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Mail Contracts New South Wales January 1861

Particulars for the contracts entered into for the conveyance of Post Office Mails, from 1st January 1861.
The + symbol signifies Per Week.

WESTERN ROADS.
John Hilt, Parramatta, Baulkham Hills, Rouse Hill, and Windsor, six days per week, for £200.
James Connolly, Windsor, Pitt Town, Wiseman's Ferry, and St. Alban's, two days, +£90.
Edward Croft, Wiseman's Ferry, and Mangrove Creek, one day, + £16.
Thomas Crisford, Windsor and Richmond, six days, + for £55.
Charles Bowen, Windsor, Wilberforce, Sackville Reach, and Portland Head, via Ebenezer, three days, + for £70.
Thomas Crisford, Richmond, North Richmond, and Wheeny Creek (Lamrock's Inn), three days, + for £35.
H. J. Kirwan, Sackville Reach and Lower Portland,three days, + for £30.
Edward Crisford, Richmond and Camden, via Castlereagh, Penrith, Mulgoa, and Greendale, three days, + for £198.
William Crane and J. J. Roberts, Parramatta Railway Terminus, and Post Office and Penrith, twice a day; Penrith, Hartley, and Bathurst, six days; Bathurst and Sofala, three days; Hartley and Mudgee, six days; with branch Post from Kean's Swamp to Rylstone, three days, and Bathurst, Guyong, and Orange, six days, + for £3250.
John Beard, Sofala and Tambaroora, one day, + for £190.
James Falconer, Mudgee, Cobbora, and Mundooran, one day, + for £175.
Edward Duckett, Mundooran and Coonamble, one day, + for £200.
David McCullough, Coonamble and Merri Merri by Bimbleyom, Bundy, Ningey, and Coanbone, one day, + for £99.
George O'Shea, Mudgee, Merrindee, and Wellington, one day, + for £180.
Edwin J. Greenwood, Mudgee and Cassilis, one day,+ for £200.
John Smith, Mudgee and Long Creek via Avisford, Grattai, Louisa Creek, Windeyer, and Campbell's Creek, two days, + for £275.
Hugh Wright, Orange and Wellington via Stoney Creek, Ironbarks, Moombla Hill, and Black Rock, three days, + for £795.
Edward Nicholls, Orange and Molong, three days, + for £285.
Thomas O'Brien, Molong and Black Rock, three days, + for £200.
Joseph Morris, Molong and South Wangan, one day, + for £115.
John Gardner, Molong and Obley, one day, + for £49.
D. L. Dalziell, Obley und Algullah, one day, + for £100.
Alexander White, Wellington and Dubbo, two days, + for £150.
James McCubbin, Dubbo and Cobbora, one day, + for £99.
Edward Duckett, Dubbo, Drungalee and Cannonbah, one day, + for £200.
John Minehan, Bathurst and Carcoar, three days, + for £348.
Thomas Walsh, Carcoar and Canowindra via Cliefden and Cowra, three days, + for £420.
Thomas Walsh, Cowra, South Wangan, Bundaburra, and Condobolin, one day, + for £360.
Thomas Grace, Condobolin and Lang's Crossing-place, one day, + for £560.
James James, Bathurst, Lagoons, and Rockley, two days; Rockley and Tuena, one day; Rockley and Swatchfield, one day ; Bathurst, Caloola, and Long Swamp, one day; Bathurst and O'Connell, two days; and O'Connell and Fish River Creek, via Mutton's Falls, one day, + for £400.

