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Family of Jeremiah and Mary Brown

Jeremiah BROWN born in Llanidloes, Wales in 1802 and died in Surrey Hills, Sydney on 18 December 1860.
Jeremiah married Mary Burns in Glasgow, Scotland in 1828. Mary died at Taree in New South Wales on the 8 May 1905; she was 96.
The couple had 12 children.

1. Female possibly named Mary the 1st daughter
--------------------------------------------
2. MR. GEORGE BROWN. 1832-1923 the 1st son
OBITUARY
George Brown was born on 21st September 1832,
at Emu Plains.
His father, Mr. Jeremiah Brown, was at
one time assistant superintendent at
Cockatoo Island Penal Settlement,
where there were between 400 and 500
prisoners. He was a very earnest Christian
man, and brought up his family in
close attachment to the church.
George joined the Sunday School at
York Street in his teens, becoming a teacher,
a church member, a member of
the choir. He was superintendent of
the Sunday School for many years.
About the time that Old York Street
Church was demolished (1886) to make
way for the Centenary Hall, Mr. Brown
removed to Ashfield. He at once threw
himself into the active work of the
church, in turn holding almost every
office a layman can fill.
From early years he also busied him
self in the promotion of temperance,
Protestant, and Friendly societies. His
record in connection with the Grand
United Order of Oddfellows is said to
constitute a world's record. He joined
this order on July 11, 1853; thus he
completed seventy years of membership
and office.
Not content with all these interests
and activities of a religious and philan
thropic nature, he offered himself as a
candidate for municipal honours. He
was accepted, and for many years was
an alderman in the Ashfield Council. He
rendered excellent service to the
borough as Mayor in 1909.
In his birth year, there were some
half dozen Methodist ministers, who
were ministering to some few hundreds
of our people in all Australia and Tas
mania. Now there are about 1,100 ministers,
nearly 600,000 worshipers, of whom 152,000 are
members of the Church. Sunday Schools have grown
from very small things, until to-day
there are 3,680 schools, 25,900 teachers,
and 204,000 scholars. Such men as Mr.
Brown have done, a worthy work in con
tributing to this great progress. .
He was an embodiment of the virtues
of industry, fidelity, honour, and kind
liness in all relations with his fellow
men. He loved the House of God, and
sacredly observed the duties of all the
offices to which the church called him.
He was specially interested in the
young people, and was never tired - of
inculcating the advantages of thrift,
sobriety, and faith in God. Until
memory failed, he kept up an intense
interest in the welfare of the church.
Right up to the last he would respond
to prayer or Bible reading. He went
back into a beautiful child-likeness as
the last days crept on. God was good
in giving him the tender care and ministry
which so lovingly surrounded him in age and
growing helplessness. And that was a fitting
reward for his own unselfish service of others.
SOURCE: The Methodist 1 September 1923
NSW.BDM DEATHS;
11157/1923 BROWN GEORGE JEREMIAH MARY ASHFIELD
George married Mary Ann GARRARD 1833-1891
------------------------
3. ELLEN BROWN 1834-1879 the second daughter
The Sydney Morning Herald,Wednesday 22 February 1854
By special license, at the Wesleyan Chapel, Prince-street, on
the 20th instant, by the Rev. J. Eggleston, Mr. T. W. Byford, of
George-street, Sydney, to Ellen, second daughter of Mr. J. Brown,
Assistant Superintendent Cockatoo Island.
Then in November the same year Thomas Byford drowns
Two years later Ellen marries Thomas West DUGDALE.
Ellen dies in 1879 and then Thomas West DUGDALE marries her youngest sister Jessie
NSW.BDM MARRIAGES
V1854425 85/1854 BYFORD THOMAS BROWN ELLEN IA Wesley Methodists
466/1856 DUGDALE THOMAS WEST BYFORD ELLEN SYDNEY
NSW.BDM DEATHS:
4676/1879 DUGDALE ELLEN AGE 45 YEARS DIED GOSFORD BRISBANE WATER

and GUESS WHAT!
She also drowned at sea. On 10 March in the The Bonnie Dundee disaster
The Sydney Morning Herald, Friday 14 March 1879
DUGDALE.Drowned at sea, off Newcastle, Ellen, the beloved wife of T. W. Dugdale, J.P., of the Manning River.
The Collision between the Barrabool and Bonnie Dundee more stories on TROVE

The Sydney Morning Herald, Friday 14 March 1879
FUNERAL NOTICES.

THE FRIENDS of Mr. T. W. DUGDALE, of the
Manning River, are respectfully invited to attend the Funeral
of his late dearly beloved WIFE, Ellen, to move from the residence ot her Brother,
George Brown, 262, Kent-street, between
King and Erskine streets, at half-past 8 o'clock, on SATURDAY
MORNING, the 15th instant.

THE FRIENDS of Mrs. MARY BROWN are respectfully invited to attend the
Funeral of her late beloved DAUGHTER, Mrs. T. W. Dugdale : to move from
the residence of her son, George, 202, Kent-street, at half-past 8 o'clock,
on SATURDAY MORNING, the 15th instant.

THE FRIENDS of Messrs. GEORGE, ALBERT,
and SYDNEY BROWN are respectfully invited to attend the
Funeral of their beloved SISTER, Mrs. T. W. Dugdale ; to move
from the residence of her brother. George. 262, Kent-street, at
half-past 8 o'clock, on SATURDAY MORNING, the 15th instant.

THE FRIENDS of Mr. H. DENGATE are respect fully invited to
attend the Funeral of his SISTER-IN-LAW,
Mrs. T. W. Dugdale ; to move from the residence of her brother,
George, 282, Kent-street, on SATURDAY MORNING, the 15th
instant, at half-past 8 o'clock.
----------------------------------------------------------
4. Benjamin BROWN the 2nd son
Goulburn Herald Wednesday 23 April 1862
MARRIED

By special license, on 17th instant, by the Rev. W. Sowerby,
BENJAMIN, second son of the late Mr. JEREMIAH BROWN, of Sydney,
to SARAH, eldest daughter of Mr. WILLIAM TEECE, of Goulburn.
Goulburn Herald, 28 September 1878
DEATHS

At Young, on the 24th September, Mr. Benjamin BROWN, late of Goulburn, aged forty-two years.
--------------------------------------

5 Grace BROWN the 3rd. daughter.

-------------------------------------------------

6. ALBERT BROWN 1841-1924The 3rd.son
OBITUARY. died 17 June 1924
Mr. Albert Brown, for many years alderman,
and an ex-Mayor of Ashfield, died suddenly on
Tuesday afternoon. He was 83 years of ago,
and was born in Norfolk Island, where his
father was a Government official He had
resided at Ashfield for about 45 years. For
many years he was In partnership with the
late Mr. H. Dengate, under the firm name of
Dengate and Brown, builders and contractors,
and when that partnership was dissolved
continued the business on his own account
Of late years, however, his health did not
permit of his active participation in the business,
which has been controlled by his son
During Mr. Browns long residence in Ashfield he
always took a deep Interest in its progress
and advancement. He was elected an alderman In 1882,
and sat continuously for 19 years, and occupied the
Mayoral chair for the 1881-2 term.
It was during his year of office
that he convened the public meeting at which
it was decided to establish the Western
Suburbs Cottage Hospital it was owing to his
determination that the hospital was erected
on the site it now occupies, and his fellow
committeemen recognise and showed their
appreciation of his efforts in bringing about
the foundation of the hospital by electing him
the first president. He held that position for
12 years, until falling health compelled the
committee reluctantly to accept his resignation
Mr. Brown was also instrumental in establishing
the Ashfield Municipal Library, one of
the first of the kind, but now merged into
the Ashfield School of Arts; the original
Ashfield Borough Band, the Ashfield Cricket
Club, and other local activities. In his
younger days he was an enthusiastic cricketer,
and when not playing himself never failed, while
his health permitted, to witness a match.
Deceased was an ardent Methodist, and was
a trustee of the Ashfield Methodist Church, a
position he held for many years. He suffered
greatly from asthma for the last 10 years,
and of recent years rarely left his home. The
bright sunshine of Tuesday, however, induced
him to go for a short walk, which proved to
be his last, as, at about 3 o'clock, he was
found unconscious in Elizabeth-street, Ash-
field, within a few hundred yards of his resi-
dence, and when medical aid was obtained it
was found that he was dead.
Mr. Brown leaves a widow, three sons, and
five daughters. His brother, the late Mr.
George Brown, who was also an alderman of
Ashfield for many years, and ex-Mayor, died
in July last, at the age of 91 years.
The funeral took place yesterday afternoon,
the remains being interred in the Methodist
section of the Necropolis, after a service at
the house, conducted by the Rev. P. J. Stephen,
of the Ashfield Methodist Church, and the
Rev. Joseph Bryant, the former of whom also
officiated at the graveside. The principal
mourners were:-Messrs. K. and S. Brown
(sons), L. W. Brown (grandson), W. T. Moore
(son-in-law), S. Brown (brother), S. Brown,
Jun. (nephew). Among others present were
Alderman D. M'Donald (Mayor), Alderman
Lapiah, Mr. F. H. G. Hargreaves (town clerk),
and A. T. Kay (deputy town clerk), represent-
ing the Ashfield Council; Messrs. A. J. Brack
pool (circuit steward), and C. Clarke (church
steward), representing tho Ashfield Methodist
Church; J. F. M'Kimm, president of and re-
presenting the Ashfield Shopkeepers' Associ-
ation; W. H. Stool (vice-president), John
Dart, and John Laplsh, representing the West
ern Suburbs Hospital; R. J. Brown, J. L.
Caldwell, J. W. Mortley, A. Crane, F. Grant,
J. A. Somerville, C. Van Troight, F. W. Gissing,
T. Lumler, L. Walkin (Watkin and Watkln),
H. Parkes. A. Dance, A. H. Chipperfield, L.
Neale, J. Chapman, H. G. Chlpperfleld, J. Bur-
ton, G. Smith, and W. Critchley, C. Weather
ill, A. Hedges, D. M'Nicol, H. Hodgkinson, W.
Rogers, N. Watkln (Strongman and Watkln),
H. Smith, H. Dengato, L. De Odel, R. J. Mar-
tin, J. W. Armstrong, G. Watson, S. E. Watts,
E. Smith.
At the meeting of the Ashfield Council it
was resolved that a letter, under the seal of
the council, be sent to the family of deceased,
expressing regret, and acknowledging the
valuable services rendered by him to the
municipality. The flag at the Ashfield Town
Hall was flown at half-mast during yesterday
as a mark of respect.
SOURCE: The Sydney Morning Herald 19 June 1924
NSW.BDM DEATHS:
5961/1924 BROWN ALBERT JEREMIAH MARY ASHFIELD
NSW.BDM Marriages:
419/1867 BROWN ALBERT SHARE MARY G SYDNEY
The Sydney Morning Herald, Saturday 11 May 1867
On the 2nd instant, by special license, at the residence of the bride's parent,
by the Rev. George Lane, ALBERT, third son of the late JEREMIAH BROWN,
to MARY GRACE, second daughter of the late THOMAS SHARE, both of Sydney.
Albert married Mary Grace SHARE 1843-1926
-------------------------------

7. ADELAIDE BROWN 1843-1926 4th daughter
The Sydney Morning Herald, Tuesday 21 December 1926

MRS. H. DENGATE.
The death of Mrs. H. Dengate, widow of the
late Mr. Henry Dongate, occurred on Wednesday at Calmsley, Hopetoun-avenue,
Chatswood. Mrs. Dengate, who was 83 years of age, was for many years
prominent among church workers, and had the respect and affection of
a large circle of friends. She leaves two daughters, Mrs. L. De Hodel and
Miss Mabel Dengate, and five sons, Archie,Leslie, Oswald, Harold, and Roy.
The funeral, which was largely attended by relatives,
and friends, took place on Thursday afternoon at the Methodist section of the Northern
Suburbs Cemetery, the Rev. G. E. Johnson,
the Rev. A. W. Parton, and the Rev. J. G. M. Taylor officiating.
NSW.BDM BIRTHS;
V18431512 44A/1843 BROWN ADELAIDE JEREMIAH MARY
NSW.BDM MARRIAGES:
433/1867 DENGATE HENRY BROWN ADELAIDE SYDNEY
NSW.BDM DEATHS:
19253/1926 DENGATE ADELAIDE (-BROWN) 84 YRS CHATSWOOD CHATSWOOD

The marriage notice in the Sydney Morning Herald 23 April 1867 picked up an 'E' ; also when Jeremiah was alive they were in 179 Campbell-street

DENGATE BROWNEMarch 27th, by special licence, by the
Rev. W. Curnow, at the residence of the bride's parent, 207,
Campbell-street, Surry Hills, Mr. Henry Dengate, second son
of Mr. E. Dengate, Liverpool, to Adelaide, fourth daughter
of the late Jeremiah Browne, late Assistant-Superintendent
of Cockatoo Island.
------------------------------------------------

8. EMILY JANET BROWN 1846-1910 5th daughter
Evening News (Sydney, NSW) Saturday 30 May 1874
MARRIAGE

On May 21, at the residence of the brides's mother, 4 Arthur-street, Surry Hills, by the Rev. J. Nolan, Wesleyan minister.
William, eldest son of James Longley, Orange Hill, Bringelly, to Emily Janet, fifth daughter of the late Jeremiah Brown, late assistant-superintendent of Cockatoo Island.
NSW BDM. MARRIAGES
468/1874 LONGLEY WILLIAM BROWN EMILY JANET SYDNEY
468/1874 LANGLEY WILLIAM BROWN EMILY JANET SYDNEY
The name is LONGLEY
NSW.BDM DEATHS: -
3264/1910 LONGLEY EMILY J JEREMIAH MARY ST MARYS
Nepean Times, Saturday 15 January 1910
Badgery's Creek.

Mrs. W. Longley, an old and respected resident of Badgery's Creek.
died on Monday last. The funeral took place at the Methodist Cemetery Luddenham,
on Tuesday, the Rev. J. Green conducting the funeral service.
-----------------------------------------
9. Robert Alexander Brown 1849-1911 The 4th. son
Robert Alexander Brown was the ninth of twelve children of
Jeremiah BROWN 1802-1860 and his wife Mary, nee BURNS 1809-1905.
Sub-Inspector Robert Alexander Brown was best known in the
Albury district, where he did duty in the police force for
over 33 years.
He went to Albury as a probationary constable in 1875, and
remained there until his retirement as a sub-Inspector in 1909.
He was promoted to the rank of first class constable three years
after he joined the force. Four years later he was made
a senior-constable. Three years afterwards he was raised to the
rank of sergeant, and six years later he got the crown, and
when he retired he was given the whip and was made a sub-Inspector.
He was one of those who helped in the capture of the Kelly gang.

Robert married Sarah Jane BUTTSWORTH 1850 1941 at Manning River in 1871
Sub-inspector Robert Alexander Brown died at Prince Alfred Hospital on Wednesday
the 5th. July 1911 at the age of 61 years.
-----------------------------------------------------

10. Fred Wesley BROWN 1851-1935 the 5th son

The Sydney Morning Herald, Tuesday 24 September 1935
BROWN.-September 22, 1935. Frederick Wesley
Brown, of 19 Ridge-street, North Sydney, husband
of Kate M. Brown, and father of Mary (Mollie),
Beatrice (Trixie), Fred (of Katoomba), and the late
Amy. aged 85 years. At rest. Privately Interred
at Waverley Cemetery, on 23rd Instant

Fred Wesley Brown was born 1 May 1851 on Cockatoo Island and died on the 22 Seprember 1935.
Married Kate Milner EATHER 1864-1931 the daughter of William EATHER 1832-1915 and Ann SENIOR 1835-1906
Fred was the postmaster at Narrabri I do have a photograph of him.
This story is on my tree:-
Kate Milner EATHER was born at "Henriendi" on 5 January 1864. She evidently received her second forename from the surname of Dr Robert MILNER, who had a hospital at his home at nearby Broadwater. Perhaps he or his wife had attended her mother at her birth. She was known throughout her life as Kate. In 1888, or perhaps late in 1887, Kate married Frederick Wesley BROWN in a wedding registered at Narrabri. He had been born at Cockatoo Island, Sydney on 1 May 1851, the tenth of the twelve children of Jeremiah BROWN and his wife Mary (nee BURNS). Born at Llanidloes in Wales in 1802, Jeremiah had enlisted in the 4th Regiment of Foot; had married Mary at Glasgow in 1828, and they had been sent out to Van Diemen's Land in 1831 on the ship "Larkins". Jeremiah was one of the guards of the convicts on board. In 1851, when Frederick had been born, he was Assistant Superintendent of convicts on Cockatoo Island. Frederick was usually known as Fred. At sometime in his early working life Fred BROWN joined the New South Wales Postal Department. In 1881 he was serving as assistant postmaster at Hay in the Riverina, and by 1887 he was postmaster at Narrabri. For the first fourteen years of their marriage, Kate and Fred lived in the one-storey residence attached to the brick post office at Narrabri. About 1902 Fred and his family left Narrabri when he was transferred back to the Riverina district as postmaster at Narrandera. The NSW Towns Directory for 1903 lists him as postmaster there. Kate and Fred had a family of eight children, the first seven of whom were born at Narrabri. At Christmas 1893 Kate had given her husband a bible as a gift and in it he recorded the dates and times of the birth of each of their children. Their three daughters all lived to adulthood, but their first four sons died in infancy; three of them under the age of one year. When Kate was expecting their eighth child in 1904, she went to Sydney for her confinement and their last son, Fred Ridge BROWN, was born at North Sydney on 15 January 1905. Fred BROWN registered the birth of his fifth son at Narrandera four weeks later. He remained postmaster there until at least 1909. At some date between 1909 and 1914 he retired and the family moved to Sydney. He turned 60 in 1911. A photograph taken about 1912 depicts him with Kate; two of their daughters and son Fred, seated on the beach at Manly. At that time Fred Brown had a grey well-trimmed beard and moustache. He was attired in a suit, complete with a waistcoat. By 1914 Frederick W BROWN was listed in the Sydney directory as living at 47 Reiby Street, Newtown. In 1915, their third daughter, Amy Emily, married a young soldier, Gunner James S HOME. He went off to war and Amy saw little of him until he returned at the end of the War in 1918. By 1917 the family had left Newtown and Mrs Kate M BROWN is listed in the Sands Directory for that year as residing at Heeley Street Paddington. A postcard shows that daughter Amy was living with her. Amy's husband had been discharged from the army for only a few months when she contracted influenza during the epidemic of the winter of 1919, and after being seriously ill for eleven days she died on 24 June. She was 26 years of age and there was no issue of her marriage. Her body was interred in the Anglican section of the Waverley Cemetery. Her two elder sisters, Mary Maud (who was known as Mollie) and Ann Beatrice (who was known as Trixie), were both still single and indeed remained spinsters throughout their lives. By 1922 the family had moved once more and in the Sands Directory for that year, Mrs Kate BROWN was listed as residing at Old South Head Road, North Bondi. In the late 1920's Kate's eldest sister, Sarah Ann COLEMAN, and her daughter Zilla, were residing at 1 Justice Street, Bondi. Sometimes Kate and her children Mollie, Trixie and Fred, would visit them. At some time in their later lives Kate and Fred seem to have separated. The electoral roll for the subdivision shows that Frederick Wesley BROWN and his daughter Ann Beatrice (Trixie) were residing at 19 Ridge Street, North Sydney in 1935. Trixie was a shop assistant. Kate was residing with her son, Fred Ridge, who had gone into business at Katoomba in 1933. Aged thirty, he was still single. Kate and Fred's eldest daughter Mollie was residing elsewhere in Sydney. On 22 September 1935 Frederick Wesley BROWN, age 85 years, died. The Sydney Morning Herald on 24 September carried the following death notice:-. BROWN - September 22 1935, Frederick Wesley BROWN of 19 Ridge Street, North Sydney, husband of Kate M BROWN, and father of Mary (Mollie), Beatrice (Trixie), Fred (of Katoomba) and the late Amy. Aged 85 years. At rest. Privately interred at Waverley Cemetery on 23rd instant. Fred's body had been interred in the family plot beside his daughter Amy. A Wesleyan by baptism, he was buried in the Anglican section of the Cemetery. By 1936 Trixie had moved to 25 Ridge Street, North Sydney. Kate survived her husband by nearly six years. She continued to reside with her son at Katoomba. In June 1941 she contracted bronchitis, which after a month turned into pneumonia and she passed away on 15 July at her son's home, "The Cosy Nook", 94 Lurline Street, Katoomba. She was aged 77. Her funeral service was held in the Chapel of Wood Coffil Ltd in George Street Sydney at 10.15 a.m. on 17 July and she was buried in the family plot in the Waverley Cemetery. Mary M (52), Anne B (51) and Fred R (36) survived her. Mary Maud BROWN, the eldest child of Kate and Frederick BROWN, died on or about 27 July 1965, age 76 years, and was buried on 29 July in the family plot in the Waverley Cemetery. Anne Beatrice, the second daughter of Kate and Frederick BROWN, lived with her brother Fred in her later years. She died on or about 25 September 1974 when she was 84. She was buried in the family plot in the Waverley Cemetery on 27 September. Fred Ridge BROWN, the only one of the five sons of Kate and Frederick BROWN to survive beyond infancy, joined the Australian Army soon after his mother's death during World War II. He was in Brisbane in October 1942 when he had a portrait taken of himself in military uniform at the Auto Studios in Adelaide Street. At that time he had a small moustache. After the end of the War he returned to Katoomba and resumed business as an estate agent. In 1952 he was a real estate agent at 94 Lurline Street. After a few years there he returned to Sydney and in 1960 was residing at 1 Harden Avenue, Northbridge with his sister Beatrice. He was a salesman then. After the death of his sister Beatrice in 1974, he was the only remaining member of the family of Kate and Frederick BROWN. He had never married and his nearest kin were some cousins. One of these, Patricia FOX, daughter of Zilla COLEMAN, took an interest in the plight of her cousin, and upon his death in the North Shore Hospital at the age of 93 on 26 February 1998, she attended to his funeral and the winding up of his affairs. His body was cremated and his ashes placed in an urn in the BROWN family plot in the Waverley Cemetery. He had been a smoker all of his life and he died from pneumonia and suspected lung cancer. As only one of the eight children of Kate and Frederick BROWN married and she died without issue, they had no descendants in the second generation.
-------------------------------------------------------
11. William T BROWN

