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St.Peter's Pew Prices-Richmond, New South Wales,

Back in the olden days you didn't just walk into church and sit down. No! a fee was paid to be comfy at church. Church on Sunday was the place to be seen and meet up with neighbours. Now, to have a pew you were definetly one of the IN crowd. The pews were more expensive and came with a certain prestige. The benches were not as comfortable but were half price. The women prefered to sit at the back with the clergyman and his family. And no doubt a better view.

By paying the rental it mean't that certain seats were reserved for you and your family. If you didn't pay you stood.

On the 14th June 1841 St. Peter's Church of England,in Richmond, New South Wales, held a meeting to establish their pew rates, which they set at 10 shillings per year, per seat in a pew, a pew sat 8 people. A bench was 5 shillings a year. The clergyman and his family were allowed to sit free. These rates seem to have been open to some negotiation because Mr. FAITHFULL paid 2 pounds 10 for his 8 seats, whereas John TOWN Jnr. paid the same for only 5 seats. Mr. COX of Hobartville paid 4 pounds for 8 seats.

Here is a list from St.Peters church of the pew holders.

NAME

Mr Cox of Hobartville
Mr. Faithfull
Mr.George Bowman
Mr. William Bowman
Mr. John Town Jnr.
Mr T. Sharpe
Mr George Pitt
Mr A. Cornwell
Mr. Joseph Onus
Mr. George Guest
Messrs. Potts and Harland
Mr. Thomas Eather
Mr. Isaac Cornwell
Messrs. Cribbs and Watts
Messrs. Paine, Oxley and Richards
Mrs. Aston
Messrs. Crawley and Markwell
Messrs. Bainer and Hogsflesh
Mr.& Mrs. Faucet, Messrs. Bannister, McGraw
and Preston
Mrs. Dight
Mrs Towns
Mrs. Teiginour
Clergyman and Family
Mrs. Bell of Belmont

This list was transcribed from "St.Peter's Richmond" the early people and burials" by Yvonne Browning

Standards For Sharing Genealogy Information With Others


9 comment(s), latest 5 years, 8 months ago

Stanley Common Clark 1888-1941

Stanley Common, the eldest son of Sarah EATHER 1861-1923 and Ashton CLARK 1844-1925, was born at 'Willow Farm' on 29 October 1888. He attended Bulga Public School with his brothers and sisters and when he was a young man he earned a living by felling timber in the range near Bulga. He had a team of bullocks and transported the logs on a bullock wagon to Gould Brothers Sawmill in Singleton. The journey usually took two days with an overnight stop at Yellow Waterholes Reserve. About 1917 he and his brother James (Jim) went into partnership on a block of land which they called 'Hillsdale'. It was covered in scrub and kept them very busy clearing it and building fences for farming. On the 3rd July 1918 Stanley married Lyndall Dorothy COOKE, the daughter of George COOKE 1865-1925 and Mary,nee CLARK 1865-1951. There was still no house on 'Hillsdale' so they lived in a tent on the farm. A citrus orchard had been planted and they commenced a small dairy herd. Jim also moved onto the farm and they employed four men to build a shed and clear the land for grazing. Stanley and his wife (called Dorothy not Lyndall) moved into the shed just before their first child was born. They then began to build a house, using ironbark and pine timber cut from the farm. They moved in as soon as the walls were up. Their family continued to increase and they had six children. The youngest daughter died at the age of 22 months. Stanley's niece Beulah SQUIRE often spen time at 'Hillsdale' after a new baby was born to help. The children were introduced at an early age to chores connected to the dairy section of the farm. At the age of four years the daughters were taught to assist in milking the cows. After the morning milking was completed, the cans were loaded onto a horse-drawn spring cart. Stanley would drive the cart to meet the milk lorry, driven by one of his cousins Dave CLARK, down at the Putty Road. Stanley was destined not to have a long life. One day he was chaffing sacaline and putting it into the silage pit, when he was taken ill. The next door neighbour, Mr. Os Thompson, took him into Singleton Hospital, where he died on 13 April 1941, aged 52. Dorothy and the children continued to live at 'Hillsdale' for about a year after Stanley's death, then they moved over the mountain to live with Dorothy's mother Mary (May) COOKE, at 'Leeholme', on the Putty Road. The house at 'Hillsdale' remained empty for more than ten years, except when used by an occasional employee of Jim CLARK.


