and even Delargys and Delahuntys may have the same difficulty; Hederman and Hessian have rather a German sound, while Nihil, well known in County Clare, and Melia, synonym of O'Malley, might be Latin words. Most of this class, however, are occasional variants, such as Gna and Gina for (Mac) Kenna or Manasses for Mannix, or rare surnames like Schaill, Thulis and Gaussen.

In some cases the anglicisation process has had very unfortunate results. The beautiful name Mac Giolla osa, for example, usually rendered as MacAleese, takes the form MacLice in some places. The picturesque and heroic Dathlaoich in County Galway ridiculously becomes Dolly and the equally distinguished Sealbhaigh which is anglicised Shelly in its homeland (Co. Cork) is Shallow in Co. Tipperary. Schoolboys of these families, unless they use the Irish form, need no nicknames; Grimes, too, is a miserable substitute for its Gaelic counterpart Greachain, which has also Grehan as a more euphonious anglicised form.

These corruptions, of course, are due to the influence of the English language, the spread of which in Ireland was contemporary with the subjection and eclipse of the old Catho1ic Irish nation: names of tenants were inscribed in rentals by strangers brought in to act as clerks, who attempted to write phonetically what they regarded as outlandish names; in the same way Gaelic speaking litigants, deponents and witnesses in law cases were arbitrarily dubbed this and that at the whim of the recording official. It was not until the nineteenth century that uniformity in the spelling of names began to be observed, but the seventeenth century was the period during which our surnames assumed approximately the forms ordinarily in use in Ireland today.

The corruptions we have noticed above have been cited as examples of the tendency to give Irish names an English appearance. Most of them have at least some phonetic resemblance to their originals or else were frankly translations or supposed translations. There is, too, a large class of Irish surnames anglicised in a way which makes them quite unrecognisable. Often these distortions are aesthetically most unpleasing, as Mucklebreed for Mac Giolla Bride and Gerty for Mag Oireachtaigh.

Citing only official registrations with the Registrar-General, Matheson notes a particularly flagrant example, viz. a family of O'Hagans in County Dublin who have actually become Hog, which in the absence of his testimony one would naturally assume to be simply the well-known English surname of Hogg (O'Hagan is unlucky in this respect. According to Woulfe the very English and plebian-sounding Huggins is one of its synonyms in Ireland). Rather less cacophonous is Ratty for Hanratty. Forker for Farquhar (in County Down) may perhaps be regarded as comparable to the contraction in England of Cholmondeley to Chumley and Featherstonehaugh to Fanshawe in less aristocratic circles, these of course being phonetic spellings. The most curious instances of phonetic abbreviation recorded by Matheson is the birth registration of a Dalzell child at Dundalk "tout court" as "D.L.", that being the peculiar pronunciation of Dalzell in its native Scotland. The commonest of all Irish surnames, though not aesthetically objectionable, is a good illustration of decadence, for Murphy is a far cry from MacMurrough and 0'Morchoe, as is Dunphy from its synonym O'Donoghue. My own name, which I am glad to say is a true Dalcassian (Co. Clare) one, is an excellent example of the distortion we are considering, for no one would readily connect MacLysaght, especially when shorn of its Mac, with Mac Giolla Iasachta. The seventeenth century officials did at first render it as McGillysaghta, etc. in documents in English, but this proved too much of a mouthful to last long.

This name is also an example of that fairly numerous class in which the initial letter (excluding the prefix) is misleading. The L of Lysaght and of Leland derives from the gioLLa. The origina1 L of Lally on the other hand is to be found in the MaoL of the original. In the same way the C of Clancy, the K of Keogh and the Q of Quaid are from MaC; the G of Gaynor and Gorevan from the MaC prefix (Mag is a form of Mac frequently used with names beginning with a vowel), while the Il of Ilhenny can again be traced to the gIOLla of the Gae1ic form.

Another tendency in the anglicisation of Irish surnames is the absorption of uncommon names in common ones. Blowick, for example, tends to become Blake, Kildellan is merged in Connellan, Cormican in McCormick, Sullahan in Sullivan, Kehilly and Kilkelly in Ke1ly, and so on. Certain well-known family names such as Courtney, Conway and Leonard have gobbled up in the course of time, not one, but half a dozen or more minor ones. We must presume that this was a result of the general Gaelic depression, part of the same indifference and hopelessness which acquiesced in the lopping off of the Mac and O from so many old Irish surnames.

I have said that the mutilation and corruption of Irish surnames took place in the seventeenth and to a lesser extent in the eighteenth centuries. It must be admitted, however, that even today, fifty years after the foundation of the Gaelic League, the gradual re-gaelicization of names resulting from its influence is to some extent counterbalanced by the opposing forces of de-nationalisation. This is found more in pronunciation than in spelling: though even in this official registration age pronunciation does tend to affect spelling. A notable example of what I have in mind is the internal H. The English seem unable to cope with this sound which presents no difficulty to an Irishman: for Mahony they say Mah-ney (or, as they would write it, Marney, since the internal R is also dead in England). Now Dublin and suburbs with over 650,000 people contains more than one fifth of the population of the Republic and one seventh of the whole country; and Dublin for a11 its genuine political nationalism is in most ways more English, or perhaps it would be more accurate to say, more cosmopolitan, in character. The contrast between Connacht and Dublin is as marked as that between Dublin and England. Of course the good old Dublin accent has lost none of its distinctive raciness, but it is only to be heard in the mouths of one section of the citizens. The gradual disappearance of regional Irish accents is much to be deplored: it is due to a number of causes including the B.B.C., the cinema, the much increased intercourse with England resulting from the recent mass emigration to that country, and perhaps I may add the "refinement" aimed at in convent education. However, I must not allow myself to go off at a tangent on this interesting topic, which is irrelevant except in so far as it is concerned with the pronunciation of surnames.

