janilye on Family Tree Circles

sort: Date Alphabetical
view: full | list

Journals and Posts

British Contingents which served in the Boer War

Alderson's Mounted infantry
Amphlett's Mounted hfantry
2 Cavalry Household Cavalry
1st King's Dragoon Guards
6th Carabiniers
2nd Scots Greys
Scots Guards,
lst & 2nd Life Guards,
lst & 2nd Royal Horse Guards (Blues)
6th lnniskilling Dragoons
5th Royal Irish Lancers
9th Queen's Lancers
12th Prince of Wales Royal Lancers
16th (Queen's) Lancers
17th (Duke of Cambridge's Own) Lancers
3rd Hussars (King's Own)
7th Hussars ( Queen's Own)
8th King's Royal Irish Hussars
10th Hussars (Prince of Wales's Own)
13th Hussars
14th (King's) Hussars
18th (Victoria Mary, Princess of Wales's Own) Hussars
19th (Queen Alexandra's Own Royal) Hussars
20th Hussars Imperial Yeomanry
lst, 2nd, 3rd, 4th, 5th, 6th, 7th, 8th, 9th, l0th, llth, 12th, 13th, 14th, 15th,
Royal Artillery Horse Field Garrison
Elswick Battery
Honorable Artillery Company
Natal Hotchkiss Detachment
Royal Artillery Mounted RiflesInfantry
Royal Dragoons,
1st & 2nd Dragoons (Royal Scots Greys)
6th (lnniskilling)Dragoon Guards,
Ist (King's)Dragoon Guards
2nd ( Queen's Bays)Dragoon Guards
3rd (Prince of Wales's) Dragoon Guards
5th ( Princess Charlotte of Wales's) Dragoon Guards
6th (Carabiniers) Dragoon Guards
7th (Princess Royal's) Devonshire Regiment,
lst& 2nd Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers
2nd Royal lrish Fusiliers
1st Royal Irish Regiment
1st King's Royal Rifle Corps (60th Rifles)
2nd Kings Royal Rifle Corps
3rd King's Royal Rifle Corps
4th King's Royal Rifle Corps
9th King's Rifle Corps
2nd Royal Irish RiflesRoyal Dublin Fusiliers,
1st & 2nd East Kent Regiment (The Buffs)
2nd Royal West Kent Regiment (The Queen's Own)Border Regiment,
1st Coldstream Guards,
1st & 2ndDuke of Cornwall's Light Infantry,
2nd Grenadier Guards,
2nd & 3rdScots Guards,
1st Royal Scots,
1st & 3rd West Surrey,
2nd (The Queen's)Northumberland Fusiliers
Queen's Own Cameron Highlanders,
1st Royal Fusiliers,
2nd King's Liverpool Regiment,
The Lincolnshire Regiment,
2nd The King's Own Liverpool Regiment,
1st Manchester Regiment,
1st & 2nd Duke of Cambridge's Own Middlesex Regiment,
2nd Suffolk Regiment,
1st Bedfordhire Regiment,
2nd Leicestershire Regiment,
1st Yorkshire Regiment,
1st East Yorkshire Regiment
2nd West Yorkshire Regiment,
2nd Lancashire Fusiliers
2nd Royal Lancaster Regiment
Royal Scots Fusiliers,
2nd Cheshire Regiment,
2nd Royal Welsh Fusiliers
South Wales Borderers,
2nd King's Own Scottish Borderers,
1st Shropshire Light infantry,
2nd (King's)Somersetshire Light Infantry
2nd (Prince Albert's)Scottish Rifles
1st Scottish Rifles
2nd ( The Cameronians)Scottish Rifles
4th Gloustershire Regiment,
1st & 2nd Worcestershire Regiment,
1st & 2nd East Surrey Regiment,
2nd Duke of Cornwall's Light Infantry (West Riding Regiment),
1st (Duke of Wellington's) Royal Sussex,
1st Royal Warwickshire Regiment,
2nd Hampshire Regiment,
2nd Dorsetshire Regiment,
2nd Welsh Regiment,
1st Royal Welsh Fusileers,
1st Black Watch,
2nd Bn (Royal Highlanders)Oxford Light lnfantry Essex Regiment,
1st & 2nd Derbyshire Regiment
1st (Sherwood Foresters)1st Royal North Lancashire Regiment
1st East Lancashire Regiment
1st South Lancashire Regiment
Royal Berkshire
2nd King's Own Yorkshire Light Infantry,
2nd King's Shropshire Light Infantry,
2nd King's Royal Rifles, Wiltshire Regiment,
2nd (Duke of Edinburgh's)North Staffordshire Regiment,
2nd South Staffordshire,
1st & 4th York and Lancaster Regiment,
1st Durham Light Infantry,
1st Seaforth Highlanders,
2nd RossShire Buffs
The Duke of Albany's)Gordon Highlanders,
Ist & 2nd Royal Irish Rifles
Connaught Rangers
1st Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders
1st Leinster Regiment,
2nd Royal Munster Fusiliers,
1st & 2nd Norfolk Regiment,
2nd Northamptonshire Regiment,
2nd Northumberland Fusiliers,
2nd Oxfordshire Light h.fhntry,
1st Highland Light infantry,
1st The Prince Consort's own Rifle Brigade,
2nd Mounted Infantry
Hannay's Mounted Infantry
Hickman's Mounted Infantry
Martyr's Mounted Infhntry
Thorneycroft's Mounted Infantry
Composite Regiment Mounted Infantry
1st, 2nd, 3rd, 4th, 5th, 6th, 7th, 8th, 9th, l0th, 1Ith, 12th, 13th, 15th, 17th, 18th (Sharpshooters),
19th (Paget's Horse),
20th (Roughriders),
21st, 22nd, 23rd, 24th, 25th, 26th Burma Mounted Infantry
Gough's Mounted Infantry
Malta Mounted Infantry
Mounted Pioneers
Naval Brigade
Royal Navy
Royal Marine
Royal Army Medical Corps
Royal Army Nursing Service
Army Service Corps
Army Veterinary Department
Army Ordnance Department
Army Chaplain's Department
Divisional Scouting Corps
Military Police
Corps of Military Mounted Police
Imperial Bearer Company
City of London Imperial Volunteers
Army Post Office Corps