1 comment(s), latest 5 years, 9 months ago

Stepney Alured Clarke 1839-1889 NSW


2 comment(s), latest 2 years, 4 months ago

SWALE of Swale Hall

The following information is for those who are interested in the surname Swale, Swale Hall and Swaledale in Yorkshire.

The owners of Swale Hall have told us that the building as it is today dates back to the mid 16th century and that there are no visible signs of the original Swale Hall.

Walter de Gaunt became the first Lord of Swaledale; he had married Matilda the daughter of the Breton Earl of Richmond. Matilda's father gave her the whole of Swaledale as a dowry. Walter then subsequently gave the Manor of West Grinton to his nephew Alured, who adopted the surname Swale after the name of the river Swale. Swale Hall remained in the possession of this Swale family and their descendants until the days of Queen Anne. The most distinguished of this Swale family was probably Solomon Swale, a barrister, who became Member of Parliament for Aldborough, which is near Boroughbridge, North Yorkshire. This Solomon was created a baronet in 1660 and is buried at St. Martins-in-the-Fields in London. Sir Solomon Swale, the third baronet and grandson of the Solomon above, failed to renew the lease of the main part of the Swale estate and this resulted in Swale Hall being sold by auction. Sir Solomon the third baronet died in a debtors prison in 1733.

There is a pedigree titled "Pedigree of the Blood of Sir Solomon Swale, of Swale Hall, in the County of York, who was created a baronet, ad 1660." Along the foot of this pedigree is written, "Vouched- G.H.De.S.N.Plantagenet Harrison (Signed)." This pedigree may well have been prepared when the Reverend Sir John Swale, the 7th Baronet claimed the title, which had been dormant after the death of the fifth Baronet. This pedigree begins an A.D 800 with Syderic, Count of Harlebeck, Governor & Hereditary Forester of Flanders. A.D.800. It then gives Engelran? Count of Harlebeck, Governor & Hereditary Forester of Flanders. A.D 814. It then gives Odoacre, Count of Harlebeck, Governor & Hereditary Forester of Flanders. A.D 850. It would take too long to give the pedigree up to 1873 but because the pedigree was vouched by G.H.De.S.N.Plantagenet Harrison makes it dubious.

George.H.De.S.N.Plantagenet Harrison wrote a one volume History of Yorkshire that was published in London in 1879 and there is a note on the library index card in the Leeds reference library in Yorkshire that this history of Yorkshire is now considered to be semi-fictitious. It would appear that those who are familiar with any written work by George.H.De.S.N.Plantagenet Harrison consider his work as semi-fictitious and this applies to the pedigree of the blood of Sir Solomon Swale.

The 1867 Floods in New South Wales

Much has been written about our terrible family loss in the drowning of 12 EATHER's during the June 1867 flood at Cornwallis, but little about the other poor souls who drowned or the terrible losses and hardship to the people of New South Wales in the middle of a very cold winter.

It is to be noted, the flood was not just in the Cornwallis/Windsor district, but encompassed most of the state. In all, it is probable, that thirty lives were lost in New South Wales between the 21 June and the 26th June 1867.

Firstly, I'd like to tell you about the appalling tragedy of Daniel Isaac BAKER (1814-1886) and his wife Mary Ann, nee MYERS (1824-1867). On the night of the 21 June 1867, Mary Ann and seven of her nine children died in the freezing water. Daniel and Mary lived in a hut at the junction of the Mudgee river, working as shepherds for the Blundun's at Burrandong. This isolated family was surrounded by water that rose six feet in ten minutes. At the first rush of water, they all climbed onto the table, then up to the loft and then, Daniel cut a hole in the bark and hoisted them onto the roof. Daniel held the children in his arms, dropping them as they died from the freezing cold. They remained on the roof until the water reached their mouths then they tried to swim for a tree. Only Daniel and two children, Moses 17 and Cecilia 15 survived. The children who died with Mary Ann were;

Daniel Baker 1854-1867, Henry Shadrach Baker 1856-1867, Andrew William Baker 1858-1867, Charles Frederick 1860-1867, John Isaac Baker 1862-1867, Thomas Edwin Baker 1864-1867, Mary Ann Elizabeth Baker 1866-1867.