SOUTHERN ROADS.
William Crane and J. J. Roberts, Railway Terminus and Post Office, Campbelltown and Camden, via Narellan and Campbelltown and Goulburn, six days, + for £825.
W. B. Campbell, Campbelltown, Riversford, Douglass Park, and Picton, six days, + for £150.
Philip Reily, Camden and Oaks, via Brownlow Hill, and Lowe's Hill, six days; and Oaks and Burrogorang, three days, + for £145.
John Wallace, Berrima and Sutton Forest, six days, + for £70.
Charles Loseby, Berrima and Bong Bong, six days, + for £40.
James Waterworth, Bungonia and Marulan, three days, + for £50.
James Woods, Campbelltown, Appin, Woonona, Wollongong, and Dapto, six days, + for £600.
Edward Graham, Dapto and Shellharbour, two days, + for £30.
Joseph Howard, Dapto, Jamberoo, Kiama, Geringong and Shoalhaven, six days, + £500.
Christopher and William Murray, Shoalhaven, Sassafras, Nerriga, and Braidwood, one day, + for £230.
William Murray, Shoalhaven and Nowra, via Greenhills, three days, + £25.
John Allen, Shoalhaven, Nowra, and Ulladulla, via Greenhills, two days, + for £133 6s. 8d.
Philip Murray, Shoalhaven, Nowra, and Ulladulla, via Greenhills, one day, + for £66 13s. 4d.
Alfred Moult, Ulladulla and Bateman's Bay, two days, + for £120.
Mary Coffee, Bateman's Bay and Moruya, two days, + for £68.
Thomas Moran, Goulburn and Braidwood, via Boro, six days; Boro, Bungendore, and Queanbeyan, six
days; and Queanbeyan and Cooma, six days, + for £900.
David Wilson, Braidwood and Major's Creek, via Bell's Creek and Bell's Paddock, three days, + for
£120.
David Wilson, Braidwood and Little or Mongarlowe River, two days, +for £75.
Thomas Moran, Bungendore and Molonglo, three days, + for £84.
Thomas McGee, Nelligen (Clyde River), and Braid- wood, two days, + for £250.
John Doughty, Major's Creek, Oranmore and Stoney Creek, via Ballalaba, two days, + for £58.
P. Heffernan, Braidwood, Araluen, Mullenderree, and Moruya, via Reidsdale, two days, + for £225.
C. J. McGregor, Moruya, Bodalla, Bega, Merimbula, and Pambula, one day, + for £160.
John Otton, jun., Moruya, Bodalla, Bega, Merimbula, and Pambula, one day, + for £180.
J. J. Roberts, Goulburn, Collector, Gundaroo, Gin- ninderra, and Queanbeyan, two days, + for £220.
Thomas Moran, Queanbeyan and Lanyon, two days, + for £68 12s.
Thomas Moran, Cooma, Adaminiby, Russell's and Kiandra, one day, + for £228 11s. 6d.
J. J. Roberts, Cooma, Adaminiby, Russell's and Kiandra, two days, + for £600.
William McGregor, Adaminiby and Cathcart, one day, + for £300.
William Roohan, Cooma and Buckley's Crossing Place, via Woolway and Jejizrick, one day, + for £138.
David Delves, Cooma and Bombala, two days, + for £350.