New South Wales

Ist Australian Horse (New South Wales)
New South Wales Artillery
New South Wales Field Hospital and Bearer Company
New South Wales Mounted Infantry
1st New South Wales Mounted Rifles
3rd New South Wales Mounted Rifles
1st New South Wales Bushmen
6th Imperial Bushmen (4th New South Wales Contingent)
3rd New South Wales Bushmen
New South Wales Lancers

Victoria 1st 2nd, 5th Victorian Mounted Rifles and Mounted Infantry
3rd Victorian Contingent also designated as Victorian Bushmen and Autralian Bushmen Army Medical Corps


Queensland Mounted Infantry
3rd Queensland Bushmen
4th Queensland Imperial Bushmen
Tasmanian Mounted Infantry
First or Cameron's Tasmanian Contingent
1st Tasmanian Bushmen
1st Tasmanian Imperial Bushmen
2nd Tasmanian Imperial Bushmen
4th Regiment Imperial BushmenWest Australia
1st West Australian Mounted Infantry
1st and 2rd West Autralian Contingents
3rd West Australian (Bushmen) Contingent
4th West Australian Contingent (West Australian Imperial Bushmen)
5th and 6th West Australian Contingent
South Australia
South Australian Mounted Rifles
3rd South Australian (Bushmen) Contingent
4th South Australian (Imperial Bushmen) Contingent
5th and 6th Australian Contingent
Royal Australian Artillery
Australian Army Medical Corps
Doyle's Scouts
Intelligence Department

New Zealand
1st, 2nd, 3rd 4th, 5th, 6th, 7th, 8th, 9th, 10th Contingents consisting of New Zealand Mounted Rifles and one Hotchkiss Gun Detachment
New Zealand Battery
New Zealand Mounted Infantry
Canadian Artillery: "C ", "D" and "E" batteries
Canadian Scouts
Royal Canadian Dragoons
The Royal Canadian Regiment of Infantry
The Royal Canadian Mounted Ritles
2nd Regiment Canadian Mounted Rifles
Lord Strathcona's Corps