--------------------------------------
12. ANNE EVA JESSIE 1856-1938 the youngest
The Sydney Morning Herald Wednesday 13 October 1880
MARRIAGES

DUGDALE-BROWN.-September 27, at Ashfield, by the Rev.
G. Woolnough, M.A., T. W. Dugdale, Esq., J.P., of the Manning River, to Jessie,
youngest daughter of the late Jeremiah Brown, Esq., of Sydney
NSW.BDM MARRIAGES:
1744/1880 DUGDALE THOMAS WEST BROWN ANN EVA J CONCORD
NSW.BDM DEATHS:
22272/1938 DUGDALE ANNE EVA JESSIE JEREMIAH MARY PETERSHAM
The Sydney Morning Herald, Thursday 13 October 1938
DEATHS

DUGDALE October 12 1938 at her residence
Clairgarrow 183 Old Canterbury Road, Dulwich Hill.
Jessie, widow of the late T. W. Dugdale late
of Taree and dearly beloved mother of Ruby, Harry
and Aubrey.
FUNERAL
DUGDALE.The Relatives and Friends of Miss R. DUGDALE,
Mr. H. W. DUGDALE, and Mr. and Mrs. A. W. DUGDALE are
invited to attend the Funeral of their beloved MOTHER, Jessie
Dugdale: to leave the Methodist Church, Moonbie
Street. Summer Hill. THIS AFTERNOON, after a
service commencing at 3.15, for the Crematorium, Rookwood.
possible birth
NSW.BDM BIRTHS:
1530/1856 BROWN FEMALE JEREMIAH MARY SYDNEY
----------------------------------------

2 comment(s), latest 2 days, 19 hours ago

John Town's Diary

I will now give a brief sketch of
a most remarkable man, Mr. John
Town. Those who were not ac-
quainted with him may not think
so; but those who had dealings with
him will tell you even now that he
was one of the straightest men of
his time. His word was his bond,
in the most trifling transaction. I
knew him well myself, and had
many dealings with him, and can
bear testimony to his honesty of
purpose. But there were many
things in connection with his life
and character which I have learned
from others, and also from his diary
(kindly lent me), which I will re-
late, that I think will be highly in-
teresting, especially as they refer to
very old dates.
I may state that it was not often
you could catch him in a communi-
cative mood, therefore you could not
expect to hear him speak much of
himself. But there were occasions
when he would repeat some of his
experiences of the early days. Some
of the most interesting he has
written in his diary, which I will
quote as I proceed.
He was born in Parramatta. His
mother died there, and is buried in
the Episcopal burying-ground. After
his mother's death he came with his
father to Richmond, when he was
quite young. We have no further
record of him until he married, on
the 17th June, 1830.
He was among the earliest settlers on the
Goulburn river. Here he was once stuck up
by Bushrangers, tied to a tree, and robbed
They committed other atrocities for which they were hanged.
He came back to Richmond, and opened the
Woolpack hotel at North Richmond (now
the Travellers' Rest) which was
built for him. This is one of the oldest
hotels in the colony, and has a history.
It was here Mr, North, the Police,
Magistrate, used to hold his court,
and where many prisoners were sen-
tenced to the lash. It was also the
local post office for many years. I
remember it in the forties, when the
Thompsons, of Pitt Town, had the
contract for carrying the mails from
Windsor to Richmond, six times a
week, and from Richmond to North
Richmond, three times a week. It
was then the terminus for mails in
Kurrajong.
Mr. Town kept the hotel for over
20 years, when he retired from busi-
ness. But during that time he had
many trips over the mountains. His
principal delight seemed to be roam-
ing through the bush. I have already
stated he was among the first to
cross Bell's Line, with others, on a
slide, with four bullocks. A slide,
remember!-not a dray. But I
think I have explained that before.
He was a great friend of old Ben.
Singleton's : and if he did hot go
over the Bulga with Ben, and Mr.
Howe, of Windsor, who were the
first white men to cross the Bulga,
he was not long after them.
I do not suppose I will be contra-
dicted if I say that old Ben. Single-
ton was the first to build a mill on,the
banks of the Hunter river, at Single-
ton, and that town was named after
him. He was well known on the
Hawkesbury before he went to the
Hunter, and had to do with several
mills here. I have a recollection of
hearing it said he built those two
mills on Wheeny Greek, and another
on the Hawkesbury somewhere
below Wilberforce.
I have often seen the two mills at
Wheeny Creek. The upper one was
what is termed an overshot (I have
seen it at work), and the lower one
an undershot. They were both
owned by the Town family. I think
they are now down.
While speaking of Ben. Singleton,
I may mention that the oldest-dated
memo in Mr. Town's diary is in re-
ference to Mr. Singleton. It is as
follows -
"Yarraman Bar Creek, at Liver-
pool Plains, was first formed into a
station by Mr. Benjamin Singleton,
in the year 1826."
Mr. Town seems to have taken
great interest in explorers. Here is
another memo :
"(Capt. Charles Sturt explored the
Darling river, the Murrumbidgee,
and the Murray to its junction with
the Darling, in the year 1829. Died
16th June, 1869."
While speaking of Capt. Sturt, I
may mention that he tells us that
Mr. Cealey, a resident of Parramatta,
is said to be the first who attempted
to scale the Blue Mountains; but he
did not long persevere in struggling
with difficulties too great for or-
dinary resolution to overcome. It
appears that he retraced his steps,
after having penetrated sixteen miles
into their dark and precipitous re-
cesses, and a heap of stones, which
the traveller passes about that dis-
tance from Emu Ford, on the road
to Bathurst, marks the extreme
point reached by the expedition to
the westward of the Nepean river.
Another memo from Mr. Town's
diary states :
"Captain Howell died 9th Nov.,
1875, in the 90th year of his age.
He was one of the explorers with
Mr. Hamilton Hume."
And yet another, which shows he
still took an interest in the Singleton
family:
"Mary Singleton died the 12th
August, 1877, aged 84 years. Buried
at Singleton."
Mr. Town makes no mention, of
his own exploits in the way of ex
ploration. I have already mentioned
a few. He was also one of the first
on the Namoi and at Moree, where
he formed stations, and was among
the first gold diggers on the Turon
But I think his greatest exploit
was when he started alone from his
home on the Goulburn river, with
nothing to guide him except a small
pocket compass, and took a bee line
to the Bulga, over mountains where
no white man had ever been before
or since. He arrived safely at the
Bulga at a place called the Cap and
Bonnet. But when there he began
to doubt his compass, and was about
to retrace his steps when his brother
in-law, Billy McAlpin, met him, and
they came along together. This
journey must have taken weeks to
accomplish.
A few other extracts from Mr.
Town's Diary may be interesting
since it refers to the death of many
old residents, who in their time took
a part in the the early history of the
colony.
They are as follows:26 May,
1852, old Mrs. Mary Town died,
aged 80 years (Mr. Town's step-
mother.)
St. Philip's Church, North Rich-
mond, was consecrated 12th Nov.,
1861.The title was presented by
Mr. Town ; he also subscribed
liberally towards its erection.
Mrs. Ann Sharp died 7th April,
1865, aged 72 years. Mrs. Sharp
was Mr. Town's mother-in-law.
Robert Fitzgerald died, April 7th,
same year.
26th May. Judge Milford died.
1866, Feb. Mrs. Hail died.
Feb. 2. Mr. Thomas Tibbut died.
1867. The Rev. H. Stiles died,
23rd June. The same day that the
great flood was at its highest.

1868. Prince Alfred shot, 12th
March. .
29th March. The Rev. Thomas
Hassell died, aged 73. Mrs. Stiles
died.
21st April. O'Farrell executed
for shooting Prince Alfred. The
prince restored to health ; thank
God, and all's well.
5th May. William Town died ;
Mr. Town's brother.
Lord Brougham died, 7th May.
Born 19th September, 1779.
18th May. Mr. Edward Cox, of
Mulgoa, died.
21st July. Dr. Bland died, aged
78 years.
20th. August. George Cox died,
aged 75 years.
Red Bank Creek bridge finished,
31st July.
28th November. The sun heat
was 100 degrees.
29th. 107 in the shade.
30th Nov. St. Andrew's Cathedral
opened.
24th Dec. The heat was 115
deg. Fah. in the shade at 12.30 p.m.
25th. 107F
The Donally nugget found in
Melbourne, weighing 200lb. nett
pure gold.
1869, 10th March. Prince Al-
fred's second visit to Sydney.
3rd April. William Sharp's barn
was burned down. This was the
second barn Mr. Sharp lost by fire.
10th May. John Hubert Plunket
died.
4th June. George Forbes (bro-
ther to Sir Francis) died, aged 82
years.
27th September. William Kirk
died, aged 87 years. An old friend
of the Town family.
1869, 27th August. The heat was
105 deg. Fah.
1870, 11th January, the ther-
mometer registered 110 ; 12th Jan .
110 ; 13th Jan, 112 ; 14th Jan., 113
at 11 a.m. ; 18th February, 100 ; 19th
Feb , 108 ; 22nd Feb., 100.
12th June. First white frost,
38th August. Thomas Simpson
Hall died, aged 62 years.
17th. August. James Cuneen died
aged 62 years. A native of Wind
sor. Mr. Cuneen was a member
the Legislative Assembly, and for a
time was Postmaster-General.
18th November. William Lee
senr., of Bathurst, died, aged 76
years.
16th Nov. Prince Alfred left
Port Jackson, after his third visit to
Sydney.
John Tebbutt died, 20th December,
1870.
1871, 10th January. Charles
Thompson, of Clydesdale died, aged
87 years.
8th April. George' Filks died
aged 80 years. Upwards of 20 years
chief constable of Sydney.
23rd April. William Hall died,
aged 74 years.

1872, 4th January. William
Perry, tailor, of Windsor, died, aged
70 years.
15th Jan. John King (the sur-
vivor of Burke and Wills exploring
expedition) died.
18th Jan. Nicholls and Lester
hanged for the murder of Walker
and Bridges on the Parramatta river
William Charles Wentworth died
in, England, 20th March, 1872, aged
80 years.
28th July. Mary Ann Piper
wife of Capt. Piper, died, aged 81
years.
4th June. Sir Hercules Robinson
sworn in as Governor of N.S.W.
15th Oct. Sir Hercules Robinson
crossed the Richmond bridge, on his
way to Douglass Hill.

Charles Louis Napoleon Bonaparte
died in England, 9th Jan. 1873. He
was nearly 65 years old.
His son was born 16th March,
1856.
10th Feb., 1873. John Richard
Rouse died, aged 73.
Mr. John Benson was killed from
a fall from his horse on 3rd March
1873, aged 29 years.

19th April, 1873. Hamilton Hume
the explorer died, aged 76 years.
22nd June. Sir T. A. Murray
died. He was President of the
Legislative Council.
5th Sept. Laban White died, in
his 80th year. '
15th Sept. Alexander Berry died
at North Shore, Aged 91 years.
14th Sept. Mr. Heath, the tailor,
died.
13th December. Mr. John Win-
ters' two sons were drowned, while
bathing near the Richmond bridge.

1874, 20th January. Mr. John
Hoskinson died at ll p m., aged 79
years.
10th Sept. John Merrick died
aged 82 years.
11th Dec. William Bowman
died, aged 75 years.
23rd Dec. Great fire in Windsor,
About 40 houses burned down on
the south end side of George-street.

1875, 22nd March., Mrs. Elizabeth Armfield died, aged 84 years
and three months. A native of the
Hawkesbury, and first-born child
thereon' of European parents.
10th May. Old Mick the Russian
died, said to be 112 years old.

1875. Sir Charles Cowper died
in England, aged 69 years.
13th Sept. Thomas Kite, of Bathurst, died, aged 87 years.
William Long (Judge Martin's
father-in-law) died, aged 80 years.

1877, 28th Feb. Luke Stanford
died, aged 80 years.
16th March. Archbishop Polding
died, aged 83. He was 42 years in
Sydney.
28th August. William Price died,
aged 85 years.
6th Feb. Pope Pius the IX died,
aged 86 years

1878, 1st May. Mrs. Mary Chisholm died, aged 81.
8th Aug. Rev. J. Dunmore Lang
died, aged 79 years.

1878, 20th Aug. William John-
ston, of Pitt Town, died, aged 83,
Sir E. Deas Thomson died, aged 80
years.

1879,18th July. Mrs. Ann Dempsey died at Emu Plains, aged 100
years. She formerly lived on
Rouse's farm over the river (now
Walter Sly's).
5th Nov. Mrs Sarah Johns died,
aged 82 years. Mrs. Mary Hughes
died, aged 89 years.

1lst May, 1880. Mrs. Mary Hough
died, aged 87 years .
27th June. Richard Skuthorp
died, aged 90 years, only wanting
one month.

4th February, 1881. Mr. John
Cobcroft died, aged 84 years.
Mrs. Ann Hausell (formerly
Copper) died, aged 88 years.
Mr. John Henry Challis, an old
resident of Sydney, died in England
on 28th February, 1880, leaving
100,000 to the Sydney University.
1st March, 1879. Captain Cook's
daughter died last week, aged 104,
so the paper says.
SOURCES:
Reminiscences of
Richmond;
FROM THE FORTIES DOWN,
[By "Coornmill."]
Nos. in part 47,48, 49
Hawkesbury Herald
Friday 19 February 1904
Page 16
Friday 26 February 1904
Page 16
Friday 4 March 1904
page 16.
transcription janilye 2012

Hawkesbury Volunteers for WW1

MILITARY.
AS early as June, 1797, Lieut. N. Mackellar was in charge of a military detachment at the Hawkesbury, being a portion of the 102nd Regiment, or New South Wales Corps. It was for this military officer's use that the old Government House at Windsor was built, about the year 1798. From this date up till 1842 Windsor was the centre of much military activity. The barracks erected especially for the use of the soldiers, about 1820, are still standing, and portion of the present hospital building was originally the military hospital.
In the early times the soldiers were called on to assist in harvesting the crops. Many of the old residents of the district are the descendants of soldiers, who, when their time expired, preferred to settle in the colony instead of returning to the old land.
A detachment of the 73rd Regiment, which came out with Governor Macquarie in 1809, was settled here for a few years. In 1825, the military at Windsor consisted of one sergeant, one corporal, and fifty-six privates. In 1835-37 a detachment of His Majesty's 50th Foot, under Lieut.-Colonel Woodhouse, were stationed at Windsor. They were succeeded in 1838-30 by the 80th Foot, formerly known as the Staffordshire. The regiment arrived in New South Wales in various ships from 1836 to 1840, and was removed to India in August, 1844. Among the officers were: Lieut.-Colonel N. Baker, and Adjutant Lightbody. (See Reminiscenses, by Wm. Walker, page 8). The bandmaster, Samuel Edgerton, settled in Windsor, and became a magistrate. He organised a local band, and took part in the formation of the local Volunteers in 1860. He died 16th August, 1878, aged seventy-eight years.

Another Regiment stationed here was the 99th Duke of Edinburgh, daring 1842-43. The officers were Captain Reid and Lieutenant Beatty. At other times the 58th and 83rd Regiments were represented here. With the cessation of transportation to New South Wales in the early forties, the military were withdrawn from Windsor. The officers for many years occupied the building now known as the Royal Hotel.

Volunteers.
In the year 1854 the Government passed legislation which led to the formation of a number of local corps, but the movement did not catch on till 1860, when a large number of men enlisted in the various towns of New South Wales as volunteers. Windsor was early in the field, the Hawkesbury corps being formed on 5th October, 1860, the first officers being Captain S. Edgerton and Lieutenant Sydney Scarvell. The first meeting called to form the Windsor Volunteer Corps was held on 19th September, 1860, when a deputation was appointed to wait on the Government and offer the services of thirty-six loyal subjects. The deputation consisted of William Walker, M.L.A., James Ashcough, J.P., Robert Dick, J.P., and Sydney Scarvell, J.P. The movement went forward with enthusiasm. The Governor, Sir J. Young, came up to Windsor to present the colours, and a steamer conveyed over three hundred volunteers from Sydney right up to Windsor to assist in the local demonstration. The corps was known as the Hawkesbury Volunteer Rifles from 1862 to 1882. The name was then altered to the Hawkesbury Infantry. We give here only the early officers, with their promotions:

Samuel Edgerton, Captain, 1860-72. Retired 1872.
Sydney Scarvell, 1st Lieut, 1860-68.
Robert Dick, 2nd Lieut., 1865-68.
James A. Dick, 2nd Lieut., 1869-73. Captain, 1874-76.
W.F. Linsley, Ensign, 1870-76. Captain, 1876-92. Major, 1892-94.
C.S. Guest, 1st Lieut., 1874. Afterwards Lieut.-Colonel in Richmond,
but retired in 1910. Died 1915.
James Anderson, 2nd Lieut., 1883-88. 1st Lieut., 1888-94.
D.D. Pye, 2nd Lieut., 1888-92.
J.J. Paine, 2nd Lieut., 1892. 1st Lieut., 1892-94. Captain, 1895-1906.
Major, 1906-13. Lieut.-Colonel, 1913-15.