Edward Jones, Bombala and Delegate, two days, + for £110.
Charles Robertson, Bombala, Cathcart, Pambula, and Eden, via Big Jack's, one day, + for £210.
Charles Robertson, Pambula and Eden, two days, + for £55.
J. M. Munoz, Goulburn and Kenny's Point, via Bangalore, one day, + for £69.
James Martin, Goulburn, Tarlo, and Taralga, via Chatsbury, one day, + for £58.
Isaac Pratton, Goulburn, Laggan, and Tuena, one day, + for £160.
George Evans, Goulburn and Binda, via Mummell, Pomeroy, Gullen, and Wheo, two days, + for £160.
George Webster, Binda and Tuena, two days, for £80.
W. Henry Smith, Binda and Bigga, one day, + for £37. 10s.
James Maloney, Wheo, Reid's Flat, and Cowra, one day, + for £126 6s. 4d.
William Crane and J. J. Roberts, Goulburn, Gunning, and Yass, daily, + £531 4s.
James Garry, Yass, Binalong, and Burrowa, two days, + for £240.
Patrick Forbes, Yass and Gundaroo, two days, + for £80.
Jacob Marks, Binalong, Murrumburrah, and Wagga Wagga, via Dacey's and the Levels, two days, + for £600.
Allan Hancock, Burrowa, and Reid's Flat, via Hovell's Creek and Phil's Creek, one day, for £60.
Daniel Crottay, Burrowa and Cowra, via Marengo, and Bumbaldrie, one day, + for £135.
Thomas West, Marengo and Morangarell, one day, + for £100.
John Sheehan and Laurence Garry, Yass and Albury, three days, + for £2,285 3s. 2d.
Robert Elliott, Yass and Albury, three days, + for £2,400.
Edward Doyle, Gundagai and Tumut, three days, + for £210.
Edward G. Brown, Tumut and Kiandra, one day, + for £480.
C. W. Crawley, Tumut and Adelong, three days, + for £100.
Frederick Abbott, Tarcutta and Adelong, three days, for £285.
Alexander Bruce, Adelong, Upper Adelong, Tumberumba, and Ten Mile Creek, with a branch post to and from Copabella, Jingillack, and Welaregane, one day, + for £350.
James Gormley, Tarcutta and Wagga Wagga, one day, + for £95.
James Gormley, Tarcutta and Wagga Wagga, two days; Wagga Wagga, Gillinbah, Lang's Crossing Place, and Balranald, one day, + for £852 12s. 8d
James Gormley, Wagga Wogga, Gillenbah, Lane's Crossing Place, and Balranald, one day, +for £685.
James Gormley, Wagga Wagga and Deniliquin, one day, + for £470.
James Gormley, Wagga Wagga and Deniliquin, one day, + for £487 1s. 2d.
James Clifford, Lang's Crossing Place and Deniliquin. one day, + for £228 11s. 6d.
Richard Bill, Lang's Crossing Place and Deniliquin, two days; and Deniliquin and Moama, three days, + for £925.
Ralph Powell, Albury and Deniliquin, one day, + for £220.
Bevan and Co,, Deniliquin and Moama, three days, + for £260.
William Burgess, Deniliquin, Moulamein, and Balranald, one day, +for £250.
Thomas Pain and Robert Driscoll, Wentworth and Mount Murchison, once a fortnight, for £600.