Also in the same house was a neighbour, Frederick SMITH the son of Edward and Elizabeth Smith. He arrived at dusk to help, whilst his wife Mary Ann Smith went to find a boat. Mrs. Smith survived the flood and came about daylight the next morning. The brave Mrs. Smith could hear them cooeying for a long time but had great difficulty navigating the boat for a mile through the strong currents. She rescued Daniel , Moses, and Cecilia from the tree by the swamped shepherd's hut and took them to shore.

In Wagga Wagga on the Friday night of the 21 June 1867 the Murrumbidgee broke it's banks flooding the town, two lives were lost. One was Samuel CHATTO 1839-1867 from Sydney, working as a labourer at Henry PAUL's station. The free selectors suffered severely on the flats, many losing their homes. 100 head of cattle and 450 sheep were washed away.

On Saturday night the Denison Bridge at Bathurst was washed away and at Murchison, the railway station was completely under water. Between the Pitt Town Punt and Wisemans Ferry the water was sixteen feet deep, you could not see the telegraph poles or wires. All communication was lost.

At Penrith, the families living on the banks of the Nepean had to quickly abandon their homes and seek shelter at the police barracks, the public hospital or railway station. On Friday morning several houses were submerged, some carried away bodily. 200 houses from High Street to Proctors Lane were filled with water to the ceilings of their ground floors. The once neat and comfortable homesteads surrounded by orchards and gardens had disappeared. Hundreds of bushels of corn, hundreds of pigs and poultry, many horses and cattle were all swept away. Fowls drenched almost to death were to be seen roosting on the saddleboards of the deserted and innundated houses.

On the night of the 21st, to the north, on the Wollombi, people took shelter in the Church of England and at the Court House as the freezing waters rose to their highest level in history, indeed, at midnight on the 21st the water was six inches into the church of England. But, for the promptness of the Police Magistrate Mr. Doppling and his dingy, the Rev. Mr. SHAW would have drowned whilst trying to save his stock. Few people escaped some loss at Wollombi, the Wesleyan Chapel and the homes of Mr. WHITEMAN and Mr. BOURNE were completely washed away and the Catholic Church had fifteen feet of water in it.

As the town flooded at Fordwich, Joseph CLARK 1817-1889 watched in horror as his store and the post office was carried down the street in a river of water.

Whilst over in Lochinvar on the night of the 22nd Mr. P GREEN at Kaludah, saw a seven knot an hour river race through and destroy his grapevines. Mr J.F.DOYLE, vineyard owner, with his own boat, tirelessly, rescued a dozen families even though he needed the boat at his own place to save his belongings.

Of Course, Windsor and surrounds suffered greatly. From Thursday at 11:00am when the water was over the banks at South Creek and in Windsor it was up to the bank and as it rained all Thursday night with gale forced winds the people were in imminent danger. With the few private boats available people were being taken from the roofs of their houses in Wilberforce and Cornwallis. By the afternoon of Friday the 21st the river had risen by forty eight feet, three feet higher than during the flood of 1864. The only parts of the town habitable were the upper portion of George Street, the water on the lower portion was three feet high. The Catholic church and McQuades Corner were above water. The Reverend C F GARNSEY's residence "Fairfield", was not overly large, but still managed to squeeze in two hundred people. The residence of Mr. William WALKER 1828-1908 local solicitor and MLA was also above water and crowded with the refugees. Everything else was out of sight in the town, but for the chimneys on the higher houses. Two thousand homeless sufferers crowded around the School of Arts, The Catholic Church and above the floodline in the Wesleyan, and The Courthouse. The Rev.Henry Carleton Stiles at St.Matthew's Anglican lay dying when the great flood was at its highest, and from his deathbed he gave orders to throw the church doors open and admit the crowds of homeless sufferers.
Everybody, whose house was above the floodline threw open their doors to the victims. The Reverend C F GARNSEY said, at a meeting chaired by Mr. WALKER MLA on the 2 July to devise a means of relief for the sufferers, " No one, unless he had been an eyewitness to the scene could have believed what had happened. There were only two small necks of land left to bring the comfortless people and he knew, as the waters rose, there were many who looked with anxious eyes and thoughts of where they might next take themselves for safety". The houses of the settlers had been razed to the ground and in many instances, not a stick, not an article of clothing had been left to the sufferers. The government boats from Customs and the water police did not arrive from Sydney until Friday night, by then, too late for most. As the waters subsided it was noted that, from the Windsor Ferry to the township of Wilberforce and also along Freeman's reach to the Highlands, no more than eight houses were left standing and all were badly damaged.