About the time of the outbreak of the Boer war, in the year 1899, the Hawkesbury Squadron of NEW SOUTH WALES LANCERS was formed, with half squadrons at Windsor and Richmond. The original officers were: Captain Brinsley Hall, Captain R.B. Walker and Lieut. N. Hall, for Windsor; Major Philip Charley, Captain W.T. Charley and Lieut. H. Skuthorp, for Richmond. The uniform was light brown with red facings, and a felt hat adorned with a plume. On retiring from the squadron, presentations were made to Captain Brinsley Hall, M.L.A., and Major Philip Charley.

About the year 1903 the name of the Lancers was changed to the AUSTRALIAN LIGHT HORSE. The Hawkesbury Squadron was successful in winning the Prince of Wales Cup, 1906-7, which was open for competition to all the mounted troops in Australia. Four teams competed, both Victoria and South Australia being represented. The competition was over a three mile course, with three firing competitions of five shots each at a target, and between each firing three hurdles had to be negotiated. The local team who brought this rare trophy to the district were: Captain Brinsley Hall (leader), S.Q.M. Sgt. Owens, Sgt. Hibbert, Sgt. Timmins, Sgt. Fallow, Sgt. Dunston, Far.-Sgt. Huxley, Corp. White, Corp. McMartin, Tpr. Aubrey, Tpr. J. Greentree, Tpr. A. Greentree, Tpr. Mason, and Tpr. Armstrong.

A number of mounted men went from the district to the Boer War, which was in progress from 1898 to 1902. A monument will be seen in Windsor Park to the memory of those who went, but "came not back." The artistic earring on the pedestal is the work of the late J. O'Kelly, and it will repay a little study. Unfortunately, it was not enclosed at first with a fence, and its proximity to the local school tempted some embryo iconoclasts whose marks remain. The inscriptions on the monument read:

In memory of soldiers from Windsor and District who lost their lives in the service of the Empire in South Africa.
This monument was erected as a token of respect by the residents of Windsor.
Trooper GEORGE ARCHIE MONTGOMERY, killed at Zeerust, South Africa, 27th October, 1900.
Trooper CHARLES JOHN GOSPER, accidentally drowned in the Vaal River, South Africa, 26th November, 1901.
Farrier Sergeant GEORGE JENNINGS DICKSON, who died of enteric fever at Standerton, South Africa, 9th January, 1902.

The following is a list of the Windsor and Riverstone district soldiers who have volunteered for the war. The list was closed early in December, 1915; many others will doubtless follow at a later date. The list it will be noted does not include the Richmond, McDonald, Colo, or St. Albans districts, nor a dozen immigrants from the Scheyville training farm:

Akins, Charles, Windsor | Bolton, Hy. H., Windsor (wounded)
Baird, Norman, Pitt Town | Bradshaw, R.N., Scheyville
Baker, W., Oakville | Brooks, John, Freeman's Reach
Bennett, W.H., Windsor | Buchanan, Donald, Windsor
Blacket, Ulric, Vineyard | Callaghan, Clive, Windsor
Blackmore, Walter, Wilberforce |
Callaghan, Reginald, Windsor | Hudson, Sid., Vineyard
Cambridge, K., Windsor | Hughes, Robert B., Windsor
Cambridge, Thomas, Windsor | Hulbert, William, Windsor
Clarke, B., Oakville | James, Henry, Windsor
Clarke, Manfred H., Windsor | Jennings, C.B.E., Windsor
Clout, Leslie, Windsor | Johnston, Staunton H., McGrath's Hill
Cobcroft, B.H., Windsor | Jones, Joshua, Ebenezer
Connelly, Fred., Windsor (killed) | Jones, Bert, Sackville
Davis, Eric, Wilberforce | Jones, Hilton, Windsor
Dickson, John, Windsor | Jones, Russell, Cattai
Dickson, P.A., Windsor | Kemp, Arthur, Ebenezer
Dickson, Walter, Windsor | Laraghy, Jack, Sackville
Dunn, Richmond, Windsor | Laraghy, Boy, Sackville
Dwyer, Gregory, Clarendon | Laraghy, Victor G., Sackville
Dwyer, John, Clarendon | Liddle, Edwin S., Windsor
Dwyer, William, Clarendon | Liddle, Fred., Windsor
Dyer, E.J., Windsor | Liddell, Sydney, Windsor
Eather, Cecil, Windsor (killed) | Lillis, Leo., Freeman's Reach
Eather, Frank, Windsor | Lindsay, A.J.H., Cattai
Farlow, Alwyn, Freeman's Reach | Lindsay, W.S.T., Cattai
Fiaschi, Dr. Thomas, Sackville | Maisey, Fred. T., Windsor
Ford, A.E., Windsor | Marshall, A. Campbell, Cattai
Fullerton, Dr. A.T., Windsor | Marshall, Stewart, Cattai (not accepted)
Gadsden, E. Jeffery, Windsor | Mitchell, Bently, Bullridge
Gibson, Geof. V., Windsor | Molloy, Jas. V., Windsor
Gibson, V.J.V., Windsor | Moses, Jas. Wm., Windsor
Gosper, Charles E., Windsor | Mullinger, Boy, Windsor
Gow, Harold, Windsor | Norris, Arthur, Windsor
Green, Mervyn, Magrath's Hill | O'Brien, V., Windsor
Greentree, C.A., Cattai | Ogden, Joseph, Oakville (wounded)
Greentree, D.S., Cattai | Paine, Lt.-Colonel J.J., Windsor
Hall, Ronald, Wilberforce (not accepted) | Parkin, B.T., Windsor
Hanchett, Samuel, Windsor | Phillips, Leslie, Windsor
Hanchett, James, Windsor | Pickup, Clive, Windsor
Haxby, E.C.H., Windsor (twice wounded) | Potts, Rowland, Windsor
Holden, Reginald, Windsor | Pye, Major Cecil B.A., Windsor
Honeman, Garnet, Windsor (not accepted) | Pye, Eric J.D., Windsor
Hough, Ernest, Windsor | Rees, Victor John, Windsor
Hoskisson, Samuel James, Clarendon |
Rhodes, William B., Wilberforce (not accepted) | Swords, B.E., Windsor
Rigg, William, Sackville | Taylor, Fred C., Windsor
Robertson, Wm., Windsor | Teals, Alex, Wilberforce
Robertson, F.J., Windsor (not accepted) | Thomson, F.S., Cattai
Sandoz, George E., Windsor | Toomey, Alfd., Windsor (killed)
Scholer, Richd., Windsor | Toomey, Edward, Windsor
Shadlow, Cecil D., Windsor (not accepted) | Turnbull, Cecil O.W., Wilberforce
Shirley, Wm., Windsor | Turnbull, Fred., Wilberforce (wounded)
Shimmels, Arthur, Scheyville | Turnbull, Harry N, Wilberforce
Sim, E., Windsor | Ulstrom, Charles, Windsor
Simpson, Cecil, Wilberforce | Uren, Dr. Cecil, Windsor
Simpson, Norman. Wilberforce (wounded) | Walker, Archibald G., Windsor
Smallwood, William, Cattai | Wall, Stanley, Windsor (wounded)
Smith, Robt., Freeman's Reach | Ward, Oscar D., Windsor
Smith, Albert Edward, Freeman's Reach | Ward, William, Windsor
Startin, Wm., Mulgrave | White, W. Frank, Vineyard (wounded)
Streeter, Frederick, Windsor (wounded) | White, Roland, Cattai
Streeter, Roy, Windsor (killed) | Woods, William H., Sackville
Sullivan, Regd., Windsor.

Riverstone List
Alcorn, Cecil, Riverstone | Davis, Herbert, Riverstone
Alcorn, S., Riverstone | Drake, Edward, Riverstone
Alderton, Robert, Schofields | Drayton, Stanley, Riverstone
Bambridge, Phil, Riverstone | Freeman, Herb., Riverstone
Bertie, J., Riverstone | Green, John, Riverstone
Bertie, Leo., Riverstone | Grenshaw, Cecil, Marsden Park (not accepted)
Brookes, Alfred, Marsden Park | Griffin, E.W., Marsden Park
Brookes, Ernest, Marsden Park | Hayward, F.A., Marsden Park
Carter, Fk., Marsden Park | Hayward, John, Riverstone
Case, G., Riverstone (not accepted) | Hayward, Robt., Riverstone
Cassidy, John, Marsden Park | Humphries, T., Riverstone
Clarke, Frank, Riverstone | Hurley, F., Riverstone
Clout, Cyrus, Riverstone | James, Matthew, Riverstone
Comyn, Frank, Riverstone | Johnston, Harold, Schofields (wounded)
Croft, G., Riverstone | Keegan, F., Riverstone
Davies, W., Annangrove |
Kenny, Herbert, Marsden Park (wounded) | Schofield, Edwin, Riverstone
Kenny, John, Marsden Park (wounded) | Schofield, Horace, Riverstone
Knight, C. C, Schofields | Schofield, S.R., Riverstone (not accepted)
Martin, Ernest, Riverstone (not accepted) | Showers, A.B., Riverstone (killed)
Mason, Ambrose, Vineyard | Smith, Albyn, Riverstone
Matthews, Rex, Marsden Park | Symonds, James, Riverstone
Matthews. Eric, Marsden Park | Sulivan, Eric, Riverstone
Morris, William McC., Marsden Park | Taylor, Frank W., Marsden Park
Pye, J.J., Schofields | Teale, George, Riverstone
Rimington, H.J., Marsden Park | Teale, William, Riverstone
Robbins, J., Riverstone | Towers, J., Riverstone
Schofield, Aubury, Riverstone | Wiggins, Frederick, Schofields

SOURCE:
* A Project Gutenberg Australia eBook *
eBook No.: 1302241h.html
The Early Days of Windsor N.S.Wales
J. Steele
Member Aust Historical Society
transcription, janilye

The COLLISION BETWEEN the BARRABOOL and BONNIE DUNDEE.