NORTHERN ROADS.
James Cole, Sydney, Lane Cove, and Gosford, via Peat's Ferry, one day, + for £129.
Peter Fagan, Sydney, Lane Cove, and Gosford, via Peat's Ferry, one day, + for £100.
Peter Fagan, Gosford and Kincumber, one day, + for £16.
Morris Magney, Newcastle Wharf, the Post-office, and Railway Terminus, twice or oftener daily, for £100.
Morris Magney, Newcastle Post-office, and Branch Office at Lake Macquarie Road and the Junction, twice or oftener, daily, for £48 11s. 6d.
Thomas Baker, Raymond Terrace and Stroud, four days, + for £178.
John Williams, Stroud and Tinonee, two days, + for £245.
Robert Summerville, Tinonee and Wingham, two days, + for £27.
G. M. Fitzpatrick, Tinonee and Redbank, two days, + for £32 10s.
Reuben Richards, Tinonee and Port Macquarie, two days, + for £210.
Thomas Carney, Port Macquarie and Huntingdon, one day, + for £28.
Henry McCabe, Tinonee, Taree, Candleton, and Jones' Island, two days, +for £35.
Christopher Felton, Port Macquarie, Rolland's Plains, and Kempsey, two days, + for £108.
Otho O. Dangar, Kempsey and Frederickton, one day, + for £36 11s. 6d.
Otho O. Dangar. Kempsey and Armidale, once a fortnight, for £73.
Robert Hyndes, Post Office and Railway Station, West Maitland, twice or oftener, daily, for £52.
Alexander McGilvray, West Maitland, East Maitland, and Morpeth, seven days, for £49.
Alexander McGilvray, Railway Station and Post Office, East Maitland, Morpeth, and Hinton, seven days, for £67.
Lawrence Arnold, Hinton, Seaham, Clarence Town, Brookfield, and Dungog, three days, + for £145.
Thomas Irwin, Dungog and Bandon Grove, three days, + for £28.
Robert Lloyd, East Maitland, Largs, and Paterson, seven days, for £125.
William Shearwood, Paterson and Gresford, three days, + for £35.
Francis Randall, Gresford and Eccleston, one day, + for £20.
Patrick McCloy, Gresford and Lostock, two days, + for £25.
Thomas Moore, East Maitland and Mount Vincent, one day, + for £24.
Thomas Moore, Maitland, Millfield, and Wollombi, three days. + for £180.
John Gill, Railway Terminus and Post Office, Lochinvar, and Singleton, seven days ; and Singleton and Murrurundi, four days. + for £1844 5s.
John Gill, Singleton and Murrurundi, two days; and Murrurundi Land Armidale, three days ; + for £3450.
Joseph Clark, Singleton and Fordwich, two days.+ for £85.
Thomas Howard, Singleton and Jerry's Plains, -via Cockfighter's Creek, and in time of flood via Thorley's, three days.+ for £77.
Patrick Ward, Muswellbrook, Merton, Merriwa, and Cassilis, three days.+ for £777.
William Acheson, Cassilis, Coolan, and Coonabarabran, one day.+ for £142.
James M'Cubbin, Coolah, Denison Town, and Cobbora, one day,+ for £90.
J. A. Johnstone, Coolah and Gulligal, one day. for £149.
Seymour Denman, Wallgett and Coonabarabran, via Kienlry, &c, one day.+ for £179.
John Gill, Murrurundi, Tamworth, Bendemeer, and Armidale, three days. + for £3980.
Joseph Taggart, Murrurundi and Oakey Creek, one day.+ for £120.
John Gill, Murrurundi, Breeza, and Gunnedah, one day, for £159.
John Gill, Murrurundi and Gunnedah, via Warra, Breeza, and Carroll, one day; and Gunnedah, Gulligal, and Wee Waa, one day. + for £550.
Abraham Johnstone, Gulligal and Warialda, one day.+ for £168.
William M'clelland, Goonoo Goonoo and Nundle, via Bowling Alley .Point, two days. + for £175.
A. S. Bourke, Goonoo Goonoo and Nundle, via Bowling Alley Point, one day, + for £71 8s. 7d.
John Gill, Armidale and Drayton, two days ; Tamworth, Warialda, and Calandoon, one day; Warialda and Wee Waa, one day ; Tamworth, Carroll, and Gulligal, one day: Wallgett. Caidmurra, and Callandoon, one day ; Wee Waa and Wallgett, one day; Warwick and Ipswich, via Cunningham's Gap. one day; Wallabadah and Quirindi, one day ; Uralla and Rocky River, three days ; + for £3900.
James Keating, Walgett and Fort Bourke, once a fortnight, for £350.
William Sly, Fort Bourke and Mount Murchison, travelling either side of the Darling, once a fortnight, for £275.
W. M. Stevenson and William Martin, Armidale and Grafton, and Bendemeer and Bundarra, one day, + for £390.
W. M. Stevenson, Armidale and Walcha, one day ; and Bendemeer and Walcha, two days, for £232.+
Gabriel Wardrope, Armidale, Byron, and Frazer's Creek, via Moredun, Paradise Creek, Newstead, Inverell, Buckalla, one day. for £150.
Edward M. Wright, Tenterfield and Frazer's Creek, one day, + for £144.
Charles Tuckwood, Tenterfield, Tabulan, and Grafton, one day, + for £288.
Ellen Thompson, Lawrence and Casino, one day ; Grafton and Casino, one day, + for £400.
Henry Sheldon, Lawrence Tabulam, and Tooloom, via Pretty Gully, one day + for £200.
James Duffy, Casino and Richmond River Heads, one day. + for £150.
John Brown, Casino and Brisbane, one day, for £265.