Amongst the tragedies there were many, many hero's and several very lucky escapes. One, very lucky to be alive was Alfred NORRIS 1837-1875 and his family, Here is his story;

Alfred took his family to a large willow tree and lashed his wife and two of their children to the highest branches. The third child he held in his arms. There were few boats available, and in the dark the rescuers had a very difficult time finding the people who had sheltered in the trees. By 4:30 pm Friday 21st the rivers had risen by forty eight feet, three feet higher than the 1804 flood. The water, had almost swamped Alfred. He was exhausted from holding the child and on the point of collapse when a boat found him and took Alfred and his family to safety.

Written by Janilye 2010

Inquest on six bodies of the Eathers lost in the Flood
Wednesday 26 June 1867.
Commercial Hotel, Windsor, New South Wales

A coroners inquiry was held on Wednesday 26 June 1867, at the Commercial Hotel, Windsor before Mr. Laban White and a jury, on the bodies of Catherine Eather, Mary Ann Eather, Catherine Eather the younger, Charles Eather, Emma Eather and Annie Eather. The wives and children of William and Thomas Eather of Cornwallis, whose mournful fate will never be forgotton in this district.

Thomas Eather, having been duly sworn deposed: I am a farmer and resided in Cornwallis, my family consisted of my wife Emma, aged 36 years, and four girls and two boys of the several ages of sixteen, fourteen, twelve, ten, eight and three. The last time I saw six of them alive(the eldest son of Thomas Eather the deponent, was fortunately from home and not in the flood) was on Friday night. Yesterday my oldest daughter Annie was brought into Windsor, the body having been seen floating near the place where she was drowned; today the body of my wife Emma was found. On Friday afternoon the waters had risen and continued to rise, very rapidly; we were all obliged to fly to the ridge pole of the house hoping to be rescued by some boat; we remained some hours in awful suspense till the violence of the wind and the waves swept the building and the whole of us into the water. I came up from the water and found myself in the branches of a cedar tree; I looked round after my wife and children, but could see none of them; in about an hour after I was rescued by three men in a boat. I told them what had happened. They landed me at Mr. Arthur Dight's, Clarendon. There must have been twenty feet of water where my family was drowned.

William Eather, being duly sworn deposed: I am a farmer and resided at Cornwallis; my family consisted of my wife Catherine Eather aged 37 and my children, Mary Ann, Catherine, Charles, Clara and William, of the respective ages of 11, 9, 6, 3 and 1; on last Friday night I saw them alive; they were then on top of a house of my brother, George Eather, having gone there for safety; I was with them; we were about 200 yards from my brother Thomas's; we had been there from Thursday night; on Friday night, I was about taking my oldest boy into my arms, when I was washed away by the waves; I saw a tree close by, after I surfaced and managed to make for it. I heard the screams of my wife and children, but I could not see them; I fastened myself to a tree and in a short time was rescued by a boat specially sent by Mr Arthur Dight; I believe my wife and three of my children have been brought to Windsor dead.

Phillip Maguire, having been duly sworn deposed: I am a farmer and live at Nelson, and a brother in law of Mrs. William Eather; I went with Charles Eather, Thomas Eather and Charles Westall in search of bodies; yesterday (Tuesday) about 2 o'clock in the afternoon we found Thomas Eather's eldest daughter Annie, floating about 40 yards from where the family had been carried away; this morning we found four more bodies; the dead bodies of which the coroner and jury have had to view, I recognise as the remains of Catherine Eather, wife of William Eather, and Mary Ann, Catherine and Charles the children of William Eather, also Emma, the wife of Thomas Eather and Annie, his eldest daughter.