Lumsden's Horse
Ceylon Mounted Infantry Commonwealth Horse West India Regiment


Aberdeen Town Guard
Adelaide District Mounted Troops
Ashburner's Light Horse
Barkly West Town Guard
Bayly's Horse
Beaconsfield Town Guard
Beaufort West Town Guard
Bechuanaland Police
Bechuanaland Rifle Volunteers
Bechuanaland Protectorate Regiment
Bedford District Mounted Troops
Beddy's Scouts
Bethune's Mounted Infantry
Border Mounted Police
Border Mounted Rifles
Border Horse
Border Scouts
Brabant's Horse
Brett's Scouts
British South African Police
Bushmanland Borderers
Bush Veldt Carbineers
Byng's Scouts
Cape Colony Cyclist Corps
Cape Colony Defence Force
Cape Medical Staff Corps
Cape Garrison Artillery
Cape infantry
Cape Mounted Rifles
Cape Mounted Police
Cape Railway Capetown Highlanders
Ceres Scouts
1st City Volunteer's (Marshall's Horse)
City of Grahamstown Volunteers
Clifford's Scouts
Colonial Light Horse
Commanderin Chiefs
Bodyguard Corps of Cattle Rangers
CradockTown Guard
Cullinan's Horse
Damant's Horse
De Aar Town Guard
De Beers Maxim Battery
Dennison's Scouts
Diamond Fields Horse
Diamond Fields Artillery
District Military Police
District Mounted Troops
Dordrecht Dictrict Volunteer Guard
Dordrecht Wodehouse Yeomanry
Driscoll's scouts
Duke of Edinburgh's OwnVolunteer Rifles
Durban Light Infantry
Eastern Province Horse
Eastern Transvaal Scouts
East Griqualand Mounted Rifle Volunteers
East Griqualand Field Force
Edwards's Scouts
Farmers' Guard
Fraserburg District Mounted Troops
French's Scouts
Frontier Light Horse
Frontier Mounted Rifles
Geoghegan's Scouts
Gorringe's Flying Column
Heidelberg Volunteers and Scouts
Herschel Special Police
Herschel Native Police
Imperial Light Horse
Imperial Light Infantry
lndwe Town Guard
Jamestown Town Guard
Jansenville District Mounted Troops
Jansenville Town Guard
Johannesburg Mounted Rifles
Johannesburg Police
Kaffrarian Rifles
Kenhardt Town Guard
Keeley's Vryburg Farmer's Association
Kimberley Light Horse
Kimberley Regiment
Kimberley Town Guard
Kimberley Mounted Corps
Kitchener's Horse
Kitchener's Fighting Scouts
Klipdam Town Guard
Knysna Rangers
Kofflefontein Defence Force
Komga Mounted Infantry
Kroonstad Scouts
Laingsburg Town Guard
Loch's Horse
Lower Rhodesian Volunteers
Loyal Burgher Corps
Loxton's Horse
Lydenburg Civil Mounted Rifles
Maritzani Mounted Irregulars
Murray's Horse
Mafeking Town Guard
Menne's Scouts
Midland Mounted Rifles
Middelburg Town Guard
Molteno Town Guard
Montagu Town Guard
Montmorency's Scouts
Morley's Scouts
Mossel Bay Town Guard
Namaqualand Border Scouts
Namaqualand District Mounted Police
Namaqualand Town Guard
National Scouts
Natal Volunteer Field Artillery
Natal Volunteers Police and Guides
Natal Bridge Guards
Natal Carbineers
Natal M

Burlington to Adelaide 1865


from London via Plymouth to Port Adelaide 2nd May 1865

The ship Burlington, Captain Ellis, which sailed from Plymouth on the 4th January, with 281 immigrants, under the charge of Dr. Gregory. Surgeon-Superintendent, arrived at a late hour on
Tuesday night, after a passage of 118 days.

Sub-joined are the names of the immigrants, together with their industrial and national classifications:

Thomas, Emma, and Thomas Allen, Thomas Amos, W. James Andrews, George, Mary, George, and James Barrow, William H. Bedella, Elizabeth Bedella, Rd. and Susan Bennett, Eli Billingham, Elizabeth Blake, Amelia Blake, Mary Botting, Richard Brookes, Harriet Brown, James Coad, John, Hannah, John W., and Wm. F. Cogan, Mich. Cullings, Ellen Cooper, James Cornish, John Crothery, George and Annie Crump, Charles, Mary, John, Henry, James, Elizabeth, and Eliza Crump, John Doyle, Catherine and Thomas Driscoll, William Driscoll, June Edwards, Sarah Faulkener, Georgina Gabb, Richard and Ellen Gill, John and Augusta Groves, Fred. Hamblin, Ann Hayes, William Herring, James and Sarah Hicks, Stephen Hill, William, Ann, and Mary Hocking. John Hogan, James Holby, William Hooker., James Hulbard, Charles Hyde, John James, John Job, Edwin Juliffe, Hugh Kent, William King, Robert and Richard Kittoe, Edwin Lamming, Sarah Langley, James Letcher, Albert McDonald, Joseph and James Maddren, George Mapstone, Mary Mankelord, George and Thomas Martin. Thomas and Samuel May, Andrew Maney, James Mellen, Elizabeth Mitchell, George Morgan, Stephen, Margaret, May, Annie, William H., and Jane Moyle, Charles Mutton, William Nancarrow, Richard, John, Elizabeth, James, and Edward Nettell, Jeremiah Nicholas, May, David, Sarah. George, Ellis, Catherine, Bertha, and Ada Norman. William Parsons, Charles C., Grace. Joseph, and John Pascoe, Abel and Ellen Pattermore, Elizabeth Paull, David and Matilda Pickett, Ann, Catherine, James, and Grace Richards, Martha, James, Ellen, and Julia Rimer, Eliza Ror, John and Jane Roskilly. Elizabeth Roskrow, Emily and Nathaniel Rouse, John, Catherine, Elizabeth, Joseph, and Thomas Rule, William and Mary Simmons, Harry Smith, Elizabeth Soames, Lavinia Sparman, Thomas Spillett, William Staff. Joseph and Nathaniel Stephens, Louisa and Charlotte Stoddard, Louisa, Jane, and George Stoddard, Thomas and Jane Stom, William, Julia, Mary, and Elizabeth Symons, John Thomas. Nicholas, Mary Jane, Nicholas, and Mary Thomas, Alice Thomas, Reuben, Mary Ann, and Louisa Toms, William and Susan Touten. Richard and Thos. Trembak, Nathaniel Trescowthick. Humphry, Eliza, and Richard Trounce. Mark. Jessie. Edwin, and Laban Wake, William, Rachel, John, and Samuel Walters, John Webster, Elizabeth Weeks, Sarah Ann White, Charles Wilcoks, James, Richard, Emma, and George Williams. James Willoughby, Samuel Wills. Charles Woodward.

Scotch Robert Aitchison, Jane Aitchison, Joseph Barton, David Bell. William H. Ford, Alexander Fulton, Jane Gardiner, David Harrison, Jane Harrison. John, Ann, Mary, Jessie, and Mary Henderson, Ann Henry, James lnglis, Ann Jolly. Alexander Johnson. Barbara Linklater, Charles Linklater, Andrew, Jessie, Jessie, Andrew, Isabella, Jane, James, and Elizabeth Lindsay, Isabel Lyndsay. Margaret Lynch, Robert McConnell Alexander and Margaret McGregor, Catherine and Jessie McKenzie, Ann McKeown, Robert Taylor, Ellen Wallace, James Young.

Irish Charles Barrett, James, Mary, and Winifred Carry, James Chant. Ann Collins. Mary and Bridget Connell. William Coughlin, James Coy, Thomas and Margaret Cunningham, Catherine and Pat Doyle, David Gunn, Mary Higgins, Michael,John, and Monty Hogan. Thady Hynes, David, Mary, Michael, Pat, and Mary Kelly, Michael Keneally, William, John, Mary, and Margaret Kenedy, Celia King, James Lyman, Ellen McAuliffe, Eliza McCahey. Mary McCarthy, Ann McLoughlin, Pat and Margaret Mouby, Thomas Neeman, Abigail O'Callaghan, Thomas Rochford, Stephen, John, and Robert Ryan. Thomas and Ellen Stafford, Ann Stunchon, John Walsh, Pat Whelan.

Summary of Nationalities.
English Adults, 155: children between 1 and 12, 19: infants, 8; total 192.
Scotch Adults 30: children between 1 and 12. 9 ; total, 39.
Irish Adults. 45; children between 1 and 12, 3 : infants, 1 ; total, 49.
Totals Adults, 240; children between 1 and 12, 31; infants, 9; grand total, 288 equal to 210
statute adults; children between 1 and 12, 15½; total, 255½. Industrial Classification. Miners 33, labourers 59, servants 43, schoolmasters 2, matron 1,cooks 4, shepherds 2, blacksmiths 5, carpenters or cabinet-makers 3, masons 3, farmers 2, farm labourers and servants 6, laundress 1, sawyer 1, railway labourer 1, housekeeeper 1, coachpainter 1, printer 1, carter 1, ploughman 2, dairymaid 1, sempstress 1, shoe makers 2.

The South Australian Advertiser (Adelaide, SA : 1858 - 1889)
Wednesday 3 May 1865
Taken from the Agents' embarkation list

Cameleers - Shaping the outback

I saw one string of sixty camels silently going about their business led by a turbaned Afghan with a gay coloured dress, the rear of the procession brought up by another Afghan riding leisurely along at the rate of say two and a half miles an hour. Unhasty, yet unresting, these grotesque animals pursue their way, each following in the footsteps of the other - no whips, no jangle of harness, no objection to the dust - just plod, plod, plod along, their brown skins and knotted excrescences harmonising perfectly with the sombre foliage, the burnt and baked up bushes, the grotesquely stunted trees.
(An account of 1895 by an anonymous writer)

The cameleers or 'handlers' came from Egypt, Persia and Turkey though most, hailed from northern India and what today is Pakistan. But the men were all, almost always incorrectly, called Afghans or simply "Ghans." they played a vital role in pioneering transport and communication routes across outback Australia's vast expanses

In June 1860, the first three Afghans with 124 camels arrived in Melbourne; they were Dost Mohamed and Hassan Khan both Pashtun people and Baloch from Balochistan.