SUBURBAN.
Peter Fagan. Sydney, St. Mark's, Waverley, and Watson's Bay, six days for £99.
G. H. Stevens, Sydney and St. Leonard's, twice a day, + for £40.
Robert Gannon, Sydney and St. Peter's, twice a day, for £12.
John Grice, Sydney and Randwick, twice a day, for £20.


Religious Smokers

At one period of its history smoking was so common that it
was actually practised in church.
Previous to the visit of James I. to the University of
Cambridge, in 1615, the Vice Chancellor issued a notice
to the students, which enjoined that "No graduate, scholer, or
student of this universitie presume to take tobacco in
Saint Maries Church, upon payne of finall expellinge the universitie."
The Rev. Dr. Parr, when perpetual curate of Hatton, Warwickshire,
which living he held from 1783 to 1790, regularly smoked in the
vestry while the congregation were singing long hymns, chosen for
the purpose, immediately before the sermon. The doctor was wont to
exclaim : " My people like long hymns, but I prefer a long pipe."
The Rev. Robert Hall, of Leicester, the well known Baptist minister,
regularly indulged in smoking during the intervals of Divine worship.
Sir Walter Scott, in his " Heart of Midlothian," refers to one
Duncan, of Knockdunder, an important personage, who smoked during the
whole of the sermon, from an iron pipe, tobacco borrowed from other
worshippers. We are told that, "at tbe end of the discourse he knocked
the ashes out of his pipe, replaced it in his sporran, returned the
tobacco pouch to its owner, and joined in the prayer with decency and
attention."
The Puritan Fathers, who settled in America, were greatly addicted
to smoking, indeed, the practice became so common that even these
strait-laced observers of time and seasons actually smoked in church.
The custom soon caused very considerable annoyance, as the religious
exercises were greatly disturbed by the clinking of steels and flints
and the clouds of the smoke in church.
Hence, in the year 1669, the colony passed this law :
"It is enacted that any person or persons that shall be
found smoking of tobacco on the Lord's Day, going to or
coming from the meetings, within two miles of the meeting
house, shall pay twelve pence for every such default."
Under this law several persons were actually fined, but
the punishment failed to secure the carrying out of the
arbitrary second portion of the enactment.
The custom of smoking during church service was not confined
to the laity and minor clergy, for it is recorded that an
Archbishop of York was once reproved by the Vicar of St.
Mary's, Nottingham, for attempting to smoke in the church vestry.
The Rev. John Disney, of Swinderly, in Lincolnshire, writing on the
13th of December, 1773, to James Grainger, says :
"The affair happened in St. Mary's Church,
Nottingham, when Archbishop Blackburn was
there on a visitation. The archbishop had ordered
some of the apparitors or other attendants to
bring him pipes and tobacco and some liquor
into the vestry for his refreshment after the
fatigue of confirmation. And this coming to
Mr. Disney's ears, he forbade their being
brought thither, and with a becoming spirit
remonstrated with the archbishop upon the
impropriety of his conduct, at the same time
telling his Grace that his vestry should not be
converted into a smoking-room

SOURCE
Dungog Chronicle
Friday 4 November 1898
Bowral Free Press
The Gundagai Independent


The Sale of Wives In England.


1 comment(s), latest 4 years, 6 months ago

Volunteering can be rewarding


3 comment(s), latest 2 years, 6 months ago

Itellya's Watson's of Sorrento and Portsea.


2 comment(s), latest 4 years, 3 months ago

Australians as America saw us in 1942

Nothing like coming here prepared!

AUSTRALIANS AS AMERICANS SEE THEM
"An Outdoors People;Breezy, Democratic"
WASHINGTON, Sunday, 25 October 1942 AAP


["You will find Australians an outdoors people, breezy, very democratic, with no respect for stuffed shirts their own or anyone else's," says a pocket guide on Australia which is being distributed among American troops.

Issued by US War and Navy departments, the booklet states that Australians have much in common with Americans. They are a pioneer people, they believe in personal freedom, and they love sports.

"There is one thing to get straight right off the bat," the booklet says. "You are not in Australia to save a helpless people from the savage Japanese. Recently in a Sydney bar an American soldier turned to an Australian and said, 'Well, Aussie, you can go home now. We've come over to save you.' The Aussie cracked back, 'Have you? I thought you were a refugee from Pearl Harbour.'
Being simple, direct and tough, the Digger is often confused and nonplussed by the manners of Americans' in mixed company; or even in camp. To him those many 'Thank you's" Americans use are a bit too dignifled.

You might get annoyed, at the blue laws which make Australian cities pretty dull places on Sundays.
For all their breezieness Australians do not go in for drinking or woopitching in public, especially on Sunday.

In Australia, the national game is cricket, but they, have another game called Australian rules football.
It is rough, tough, and exciting. There are a lot of rules, which the referee carries in a rule book the size of Webster's dictionary. The game creates the desire on the part of the crowd to tear someone apart. The referees in some parks have runways covered over so that they can escape intact after a game.

As one newspaper correspondent says, Americans and Australians are 2 of the greatest gambling people on earth. It has been said of Australians that if a couple in a bar have not anything else to bet on they will lay odds on which of 2 flies rise first from the bar.
Aussies do not fight out of textbooks. They are resourceful, inventive soldiers with plenty of intiative.
The Australian habit of pronouncing "a" as "I" is pointed out, and an example quoted: "The trine is lite to-di." The booklet includes "Waltzing Matilda" in full."]

I don't know about the too many thank-yous. It would seem that the Australian girls liked it, for 10,000 Aussie brides returned to America with these well heeled, well mannered and certainly well informed troops.


1 comment(s), latest 5 years, 7 months ago

The things you should have asked

After hearing the old story about not asking the 'right questions' or 'not paying attention', when you were younger and the grannies were still around.
I went in search of an answer and I found these questions below on a blog posted by Ancestry Australia and New Zealand on January 9, 2012 in Australia. I have added a couple of things, as you can too.