The inquest on the body of Sarah Brown, one of the
victims to the collision between the Bonnie Dundee and
Barrabool, was concluded yesterday, the jury finding a
verdict of manslaughter against the captain and mate of
the Bonnie Dundee. The inquest was commenced on the
12th instant, and that day's evidence we published, but the
following day the Coroner made an order against the pub-
lication of the evidence until the conclusion of the inquiry,
so we were unable to record the evidence from day to day.
The following are the statements of the witnesses, with the
exception of those taken on the 12th, which we have
already published :-
Dr. Owen Spencer Evans deposed that on Tuesday he was
called to a house in Darling-street, Balmain, and there saw
the dead body of a woman, about fifty years of age, which
he recognised as that of a woman known to him by the
name of Sarah Brownhe examined tho body and found
no direct marks of violence ; froth was oozing from the
mouth and nostrils, and the body generally presented the
usual appearances of death by drowning; witness was of
opinion that death had been so caused.
Thomas Crawford deposed that he was chief officer of the
lost steamship, Bonnie Dundee, a screw steamer, trading
between Sydney and the Manning River; she left
Sydney at forty minutes past 1 o'clock on Monday
afternoon, the 10th instant, her destination being
the Manning River: when the vessel got clear
of the heads her course was shaped N. by E. half
E.; the weather was fine and clear, a light breeze blowing
from the northward and eastward until tho evening, when
the wind fell and it became calm; witness took charge of
the deck at 6 o'clock; the vessel was then steering the same
course; shortly after 6 o'clock the coloured side lights and
white masthead light were lit and slipped in their usual
places; the steamer was then going at the rate of seven or
eight knots, and was about two or two and a half miles off
the land; the vessel had not a full cargo and was not deep
in the water; she answered her helm readily; about half
past 7 o'clock witness saw a masthead light, bearing about
north by east and about two and half miles distant ; at the
same time that witness saw the light, the look-out man on
the forecastle reported "a vessel a-head; the strange
vessel appeared to be steering a S. S. W. course; at this time
the moon was up a little, and the night was fine and clear,
with smooth water and little or no wind; a few minutes
after the look-out man reported the vessel, witness saw her
red light; he then ordered the man at the wheel to keep the
vessel off a point, and her course was accordingly changed
to north-east by north; the Bonnie Dundee kept on this
course until witness saw the green light of the approaching
steamer, about five minutes after he saw the red light; at
this time the captain of the Bonnie Dundee was on the
bridge on deck, witness was also on the bridge; the quarter-
deck of the Bonnie Dundee was raised about two feet above
the main deck; her deck was about 120 feet in length, and
her tonnage was 130 tons; at the time the strange steamer
was approaching, the Newcastle light was in sight about 15
miles on the port bow of the Bonnie Dundee; immediately
on seeing the green light of the approaching steamer,
witness gave the order to put the helm hard-a-starboard, and
then when the two vessels got to within half-a-length of each
other, he saw that the stranger had altered her course, so
that her red light was again showing; the captain, who
was on the bridge at the time, ordered the man at the wheel
to keep the helm as it was, and then he gave the order to
stop the engines and go full speed astern, but by that time
the stranger was close on to them on the starboard side,
and immediately afterwards struck the Bonnie Dundee
amidships; the water began to pour in on the main deck,
and the vessel heaved ovor heavily to port; witness saw
some of the men jump on board the other steamer, and he
had tho ship's hoat lowered, and took charge of it; the
Bonnie Dundee sank almost at once, foundering about four
minutes after the collision; there were four lady pas
sengers on board the Bonnie Dundee; one of them was a
Mrs. Brown, whose dead body witness viewed on Wed-
nesday, in a house in Balmain, in the presence of
the Coroner and jury; after the Bonnie Dundee had
foundered, witness's boat was pulled alongside the
strange vessel, which was then ascertained to be
the Barrabool, and witness was taken on board,
after assisting in recovering the body of Mrs. Brown;
(witness here expressed a wish to make a correction in his
former evidence: when the mast-head light of the Barra-
bool came in sight, the Bonnie Dundee was steering
N.N.E.;) at the time of the collision, the engines of the
Bonnie Dundee were going astern, but the vessel had still
a little way on, probably about two knots an hour; witness
could not say exactly at what rate the Barrabool was
going when she struck the Bonnie Dundee, but she was
going at great speed, and she struck with great force;
witness did not hear any order given on board the Barra
pool; in his opinion, after the collision, everything that
could possibly be done to save life was done by both ships.
To Mr. Rogers: Witness did not see the green light of the
Barrabool first, but the red one; when ships met in a line
the rule was to keep red light to red light, or green to
green; when the ships met end on, each ship ported her
helm. To a juror: Witness held a certificate of master in
a coasting vessel from the Marine Board; when the captain
was on deck, the charge of the ship devolved on him.
;John Alexander Stewart stated that he was master of the
BonnieDundee which left Sydney on Monday afternoon for
the Manning River: the Bonnie Dundee was 121 tons register,
an 45-horse power; her length was about 20 feet, and her
full power of steaming 8 knots an hour; witness went on
deck about 6 o'clock in the evening, and at about a quarter
to 8 he heard the officer of the watch, who was on the bridge,
sing out to the man at the wheel "hard a starboard;"
witness rushed up on the bridge and saw a vessel's green
light; he then asked the man at the wheel how his helm
was, and the reply was that it was hard a starboard, and
witness ordered the seaman to keep it so; very shortly after-
wards the green light of the approaching vessel disappeared,
and the red light became visible; on perceiving this,
witness gave orders to stop the engines, and this was done,
and about a minute afterwards the stranger having ap-
proached to within fifty yards of the Bonnie Dundee, the
engines were reversed full speed astern; very shortly after
this the stranger struck the Bonnie Dundee amid-
ships on the starboard side cutting about four feet
into the deck and smashing the starboard life-boat;
at once a number of the crew rushed to the part
of the deck where the collision took place and climbed up
the bows of the Barrabool; witness, not knowing exactly
the extent of the damage sustained by his vessel, ordered
the engines full speed ahead in order to try and reach the
beach which was about two and a-half miles distant; after
giving this order he perceived the uselessness of such an
attempt, and stopping tho engines, gave orders to lower
a boat which was promptly done; by this time
the lady passengers, four in number, were on the
bridge with witness and he, cutting away the lifo buoys
gavo them to the ladies; as soon as the boat touched the
water and got rid of the tackling, the stewardess, who had
a child in her aims, threw it into the boat, and immediately
afterwards the vessel went down with witness and the four
women on the bridge, all the others having left the ship
either in the boat or by climbing up the bows of
the Barrabool. Between three and four minutes elapsed
from the time of the collision until the vessel went down;
there were 21 hands on board all told at the time of the
collision; witness did not know, there was a vessel in sight
until he heard the mate give the order "hard a starboard;'
it was not the duty of the officer of the watch to report a
vessel in sight, to witness unless he thought there was
danger; when witness first saw the light of the Barrabool
she must have been about 300 or 400 yards distant, and the
Bonnie Dundee was going at the rate of 7 knots an hour
when the collision occurred, the Barrabool was, in witness's
opinion, going at a speed of about 3 knots.
To Mr. Sly: In witness's opinion the vessel was properly
handled after the light of the Barrabool had been sighted
the steam whistle was not used; it was not customary to use
it on a clear night like that on which the collision occurred
when the red light of the Barrabool was sighted, it was too
late to port the helm of the Bonnie Dundee, as the former
vessel was almost on top of her; at the exact time of the
collision the Bonnie Dundee was almost stationary; there
was no time to get the passengers into the boat before the
vessel went down.
To Mr. Rogers: The Bonnie Dundee was heading about
north-west when she was struck; everything was done by
the Barrabool people to save life.
To Mr. Manning: Witness did not think, under the cir
cumstances, that there was any occasion for the chief officer
(to communicate with him before allowing the ships to come
so close together if the green light of the Barrabool had
continued in sight; witness had given the Herald news
paper a report of the occurrence; - he was in bed when the
reporter came, and the chief officer was in the room; wit
ness was the only man left on board the vessel when she
went down.
Henry Dose, able-bodied seaman of tho Bonnie Dundee
joined tho vessel on Monday last; he was at the wheel at
the time of the collision with the Barrabool; he went to
the wheel about 6 o'clock, when about twelve or fifteen miles
south of Newcastle; the vessel's course was thena north
by east half east; about 7 o'clock witness was directed
by the mate to change the course to N.N.E.; the
vessel had passed Bird Island when that order was given;
the N.N.E. course was continued until the red light of a
steamer, afterwards found to be the Barrabool, was sighted
about four miles distant, and bearing about north on the
port bow; on seeing the red light, the mato gave the order
to keep the vessel off a little, and accordingly witness kept
her off another point, her course then being north-east by
north; that course was kept until the Barrabool, when
nearly abreast of the Bonnie Dundee, showed her green
light; the mate then gave the ordor, "Hard a starboard,'
and witness brought the vessel round till her head was
about north-west; the Barrabool was then almost on top of
them, and showing her red light, and immediately after
that she struck the Bonnie Dundee on the starboard side;
the captain went on the bridge about 10 minutes before the
collision took place; when the vessel waa struck, the captain
shouted, "look out for yourselves;" if the Barrabool
had not altered her course there was sufficient room for her
to have passed between the Bonnie Dundee and the land.
John Petersen, seaman of the Bonnie Dundee, was look-
out man on the forecastle when the collision occurred; he
went on the lookout about 6 o'clock; between 7 and 8
o'clock, while on the lookout, he sight a bright masthead
light, which appeared to be straight ahead; about five or
ten minutes after sighting the masthead light the red light
of the vessel came in sight; witness reported the light to
the officer in charge of the deck, and he said " All right:"
witness continued on the lookout on the forecastle, and soon
afterwards, when the vessels began to near one another the
red light disappeared and the green light came in sight
almost immediately after the green light of the approaching
vessel come in sight she ran into the Bonnie Dundee; when
first witness sighted the masthead light it was about two or
three miles off.
To Mr. Rogers: Witness did not notice whether the
Bonnie Dundee slackened speed; he could not tell that,
being forward.
To Mr. Monning: Witness did not see the red light of
the Barrabool a second time; he was looking at the Barra-
bool from the time she showed the green light until the
collision occurred; he climbed the bows of the Barrabool
after the collision.
To the Coroner: Witness heard the steam-whistle
sounded on board the Bonnie Dundee; there was so much
confusion and excitement that he could not tell whether a
bell was rung or a whistle sounded on board the Barrabool;
but he was quite certain that the whistle sounded on board
the Bonnie Dundee.
Thomas Crawford, recalled, deposed that when he first
saw the green light of the Barrabool it was on the port bow
of the Bonnie Dundee, nearly straight ahead; he lost the
red light, and a minuto or two afterwards saw the green
light; from the position the steamers were in to one
another, a slight movement of the helm would have caused
the change of lights; when he first saw the green light the
Barrabool was about her own length off; there was nothing
in the relative positions of the two vessels that would have
led witness to apprehend danger until he saw the green
light of the Barrabool.
John Charles Simmons, chief engineer of the Bonnie Dundee,
was attending, to the engines of the vessel when the collision
took place on Monday night; about a quarter to 8 o'clock
that evening he received an order by telegraph to stop, and
then "full speed astern" ; he obeyed both orders without
any delay; about a minute after he received the latter
order he felt a shock, and almost immediately afterwards
received the order "full speed ahead," quickly followed by
"stop"; after stopping the second time he went on deck,
and found the vessel sinking.
Henry Dose rocallcd: When he first saw the Barrabool
he saw the red light and the mast-head light.
To a juror: At the time he first saw the red light he did
not see the green light; when the mate saw the red light he
told witness to keep off a little, and witness then ported his
helm, which would have the effect of showing the red light
more; about a quarter of an hour elapsed between the time
witness first saw the red light, and the timo he received the
order "hard a starboard" he did not see the greenlight till
he got the order, "Hard-a-starboard;" if the Bonnie
Dundee had kept the course she was on before that order
had been given the Barrabool would have struck her on the
port bow; witness did not hear the lookout man sing out,
but that would be accounted for by the fact that he
(witness) was standing alongside the steam funnel, and the
noise from that would probably drown the shout of the
lookout man; witness got on board the Barrabool by the
bows.
Hercules Dalzell, one of the seamen of the Bonnie
Dundee, first saw the Barrabool's masthead light bearing
on the port bow about two points and about three miles
distant; he next saw the red light and some time after-
wards the green light almost abreast of the Bonnie Dundee;
as soon as he saw the green light, he heard the order given
by the mate, "Hard-a-starboard," and directly afterwards
the Barrabool ran into the Bonnie Dundee, which sank
about three minutes after the collision.
To Mr. Want: The first time that the vessel's helm was
shifted it was to starboard; witness was sure that it was
not ported before it was put to starboard; he could not say
whether the helm was not ported when the Barrabool's
red light was first sighted; it might have been at that time
without his noticing it.
To Mr. Sly: After the vessel's helm had been put to
starboard witness again saw the Barrabool's red light before
the collision.
To Mr. Manning: When the Barrabool's green light first
came in sight witness was forward on deck; if no other
change had been made from that time in the course of either
vessel, witness did not think there could have been a colli-
sion; after he first saw the green light of the Barrabool the
latter vessel appeared to change her course, and then her
green light came in sight; he heard the look-out report the
masthead light.
John Redmond Clarke deposed that he was master of the
screw steamer Barrabool trading between Melbourne,
Sydney, and Newcastle; she left Newcastle on the evening
of Monday, the 10th instant, clearing Nobby's Head at
half-past 6 ; it was a beautiful clear, moonlight night, with
a light north-easterly, wind blowing and the water
smooth; after clearing Nobby's the vessel's course
was shaped S.S.W. by compass, and that course
was kept until half-past 7, when it was changed
to S. by W. three-quarters W.; when the course was
altered the vessel had gone about ten miles; a quarter-of'
an-hour after leaving Newcastle the second mate took
charge of the deck; witness also was on deck; about twenty
minutes to 8 o'clock a masthead light was reported; witness
looked over the side and saw a masthead light about two
points on the starboard bow, and about 3 miles distant; a
few minutes afterwards he sighted a green light
he then spoke to the mate asking him if that
was not a green light the stranger was showing, the
mate replied in the affirmative, and witness then ordered the
man at the wheel to starboard the helm a little; the order
was hardly given, and was not executed, when the mate
drew witness's attention to the fact that the approaching
steamer (which afterwards turned out to be the Bonnie
Dundee) was showing her red light; witness then counter
maned his former order to the steersman, and gave the
order " hard-a-port," which was immediately obeyed
the light of the Bonnie Dundee, now about half
a mile distant, disappeared across the Barrabool's
bow; witness telegraphed to engine-room, "Stop her," and
directly afterwards, from the position of the Bonnie Dun
dee's light, thinking that they were going all clear, he was
about to telegraph to the engine-room to start her ahead
again, when suddenly the green light of the Bonnie Dundee
came in sight, and all three lights were in sight, revealing
that the vessel was bearing down right upon the Barrabool
witness instantly telegraphed the engineer, "Full speed
astern," and proceeded to blow the steam-whistle, several
times, at the same time the red light of the Bonnie Dundee
went out of sight, showing that she was bearing up towards
the bow of the Barrabool; immediately afterwards the
vessels collided, and witness gave orders to lower a boat
which was done without any delay; the boat was manned
by the chief mate and two seamen, who were instructed to
pull with all speed to the Bonnie Dundee, then in a sinking
condition on the starboard bow of tho Barrabool; witness
ordered the engines to go slow ahead, and when
his vessel had approached to within fifty yards
of the Bonnie Dundee, the latter went down; the
Barrabool was then stopped among the wreckage, and three
life buoys and some cork fenders were thrown overboard in
case there should be any person in the water; the boat of
the Barrabool, accompanied by that of the Bonnie Dundee
soon came alongside, and witness shouted out to them to
know if all hands were saved; receiving no answer
he went on the main deck, and hearing someone say there
had been four women on board, looked over the rail and in
quired if there were any women in the boats; the reply
was "no," and witness ordered the chief mate to go
back and see if he could find any one floating; the Bonnie
Dnndee's boat was also ordered away for the same purpose;
soon the chief mate of the Barrabool returned with a lady in
his boat; she was got on board, and though she appeared
to be quite inanimate, efforts were made to endeavour to
restore animation for more than an hour and a half, but
without avail: after bringing the lady on board, the boat
returned to search among the wreckage, but no one else was
found and witness asked Captain Stuart if he thought there
was any use staying longer; Captain Stuart replied that he
thought everv thing possible had been done, and after the
damage which had been done to the Barrabool's bow had
been repaired as well as could be under the circumstances,
the vessel proceeded on her course to Sydney; about a
hour and a half elapsed between the foundering of the
Bonnie Dundee and Barrabool's resuming her voyage to
Sydney. To Mr. Want: The look-out man of the Barra
bool was on the top-gallant forecastle, and to prevent any
mistake being made by the look-out man, the signals were
given by bells; there was nothing to interrupt witness's
view-nor that of the mate, the look-out man, or the man at
the wheel; there were passengers on board the Barrabool,
two of them-Mr. and Mrs. Lovell-were on the saloon
deck; when two bells, the signal of the Bonnie Dundee
coming in sight, were struck, Mr. Lovell asked
if that was 8 o'clock, and witness replied
"No, it is a light on the starboard bow;"
when first the Bonnie Dundee was sighted, if each
vessel had kept on her course they would have cleared each
other by a good half-mile; witness gave the order "star-
board a little to clear them a little more, but before the
order was obeyed the red light of the Bonnie Dundee came
in sight (here the models were again brought into use, and
at this time and throughout the remainder of his evidence
the witness explained the positions and manoeuvres of the
two vessels by their aid); seeing that the red light of the
Bonnie Dundee was on the starboard bow of the Barrabool
it was the duty of the latter to keep clear, and accordingly
witness had the helm put to port aud stopped the engine
and supposing they had gone on as they were then, they
would have passed each other quite clear; the green light
of the Bonnie Dundee, however, then came into sight; the
evidence of some of those on board the Bonnie Dundee had
stated that the green light of the Barrabool was seen
by them after they sighted her red light, but that was
quite impossible, as the Barrabool was on her port
helm after it was first ported; it was not true that after
showing her red light to the Bonnie Dundee the Barrabool
came across and showed her red light; when the
vessels collided, the Barrabool's speed was under a mile an
hour; the Bonnie Dundee was going about five or seven
miles; if the Bonnie Dundee had stopped her engines
the same time as the Barabool did there would have been
no collision, as the two vessels would not have reached one
another; the damage to the Barrabool was on the port bow,
about 20 inches from the stern, and was caused by the
Bonnie Dundee tearing across the Barrabool's bow; if the
Bonnie Dundee had not been going so fast she would not
have made the hole in the Barrabool's bow that she did.
To Mr. Sly: The Bonnie Dundee was about 3 miles
distant when witness first sighted her masthead light, and
about a mile distant when her green light was first seen
witness would positively swear that, at the time of the
collision, the Bonnie Dundee was going at a rate of about 5
knots an hour, and the Barrabool was going at a rate of less
than one mile an hour; immediately after the collision the
Barrabool had stern way on; when first the red light of the
Bonnie Dundee was sighted the vessels were about three
quarters of a mile apart.
To Mr. Manning: The masthead lights of each vessel
would probably have been sighted by the other at about the
same time, but the Bonnie Dundee would most likely have
sighted the side lights of the Barrabool before her own
lights could have been visible to the latter, as the moon was
rising and was putting the Bonnie Dundee's lights in the
shade; witness had heard the examination of the mate
the Bonnie Dundee; he (the mate of the Bonnie Dundee)
did port his helm in the first instance, and then after showing
a red light put his helm hard-a-starboard, and as a
matter of fact the helm of the Barrabool was first put a little
a-starboard and then hard-a-port; if the mate of the Bonnie
Dundee was right in saying that when he first sighted the
Barrabool, she was two miles on his port bow, that would
put the Bonnie Dundee about a mile further out to sea than
she really was; the Barrabool was about three miles out
from land when she first sighted the Bonnie Dundee.
To a juror: The Barrabool's full speed is ten knots an
hour; after giving the order to stop, if the engines were
reversed full speed astern, she would go about one-third of a
mile before she stopped altogether; there was a rule of the
road that when ships are meeting end-on, all lights being
in view, each vessel must port; that was the only case in
which that rule held good; when witness gave the order to
stop the engines immediately before the collision, it was
not, he considered, an error of judgment; if he had not
dono so the Bonnie Dundee would have run into the Barra-
bool; when witness gave the order "stop" the Barrabool
was going about 10 knots an hour; he did not think he
could have got ahead of the Bonnio Dundee by going full
speed ahead; when the Bonnie Dundee's red right was on
the Barrabool's starboard bow, it was the Barrabool's duty
to give way, and the Bonnie Dundee should have held on
her course.
Arthur Nelson Pidcock, second mate of the Barrabool,
with a master's certificate, was in charge of the deck when
the masthead light of the Bonnie Dundee was reported;
on looking at the light he saw it was bearing two
points on the starboard bow, and about 4 miles distant;
about 10 minutes after sighting the masthead light
of the Bonnie Dundee, the green light became visible ;
Captain Clarke who was on deck asked what lights
the steamer was showing, and witness replied, " Green, but
burning indistinctly ;" the captain replied, "Yes, oh yes,"
and then gave orders to the man at the wheel to starboard a
little; this order was scarcely given before the Bonnie
Dundee showed a red light; witness mentioned the fact to
the captain, who immediately had the helm put hard-a-port,
and gave the ordor to stop the engines; very soon after the
engines had been stopped the Bonnie Dundee showed both
her lights, but the red light soon went out of sight and the
green light showed close on the starboard bow of the Barrabool,
which at that time was going very slowly; shortly
afterwards the two vessels collided; tho Bonnie Dundee
appeared to have a pretty good speed; when the collision
took place the Barrabool's boat was lowered and sent away
to render assistance; after being absent someo time, the
boat returned with the body of the deceased Mrs. Brown;
after hanging about the scene of the wreck for over an hour
the vessel continuod on her course to Sydney.
To Mr. Waut: From the position of the Bonnie
Dundee when first she was sighted, it would have
been impossible for her to have seen the red light of the
Barrabool, and if the mate of the Bonnie Dundee had stated
that the gresn light of the Barrabool was the one first
sighted he would be correct; witness had read a report in
the Echo of the 11th instant, with reference to the mate's
statement about his seeing the green light of the Barrabool
first-that was correct; if the Bonnie Dundee had not
ported, the two vessels would have passed one another about
half a mile distant; t was only the Bonnie Dundee star-
boarding after her porting that brought her across the bows
of the Barrabool; it was untrue that the Barrabool after
porting her helm ever showed her green light to the Bonnie
Dundee; the Barrabool had not more than half a knot way
when the collision took place; the Bonnie Dundee appeared
to be going over four knots.
To Mr. Sly: Witness did not hear the Bonnie Dundee
blow her whistle at all; when first the green light of the
Bonnie Dundee came in sight the two vessels were about a
mile distant; the engines of the Barrabool were stopped on
the red light of the Bonnie Dundee becoming visible; witness
was of opinion that, according to the regulations of the
Navigation Act, the Bonnie Dundee was the vessel which
should have kept on her course while the Barrabool was the
giving way vessel, consequently the Bonnie Dundee should
not have altered her course.
Thomas Crawford recalled, in answer to a question as to
whether he had given a report of the occurrence to a reporter
of the Echo newspaper, stated that some persons had come
to him two or three hours after he arrived in Sydney,
and he gave them some account about the ships; he did not
know what he said to them; he could not say whether they
told him they were reporters for a paper; he could not say,
so far as he was aware of, that he gave the statement to the
reporters that appeared in the Echo of March 11th, he never
saw any account of the occurrence in the Echo.
To Mr. Sly: Witness was in the Caledonian Hotel when
they came and asked him some questions; he gave them no
written account ; it is not a fact that he first saw the green
light; he could not possibly have said so to a reporter ; he
did not say so; he could not say whether an account
appeared in the Evening News about the same time; ho did
not take notice of any newspapers; he was quite sober when
he made the statement in the Caledonian Hotel.
John Tucker, able seaman on board the Barrabool, went
to the wheel a few minutes after clearing Nobby's Head;
about an hour afterwards witness saw the mast-head light
of a steamer on the starboard bow, which had been signalled
by the lookout; she appeared to be running an opposite
course to that of the Barrabool; some time afterwards the
mate reported the green light of the steamer, and the
captain gave tho order, "starboard a little" ; witness was
just obeying that order when the mate reported a red light,
and the captain ordered the helm "hard a-port"; witness
obeyed the order, and, as he did so, saw the red light of the
Bonnie Dundee on the starboard bow; when the Barrabool
came round in answer to her helm, both the side-lights of
the Bonnie Dundee came in sight, and the red one disap-
pearing, she crossed the bows of the Barrabool; the captain
ordered the engines to stop, and a minute after gave "full
speed astern "; before the Barrabool had completely lost her
way, she struck the Bonnie Dundee amidships.
To Mr. Want: The helm was not put astarhoard at all
after it was ported; if any of the witnesses on board the
Bonnie Dundee had sworn that they saw the green light
of the Barrabool after having seen the red light, they
would have stated what was untrue; witness thought
that the Bonnie Dundee had more way on at the
time of the collision, but he would not swear to it;
it was about two or three minutes from the time witness
first saw the red light of the Bonnie Dundee until he saw
both lights, and about the same time between when the two
lights first showed and the collision.
William Lovell deposed that he was a passenger on
board the Barrabool at the time of the collision; he was on
the saloon deck of the Barrabool when the Bonnio Dundee
was first sighted, and on hearing the bell struck asked
if it were 8 o'clock, but the captain replied that it
was a vessel on the starboard bow; tho captain then
went to the starboard side of the vessel and look-
ing over said, "she is showing a green light;"
and then gave the order to the steersman "starboard a
little;" shortly after the mate on the bridge reported that
the vessel was showing a red light in place of the green,
and Captain Clarke gave the order "hard a port;" a few
minutes subsequently someone said that the vesssel was
showing a green light again, and the captain said "where
is she coming to ?" a few minutes after that the collision
took place; witness saw the white mast-head light of the
Bonnie Dundee when it was reported, and very soon after-
wards saw the green light; it was immediately after the
Bonnie Dundee showed the red light that the Barrabool's
engines were stopped.
To Mr. Want: He never heard any order given to star-
board the helm after the order to port it had been given ;
when he first saw the light of the Bonnio Dundee he had
no fear of a collision; there was no confusion on board the
Barrabool; Captain Clarke was very calm and cool, and
appeared to be exercising his judgment calmly.
Charles Wilson, able seaman on board the Barrabool, was
on the look out when the collision occurred; he saw the
masthead light of the Bonnie Dundee and reported it by
striking two bells, which signalled "a light on the starboard
bow;" when he first sighted it the light was two points
on the starboard bow and about four or five miles
distant; the vessel appeared to be steering in an
opposite direction to the course of the Barrabool;
about seven minutes after the masthead light was
sighted the green light became visible; several minutes
after the green light first came in sight, it disappeared, and
the red light took its place; Captain Clarke then sang out
"Hard a-port," and the Barrabool went round until the
red light of the Bonnie Dundee was on her port bow;
directly after that, both the Bonnie Dundee's side-lights
became visible, and then the red light disappeared, and the
Bonnie Dundee crossing the bows of the Barrabool, was
struck amidships, and shortly afterwards sank.
To Mr. Sly: The Barrabool was forging ahead very
slowly when the two vessels collided.
To the Foreman: The Bonnie Dundeo must have been
going at a rate of 4 or 6 knots an hour when she was crossing
the bows of the Barrabool.
Thomas Ashford, an able seaman belonging to the Barrabool,
was on the after part of the saloon deck when the
Bonnie Dundee's light was signalled; directly after the
light was signalled witness looked at the time and saw it
was twenty minutes to 8; shortly afterwards the officer on
the bridge reported a red light, and then witness went to the
assistance of the man at the wheel, and caught sight of the
red light bearing about two points on the starboard bow; as
soon as the mate announced the red light the captain gave
the order "hard-a-port;" the helm was put hard-a-port
and kept so until the collision took place.
To the Foreman: The Bonnie Dundee seemed to be going
very fast when she crossed the Barrabool's bows.
Isaac Wagland, second engineer of the Barrabool, was in
charge of the engine room when the collision occurred,
the chief engineer being off duty at that time; some time
between half-past seven and a quarter to 8 o'clock the
telegraph signalled "slow"; witness obeyed the order,
and then the telegraph signalled "stop" and "full speed
astern " in one order; the engines were at once stopped and
reversed, and about two minutes afterwards there was a
shock as if the vessel had struck something.
To Mr. Sly: If the Barrabool were going full speed
ahead, and the engines were stopped and reversed, it would
take two or three minutes before tho steamer would be
stopped.
William H. Dick, a reporter on the staff of the Sydney
Morning Herald, remembered hearing a rumour on the
night after the 10th instant that the Barrabool and Bonnie
Dundee steamers had collided; and in consequence of this
rumour he made inquiries to ascertain the truth of the
report; he saw the man before the Court, who
gave his name as Thomas Crawford; he stated
that be was the chief officer of the Bonnie Dundee;
the man giving his name as John Stewart was
present when witness interviewed the chief officer;
they were in the bedroom of an hotel, and Stewart,
who stated that he was the master of the Bonnie
Dundee, was lying on a bed; witness got the mate's state-
ment, which was to the effect that he was in charge of the
vessel at the time of the collision, that he saw the green
light about two miles ahead, and that he steered his vessel
so os to show his own green light: that suddenly he saw a
red light exhibited, and that soon after that Bonnie
Dundee was 'struck amidships on the starboard, the
captain was present when the mate made the statement
and did not contradict it in any way.
To Mr. Want: Witness reduced the mate's ?? to
writing; he went back a second time (after he to??
of the mate's statement), in company with the ??
reporter, in order that he might heur the stat ??
had a greater knowledge of nautical matters ??
was possessed of; the same statement was made and
time as had been on the first occasion; which he took
down the statement in shorthand and t?? it
into writing; he saw it afterwards in print it
was correct; the fifth paragraph after the ??
of the occurrence in the Echo of March ll, citing
" The chief officer of the Bonnie Dundee states, ??
ing with the words " escaping the suction,' was ??
ment made to witness by the mate; the same ??
wards appeared in the Herald of March 12th; ??
never asked to contradict these statements, nor ever
heard of any complaints about their being incorrect took
down the mate's statement in shorthand; ??
sitting in the same room with the captain; ??
very little about shipping matters, and the ??
to him what the three lights were.
To Mr. Manning: The mate did not appear under
the influence of liquor.
Thomas Crawford recalled : Had been ??
Sydney and the north for about 10 years; he ??
course steered by the Bonnie Dundee ??
particular occasion; it was the course generally used
in fine weather; the Bonnie Dundee was bound for the
Manning River, and had gone the same trips ??
18 months: when witness first saw the Barrabool ??
light she was about 225 yards off ; if he had seen ??
light on his port bow it would have been his duty ??
on his course, but he did not see her green light ??
bow; he saw it almost ahead; the Barrabool ??
been 1 or 2 points on the port bow when she ??
her red light; sometimes a couple of minutes ??
tween the time of losing one light and sighting the other;
it was a fact that the losing of one light necess??
immediate picking up of the other; when the ??
was first sighted it was ahead, but was if anything ??
on the port bow; as soon as witness saw the green he
put his helm to starboard; Witness had had no ??
the captain; there was no confusion or quarrelling on board
the Bonnie Dundee before she left the wharf; as ??
captain had heard the order 'hard-a-starboard," ??
up on the bridge and took charge; witness never ??
sounding the steam whistle; if he had not given ??
"hard-a-starboard," he believed the Barrabool would have
run into them on the port side.
John Alexander Stewart, recalled, stated that he had
been trading to the north for about twelve ??
course the Bonnie Dundee steered was, under the circum
stances, the proper course to steer; had heard ??
the Herald reporter, give his evidence; was present on the
11th instant when the chief officer gave him an account of
the collision; the report in the Echo of the llth instant
was not a correct report of what the mate told the reporter;
the orders that witness gave-"Stop her," " ??
astern "-wereo given, the one immediately after that.
To. Mr. Manning: When the reporter came witness was
too unwell to notice what took place; he did not ??
the mate said to the reporter, but he knew that he ??
say what afterwards appeared in the Echo.
To Mr. Want: There was no break between the orders,
"Stop her" and "Full speed astern;" witness ??
ously sworn there was a break of a minute between;
he did not consider that when the order "hard-a-starboard"
was given it was a serious thing, although he had previously
stated it was; there was no great probability ??
when the helm was starboarded; there might have been a
little danger.
To Mr. Want: The Bonnie Dundee was steering ??
close in to shore to avoid currents; she kept within ??
or three miles from the coast, and went from point ??
it was the general practice for coasting steamers going
south to go outside steamers going north; if witness ??
miles from Bird Island, and had the Barrabool been ??
out he would stand a pretty good chance of seeing ??
light.
The foregoing being all the evidence that was ??
anent the collision, the Coronor stated that previous ??
jury retiring to consider their verdict they would be
addressed by Mr. Manning, the legal rcpresentative of the
Crown. It had hitherto been his custom not to permit any
lawyers to address the jury, but in the present case
would follow the precedent offered lately in England ??
inquest on the body of the victims in the collision of Her
Majesty's yacht Misletoe, when the Crown Prosecutor
summed up and addressed the jury. Mr Manning accordingly
proceeded to review the evidencee,
and summed up greatly against the officers of
the Bonnie Dundee. He remarked that, in that
place, the jury were to consider whether the collision was
the fault of the Bonnie Dundee or the Barrabool. Accord-
ing to the evidence of the officers and crew of the Barra-
bool, the Bonnie Dundee was entirely to blame for the
occurrence, for she had twice offended against the regula-
tions of the Navigation Act in not holding to her course
when her green light, was to the Barrubool's green light,
and, subsequently, when red light was to red light,
of which positions she should have hold on her course. He
also pointed out that even by the showing of the Bonnie
Dundee's own men, she was in fault in crossing the Barra-
bool's course the second time. If the jury took the view
that the Bonnie Dundee committed a breach of the regula-
tions, they must further decide who was actually to
blame for the act, and return a verdict accordingly.
The jury were then left to consider their verdict
and after a deliberation of an hour and a half
returned the following verdict:-" We find that
the deceased, Sarah Brown, came by her death
on the night of the 10th instant by drowning, the result of a
collision between the steamer Bonnie Dundee and
the steamer Barrabool, in the former of which she was at the
time a passenger, which collision was brought about by the
gross negligence of the first mate of the Bonnie Dundee,
Thomas Crawford, and Captain John Alexander Stewart
of the same vessel; and we consequently return a verdict of
manslaughter against the said Thomas Crawford and John
Alexander Stewart." The Coroner accordingly proceeded
to commit the prisoners to take their trial at the next sittings
of the Central Criminal Court. Bail was allotted to
each prisoner in 300, with two sureties of 150 each.
Before the Court broke up the Coroner, in the warmest
terms, expresscd his thanks to the jury for the ??
careful, and intelligent way in which they had investigated
the case. He entirely concurred with them in their verdict
and he had much pleasure in stating his conviction that
was as good and true a verdict as could have been given
Source:
The Sydney Morning Herald
Saturday 22 March 1879
Page 6
Transcription, janilye
NOTE: This newspaper article is badly creased down the
right hand side; for the parts
unreadable I've used question marks.
Mrs. Sarah Brown wife of David Brown of Balmain was 53 and
came from County Derry,
Ireland.