European exploration and settlement of inland Australia depended heavily on the expertise of these cameleers. During the late 19th century their network of transport routes opened up the arid interior.
More efficient than bullock or horse teamsters, the cameleers were in great demand. They helped construct the Overland Telegraph Line and inland railways, took part in exploration expeditions, and supplied mining towns and pastoral stations.

The cameleers small Muslim communities were a feature of Australian outback towns for more than 50 years. Areas where the Afghans would settle were called Ghan Towns and, tin mosques, palm trees and camel stables, marked these towns.

Cameleers would build Masjids that would not only serve as a place of worship, but as a gathering place that offered them a sense of community that they could not find elsewhere.

Ghan towns" are mostly found in South Australia in Port Augusta, Maree, Beltana, Farina and Oodnadatta.

In some instances, European attitudes to the cameleers focused on their religion and in other cases, it was related to their pride and independence as, at the time, Afghanistan was only known to most Australians as the country that had, unlike British India, resisted British rule.

They were not allowed to bring their women with them consequently some, who remained in the country married native Australian Aboriginal women. Laws in Australia at the time did not permit marriage with european women. Excellent research entitled The Afghans and the Aborigines by Philip Jones of the South Australian Museum describes the relationships between the cameleers and the aborigines.

[Alice Springs owes its existence to the hardy camel and the equally hardy cameleers. It was founded in the early 1870s as a repeater station for the Darwin-to-Adelaide Overland Telegraph Line which was also built by men who depended on dromedaries for supplies and equipment. Plodding camels not only helped establish "The Alice," they brought it music: The first piano arrived in the 1880s, the story goes, strapped to the back of a camel. Aptly, the city holds a state legislative district, The Sadadeen primary school and a major thoroughfare all named after cameleer Saleh "Charlie" Sadadeen, who came to Alice Springs with his team in 1890. "Children were enthralled with his distinctive, flowing robes and intrigued with the long-stemmed pipe he smoked," reports the Alice Springs Centralian Advocate.]

[Men like Sadadeen came to Australia on two to three-year contracts but often lived out their lives in the country, writes American geographer Tom McKnight in The Camel in Australia. While a handful became wealthy, deploying "thousands of camels organized into the backbone of corporate business," most toiled from dawn to well past dusk for low pay, and lived near outback towns in little communities distinguished by the "tin minarets of their hastily constructed mosques." Wherever the cameleers settled, writes McKnight, "they would soon construct a place of worship. In every case the mosque was a focal point of community life in Ghan Town."]

Philip Jones and Anna Kenny, wrote a book called Australia's Muslim Cameleers about the cameleers from Afghanistan, a wonderful pictorial history of these men, their religious and cultural life, and their relations with Indigenous and European Australians. This book contains a biographical listing of more than 1200 cameleers. Many of the images and artefacts in this fascinating account being published for the first time.
This book may be ordered through Flinders Rangers Research The largest site for South Australian and Northern Territory Historical Information.

Today Australia is one of the major camel exporters to the Middle East

In 1921 the semi-retired Cameleer Saleh (Charlie) Sadadeen leased the block which now houses the Council`s Civic Centre. Sadadeen was born in the Punjab, northwest India, and arrived in Alice Springs in 1890 after ten years in Australia and previous service in the British Army as a Cameleer. Two tall date palms outside the Council Civic Centre were planted in 1916 by Walter Smith who worked with the cameleers bringing supplies from the railhead at Oodnadatta. In front of the palms is a monument and seat, built in the 1980`s, dedicated to the Cameleers. The park was rededicated in 2001.

When the Coolgardie gold rush occurred in 1894, the cameleers were quick to move in. The goldfields could not have continued without the food and water they transported. In March that year, a caravan of six Afghans, forty-seven camels and eleven calves, set out across the desert from Marree to the goldfield.

Throughout the outback, there are many lone graves of cameleers, often buried with their camels.