I have printed out some copies and intend to pass them around to the oldies (the other oldies) in the family at our next get-together. Of course they'll all roll their eyes and think, 'ohhhh nooooooooo here she goes again'. But hopefully they will humour me and maybe your family will too.


Family Questions
Do you have a family legend or story that has been passed down for generations?
What traditions do you look forward to at family get-togethers?
What is unique about your family background or ethnicity?
How did your ancestors change your life?
Do you have any advice for future generations?
What is the most important thing you learned from your parents?
When was the best time in your life and why was it great?
What are you most proud of about your family?
How do you want to be remembered?
What is your favorite thing about being part of your family?

My Family
What quirky personality traits run in your family?
What physical characteristics run in your family?
What is/was your favorite activity to do with your mother or father?
How would your family spend a typical day together?
How would your mother or father punish or reward you as a child?
What things did you do with your brothers and sisters when you were growing up?
How have your brothers and sisters influenced your life?

Fun Family Questions
Who is the biggest troublemaker in your family?
Who in your family would you want to be stranded on a desert island with?
Which family member do you think could be famous?
Who is the best cook?
What is your favourite food?
What is your favourite song?
Who do you most want to be like in your family?
Who has the best sense of humour in your family?

World Questions
What do you think was the biggest problem facing the world when you were growing up?
What do you think is the biggest problem facing the world today?
What do you think are the discoveries and inventions that changed your life?
What do you think the world will be like for your family?s future generations in 100 years?
What is your wish for the future generations of your family?

INSTRUCTIVE CODE ...

FOR MARRIED LADIES.


1. Let every wife be persuaded that there are two ways of governing a family; the first is by the expression of that will which belongs to force; the second by the power of mildness, to which even strength will yield. One is the power of the husband; a wife should never employ any other arms than gentleness. When a woman accustoms herself to say I will, she deserves to lose her empire.

2. Avoid contradicting your husband. When we smell at a rose, it is to imbibe the sweetness of its odour: we likewise look for every thing that is amiable from women. Whoever is often contradicted feels insensibly an aversion for the person who contradicts, which gains strength by time, and, whatever be her good
qualities, is not easily destroyed.

3.Occupy yourself only with household affairs. Wait till your husband confides to you affairs of higher importance, and do not give your advice till he asks it.
'
4.Never take upon, yourself to be a censor of your husband's morals, and do not read lectures to him. Let your preaching be a good example, and practice virtue yourself to make him in love with it.

5.Command his attentions by being always attentive to him; never exact any thing,
and you will obtain much; appear always flattered by the little he does for you,
which will excite him to perform more.

6.All men are vain ; never wound his vanity, not even in the most trifling instances.
A wife may have more sense than her husband, but she' should never seem to know it.

7.When a man gives wrong counsel, never make him feel that, he has done so, but lead him on by degrees to what is rational, with mildness and gentleness; when he is convinced,
leave him all the merit of having found out what was just and reasonable.

8.When a husband is out of temper, behave obligingly to him; if he is abusive, never retort;
and never prevail over him to humble him.

9.Choose well your female friends: have but few, and be careful of following their advice in all matters.

10. Cherish neatness without luxury, and pleasure without excess; dress with taste,
and particularly with modesty; vary the fashions of your dress, especially in regard to colours.
It gives a change to the ideas, and recalls pleasing recollections. Such things may appear trifling, but they are of more importance than is imagined.

11.Never be, - curious to pry into your husband's concerns, but obtain his confidence
by that which, at all times, you repose in him. Always preserve order and economy;
avoid being out of temper, and be careful never to scold.
By these means he will find his own house more pleasant than any other.

12. Seem always to obtain information from him, especially before company,
though you may pass yourself for a simpleton. Never forget that a wife owes all her importance
to that of her husband; Leave him entirely master of his actions, to go or come whenever he thinks fit.
A wife ought to make her company so amiable to her husband that he could not exist without it;
then he will not seek for any pleasure abroad if she does not partake of it with him.


transcribed from The Australian (Sydney, NSW : 1824 - 1848) issue Friday 1 August 1828, by janilye on the 29 January 2012

Below;
Still happily living by the code in 1900 in Dungog, New South Wales just as her mother and grandmother did.


9 comment(s), latest 5 years, 9 months ago