In America the distortion of the name Mahony takes a different form, for it is often mispronounced Ma-honey, just as the wrong vowel is stressed in Carmody and Connell. In Ireland one does not hear Ma(r)ney for Mahony or Clossey for Cloghessy, but boggling at the internal H has come to Dublin now. I know a family in Dublin named Fihilly: the parents insist quite rightly that there are three syllables in the word, but the younger generation are content to answer to "Feeley" and so pronounce the name themselves; Gallaghers in Sydney, after a long losing battle with Australian philistinism, have had to accept "Gallagger" with the best grace they could. This, however, may be partly due to the ocular influence of the middle G. There is another difference in these two cases, besides the fact that the Fihilly deterioration took place in Ireland itself: Feeley has actually become a recognised way of spelling that name. Similarly there are Dawneys who were originally Doheny.

The surnames Hehir and Cahir in Thomond are still dissyllables, but the latter when denoting the town of that name in Co. Tipperary has become immutably "Care". This again prompts a long digression on place names: but that subject, so full of pitfalls for all but the most learned, would be out of place in this text.

The internal H is not the only stumbling-block for English people and anglicised Dubliners. They pronounce Linnane as Linnayne and Kissane Kissayne. Our "ane" sound, which is intermediate between the English "Anne" and "aunt", is not heard in English speech. Similarly O'Dea is called O'Dee. These emasculated pronunciations sound like affectation to people who come from the places where those names originated and still abound. This is not to deny that there is actually a name O'Dee, but that is not a Clare name, as O'Dea emphatically is.

Some English inspired innovations fortunately do not last. During the first World War a neighbour of mine in Co. Clare named Minogue joined the British army; in due course he returned as Capt. Minogue - Captain "Minnow-gew", if you please, not "Minnoge"! He may have got the idea from the mistake of a fellow soldier but he adopted the monstrosity and even insisted on it.

One of the most irritating of the examples of capitulation to English influence is the adoption of the essentially Saxon termination "ham" for the Irish "ahan", "ann", etc. This is not confined to surnames: the Gaelic word "banbh", called bonnive in English in the less anglicised counties, is bonham in most places. Rathfarnham, recte Rathfarnnan, is the best known place so anglicised; while on our own ground we have the very English-looking Markham, a Clare surname of which the normal version should be, and indeed formerly was, Markahan (cf. the place name Ballymarkahan in Co. Clare).

In the same way, but less noticeably, the final S so dear to English tongues degaelicizes Higgin(s), while the addition of an unnecessary D has somewhat the same effect on Boland. This D seems to have been a matter of chance for Noland is almost as rare as Bolan.

Quite often the anglicisation of a Gaelic surname resulted in the adoption in English, whether consciously or not, of one which carried a certain social cachet like D'Evelyn for the usual Devlin, Molyneux for Mulligan or Delacour for Dilloughery. Montague for MacTadgh or Mactague probably arose in the same way, the sound Montag at some period giving way to Montagew through the ocular influence of the spelling. The cognate Minnogew for Minogue was just "swank". We may assume that the good captain's descendants have gone back to plain Minnoge, as it is only a matter of pronunciation in their case.

There are other examples of this tendency which cannot be shed so easily. When Mulvihil has thus become Melville and Loughnane Loftus, resumption of the true patronymic necessitates (in practice, though not in strict law) certain legal formalities. - am told that there are people whose name was originally Mullins (Maolain) using the form de Moleyns. I have not met a case myself. According to Burke's peerage the best known family of the name, the head of which is Lord Ventry, are not true Irish Mullinses at all, and they presumably had justification for assuming the form de Moleyns in place of Mullins, a step which they took in 1841.

Some people with Mac names insist on the Mac being written in full, others prefer Mc, and formerly M' was quite usual. It is hard to understand why any objection should be taken to Mc or even M', since these are simply abbreviations of Mac. The practice of some indexers, notably in the Century Cyclopaedia of Names, of differentiating between Mac and Mc is to be deplored, since the reader must seek the name he wants in two places - in the Macs, which are interspersed among such words as Maccabees and Macedonia, and in the Mcs many pages further on. It is impossible to differentiate satisfactorily. Take MacGillycuddy for example: it appears in the work in question as MacGillycuddy's Reeks, yet the Chief of the Name always subscribes himself McGillycuddy of the Reeks. The idea that Mac is Irish and Mc Scottish is just another popular error. Mcc, however, may fairly be called an affectation, being merely the perpetuation of a seventeenth century scribe's slip of the pen.

The most prevalent of peculiarities in the spelling of names - the use of two small f's for a capital F - would seem to have arisen not through snobbery but from ignorance: the originators of this now carefully treasured blunder were probably unaware of the fact that in seventeenth century documents the normal way of writing F was ff, a symbol almost indistinguishable from f f.

The Irish Information website an excellent website with many free resources also has a page on the Origin of Irish Names