Alice Springs Memorial Cemetery

This cemetery is the resting place of many pioneers, including the remarkable Eddie Connellan and his family (a row of white marble headstones), famous Aboriginal artist Albert Namatjira, Harold Bell Lasseter, who died trying to find a lost gold reef and Miss Olive Pink an early anthropologist. There is also a special section devoted to the early Afghan cameleers and their descendants who were a vital part of the early exploration and settlement of Central Australia. They are buried facing Mecca.

2,000 Cameleers arrived in Australia. For more information on any one of them please ask.

Photo below; Loading camels at Marree, about 1901

Canada Genealogy sites

Besides The Drouin Collection of Quebec Vital and Church Records. Which I believe can now be accessed through ancestry.com

give these following sites a go.

Library and Archives of Canada

Canada GenWeb Project

Newfoundland Labrador

For Cemeteries D'ADDEZIO.com and GenWeb Cemeteries

Gnalogie du Qubec et de l'Acadie

Canada GenWeb for Kids

Montreal records

Quebec Genealogy

Also Canadian Convicts to Australia 1839-1840
American patriots, convicted at Fort Henry, Toronto
and French Canadians, convicted at Montreal

4 comment(s), latest 3 months, 2 weeks ago

Capt. George Manning 1811–1907

A convict arrived on the 'Norfolk' 27 August 1829 sentenced to seven years at the Surrey Quarter Sessions.
It is not given to many (writes a correspondent) to pass the end of their lives close to the place where their life work has been carried on, but such was the case with Capt George Manning, who died at Sackville, on the 22 July 1907.
His home was the farm originally built by Mr George Loder, one of the pioneers of farming on the fertile river when it was the granary for the infant colony an important agricultural asset of the land in times when food was often famine prices. The late Mr Manning was in his 96th year at the time of his death; and two years ago, when the writer visited him, had a vivid remembrance of the river from the days of the very early sailing vessels there. He remembered the boat building that made the river a busy place, and the forests of cedar that the sawyers felled and floated down the numerous creeks and rivers, Although before his time, he could speak of such early men as Griffiths, the boat builder, whose Bee took Governor Bligh on his many expeditions to the Green Hills, as Windsor was then called, 'Boat and ship building formed a most important river industry in my early days,' said Captain Manning. 'Beazley's Wharf, between Richmond and Windsor, was still busy, though the building of the Mary and Elizabeth and the Governor Bourke was before my time. The Glory was the last of Griffiths' boats, built about 1819, and the Francis and the Norfolk were still talked of. Captain Manning's sailing vessel, so many years the favorite passenger and cargo boat of the Hawkesbury, was the Maid of Australia, 'but I suppose,' said the ex-master, 'most of those who travelled by her have joined the great majority,' for few live to bear the weight of 90 years. The Loders, Halls, Churchills, Doyles, Parnells, Bowmans, and many other men who first lived at Hawkesbury, though now their names are known throughout the land, were my passengers, and gladly paid 12/6 for a trip from Sydney to Windsor in The Maid. Many a little girl, now a middle aged woman, has been put under my care for her first trip to the big city, as it was then looked on as quite an adventure for young people to go so far from home as from the river to Sydney.' Captain Manning was long the only survivor of the band of river shipmasters who all rest in the graveyards along the banks of the Hawkesbury - Captains Grono, Herd, Christie, Sternbeck, Books, and his partner, Mitchell, being his early contemporaries. Among his passengers was the one-time almost king of the river, old Solomon Wiseman. 'I knew him well,' said the captain. 'He was providore for the convicts, and made many thousands out of that job. A rough mannered man, but very hospitable, and hand-in-glove with the Government. The judges on circuit, especially Judge Roger Therry used to stay with him, in his old house (now an hotel at the Ferry), in the days of overlanding, when they travelled on horseback that way between Sydney and Maitland. Captain Manning came out from England when a child in the very early emigration days.[sic]
After steamers were introduced on to the river as passenger carriers, he continued to command a vessel; and was, for over 50 years, until his retirement into private life on his farm, constantly engaged in the Hawkesbury River traffic. Even to the last he showed traces of what a fine personage physically he was, being fully 6ft high, and a broad, well-built figure. His daughters, who have lived all their lives in the district, tended him in his declining years, and carried on the work of the farm since he ceased to be able to do so.