PUBLICANS' LICENSES 1851 New South Wales

Published Saturday 10 May 1851 in The Sydney Morning Herald
THE following is a list of applications for Publicans' Licences considered by the Session of Justices held for that purpose.
Those applications to which no remark is appended have been granted.
It will be seen that two are open for a hearing on Monday next.

1. Edward Robertson, Harbour View Hotel, George-street.
2. Louisa Wood, Commercial Hotel, George-street North
3. Edward Hancock, King's Head, George-st.
4. William Howell, King's Arms, George-st.
5. Thomas Waldock Smith, Observer Tavern, George-street
6. James Chapman, Marine Hotel, George-st.
7. William Sullivan, New York Hotel,George-street
8. Robert White Moore, Fortune of War,George street
9. Isaac Moore, Patent Slip, George-street
10. John Henry Humphreys, Land we live in, George-street
11. Charles Hargrave Salmon, Australian Hotel, George street
12. Abraham Levy, American Hotel, George-street
13. Richard Hawkins, Rose of Australia,
George-street
14. John Reed Harman, Blue Posts, George-street
15. William Livingston, Glasgow Arms, George-street. Applicant deceased. The Session agreed to
recommend the case to his Excellency the Governor, as one in which he might exercise his power
of granting a license to the widow.
16. Nicholas Bray, Liverpool Arms, George-street
17. William Cankett, Vine Tavern, George-street
18. Hugh M Lachlan, Crooked Billet, George-street
19. Charles Bath, St. John's Tavern, George and Bridge streets
20. George Scott, Castle Tavern, George and Bridge streets
21. Thomas Moore, City Wine Vaults, George-street
22. Richard Kenyon King, Forth and Clyde,George and Jamison streets
23. Donald Munro, General Washington, George-street
24. George Skinner, Skinners' Hotel, George and Hunter streets
25. Archibald Menzies, Star Hotel, George-st.
26. Robert Rowland, Golden Fleece, George and King streets
27. William Edward Rider, Black Boy, George and King streets
28. John Holman, White Horse, George-st.
29. John Sparke, Royal Hotel, George street
30. Michael Farrell, Farriers' Arms, George-street
31. Henry Robberts, Crown and Anchor,George and Market streets
32. Isaac Titterton, White Horse Cellar, George and Market streets
33. James Cunningham, Bull's Head, George-street
34. George Wilkie, London Tavern, George st.
35. Benjamin Palmer, Swan with Two Necks, George and Park streets
36. William Aitkenhead, Emu Inn, George-st.
37. Refused
38. Refused
39. John Daly, Friendship Inn, George-street
40. Thomas Leary, Currency Lass, George st.
41. Edward Conyngham, Dublin Tavern, George-street
42. Thomas Lee, St. John's Tavern, George and Liverpool streets
43. Thomas Johnson, Crown, George-street
44. Henry Harris, Jew's Harp, George-street
45. Philip Whelan, Britannia Arms, George and Goulburn streets
46. Charles Adrain, Fountain of Friendship, George and Goulburn streets
47. Michael Daly, Golden Fleece, George st.
48. John Francis, Square and Compass, George-street
49. Refused
50. James Stewart, Woolpack, George-street
51. Andrew Byrne, Peacock, George street
52. John Wright, Omnibus Inn, George-st.
53. Abraham Marcus, Steam Engine, George-street
54. John Dishington, Odd Fellows' Hall, George-street
55. George Coulton, Black Swan, George-st.
56. Peter Hanslow, Dog and Duck, George-st.
57. David Roberts, Farmer's Home, George-street
58. David Taylor, Wheat Sheaf, George-st.
59. Thomas Parkinson, Wellington Inn,George street
60. William Ford, Rising Sun, George-street South
61. George Simpson, Currency Lass, Pitt and Hunter streets
62. Matthew Mullaney, Fortune of War, Pitt-street
63. Maria Kelk, Spread Eagle, Pitt-street
64. Denis Kearney, Brougham Tavern, Pitt-st.
65. Joseph William Roche, Rainbow Tavern, Pitt and King streets
66. Edward Samuell, Liverpool Arms, Pitt-and King streets
67. John Alheit, Elephant and Castle, Pitt and King streets
68. Stephen B. Murrell, Sir Richard Bourke, Pitt-street
69. John Mullen, William the Fourth, Pitt-st.
70. Joseph Wyatt, Victoria Hotel, Pitt-street
71. Joseph Faris, Shakspeare, Pitt-street
72. Mary Stone, King's Arms, Pitt-street
73. Edward Borton, Cricketers' Hotel, Pitt and Market streets
74. Thomas Spencer, Toogood's Hotel, Pitt and Market streets
75. John Somerville, Fermanagh Hotel, Pitt-street
76. Refused ; but to be reconsidered on Mon-day next.
77. John Smith, Nags' Head, Pitt-street
78. Michael Cohen, Glasgow Hotel, Pitt-st.
79. John Dane, Railway Tavern, Pitt and Bathurst streets
80. Sarah Doran, Edinburgh Castle, Pitt and Bathurst streets
81. Matthias Hooper, Cottage of Content, Pitt and Bathurst streets
82. George Chambers, Curriers' Arms, Pitt-st.
83. John McCabe, North Star, Pitt and Liver-pool streets
84. George Turner, Brown Bear, Pitt and Goulburn streets
85. James Oatley, Sportsman, Pitt and Goul-burn streets
86. Withdrawn
87. James Davison, Settlers' Arms, Castlereagh-street
88. Thomas Martin, Commercial Hotel, Castlereagh and King streets
89. Henry Peter Hook, Painters' Arms, Castlereagh-street
90. Louisa Watkins, Globe Tavern, Castlereagh and Market streets
91. Roger Murphy, Travellers' Rest, Castlereagh and Market streets
92. Edward Borton, jun., Sydney Arms, Castlereagh-street
93. Edward Canter, Barley Mow, Castlereagh and Park streets
94. William Tunks, Curriers' Arms, Castlereagh and Bathurst streets
95. Robert Collins, Cherry Tree, Castlereagh and Bathurst streets
96. George Clayton, Dungate Inn, Castlereagh and Liverpool streets
96. William Windred, Painters' Arms, Castlereagh and Goulburn streets
97. Baron Burnett Cohen, Nelson Hotel, Castlereagh and Campbell streets
98. Emanuel Crabb, Golden Fleece, Castlereagh-street
99. James Turley Jones, Crown and Kettle,York-street and Barrack-lane
100. John Hawkins, Original Hope Tavern, York-street and Barrack-lane
101. James Entwisle, Masonic Hall, York-st.
102. John O'Dowd, Forbes Hotel, York and King streets
103. William White, Garrick's Head, York and King streets
104. John Malcom, Adelphi Hotel, York-st.
105. Joshua Hutchinson, Harp and Shamrock, York-street
106. John Ward, Redfern Inn, York street
107. Sarah Kilpatrick, Harp of Erin, York-st.
108. John Nobbs, Gardeners' Arms, York-st.
109. Christopher Somerville, Erin-go-Bragh, York-street
110. Thomas Buck, Lamb Inn, Clarence-street North
111. Thomas Thorn, White Hart, Clarence-st.
112. Abraham J. Levy, Solomon's Temple, Clarence-street
113. Joseph Davis, Crispin Arms, Clarence-st.
114. James Cavanagh, Australian Inn, Clarence-street
115. Joseph Spinks, White Hart, Clarence and King streets
116. Michael Blakeney, Leinster Arms Clarence and King streets
117. James Holloway, Blue Lion, Clarence and Market streets
118. Saul Solomon, Australian Hotel, Clarence-street
119. Patrick Conlan, Tradesman's Arms Clarence-street
120. William Wells, Lord Nelson Hotel, Kent and Argyle streets
121. Ralph Benjamin, Dumbarton Castle, Kent-street
122. Andrew Goodwin, Lord Rodney, Kent-st.
123. William Davis, Gas Hotel, Kent-street
124. James Gomme Stanes, Steam Navigation Inn, Kent-street
125. Joseph Kelp, Steam-boat Inn, Kent-street
126. David Fernandez, Green Dragon, Kent and Erskine streets
127. Dulcibella Beath, Masonic Arms, Kent
and Erskine streets
128. James Prescott, City Inn, Kent street
129. William Murphy, Wollongong Hotel,
Kent and King streets
130. William Brinkley, St. Andrew's Tavern,
Kent and King streets
131. Hugh F. O'Donnell, Australian, Kent and Market streets
132. George John Jilks, Union Inn, Kent-st.
133. John Lonergan, Ship Inn, Kent-street
134. John Smedley, Brisbane Inn, Kent-street 135 Refused
136. Jane Woodriffe, Macquarie Inn, Kent and Bathurst streets
137. Andrew Scotland, Hunter River Inn, Sussex-street
138. William Carss, Clarence River Inn, Sussex street
139. Duncan McLennon, Ship Inn, Sussex-st. 140 Refused
141. Robert Henderson, Dove Inn, Sussex and Erskine streets
142. Thomas Stewart, Royal Oak, Sussex and Erskine-streets
143. Patrick Casey, Toll Bar Inn, Botany Road
144. James Maxwell, Saracen's, Head, Sussex and King streets
145. William Stevens, Patent Slip, Sussex and King streets
146. James Yied, Commercial Hotel, Sussex and King streets
147. Henry Linden, Woolpack, Sussex-street
148. James Clarke, Governor Bourke, Sussex-street
149. Cornelius Murray, Cheshire Cheese, Sussex-street
150. Cornelius O'Neal, Darling Harbour Inn, Sussex-street
151. Matthew Charlton, Charlton's Hotel, Market Wharf
152. George Coleson, George and Dragon, Market Wharf
153. George Spears, New Inn, Sussex-street
154. Matthew Hezlett, Labour in Vain, Sussex-street
155. Susan Leggatt, Hope and Anchor, Sussex-street
156. John Kirkman, Lancashire Arms, Sussex-street
157. Alexander Gray, Light House Hotel,Sussex-street
168. Daniel Bissland, Sir Walter Scott, Sussex-street
159. James Smail, Robert Burns, Sussex-street
160. Eliza Boyle, Builders' Arms, Sussex-street
161. Patrick Comerford, Angel and Crown, Sussex-street
162. William Harrison, Butchers' Arms, Susex-street
163. Patrick Lee, Harp of Erin, Sussex-street
164. Jane Coulson, Whitehaven Castle, Sussex-street
165. William Cole, Bee Hive, Prince and Arglye streets
166. Edwin Marlow, Neptune Inn, Prince st.
167. Thomas Buxton, Glenmore Cottage, Prince-street
168. James Casey, Rock of Cashel, Cumberland-street
169. Edward T. McDonald, Forth and Clyde, Cumberland street
170. John Hurley, Coach and Horses, Cumberland-street
170.Charles James Bullivant, Three Crowns,Cumberland-street
171. John Sims, Whalers' Arms, Gloucester-street
172. William Andrews, Ship and Mermaid, Gloucester-street
173. Richard Wild, Black Dog, Gloucester st.
174. John Bruffell, Ship Inn, Gloucester-street
175. John Rochester, Erin-go-Bragh, Cambridge street
176. Margaret Brown, Rose and Crown, Argyle-street
177. Jonathan Brown, Hero of Waterloo, Fort and Windmill streets
178. William Ford, Napoleon Inn, Windmill-street
179. James Merriman, Whaler's Arms, Miller's Point
180. John Pomroy Bond, Royal Oak, Miller's Point
181. Lawrence Kearney, Captain Cook, Miller's Point
182. Refused
183. George Clarke, Clarke's, Hotel, Circular Quay
184. William Collie, Circular Quay Hotel, Circular Quay
185. Henry Barnett, Royal Admiral, Macquarie-place
186. George Pike, Custom House Hotel, Macquarie-place
187. John Henderson, Dolphin Hotel, Bridge-street
188. Henry Webb, Captain Cook, Spring andBent streets
189. George Snell Clarke, Horse and Jockey, O'Connell and Hunter streets
190. Refused
191. John Raynor, Star Inn, Phillip and Hunter streets
192. Robert Edward Heaney, Lord Nelson Inn, Phillip and Hunter streets
193. Anthony Tuohy, Lemon Tree, Phillip-street
194. William Baxter, Sir Maurice O'Connell, Elizabeth and Hunter streets
195. Richard Driver, Three Tuns, Elizabeth and King streets
196. Durell De la Faste, Cricketers' Hotel, Elizabeth street
197. Mountford Clarkson, Spread Eagle, Elizabeth-street
198. Charles Roberts, Crown Inn, Elizabeth and Goulburn streets
199. William A. Cahill, Albion Hotel, Elizabeth-street
200. Joseph Coquelin, Cheshire Cheese, Elizabeth street
201. James Kelly, Friendship Inn, Bathurst-st.
202. Robert Maxwell, Sir William Wallace, Bathurst street
203. Sarah Wallis, Hand and Heart, Liverpool and Dixon streets
204. Timothy Alfred Cowell, Builders' Arms, Liverpool and Charles streets
205. Thomas Quigley, St. Patrick's Inn, Goulburn-street
206. Arthur Walker, Picton Arms, Campbell-street
207. Maurice Walsh, Bee Hive, Campbell-st.
208. Philip Hart, Harp, Campbell-street
209. Richard Loseby, Pack Horse, Campbell-street
210. Elizabeth Benham, Museum Hotel, Woolloomoolo
211. Michael O'Keefe, Richmond Hotel, Woolloomooloo
212. Charles Shaw, Boomarang, Woolloomooloo
212. John Walpole Ireland, Cottage of Content, Woolloomooloo-street
213. Joseph Carter, Dublin Castle, Crown-st.
214. William Ebbetts, Fitz Roy Hotel, William and Palmer streets
215. Frederick Thompson, Riley Arms, Woolloomooloo and Riley streets
216. Thomas Baker, Woolloomooloo Inn, William-street, Woolloomooloo
217. Zachariah S. Moore, Sir Maurice O'Connell, Riley-street, Woolloomooloo
218. Charles Morris, Willow Tree, Victoria-street, Woolloomooloo
219. Joseph Brady, Shamrock, Woolloomooloo and Crown streets
220. Daniel Clarke, White Conduit House, Rushcutter Bay
221. Alexander Kyle, Terrace Inn, South Head Road
222. Thomas Blake, Robin Hood, South Head Road
223. Anthony Finn, Pelican Hotel, South Head Road
224. Robert Steel, Rising Sun, South Head Road
225. James Teare, Eagle Tavern, South Head Road
226. William Osborn, Half Moon Inn, South Head Road
227. Christina McDonald, Downshire Arms, South Head Road
228. Stephen Newby, Sportsman's Arms, South Head Road
229. Jane Elizabeth Allison, Queen's Arms, South Head Road
230. Jeremiah Healey, Victoria Inn, South Head Road
231. Thomas Taylor, Happy Vale, South Head Road
232. Benjamin Haigh, Rose and Crown, Glenmore Road
233. Margaret Canavan, Greenwood Tree, South Head Road
234. Michael Newman, Odd Fellows' Arms, South Head Road
235. Isabella Gilchrist, Greenwood Tree, South Head Road
236. John Wilson, Sir William Wallace, South Head Road
237. Thomas Hopkins, Prince Albert Inn, South Head Road
238. Jane Beard, Paddington Inn, Paddington
239. Elizabeth Marshall, Waverley Hotel, Waverley
240. Thomas Newell, South Head Hotel, South Head
241. George Francis Baker, Green Isle, Bourke street, Surry Hills
242. Joseph Benjamin Oliffe, Cookatoo Inn, Bourke-street, Surry Hills
243. John Barlow, Pine Apple, Cross-street, Surry Hills
244. James Bluck, Bluck's Family Hotel, Surry Hills
245. John Robinson, Boundary Stone, Surry Hills
246. Thomas Curtis, Bristol Inn, Crown and Campbell streets
247. Emanuel Martin, Madeira Inn, Devonshire-street
248. Thomas Wheeler, Strawberry Hill Inn, Strawberry Hill
249. William Walsh, Napoleon Inn, Kensington-street
250. David Armstrong, Crown Inn, Chippendale
251. Daniel Hickey, Old Rock of Cashel, Chippendale.
252. William Ryan, Railroad Inn, Chippendale
253. John Doyle, Stirling Castle, Chippendale
254. John Maillon, Chippendale Hotel, Chippendale
255. Michael Williamson, Belfast Wine Vaults, Botany Road
255. Patrick Casey, Toll Bar Inn, Botany Road
256. James Chamlis, Redfern Inn, Redfern
257. Daniel Toole, General Gough, Botany Road
258 Refused ; leave given to make application on Monday next for re-hearing.
259. Honora Simes, Pilot Inn, Parramatta and Harris streets
260. William Sullivan, Erin's Green Isle, Parramatta street
261. Thomas Bass, Britannia Inn, Parramatta-street
262. William R. Green, Wellington Inn, Parramatta-street
263. John C. Webb, Red Bull, Parramatta-st.
264. Thomas Clune, Clare Castle, Parramatta-street
265. Joseph Holder, Albert Inn, Parramatta-street