The jury returned a verdict of accidental drowning. Boats have been out all day searching for other bodies, but have returned unsuccessful.


transcribed by janilye from a report in the Sydney Morning Herald 1 July 1867.


6 comment(s), latest 5 years, 3 months ago

The barque ATALANTA to South Australia 1866

The Atalanta, Captain John Ballingall, sailed from Plymouth on the 23rd January with emigrants for Adelaide. The names and nationalities of the passengers we give below:

English.
Edward, Anne, Henry, Emily, and Anne Allchurch,
John Arney, Joseph Bailey, Jonathan, Ann, Josiah,
and Stephen Baldwin, Richard Bate, Jeremiah Barron,
Peter, Mary, William J., Jane, Peter, and Mary Bawden,
Charles Bawden, George Bolts, William and Eliza Bonson,
Benjamin, Maria, Mary and James Chick, John Coomb,
Andrew, Ann and Andrew Cooper, Charles, Martha and Helena Courtis,
John Craggy John, Christina, Elizabeth, Arthur, Niel,
Christina, and Mary Curnow, Mary Curnow,
James J., George, Bichard and William Curnow,
Fanny Davis, John and Alice Davy, James, Amanda,
Francis, Thomas, John, and Albert Daymond, Samuel,
Ellen, and Ellen Dennis, William Devine, William and
Elizabeth Diderah, Robert Duddleston, John and
Emma Forseath, Thomas Foster, John, Elizabeth, and
Fred Fowkes, Joseph Freeth, John Fry, John Gill,
William Gray, Henry, Sarah, and Thomas Green, John, Mary,
Mary, John, and Charles Hawke, Henry and Maria Heath,
Elizabeth Helliger, Eliza Henwood, William House,
Catherine and Catherine Hunter, William and
Amelia Jasper, George and Gilbert Jerden, Robert
Johnston, John Jose, Hugh, Elizabeth, James, and
Mary J. Kearns, W. Lake, Joseph Lester, Hannah
Lovell, James and Henry Loveridge, James Lownds,
Eliza Mallett, Tom Marsan, Nicholas, Mary, Thomas,
Mary and Edward May, Thomas, Harriett, Mary,
and Atalanta McCormack, William Mills, Robert
Mitchell, John, Mary, and Anne Mutton; Iltyd
Nicholas, Henry and Bichard Painter, Bichard Parkyn,
Sam. Pigeon, Chadwell Pearce, John Poor, John,
Rebecca Mary, and Edward Potter, Joseph and Eliza
beth Richards, John Richens, John, Martha, John,
James, and Phillip Roberts, James Rule, James Rogers,
Henry Rowe Ellen Sawyer, John Shaw, Philip Snigs,
Mary Skewes, Joseph and Ann Townsend, Walter Tre-
harne, Joseph Treloar, James, Harriet, Thomas, Mary,
and Fanny Trevaill, Charles, Elizabeth, and Maria
Tucker, James and William Turnbull, Edward and
Emma Tippond, James Walker, Thomas Watkins,
Francis and Anne Weller, William, Frank, Emma,
Florence, and Elizabeth Weller, Ann, Winnifred, and
Kate Weller, Elizabeth Welsh, Charles White, William
and Adam Whitehall, William and Elizabeth White
hall, Mary Whitehall.
Scotch.
James Abel, John Allan, James Anderson,
William Anderson, Christina Ballantine, John Banner-
man, Donald and Ann Bremer, James Bradshaw, Sam,
Margaret, Janet. John, and Maria Black, Jessie Calder,
Alexander Cameron, William Cameron, Catherine
Carey, John Chalmers, John Chesser, Alexander Chis-
holm, David Christie, Adam Clark, Thomas Copland,
John Cormack, Ann Cormack, David Cormack, James,