The late George Manning had been 78 years in New South Wales, and in 1838, at the age of 26, at Sackville Reach, he married Elizabeth Elkins. The issue of the marriage was 11 children, (three of whom are dead, viz, James, who died at Lower Portland, George, and William, who died on the Clarence River. The surviving members of the family are Mrs T. Turnbull (Canterbury); Ann, Mrs John Warr Turnbull (Sackville) Miss Sarah Manning (Sackville); Mr Frederick Manning (Narrabri); Mrs Griffiths (Colo Vale); Mr Andrew Manning (Terrace, Windsor); Mr Charles Manning (Lithgow); and Miss Clara Manning (Sackville). The funeral took place on Tuesday last, the remains being conveyed from deceased's late residence in Mr Jones' steamer, and interred in the family vault in the Sackville C.E cemetery, where a large concourse of people had assembled. Rev W. S. Newton, M A., carried out the last solemn rites, and Mr J. W. Chandler was the undertaker. The cause of death was bronchitis, and deceased had been ill about a fortnight.
Windsor & Richmond Gazette (NSW), 27 July 1907, p 4
Original Copy

Catherine Eather 1846-1928

Catherine EATHER, the thirteenth and last child of Thomas EATHER 1800-1886 and Sarah, nee McALPIN, was born at Richmond, New South Wales on 13 January 1846. Her childhood home was the "Union Inn" in Windsor Street, Richmond where her parents resided and her father was sometimes the inn-keeper.
Her eldest brother and sister were already married when she was born and the next two were married when she was still too young to remember the respective events. Four more family weddings occurred by the time she was ten, and she became used to seeing older brothers and sisters departing from their home town for destinations over the ranges to the north.
She was only two when her sister Susannah died from burns and she probably did not remember her in later life. Her chief childhood playmates were her brothers James and John and some of her nieces and nephews who lived nearby. She was nine when her eldest sister, Elizabeth, became a widow and there was sorrow in the family. Of her older sisters, the ones whom she knew the best were Elizabeth and Annie, as they were the ones who continued to live at Richmond after their respective marriages. Catherine EATHER probably had formal schooling as a pupil at the school a few streets away and she would have gone along with her parents and other relatives on Sundays to the regular service in St Peter's Church. She probably went to Sunday school classes.

On 23 May 1866, when she was twenty, Catherine EATHER married twenty-nine year-old William Henry TAYLOR. The wedding was held at Richmond by the rites of the Presbyterian Church. The witnesses who signed the marriage register were two of her seventeen year-old nephews, Albert YOUNG and Henry Charles EATHER. The groom had been born at Richmond in 1837, the son of a farmer, Robert TAYLOR and his wife Sarah. Like many of the young men born on the Hawkesbury, he had ventured out onto the Liverpool Plains and beyond and by the time of his marriage he was a grazier in the Narran Creek district far out to the north-west of the colony beyond the township of Walgett. He signed the marriage certificate with his mark (a cross).

Soon after her marriage Catherine left her home district, just as most of her elder siblings had done, and proceeded to the Liverpool Plains. On the way she would have been able to have called upon her eldest brother and family at Bulga; her sister Sarah and family at the hotel at Muswellbrook, and her sister Charlotte and family at nearby Liddell. She didn't make her home permanently at Narran Creek. She and William spent most of their married lives on the Namoi River at Baan Baa. There Catherine was amongst quite a number of her relatives, as her brothers Charles, Peter and William were all married and living on or near the family station "Henriendi", and her single brothers James and John were also there except when away on droving trips or visits to the Hawkesbury or elsewhere.

During the first twenty-one years of their marriage, five children were born to Catherine and William. At some date between 1876 and 1883 William Henry TAYLOR changed his surname to ALLEN. The reason for this is still a mystery. His first three children were registered with the surname of TAYLOR, but William, born in 1883, was registered as ALLEN. Thereafter all references to the family members in official records, including the first three children, have the family name as ALLEN.
When grandchildren of Catherine and William became subscribers to the EATHER Family Newsletter in the 1980's, they were unaware that TAYLOR had once been the surname of two of their grandparents. Catherine EATHER became well-known in the Boggabri and Narrabri districts. She has been recorded as an expert horsewoman, riding side-saddle as many women did in those days.

She became an experienced mid-wife and for years travelled the countryside in the Baan Baa and Narrabri districts, attending to her patients. William remained a grazier, but according to oral family history he also drove coaches for Cobb and Co for several years in the 1890's. Eventually there came an occasion when bushrangers attempted to hold up his coach. Gun-fire ensued and the sound of it caused the team to bolt. William was thrown from the driver's seat and dragged along the ground for some distance. He was transported to the Narrabri hospital suffering from head and other injuries. He died in hospital eight days later on 7 October 1894 from "injuries to the brain". He was 57.
His daughter, Sarah age 23 years, provided the information for her father's death certificate. She was single and her place of residence was Nowley Station, Narrabri. His name was given as William Henry ALLEN and his occupation as grazier.
He had seven living children and none deceased. An inquest was held into the cause of his death. The coroner's verdict was, "Effects of injuries accidentally received" and the locality, "near Narrabri". Catherine survived her husband by thirty-four years.