On page 3

266. James Harris, Golden Anchor, Parramatta-street
267. George Williams, Australian Inn, Parra-matta-street
268. Margaret Onan, Victoria Inn, Parramatta-street
269. Phil Macdermott, Sportsman, Parramatta-street
270. Peter Brenan, Coopers' Arms, Pyrmont
271. Thomas Burdon, Edinburgh Castle, Pyrmont
272. John Clissold, Foresters' Arms, Glebe
273. Edward Cadden, Glebe Tavern, Glebe
274. James Simpson, Lady of the Lake, Glebe
275. Michael Doyle, Captain Cook, Botany
276. William Beaumont, Sir Joseph Banks, Botany
277. Andrew Guy, Sportsman's Arms, Newtown
278. Thomas Gettens, Robin Hood, Newtown
279. James W. Corbett, Antrim Arms, Newtown
280. Joseph Blackstone, White Horse Inn, Newtown
281. Robert Bates, St. John's Tavern, Newtown
282. George Rose, Pulteney Hotel, Cook's River
283. Michael Gannon, Union Inn, Cook's River
284. William Trinby, Bold Forester, Cook's River
285. Evan Evans, Man of Kent, Cook's River
286. John File, Canterbury Arms, Canterbury
287. Refused 288 Refused
289. William James Stack, Sugar Loaf Inn, Canterbury
290. Thomas Collins, Omnibus Inn, Parramatta Road
291. Richard Williams, Sir Richard Bourke, Parramatta Road
292. William Walker, Union Inn, Camperdown
293. Thomas Perren, Victoria Inn, Camperdown
294. William O'Brien, Royal Oak, Camperdown
295. John Lucas, Patriot, Camperdown 296 Refused
297. George Shirbin, Red Lion, Parramatta Road
298. Not entertained ; applicant being an uncertificated insolvent
299. Thomas Weedon, Cherry Gardens, Parramatta Road
300. Charles Hearne, Baldfaced Stag, Parramatta Road
301. Robert Oliver, Woolpack Inn, Parramatta Road
302. John Jones, Wheelwrights' Arms, Parramatta Road
303. William Henson, Norwood Inn, Parra-matta Road
304. James Clifton, Union Inn, Parramatta Road
305. Jane Hill, Cheshire Cheese, Parramatta Road
306. Lawrence Ryan, Wheat Sheaf, Liverpool Road
307. Charles Whitney, Cottage of Content, Liverpool Road
308. George Davis, Bark Huts, Liverpool Road
309. Mary Aiton, Unity Hall, Balmain
310. Thomas Rostrow, Shipwrights' Arms, Balmain
311. James Barr, Balmain Hotel, Balmain
312. William Carter, Marquis of Waterford, Balmain
313. William Roberts, Burnbank Hotel, Bal-main
314. Thomas Redgrave, Fig Tree Cottage, North Shore
315. Susannah Lavender, Macquarie Inn, North Shore
316. William Dind, Lily of St Leonard's, North Shore
317. Isabella Beirne, Union Inn, North Shore
318. Daniel Gallagher, Traveller's Home, Lane Cove
Note.An application was made by Samuel Taylor, of Canterbury, that a license might be granted to a house occupied by him, to be called the Rising Sun, but having been lodged with the Chief Constable a day too late it was not published with the other applications. It is believed that application will be made for the welfare of the magistrates that it is one of those special applications which the Governor may grant with advantage to the public.

Our First Farmer - Colony of New South Wales

The claim on the headstone of James Ruse 1760-1837 that he sowed the first grain in the Colony is not accurate. Ruse certainly was the first person to cultivate the ground for his own benefit, but he was not our first farmer. That distinction belongs to Henry Edward Dodd, Governor Phillip's servant, who was instructed by him to cultivate an area of ground near Sydney Harbour on part of the present Botanical Gardens, called Farm Cove to the present day. That was during 1788.
The Farm Cove attempt failing, Phillip turned his attention to Rose Hill, afterwards called Parramatta, and Dodd was instructed to commence operations west of the present town. This area became known as the Government Farms, and was situated between Westmead and Wentworthville. Here was gathered the first harvest in the colony during December, 1780, It consisted of two hundred bushels of wheat, sixty bushels of barley, and a small quantity of flax corn and oats. This was a few weeks after Ruse entered into possession of his grant and twelve months before he reaped his first harvest.
This, of course, does not detract from the credit due to Ruse as the first to cultivate the ground on his own behalf, but it is not an historical fact to assort that he sowed the first grain.
Henry Edward Dodd died in 1791, and is buried in St. John's Cemetery, Parramatta, his grave being marked by a large flat stone inscribed with his name and the year of his death.
In "The History of New South Wales" we read, "The first farm in the colony was at Farm Cove, whence its name." And there nine acres were laid in corn soon after the settlement was formed. But nine acres were not enough, and Phillip had to explore the country for bettor soil. The only available land he found, was at a place which he had named Rose Hill, not knowing at the time that the native name was Parramatta. Here in November, 1788, he commenced operations on a large scale, In a foot note to page 142 we read that Phillip, "had luckily brought out with him. from England a man servant who, joined to much agricultural knowledge a perfect idea of the labour to be required from and that might be performed by the convicts. This man was said to be the only free person in the colony who had any knowledges of farming."
Thirty years ago I often found military buttons, old coins, portions of old farming tools, and, on one occasion, a pair of leg irons in the paddocks just west of Hawkesbury Road, Westmead, when part of this area was cultivated by the late Richard Houison (d:1922). Subsequently the timber on the portion near the railway line was cut down by my old friend, the late William Garner.
In the early records reference is made to the sufferings of the convicts working at Toongabbie. Large numbers died every week from overwork, exposure, and insufficient food, I remember many years ago a round flat stone being found close to the railway at Wentworthville, which had been the floor of one of the sentry boxes, and there is a similar stone near tho railway close to the bridge in Parramatta Park, east of Westmead.

Source:
William Freame
Nepean Times
Saturday 21 January 1933
Page 5
Transcription, janilye 2012

ST. PETER'S OLD CEMETERY Richmond NSW.

St. Peter's Churchyard, Richmond is one of the most historical in the State of New South Wales. ln it are buried many old pioneers of the Nepean district. It was consecrated in 1814, but the earliest burials date from 1809. Several buried there reached very great ages. There were six who lived 90 to 100 years, and 47 who lived from 80 to 90 years. William Magick [sic] who died June 6, 1860, was 108 years when he passed away. The oldest date seen is that of George Rouse, who died on September 9, 1809; his father, Richard Rouse, arrived in the colony in 1801 by the ship 'Nile,' the ship that brought Margaret Catchpole to these shores. One of the oldest vaults bears the names of Thomas Hobby, Esq., formerly of the 102nd Regiment, who died January 8, 1833, aged 57; and Ann Elizabeth, his wife, died June 6, 1839, aged 72 years.
An old stone bears the name of Joseph Hobson, killed by the blacks 1816; Thomas Spencer, who was a marine in the first fleet, died 1821; Thomas 'Jonds,' arrived in 1792, died December 12, 1817.
The most curious epitaph is that of John Sutherland, died 1830. It reads:"Afflictions long time I bore; Physicians was in vain; Till God did please to give me ease, and free me from my pane."
William Harrington, of the 73rd Regiment, arrived 1810, and died !
In the same ground are the remains of two men who were hanged for stealing a bullock, The register in forms us that, the wife of one died of grief a few days after.
The epitaph of John and Honor Bowman concludes: "Without a trouble or a fear, they mingled with the dead." John Bowman, died 1813.
There are two headstones, both broken and fallen, that hold history, Ellen Innes, died August 2, 1853, aged 23 years, and Jacob Innes, died 1849 aged 69, lying between them there is another, the inscription downwards.
The Cox vault is in need of repair. It bears the names of William Cox, of "Hobartville," died 20/1/1850, aged 60; Sloper Cox, died 24/9/1877, aged 53; Francis, wife of Henry Cox, died 15/8/1851; and Louisa Stafford, wife of Charles C. Cox, died 6/7/1850.
Two old names are those of Catherine Hand, died 4/2/1825, aged 48 and Patrick Hand, died 15/12/1827, aged 50.
One notices the many generations of the same families buried in this churchyard, notably the Cornwells Farlows, Singles, Draytons, Towns, Travis, and the Marlins; John Single, born 1791, died 28/1/1858, and Sarah, his wife, born 1801, died 27/9/1868; John Towns, died 27/10/1846, aged 77; Mary Farlow, died 22/10/1842, aged 36; William Farlow, died 6/12/1864, aged 55; Ellen Maria, his widow, died 27/5/1900; Phillip Marlin, died 29/ 9/1859); Abraham Cornwell, died 18/7/1884, aged 82; Susannah, his relict, born Richmond 10/6/1807, died Bathurst 13/6/1888; William Drayton, died 20/11 /1925, aged 78; Emily Drayton, died 2/2/1930; William Drayton, died 30/1/1855, aged 46; Henry Drayton, died 1/4/1874, aged 57.
The Dights were an old family. Mary Dight, born 1804, died 1819; Sarah Dight, born 1800, died 17/2/1832; John Dight, born 1772, died 2/7/1837; George Dight, born 1810, died' 26/2/1851 and Hannah Dight, born 1781, died 27/5/1862
Several of the inscriptions are so faded as to make them wholly or partly indecipherable, and rather than perpetuate an error I will omit names and dates I have not been able to read. We will continue With the names of John Barwick, died 7/5/1858, aged 65; and Charlotte, his wife, died 14/7/1893, aged 93 years; George Barwick, died 8/12/1864, aged 16; Mary Leonard, died 1849, aged 29; William Aull, died 1830, aged 26; Thomas Cross, died 10/3/1843, aged 66; and Martha, his wife died 3/9/1839, aged 42; George Howell, died 22/2/1839, aged 79; Hannah Howell, died 2/10/1851, aged 81; Peter Howell, died 16/4/1861, aged 49; Elizabeth Ann Howell, died 3/8/1885, aged' 78; Thomas Griffiths, died 1826, aged 29; Thomas Griffiths, died 1910, aged 70 ; Albert Uriah Hibbert, accidentally killed on 26/4/1897, aged 27; Frederick J. Griffiths, died from a gunshot wound on 1897, aged 22; and Thomas, Gordon Griffiths, accidentally killed at Clarendon Camp on 26/4/1905; aged 4 year's. What a sequence of tragedies!
Names on other tombstones include: Sarah Sharpe, died 3/12/1836, aged 55; William sharpe, died 17/11/1897, aged 88; Mary Mason, died 1835; William Mason, died 27/3/1839; Thomas teaton, died 2/9/1840; aged 45; Francis Willis, died 3/6/1840, aged 33; Job Moore, died 17/11/1840; Sarah Begley; died 29/4/1839, aged 50; Mary Richardson, died 22/11/1839, aged 35; Thomas Huxley, died 1834, aged 84; Elizabeth Bridger, died 4/9/ 1840, aged 42; William Bridger, died 11/12/1859, aged 92; Mary Hives, died , 25/6/1837, aged. 30; Joseph Young, died 1842, aged 29 ; Catherine Bishop, died 24/8/1835, aged 62; Elias Bishop; died 26/9/1835, aged 65; John Henderson, died 11/10/1846, aged 81; John Fawcett, died 27/9/1847, aged 58; Stephen Field, died 26/7/1883; Jacob Innes, died 1849, aged 69; Ellen Innes, died 2/8/1853, aged 23 the two Innes headstones have fallen and broken William Faithful, died 16/4/1847, aged 73; and Susanna; his wife, died 5/9/1820, aged 46; and Maria, his widow, died 29/5/1859,' aged 65. (Note. It will be seen that William Faithful, married 'twice, his second wife surviving. him. W.F.,).
William Bowman, born 1799, died- 11/12/1874; and Elizabeth, his wife, born 1798, died 21/11/1885 ; Laban White, died 5/9/1875, aged 80 years; and Jane, his wife, died 12/3/1846, aged 68 years; Jane Guest, born 1818, died 20/3/1865; George Guest, born. 1811, died 9/2/1893; Matilda Guest, died 26/1/1853, aged 18 months; Grace, the wife of Robert Lambert, late of 'Holwood,' King's Plains, Bathurst, died 16/2/1849, aged 65 years; Edward Merrick, died 1839, aged 76 years; James Watson, died 20/1/1853, aged 43; John Greenhalch, died 1832; Margaret Patton, died 8/5/1831, aged 27 years; Elijah Lane died 1826; Catherine Hand, died 4/2/1825; aged 48 years,' and Patrick Hand, died 15/12/ 1827. (Note. The name Greenhalch is usually spelt 'Greenhalgh,' but I have spelt it as I found it on the stone. Probably the stone cutter erred. W.F.)
We now notice a few more notable names, such as John Town, senr. died 27/10/1846, aged 77; Mary Town, died 26/5/1852, aged 80; William Town, died 5/5/1868, aged 51; Mary Town, died 4/4/1886, aged 67; Andrew Town, born. 1840, died 10/2/1890; also two children and John Thomas Town, son of John and Julia Town born 1863, died 7/11/1929; Thomas Hobby, Esq., formerly of the 102nd Regiment, died 8/1/1833, aged 57; and Ann Elizabeth Hobby, died 30/6/1839, aged 72 years; William Magick, died 16/6/1860, aged 108 years; and Elizabeth, his wife, died 8/8/1869, aged 80; Isaac Cribb, died 1841 [sic]; James Cribb, died 13/7/1841; Samuel Thorley, died 9/8/1821, aged, 53; and Agnes, his wife, died 18/4/1821, aged 47. George Rouse, died 23/9/1809, aged 5 years; Elizabeth Rouse, died 1/8/1811, aged 19 days; Elizabeth Rouse, their mother, died 28/12/1849, aged 76; and Richard Rouse, the head of the family, who, having arrived in this colony in the ship 'Nile' in 1801, departed this life 18/5/1852, aged 78; also John Richard Rouse, died 10/2/1873, aged 72; George Rouse, born 27/7/1816, died 29/7/ 1888; and Elizabeth, his wife, died 1/3/1863, aged 42; also 2 children. Maria Gow, died 26/9/1865, aged 59; William P. T. Gow, died 2/2/1872, aged 77; Mary Ann Powell, died 30/11/1870, aged 30; Henry Powell, died 14/2/1920, aged 84; Ann Powell, died 1921, aged 75; Wm. Ritchie, died 1856. aged 42; Geo. Sutherland, died 4/6/1850, aged 49; Mary, wife of Robert Martin, died 3/3/ 1841, aged 78; Robert Martin, senr., died 15/6/1846, aged 79; Mart Martin, junr., died 7/10/1855, aged 60; Robert Martin, junr., born 1797, died 11/9/1872; Wm. Martin, junr. born 1832, died 4/5/1871; Henry Newcomen, died 10/10/1884, aged 61; and Emily Jane, his wife, died 6/4/1871; Andrew Wellington Hough, born 1864, died 20/12/1870; Mary Ann, wife of George Hough, died 16/6/1875, aged 55; George Hough, died 25/12/1878, aged 64; and Mary Ann Hough, died 5/2/1911, aged 71; Mary Dight, born 1804, died 26/12/1819; Sarah Dight, born 1800, died 17/2/1832; John. Dight, born 1772, died 2/7/1837; George Dight born 1810, died 26/2/1851; Hannah Dight, born 1781, died 27/5/1862; Sophia Thurston, died 23/6/1825, aged 2 years and 7 months; Mary Ann Crosbie, died 1877, aged 73. John Gordon Town, died 9/4/1883, aged 70 and Elizabeth, his wife, died 23/8/l882, aged 71 years; Wm. Gordon, 3rd son of the above, died 25/12/1858, aged 20; Frederick M., son of G. M. and E. Pitt, died 16/6/1903, aged 36; Elizabeth, wife of George Matcham Pitt, died 18/10/1908, aged 7'5; George Mat chem Pitt, died 19/3/1912, aged 74; Clarence M. Pitt, died 30/7/1920, aged 51. One of the oldest vaults bears the names of Sloper Cox, died 24/9/1877, aged 53; Frances Cox, wife of Henry Cox, died 15/8/1851; Louisa Stafford Cox, died 6/7/1856; William Cox, Esq., of 'Hobartville,' died 20/1/1850, aged 60; also two infant children. Part of the inscriptions on this vault are freeting away. On one of the largest vaults we read the names of Benjamin Richards, born 1818, died 5/3/1898; and Elizabeth, his wife, born 1821, died 30/7/1896; and Mary Ann, their eldest daughter, died 11/11/1867; Elizabeth, wife of Theodore Charles Badgery, died 27/i8/1870; Lucetta, 4th daughter, born 1857, died 18/1/1874; Wallace, 5th son, born 1865, died 11/10/1880; William James, 2nd son, born 1846, died 2/8/1885.
Many well-known names are seen on, another vault, viz., Mary Farlow, died 22/10/1842, aged 36; William Farlow; died 6/12/1864, aged 55; Ellen Maria, his widow, died 27/5/1900, aged 75; Emily, wife of Robert W. Farlow, died 7/11/1900, aged 56; Robert W. Farlow, died 16/6/1913, aged 83 years; and also several of recent dates.
The Skuthorpe vault is difficult to read. On it we see the name of Mary Ann Skuthorpe, died 20/2/1854, aged 32; and John Long, died 2/1/1856, aged 26.
The Onus vault bears several names from which we copy: Joseph Onus, died 22/6/1835, aged 54; Thomas Onus, died 28/3/1855, aged 35; William Onus, died 8/5/1855, aged, 33. On another stone are Joseph Onus, died 22/4/1891. He was born in 1840; also Emma, wife of Joseph Onus, died 30/11/1865. Other well known names seen are John Single, born 1791, died 28/l/1858; and Sarah, his wife, born 1801, died 27/9/1868; Sarah Wilmot, their daughter, died 1871; Alfred, Single, died 5/11/1889, aged 48; Henry Single, died 5/7/1896, aged 66. Abraham Cornwell, died 18/7/1884, aged 82; and Susannah, his wife, born at Richmond 10/6/1807, died at Bathurst 1888; John Cornwell, died 26/8/1914, aged 82; also Ann Cornwell, died 20/2/1915, aged 81 years. Louis Jockel, 10 years Government Medical Officer at Richmond, died 20/5/1888, aged 37; and Martha, his wife, died 13/7/1922, and buried at Manly; William Drayton, died 30/1/1855, aged 46; and Harriet Province, his widow, died 1886 aged 68; Mary Ellen Drayton, born 1853, died 23/5/1858; Henry Drayton, died 1/4/1874, aged 57; Jane Drayton, died 8/10/1876; William Paris, died 18/3/1840, aged 52; Phillip Marlin, died 29/9/1859; James Burril; died 6/10/1858, aged 34; James Douglas, died 24/11/1858, aged 41; Mary Ann Norris, died 8/2/1856, aged 49; Mary'Biddle, died 7/3/1855, aged 32; James Andrew Biddle, died 11/3/ 1879, aged 22.
We again come across a few old dates, viz., Thomas Wheeler, died 15/2/1820; Thomas Mason, died 27/11/1827, aged 46; Mary Ann, the wife of Mr. Charles Palmer, died 1824; Ephriam Palmer, died 1827; Athelia Stack, died 1839; Charles Palmer, died 14/4/1846;. and Mary Ann Stack, died 26/4/1829, aged 14 months.
The Williams vault bears many names. We mention Robert Williams, born 1794, died, 28/11/1839; Mary Ann Williams, born 1850, died 14/10/1852; Charlotte Malony, born 1795, died 1862; Jane Williams, born 1826,. died 18/12/1873; Thomas Williams, born 1824, died 26/7/1888;. John Eather Williams, died 25/1/1917, aged 83; Ann Eather Williams, died 1/8/1913, aged 83.
The most imposing monument in the cemetery is the Hordern memorial inscribed with the names of Edward Hordern, senr. died 14/8/1883, aged 45; and Christina, his wife, died. 24/4/1904, aged 59; and Cecil, son of Edward Hordern, senr.; died 14/9/1931, aged 63 years.