Elizabeth, William, Mary, Louisa, and Sam Cormack,
Thomas, Craigill, John Chricton, John, Jane, Jane,
John, and Eliza Deany, Thomas Duff, John Duncan,
David Duncan, David Ferrier, William, Elspet, and
Peter Foreman, John Forsyth, Alexander Fraser, John,
Ann, and Jessie Fraser, Simon, Mary, James, John
and Elizabeth Fraser, John Gillies, John Grant,
Isabella, John, Ann, Lodovick,James, Margaret, Eliza-
beth, and Fred. Grant, Bernard, Catherine, and Ann
Grogan, John and Mary Innis, John Inverarity,
George Jenkins, David, Rebecca, James, and Mary
Johnston, James, Jane, and Isabella Knight, Catherine
Mecnee, John and Christiana Marton, Edward, Mary,
Janet, and James Mason, Archibald McCallister, John,
and Jane McCann, Duncan and Margaret McCorquidale
Alexander, Eliza, Eliza, and Alexander McDonald,
Daniel and Welter McFarlane, Daniel and Mary
Mcintosh, Alexander McKenzie, John McKay, John,
Barbara, and Kenditfeva McLennon, Isabella and Mar
garet McNaughton, David McQueen, John, Ann, and
Elspet Murdoch, John Munro, William Nicol, Thomas
Oswald, Mary Pearson John, Isabella, Isabella and
and Helen Riddell. John Robertson, James Ross, Wil
liam, Catherine, and Alexander Ross, Mary A. Shaw,
William and Isabella Simpson, W. and E. Smith, James
Smith, John Smith, James Strachan, James Stirling;
Andrew, William, and Peter Sutherland, Thomas
Thompson, Eliza Troup; Duncan Urquhart, George
Walker, Alexander Wann, George Watt, Alexander,
Mary, and Alexander Watt.
Irish
Margarett Barrett, James Boucher, Bridget
Brady, Hannah Bridle, James Burns, Elizabeth
Caverby, Wm. Cleary, Honora Cotter, Timothy Dane
ter, Johannah Davidson, Margaret Drisbane, Bridget
Dunne, Boger Dwyer, John, Mary, James, John, and
Margaret Dwyer, Mary Egan, Bridget.Faby, John Fitz-
gerald, Julia Flaherty, Ellen Flanagan, Mary Goomane,
Francis Harrison, Margaret Henessy, Ellen Hoolam,
Mary Hogan, Mary, Johanna and Margaret Kelly,
John, Margaret, John, and Michael Kelly, Mary A
Kenny, Annie Keumane, Catherine Kenny, Mary and
Margaret Kettleby, George and Elizabeth Kidd, Julia
Madigan, John Mahoney, Anne McDermott, James,
Norah, John, and Annie Madigan, Mary McNamara,
Mary McDermott, Ellen Melvin, Patrick Noher, Ellen
O'Brien, John O'Brien, Bridget Quirke, James Rearden,
Francis Schoales, Owen, Isabella, Terence, and
Frederick Shannon, Mary Sheehan, Mary Walsh.
Summary.
Adults —
English, 136 ; Scotch, ; 114 ; Irish, 58—total, 308.
Children between 1 and 12 —
English, 39; Scotch, 27; Irish, 6—total, 72.
Infants —
English, 6; Scotch, 5; Irish, 1—total, 12.
Grand totals—English, 181; Scotch, 146 ; Irish, 65. Equal
to 244 statue adults.
The following are the names of the children who died on the voyage:
Atalanta McCormack, Maria Tucker, Frances Grant,
James Mason, Thomas Green, and two infants.
Source:
The Adelaide Express (SA : 1863 - 1866)
Friday 16 March 1866
Page 3
transcription, janilye 2014
The Ships List

South Australian Weekly Chronicle Saturday 21 April 1866 Page 3
ARRIVAL OF THE ATALANTA, WITH 394 GOVERNMENT EMIGRANTS.