She suffered further tragedy in her life when her second son William, who had enlisted in the AIF during World War I, was killed in action overseas.
Her eldest son, Thomas, also died during her lifetime.
She lived to see her three eldest children married, and to see grandchildren and great-grandchildren. At some time in her old age she left the Narrabri district and moved to Sydney.
After the death of her sister Sarah in Queensland in 1926, she was the only surviving daughter of Thomas and Sarah EATHER.
She was 82 when she passed away at the residence of her grandson, Athol HATHORN, at 125 Forest Road, Bexley on 26 October 1928. She was buried in the Woronora. Cemetery. Three children; Sarah (age 57), Mabel (53) and Frank (41) survived her. The information on her death certificate was provided by Athol HATHORN.

The Children of Catherine Eather and William Henry TAYLOR 1837-1894 were:-

Thomas Charles Taylor Allen 1868 1919 m. Minnie Clara FREEMAN 1878-1965
Sarah Eliza Taylor 1871 1955 m. Henry HATHORN 1866-1962
Mabel Kate Taylor 1875 1958 m. William Henry ROBINSON 1877-1945
William Roland Allen 1883 1917 ANZAC Killed in action
Frank McAlpin Allen 1887 1956

John St.Pierre
Eather family Newsletter
Eather Family History

CENSUS 1841-1911

The census was held on a Sunday either that last weekend in March or the beginning of April. Sunday night when most people would be at home.
You'll notice the first census in 1841 was held in June and not successful at all, because the bright sparks in the city who organised it, didn't realise, it was during the agricultural season and most people were away for the harvest. The 1841 census in England and Wales was the first census where the names of all the occupants of the household were taken.
They were administered in census districts which were based on the registration districts used in the civil registration of births, deaths and marriages. These districts were made into divisions of about 200 households called enumeration districts and enumerators were employed ( yes! they were paid)to visit the households and explain the forms, much the same as they do today.
The districts did not always match the existing parish boundaries.

The date of the census were:

Sunday 6 June 1841
Sunday 30 March 1851
Sunday 7 April 1861
Sunday 2 April 1871
Sunday 3 April 1881
Sunday 5 April 1891
Sunday 31 March 1901
Sunday 2 April 1911

Census returns are subject to a 100 years' privacy rule

I couldn't resist adding this History of the British Empire from Horrible Histories.

Special forms were supplied for asylums, hospitals, schools and similar institutions
with over 100 occupants.
The form below is the 1911 Census

1 comment(s), latest 3 years, 8 months ago

Central Goldfields, Victoria, Australia-Lookups

I will be in The Maldon and Castlemaine area from the 16th March till the 27th March

I will be visiting the Maldon Cemetery .
So if you need a photograph or confirmation of a death, let me know
If you have a request for anything at any of the other towns in the central goldfields area, ask and I will do my best to get there.

For 3 days during this time I will be at the Goldfields Research Centre in Bendigo.
If any member has look-ups they would like carried out whilst I'm there. Please contact me or post them on this page. I will notify you whether or not a favourable result is achieved.

After this trip, I will not be returning till 27th April 2013

2 comment(s), latest 2 years, 7 months ago

CHAFFE DEATHS - NSW from earliest 1860 to 1980

5700/1860 CHAFFE HENRY

6580/1873 CHAFFE PETER


11001/1884 CHAFFE MARY


10035/1901 CHAFFE ETHEL



18932/1915 CHAFFE ARTHUR C


18570/1922 CHAFFE PETER H

11730/1938 CHAFFE ALFRED

21894/1942 CHAFFE HENRY



29411/1952 CHAFFE JOHN













21185/1980 CHAFFE MARY

CHAFFE BIRTHS - NSW from earliest 1857 TO 1910

12030/1859 CHAFFE HENRY

12883/1862 CHAFFE ALFRED H


15052/1876 CHAFFE JOHN



23224/1880 CHAFFE JOHN

20631/1882 CHAFFE HENRY

23623/1883 CHAFFE MARY

25307/1884 CHAFFE MARTHA

26868/1886 CHAFFE HANNAH


21150/1878 CHAFFE GEORGE


38175/1891 CHAFFE ALFRED

30294/1892 CHAFFE ALFRED A

23715/1901 CHAFFE ETHEL

33008/1903 CHAFFE AGNES L

29470/1909 CHAFFE AGNES L