Since commencing , these articles I have seen the report of the consecration of St. Peter's. As a record it may be not only interesting, but also useful: In the Sydney Herald' of Monday, July 19, 1841, there is a brief account of the opening and the consecration of the church by the Lord Bishop of Australia on the previous Thursday, when all the respectable families of the town and neighborhood were present. In the 'Herald' of July 22, 1841, there is a fuller report of the event. Rev. T. Hassal acted as chancellor, Rev. H. T., Stiles read the prayers, and Bishop Broughton, after the consecration, preached, his text being Matt. 16 vlS. Revs. R. Allwood, T. Makinson, W. B. Clarke, E. S. Pryce, C. Kemp, and J. Vincent were also present in the chancel. After the service the Bishop, clergy, police magistrate, etc., were entertained, at 'Hobartville' by Mr. and Mrs. W. Cox.


Sources:
Expressly written By WILLIAM FREAME for the
Windsor and Richmond Gazette in 1933
Saturday 25 February 1933
Page 3
Friday 10 March 1933
Page 8
Transcription, janilye 2014

William Freame, b:27 November 1867 in Geelong Victoria and died at Randwick in New South Wales on the 19 September 1933, was a familiar figure, in every historic cemetery in New South Wales and Victoria, and an authority on Australian genealogy. Mr.Freame, spent many years copying and preserving the inscriptions on headstones at St. John's, Ebenezer, Camden, Windsor and other cemeteries, and it was he who rediscovered the headstones of Thomas Allen, Sydney's first miller, and a number of other pioneers. He wrote a number of historical books, including "Sweet St. Marys." Mr. Freame represented the 'Evening News' in the Parramatta district for many years, and contributed to the Nepean Times. He was an alderman of Holroyd for more than 20 years and also a life member of the Parramatta District Hospital, a member of the Black Preceptory, of the L.O.L. and of Masonic Lodge, worthville. He was a founder of the Parramatta and Windsor, Historical Societies.

Recollections of Richmond, New South Wales, Chronicled in 1910

[These are the memories Alfred Smith of the Hawkesbury in New South Wales.
Alfred was born in Hobartville, New South Wales on the 13 July 1831 to John Smith 1798-1833 a convict who drowned in Liverpool in 1833 and Adelaide Eliza De La Thoreza 1808-1877 she had been born in Madrid. After John Smith died, at 15 months of age, Alfred was adopted by George JAMES 1768-1862 and his wife Ann Kelly 1789-1864. They had only one girl, Eliza JAMES 1824-1862 ( the mother of Ann ONUS 1841-1927) Alfred died 0n 24 December 1917. On the 11 October 1854 at St.Matthew's Catholic Church, Windsor, Alfred married Ann Amelia KINSELA 1838-1917 the daughter of Martin KINSELA 1793-1860 and Ellen, nee HENDLING 1794-1862. Alfred had many jobs throughout his lifetime, including Town Stockman, running The Punt across the river and a drover, droving throughout New South Wales and as far down as Victoria.]
Many of the people mentioned are my ancestors and his recollections have been an invaluable aid not just to my own family research but many other family trees seeded in the Hawkesbury.janilye

Right in the corner of the vacant allotment at the corner of Paget and March streets, there stood a weatherboard house, which had a verandah in front. At the side of the house was a very large cedar tree. When I first remember the place the old man Douglas of all lived there. He would be great-grandfather to the present William Douglas, who we all know today as a good bricklayer in Richmond. In those days we always knew the corner as Douglas' corner, and the big tree at the side of the house as Douglas's cedar tree. I still have a vivid recollection of old Mr. Douglas. He used to wear his hair very long, brush it round behind his ears, and it would hang well on to his shoulders. He had two horses and carts, and hired them out to people who wanted to draw wood. He charged five shillings per day for each horse and cart. He had one very funny saying, which he would use on special occasions. It was this "Bad luck to all informers! You're a liar ! Whether or no too bad. cabbage is no good without pork." He bad two sons, wheelwrights, Joseph and Isaac, and about where Ernest Marlin is living at present there was a skillion, and they had a big workshop there. In this same skillion Ellen Cavanah lived for some time. I think old Saunders, the brickmaker,lived there also. Alderman T. Biddle's father was the agent. Where Mr Sid Paull's residence stands there was a blacksmith's shop kept by Dan Ward. He was a single man and lived with his mother, who we always knew as Granny Ward. I remember three daughters. Sarah married a man named Brett. Jane married a man named Ben Gawthorn, and went to Mudgee to live. I think there are some of the descendants about there now. Phyllis married a chemist named Lester, in Mudgee. Old Granny Ward had a white cockatoo, which could say almost anything, He would call her whenever she was wanted in her little shop. I understood he was 35 years old when Mrs Ward died, and I heard her daughter, Mrs Lester, took him to Mudgee. Outside her family she had a boarder named Robinson, who was a tailor. The old lady was a most industrious woman, and had a big mangle, with which she did a large trade.
Then there was vacant land till we came to where Mr W. Drayton is residing. Here was an old house, used as a school, which was kept by Mr Hogsflesh. Mrs Harrington, a widow, lived there after Mr Charles Hogsflesh kept the school. I think Mr Harrington was killed by the blacks somewhere up Kurrajong. Old Mrs Harrington was a chatty old woman. She often came round to Mr James for advice, as he was a constable. If I were about when she came she would say to me 'Go out ! get out of this!' and away I would have to go. Later she becme Mr. Preystnell, but the union did not turn out a happy one. They did not live long together, and Preystnell told me the reason.
In the course of time the property came into the hands of the Draytons, and is now owned by my old friend Mr W. Drayton. Some years ago he built an up to date cottage on the land, which has improved it so much that only us old hands can have an idea of what it was like in my boyhood days. Next door to this stood the old Horse and Jockey Hotel that was pulled down when the Imperial was built on the corner. The first person I remember living there was Thomas Silk, Harry's father, who kept it as an hotel. His sign was the Lion and the Unicorn. We lads had a song among ourselves which went :
The Lion and the Unicorn Are fighting for the crown,
The Lion beat the Unicorn All around the town.
The first circus I ever saw was in the paddock at the back when Tom Silk kept the pub. A man named Croft was the proprietor, and I never forgot Quinn the tight rope walker. We thought it was something wonderful to see a man walking backwards and forwards on a tight rope. Old Mr.Joseph Onus lived there for a while. Here he had 'Jerry Sneak,' the racehorse, half brother to the famous 'Jorrocks' The first gold cup run for in the colony was won by 'Sneak' at Homebush. When old Mr Crisford and family first came to Richmond it was in this place they commenced housekeeping. Caleb Crisford was only talking to me about it the second last time he was in Richmond. Then a tall man, whose name I don't remember, kept a school there. He had a school also down on the 'Bottoms,' by 'Smashem' Smith's. One night as he was going to Windsor two fellows nearly killed him. The Rev. Father Terry, the Roman Catholic priest, held services upstairs in the big room. Old Mr Brooks also kept a school here, and no doubt some of his pupils are alive to-day in the district. At the time Mr. James Bates took it over to start pub keeping, the building was in a state of great disrepair, and it cost him a large sum of money to put it in thorough order. He was living there at the time of the '67 flood, and I heard it was about half an inch over the counter, but I was up the country at the time and only heard this.
Among others who kept the old place as an hotel will be remembered 'Black' Johnny Gough, ]im Ryan (Toby's son), Tom Hough, George Cobcroft, Tom Young, Campion, Ted Morgan and, after his death, his widow. On the piece of land on which the Imperial Hotel is built was a weatherboard place in which Dan Neil lived. Right on the corner he had a blacksmith's shop. I have been given to understand he was a Government man to old Mr Cox, of Clarendon, and did his blacksmithing. But to his credit, with good conduct and a good record he became a free man, and started black smithing on his own account on this corner.
On this same corner Tom Masters, of Windsor, kept his first little shop. He had been droving, but his health began to give way, and he decided to start in business. On the opposite side of the street where Joseph Ashton keeps his cases there was a little slab place with no verandah. 'Bill' Wilmott a shoemaker, lived in it. While living there he died suddenly. Mrs Morgan, who they called 'Betty,' a very stout woman, was his housekeeper. Next door, only on the same block of land, there stood one room in which lived an old bachelor known as 'Bob the Stockman.' For a long time he made ti-tree brooms, and sold them for sixpence each. He would go out to the Black Swamp and get the good class of ti-tree, cut it, and let it wilt for a certain time before making it into brooms. You would see him coming home with a large bundle of it on each shoulder. Where Mr. S. Orchard's own house stands, and where he kept a store for many years, stood a skillion with no verandah and containing three or four rooms. Here Mrs. Davis, mother of Mrs S. Orchard, lived for some time. Later on Mrs. Davis married Matthew Webb, a carpenter. It was Mr Webb who had the front put on and started storekeeping. Later on he went to St Mary's, and kept a tannery. He died over there. Tom Masters kept a general store there also. Coming down nearer the present day we knew it as a butcher's shop kept by 'Ike' Cornwell. Mr. Orchard conducted a successful business there and a general store for a long time.
What we now call the park, wasn't such a beauty spot when I first knew it, and was called the Market Square. In wet weather water would lie in a few places about the centre. It wasn't quite as level as now. There were a few trees standing, a few logs on the ground, and plenty of stumps. On the 5th of November, Guy Fawkes day, they would build a platform some five or six feet high about where the pavilion now stands, and make a effigy of a man. They had the effigy on show at day time, and large heaps of wood piled up about a a rod away. When night came they set fire to the man and heaps of wood, and great was the rejoicing.
Where the School of Arts and public school stands was the pound paddock. About where Constable Ross has his garden was the pound. The first poundkeeper I remember was old 'Dicky' Lounds.
Returning to the corner where Mr. S. Orchard keeps his present "Railway Stores" I remember there stood a skillion with a small verandah. In this humble, dwelling Charles Chamberlain, the fencer and splitter, lived. On the spot where Mr Orchard's store stands there were several lots of bricks made by 'Tim ' the brickmaker. This was the only name I knew him by. Where Mr. F. Gow's places are there stood a weatherboard skillion of four rooms and no verandah, which was occupied by Mr Tafe. He used to grow tobacco, and had two sons, Joe and Dick. After that there stood a brick skillion, where Mr Wade lived. Mr Wade was a gardener to Mr William Bowman. In his spare moments, and with the help of his wife, he used to raise a lot of good vegetables, his wife used to sell them. He also grew tobacco. He had two daughters, Jane, and Harriet. but only one son, I think. He had a tobacco press made out of logs and a long lever to press his tobacco leaf. A man named Province 'Ratty,' as he was always called lived with him for a long time and helped him with the tobacco.
A brick house stands on the allotment where Mr Guest's saleyards are. It is an old place. I don't remember it getting built, but I don't think it had been up many years when I first knew it. Here old Mr Ducker (Roland's father) kept a shop when they first came to Richmond. Old Mr Ducker was an industrious man and I recollect him driving his team up and down for goods. Mr B. Richards had a butcher's shop in the verandah portion on the end towards Mr. F. Gow's property, and sold, mutton only. This was the last place he lived in in Richmond till he built the beautiful mansion 'Kamilaroi.' From here he went to live at the bridge, where he kept public house. Mr Joseph Single lived there also.
I have heard old Mr Martin, who married Miss Henderson (Granny Field) gave it to his granddaughter, who married Charley Price. Charley lived here a good while. Next door, where Miss Fergusson is living, must be a very old place, as it had an old look when I first recollect it. Mr King occupied the whole premises late years it has been made into two dwellings. Old Mr King was a nail maker, and consequently was always known as 'King the nailer.' He used to live in one end and have his shop in the other. After Mr King left it, Joe Poole lived there. He ran a one horse coach to Windsor. Nixon, the tailor, lived there also.
Then there was a vacant allotment next in my earliest days. Later on, but standing on this piece of ground is the old two-storey place which has been in the possession of the Price family for many years. The brick work was done by Caleb Crisford and his father. Grand father Price died there, as also did Rebecca, his daughter. It was from this place that Mrs Archie Kennedy buried a son, Donald, and a daughter, Mary, in a very short space of time. Mrs Parkinson, who afterwards went to England, kept a school there.
Next door we have the old home of the Price family which I don't remember getting built. Old Mr. William Price of all (great grandfather of the two young Prices now living in Richmond), kept the second post office in Richmond in the old place. At the back was the tan-yard. He also carried on undertaking, &c.
Again there was vacant land, but afterwards there was a black-smith's shop erected, and this, combined with monumental work, made it a scene of activity.
I don't remember the house at the corner, owned by William Sly, getting built. The first I recollect living there was 'Joe the wheeler,' a wheelwright by trade. Joe engaged with Mr William Bowman to go to Tunnabutta but he never turned up. He arranged to go by Bell's Line, and some considerable time afterwards the remains of a man were found at the Bald Hill, seven miles the other side of Mount Tomah. As he was never heard of after leaving Richmond it was always thought to be his body.
Dr. Rowan lived there also. Miss Hawsey a miss, about 60 years of age kept house for him, and did dressmaking besides.
Where Mr Steve Dunston is living plays its part in Richmond's history.The first man I remember living there was James Griffiths. Then old Alexander Gough (father of the 'Johnny' who kept the Royal Hotel) lived there. He was a cooper by trade, and used to make the old fashioned churns, &c, and one of his make I worked many a time when making butter at old Mr James'.
On the same block of ground as John Sly has his house built, only about forty for fifty yards back from March-street, was an old slab place, I think, with a tremendous large vine in front of it. Here lived old Mr and Mrs William Magick. And here it was Mr Magick died at the reputed age of 108 years. I
remember the old man well. He had two bullocks, and with these he ploughed the back paddock of nearly an acre for old Mr George James where he lived. It was through ploughing the paddock I came to know him first. Further down there stood an old weatherboard place. I do not remember its erection. It contained four rooms and had a verandah. Robert Reeves 'Bob Fatty,' as he was generally called who owned this block from March-street to Lennox-street, lived in the house and kept a little shop. He sold pipes, tobacco, starch and blue, He died in this place and I saw him when he was dead. Mr. William Sharpe young Bill as we knew him then married the widow, and I think the old lady died there. At any rate some time after her death, I remember Sharpe marrying old Mrs Onus, mother of the old Joseph Onus, who did a great deal towards the making and advancement of Richmond. The two-storey place next door to where I have been speaking of I remember getting built. Burgess and Shelton kept a store there for a while Burgess married a Miss Dargin, of Windsor, I understood. Thomas Bell, after leaving 'Belmont' came there to live. I sold him many 'possum skins while he lived there. I remember well old Mr Bowen (father of Mr G. B. Bowen, of 'Bowen Mount') living in the two storey house for about two years, It was my work to take them two quarts of milk every morning. They dealt with old Mr George James for butter as well, but he always delivered this himself. Mr G. B. Bowen never forgets it, and always likes to have a chat with me about it. He reckons he was about four years old then. The old house owned by William Sly on the corner will be dealt with when we speak of Bosworth-street, as it faces into that street Where the late Doctor Cameron's grand mansion stands was vacant ground. Next to this vacant block I speak of was a skillion with no verandah, at that time, which belonged to old Mr. Sam Payne, He was grandfather, of the present Mrs. Tomkinson who lives in Windsor street. The first man I remember living there was Thomas Death, a butcher. He was a single man, and was found dead on the floor of his bedroom. They held an inquest, and found the cause to be eating cucumbers. After this 'Long Harry,' the bricklayer, lived there and died there also. I was one who helped to carry him to the cemetery. From there to Bosworth-street was vacant land.
Going down March-street, from the corner of Bosworth-street, toward Mr Charles Guest's there was a skillion standing just past the corner. The front portion has been put on since I first knew it. The first person I have any recollections of living there was John Masters, father of Tom Masters in Windsor. He was a painter and decorator by trade, and a splendid tradesman. He was an artist also, and could paint animals or any other pictures.
Weller , I think, who was a publican of Windsor in the early days, had a sign done by him. It represented a blackfellow and a large lump of gold in his hand.
Sam Nixon, the tailor, lived there also. Nixon's wife was run over by some horsemen while coming home after dark, The accident happened at Seymour's corner (now the 'Black Horse') only in Bosworth-street. In those days they hadn't a Constable Ross to regulate the traffic, and as they were galloping round the corner run over Mrs Nixon.
It was in this house that Bill Johnson was living at the time he got his leg broken in front of my residence, and it was here he had it taken off. Tom Johnson (father of Arthur and Tom) told me that when the doctor was taking off the leg it was like as if they were sawing a baton. He stood the operation without chloroform, and had, I believe, a handkerchief rolled up in his mouth to bite to stand the pain.
[I informed my narrator that my grand father, William Heath, who had been an old soldier, held the leg while the doctor amputated it, and carried it for the doctor who preserved it. Also that Dan Carter saw the handkerchief after, the operation was over, and it was bitten to pieces. R.F.]
Where Mr C. S. Guest is living there was a weatherboard house of' about four rooms with a verandah. In it lived a man by the name of Simpson, who was a currier by trade. I went to school with two of his sons Ebenezer and William. Our schoolmaster was good old Mr Charles Hogsflesh.