There are very few vessels arriving in the Gulf which cause more interest than immigrant ships. For a period
some slow craft were engaged ; but of late much better passages have resulted, and the AtaLanta has accomplished tier's in 81 days, against every disadvantage of foul winds and a long continuation of calms on the
Line. The vessel is American built, of 930 tons, commanded by Captain Ballingall, a gentleman who has
before visited Port Adelaide in the Omega. In the Surgeon-Superintendent a familar face was recognized
in Dr. Sanger, late of the Morning Star. This system of electing gentlemen of experience evidently works
well, for it almost invariably produces a degree of co-operation highly necessary in promoting the well
being of the persons on board. With regard to the sick list, the cases entered on the hospital record are
by no means important ; some few children and persons in delicate health being the principal patients
treated, and even those cases were partly attributable to inclement weather experienced while
in the depot at Plymouth. The mortality on board, was one less than the increase by births, the former being young children and infants
— two of the latter and one of the former having succumbed to the damp cold weather experienced while
running down the easting in the Southern latitudes.
The general appearance of the people was prepossessing in the extreme, indeed, rather more so than some batches
of importations ; and it is extremely pleasant to add the Surgeon's testimony to a course of good conduct
during the voyage. The only disagreement was some fracas between the feminine portion of the population,
which, however, ended in nothing. Dr. Sanger's experience of the distiller is much to the credit of the
machine, which has produced an ample supply of water.
In the tropics the usual allowance was increased, and proved a valuable assistance in preserving good health.
Of the recently introduced ventilating trunkways. his
opinion is decidedly opposite, and he remorselessly condemns the whole affair as calculated only to monopolise valuable space without corresponding good result. In reviewing the figures in the official lists it is evident the mechanical trades are well represented. There is a most singular collection of designations, some of which must be rather altered before finding occupation here, but as they are all hard working people there is room and to spare for the lot. Perhaps the domestic servants may tend in a measure to relieve the demand for that class.
There are 94 laborers, 51 domestic servants, 2 housekeepers, 1 dressmaker, 2 porters, 1 draper, 3 gardeners,
7 carpenters, 1 printer, 1 papermaker, 1 widow, 1 policeman, 14 ploughmen, 6 miners, 5 blacksmiths, 2 tailors,
2 bricklayers, 5 shepherds, 2 masons, 2 grooms, 2 painters, 8 bootmakers, 2 butchers, 1 sawyer, 1 quarryman, 1 coachbuilder, 1 saddler, 2 wheelwrights, 1 fitter, 1 waiter, 1 platelayer, 3 cooks.

The barque Lord Stanley 1850 Passenger List

ARRIVED. Port Adelaide
Monday, February 11.1850
The barque Lord Stanley, 336 tons, Hugh McKay, master,
from Gravesend 15th October, touching, at St. Jago on the 13th and sailing thence on the 18th
November with 104 passengers.

Passengers for Adelaide
Cabin

Mr A D Bottomley

Steerage
William Elijah Bonnett, wife & 4 children
James Evans and wife
James Ludom, wife, child
Charles Thawe Armitage
Henry Gibbons, wife, 8 children
Edward Turnbull
Maria Witty
Adolph Seidler
Henry Appleton
Joseph Balderson
Charles Cherry, wife, child
Jabez Hughes, wife, 5 children
George Watson and sister
Sarah Braby
Peter Thomson
Charles Spencer
Thomas Spice
Alfred Butler
William Mills and wife
George Beddowes
John Massey and 2 children
William Cann, wife, 4 children
Robert McMullen
William Tabor, wife, 2 children

Passengers for Sydney
Cabin

George Collins Levey
Dr Dalleston

Steerage
Alfred Burnham, wife, 4 children
Jas. Reading
Richard Cook
George and Charles Mason
Marion Cockerell
Eliza Lewis
Thomas Fryer
Robert Hamilton
Henry Beese
James Derrick, wife, 6 children
Charles Moore
Joseph Rose
Henry Woods
Thomas Meacher and wife

Passengers for Port Phillip
CABIN

Benjamin Taylor
John Webster and wife

Steerage
John Merrefield
Caroline Reeves
George Hinchen
William Turley wife and child
Richard Knight
Henry Miller
Thomas Cole
Richard and James Garton
Thomas Lilley
2 children named Reeves and Meacher were born on the voyage
One infant named Tearsley died on the voyage.

SOURCE
South Australian Register
Wednesday 13 Feb 1850
Page 2
transcription, janilye 2015