WINDSOR STREET.
In the house which is now the back of the Commercial Hotel, and which was occupied by Miss Caroline Price for many years, Mr Alfred Cox lived for some time. He was the son of the original Cox, who died at ' Fairfield,' after leaving Clarendon. This same Mr Cox was grandfather to Sloper. I used to take milk to Mr Alfred Cox, and he was the first person I have any knowledge of living there. It was the post office also for some time
previous to the new office being built. Mr White, who married a step-daughter of Mr William Reid, and a sister to the present Mr. Joseph Onus, of Richmond, was postmaster at the time. In years after Mr George Cobcroft bought the property and built the hotel on to the front of it. Next door Mrs Parkinson, as I have stated, kept her school, and I was her milk boy also. I remember the ser- vant girl she had living with her, whose name was Rebecca Rose. She came from Wilberforce way. At another period it was a school again, and kept by Mr Brown. Again it was a school, and kept by a Mr Gaisley, but only for a short time. I remember the Gaisleys were strict Wesleyans. The ground where the present Wesleyan Chapel stands was given by old Mr Martin. I remember this church being erected. I have said that where Woodhill's drapery store is was the old Wesleyan Chapel, and I remember quite well when they used to preach in it. Afterwards it was bought by old Mr Ducker, and he re- moved from March-street over there. The grocery store was afterwards built by Mr Ducker. Where Mr O Ridge now has a shop, a man named Forrester, who was a baker and confectioner was the first I remember living there. He was a very religious man and a strict, Wesleyan. He brought wood into town with his pair of a blue bullock in the shafts and a chestnut horse leading. Then the late William Sullivan's father kept a school there. I think where the Price brothers have their office was the chemist shop kept by "Cocky" Jones. He also kept the post office. When he left, "Grandfather" Price kept the post office and sold patent medicines, perfumery, etc. But before "Cocky" Jones lived there, the first I recollect was a Mr McCreedie, a boot and shoe maker. When he left there he went to live where Mr. Tom Richardson lived for many years at the corner of Lennox and Paget-streets. Old Mr Collins, mentioned in a previous paper, lived in the same house, which McCreedie left, for some time. In the last house of this terrace of four cottages, and which stands next to Mr Henry Sly's, a Mr Oxley kept a butcher's shop He had been an overseer for Mr. Bowman, of Richmond. At the same time his wife kept a school where "Granny" Ashton lives. The last time I saw his son, Owen, he was at Coonabarraban, where he was carrying on business as a saddler and harness maker. A daughter of his, Mary Ann, married a drover named Baker. The last time I saw her she was living at Cooyal, and told me her husband had been dead a few years. Robert Eather also kept a butcher's shop there. He married the eldest sister of the present Mr John Cornwell, of Richmond. The house where Mr Henry Sly lives I re- member getting built. W. G. Burgess and Shelton kept a general store there. These two men will be remembered as living and keeping a store in the two storey house in March-street. One night a hole was made in the brick wall just large enough for a man to get through. It was in the corner of the building just as you go in off the street into where Mrs Rogers now lives, Several articles were stolen. Old Mr. King, who we always re member as "King the Nailer," kept a store there for a long time. Of course the late William Sullivan kept a boot and shoe factory there for a number of years. The first horse I ever bought I sold to William Sullivan, say, to-day at a profit of 10/-. He rode the horse to Windsor the same day and made 10/- on his deal. Mr Cox, when writing to you about a bit of old times, mentioned William Sullivan running a one horse coach from Richmond to Windsor. Mr Sullivan ran the coach while I was keeping the pub., but before that Joe Poole ran one, and again Tom Phillmore ran one. These two latter plied their coaches to and from Windsor when I was a big lump of a lad. Where Henry Mortimer is living the back portion was built first, and it had a small verandah. A Mr. Burgess, a very big man and no way connected with the other Burgess I have mentioned, was the first one I remember living there. He kept a butcher's shop and used to hang meat in the verandah. Afterwards Tom Eather kept a butcher's shop there for a long time. He married Eliza Crowley, sister of John Crowley, who lived and died at Yarramundi. He was the eldest son of Mr Thomas Eather, who kept the pub. Later on, the front portion was built. The old dwelling portion of the present A.J.S. Bank I saw getting put up. Old Thos. Eather had it built. He was keeping a public house, where the Bank of N.S. Wales is, at the time, and when it was finished he shifted into it. The sign then was the "Union Inn." Afterwards it was kept as a pub by Mrs Griffiths. The old lady dropped dead in the kitchen. I was going up Kurrajong with Mr. An- drew Town to have a look at some horses he had for sale. On our way up Mr Town "shouted" for me and Mrs Griffiths served us. When we came back she was dead. A good, jolly woman she was. She was a daughter of Robert Eather and mother of the present Thomas Griffiths, sen., who lives in Richmond. "Ned" Young must not be forgotten as keeping a pub there also, not George Cobcroft. Mrs Charles Eather died suddenly there while reading a telegram she had re- ceived. Opposite to the place we have been speaking about was the old lockup, and a big cedar tree stood in front of it. It was a brick place of four rooms, whitewashed and a verandah in front. After some time the authorities had a slab building put up at the back, but close to the house, for a lockup. "Daddy" Merrick, grandfather to Mrs. T Pryke, was the first lockup keeper I remember. Fred Williams, the constable, lived there for a number of years. After him a man named Andrews was constable and lockup keeper. Andrews was guardian to William Tom kinson, and it was he who bound Mr Tomkinson to Mr John Long for five years to carpentering. Mr Tomkinson served his apprenticeship where Harry Fong is living. Where Chalmers' build ings and Holborow's store stand was vacant land when I first, recollect it. It be longed to old Mr John Stevenson, grand- father to the present Mr Edwin Steven son. Mr Abraham Cornwell bought the land from old Mr Stevenson, and built the low long house where Thomas Chalmers kept a shop for so many years. Mr Chalmers purchased the house and land from Mr Cornwell, and a few years before his death replaced the old house with the present up-to-date premises. When he was pulling the old place down to build the new terrace I happened to be going by one day and he was standing outside. We entered into conversation, when he said to me "I suppose you don't remember this old place getting built." I told him I did, and where his stables were.
On St. Patrick's Day I have seen cock- fighting, men fighting, a skittle alley and quoit playing. One St. Patrick's Day, Constable Byrnes, who was for years in Yarramundi, was in Richmond, and was what they would now call a hot member. A row had started in Tom Eather's yard just opposite, and he went over and was trying to stop some fighting when Isiah Bell, a blacksmith, gave him "a beauty " on the nose. Byrnes didn't know at the time who it was that had dealt it out to him owing to the crowd, but someone "came it" on Isiah. Byrnes summoned him and he was fined 5. It was made up for Isiah among his pals. He was an apprentice to Jack Freeman at the time. The land on which Holborows shop stands was bought from old Mr John Stevenson by Mr Brew, who built the shop and kept a big store, and a post office as well. Afterwards old Mr Grinsell kept a large store there, and died there. Mr William Holborow kept a store there for years. The back portion of the house this side of Mr Allison's was a brick place of four rooms and a veran- dah, and belonged to old William McAlpin. He was a blacksmith, and carried on his business there. A cabinet maker lived there, and the late Mr. W. Sullivan's father worked with him. There was a saw pit in the yard, and I remember them sawing up big cedar logs there. The portion I have just mentioned I don't remember getting built. The front ot it I remember getting built. About where Mr Allison's shop is there was another brick place of four rooms and a verandah which was built before my time. William Hook, a tailor, was the first I recollect living there. Mrs Hook was a sister of the late Thomas Laycock, senr., of Putty. John Hammond, a butcher, lived there for some time and
died there. Old Tom brown, a shoe maker, who married Mrs Savage, lived there also. The building of Allison's and Pryke's shops will be within the recollec tion of the young generation. I don't remember the present Bank of New South Wales getting built. The first per son living there to my knowledge was Thomas Eather, who was keeping a pub. After he left it and started up at the corner already spoken of, old Mr George Guest kept a saddle and harness-maker's shop there. He also had a tan-yard there. His currier was a Mr Shepherd. Thomas Onus kept a pub there, and here he died. Mrs Thomas Onus married a man named Joseph Rutter, and he died there also. The old residence by the Army Medical orderly room I don't remember getting built, and it looked as if it had been up for a number of years when I first knew it. Old Mr Brew was the first person who lived there to my recollection. He kept a store and post office. I remem- ber old Mrs George James paying him 1 for 4 lbs of tea. At the time the Californian diggings broke out. Mr J. A. Earle, a cabinet-maker, lived there. The Army Medical room was a specula- tion of Mr Sam Boughton's in more re-
cent years. Where the baker now lives had no front when I first knew it. There were four rooms of weatherboards, and a verandah. The land was owned by old Robert Potts. The late Mr Joseph Walden, who some little time ago died in Yarramundi, married Rachael, his daugh- ter, and the house was put up for them to live in when they were first married. After him a single man named "Frank the groom," lived there. He had been a groom to Andrew Town's grandfather. He died there, The first man I remember in the house occupied by Miss Richards was "Bill the painter." He had a man working for him who flew into a rage one day, and in the heat of passion he took an axe and went to cut "Bill" down. He got 75 lashes for it. Then Mr Robert Potts came there to live, and kept a butcher's shop only selling mutton. He lived there for years, and he and his wife died there.
After him old Mr Thomas Richards came there and started butchering.
Then we have no houses till we come to the corner where Mrs Alex Benson is living. This was built before my time. The first I knew there was Mr Issac Cornwell, who kept a big general store there. When Mr Ben Richards got married he lived there and kept a mutton butcher's shop, and while he was living there Mr Robert Richards
was born. William Delange and Mitchell Despointes kept a large store there. I took milk to William Delange, who was always known as ' Billy the Frenchman.' Here old Tiernan, the constable, luckily missed meeting his end. One night calling in for a chat, as was his custom, on his round he happened to have his big over- coat on and buttoned up which saved him from a well directed stab. He had been in the shop only a few minutes when a very tall stranger came in and wanted to buy some clothes. He had selected the goods and put down a 5 cheque, on some of the Dangars, of Singleton. Tiernan had heard about the mail up there being robbed and these cheques being among the missing articles. Naturally he was on the look-out for any stranger on for passing them. David Yates was shopman, and Thomas Hughes, a brother to Henry Hughes, happened to be in the shop talking to Yates. Neither of the owners happened to be there at the time. When he put down the cheque Tiernan asked him how he came by it. "What is that got to do with you?" he said. Tiernan tapped him on the shoulder and told him he was going to arrest him. He sprang back from Tiernan, and as he did so he drew a big knife and made a stab at the policeman. His blow missed the desired mark, and only cut Tiernan's coat a few inches. It was lucky for Tiernan he had his great coat on and buttoned up. In the scuffle that followed the stranger was too much for Tiernan, who wasn't the easiest man to best. He called on Yates and Hughes to assist him. One got hold of one leg and one the other, and between them they downed him and succeeded in popping him in the lockup. Tiernan had got word there were two in the matter, and he 'dropped down ' that the other was about the town, somewhere handy. He sent to Windsor and George Shirley, the chief constable, came out. Well on in the night they were having a cup of tea when they heard someone knocking at the front door of the pub opposite and calling out. Tiernan went out and saw a man there, and told him to go round to the back and what window to knock at if he wanted to get in. He asked Tiernan if this was where the mail of course it was only a one horse coach running to Windsor started from for Windsor. He guessed it was the mate of the man he had arrested, and told him he and a friend were having a cup of tea and invited him to come and have one, as they were going by the coach also. There was a palisading in front of the old lockup, and Tiernan opened the little gate for him to walk in. He walked in ahead of Tiernan till he got to the front door, and as soon as he saw the handcuffs hanging on the wall he knew what was up, and made a bound back. Tiernan grabbed him, and he and Shirley locked him up with his mate. I saw the two next morning when Tiernan was taking them to Windsor handcuffed.
Tiernan told me they got ten years at Cockatoo Island.
Then old Mr Henry Turner kept a general store there for many years. Mr Turner was a schoolmaster at one time down on the front of the river. Coming on to the opposite side, between West Market and Bosworth streets, there was a little place of four rooms with a small verandah some 30 or 40 yards back from where Charley Knott's store stands. A plasterer lived there in my earliest recollections of it. His name I don't remember. Old William Allen lived there and dealt in eggs and poultry in a large way. James Roberts lived there also, and had a blacksmith's shop in front of the place near the road. He shod horses for me when I had the Camden mail. A little farther on there was a little weatherboard place of four rooms, and no verandah. The first I remember living in it was a Mr Shepherd, who was a currier to old Mr Guest. Joe Poole lived there for a while when he was running the one horse coach to Windsor. Where Miss Long is living I remember getting built. It was the first bank of New South Wales in Richmond. I think Mr Hole was the first manager. He married a Miss Long. Old Mr Brew lived there before it was a bank. When he left there he went to England.
Old Mrs Long died in this house. She was half sister to old Richard Skuthorp, on the mother's side. This Richard Skuthorp would be father of the present Mr Richard Skuthorp, J.P., of Kurrajong. The old low long house which stood next door it was pulled down by Mr John Long some time ago I don't remember getting built. When I first knew it there was a big grapevine growing in front. It belonged to old Mr Samuel Payne. I used to mind his cattle for him five milking cows, and among them I remember well he had a white cow and a brown 'poley.' Being the owner he lived in it. Old Mr and Mrs Long lived there for a long time. Their son, Thomas, died there, and Mr Long ended his earthly days there also. Where the third infantry have their office, I remember that getting put up. Atkinson, a builder in Windsor, was the man who had the contract. He was old Mrs Edward Robinson's father. Dr Whittaker and his wife were living there, and one time they happened to be away the roof caved in, and it was a wonder it did not fall right in. It was afterwards put to rights by old Mr George Marlin. Mr Marlin, being such a good tradesman, was sought after, and old Mr William Durham got him to go to Wombo to put up some buildings for him. I also remember a Dr Brown living there. Dr Jockel lived and died there, and Mr. Robert Richards lived there. Of course I don't remember the Black Horse Hotel getting built. It looked old when I first recollect it. Old Dr and Mrs Seymour were the first people I remember there. The old doctor was a bit lame. Ever since I can recollect the sign was in Mrs Seymour's name during the time they kept the hotel. The old pub couid tell many tales if it could only speak. Many of the nobility have spent their honeymoons there. It has been the means of giving Richmond a fair footing in history.
On the opposite side of Bosworth-street, on the corner, there stood a large brick place there must have been six or seven rooms in the place and old Mr and Mrs Cuff were the first people living there in my earliest recollections. The old people lived in the back portion of the premises, and rented the front to William Delange and his partner. This was before they went to live where Mr Henry. Turner kept the store. Living in the same place was a young man named McEwen. He married a widow named Mrs White. Old Mr Cuff died first, and after his death Mrs Cuff rented the front portion, which the French man had occupied, to this McEwen. She died while the McEwens were there. Some time after Mrs McEwen died there. Before McEwens went there to live a woman we always called ' Little Ann,' a dressmaker, lived there. Later on Mr James Haughton kept a shop there for a good while. He had a creamy pony and a cart with a tilt, and used to go over Kurrajong selling ornaments. (Here my narrator showed me an ornament he bought from Houghton, a few weeks be- fore he was married, nearly 56 years ago. It represents an animal like a greyhound dog resting R.F.) I was putting him over the river in the punt when I bought it. While living in this place Mr Houghton had two children die at the same time. In course of time the old place went to ruin and has been pulled down many years. Just this side of where Mrs Stewart is living, about opposite Mrs Onus' place, there stood a four roomed place with a verandah and built of brick. Here a man we always knew as Sam Davison lived. Then it was occupied by 'Johnny the Sexton ' and his wife. He was the first sexton to the church. They had no children, and were peculiar speaking people, and were known as ' Shonny and Shany.' Then Johnny Ward, a brick- maker, lived there. He was a married man, but had no family. Two women also lived there. One was a widow named Mrs Levey and the other they used to call "Big Jane." Where Mrs Stewart lives was built before my time, and was, I think, built by old Mr G. Bowman. I have heard old hands say he kept a pub there. I have heard also he did some blacksmithing there. I remember quite well the old roan horse he had, named Richmond. I have heard them say he was the first foal foaled in Richmond, and that he had turned 30 years when he died. Many a time I have seen him in the water truck fetching water from the lagoon. After the Bowmans left a doctor lived there, but I forget his name. Crossing over to the opposite side of the street there were no houses from the cemetery till we come to the brick place opposite Mrs Stewart's residence. I don't remember it getting built. In my earliest days a man named Tipping lived there. After him Jack Freeman, a blacksmith, came there to live. Jack McGinnity served his apprenticeship there with Freeman. After serving his apprenticeship he married Hannah White, whose father was a farmer, and lived there for a long while. Afterwards he bought a piece of land from Fred Thompson in March-street, about where Ald. Brownlow is now living. He built two places of four rooms and a verandah to each of them. He went up country. But coming back to the old place in Windsor-street, where MrGinnity lived. After he left, a man named Thomas Chapman lived there. He worked for Mr Joseph Onus. He went to Guntawong, and lived for a long time with the Rouses. He met his death while driving a waggon.
About where the A. J. S. Bank was first kept in Richmond (next door to the widow of the old Mr Joseph Onus) there was a weatherboard place of four rooms. The first I remember living in it were the Ashtons old Mrs Ashton, who is still alive, and who we now call "Granny Ashton," and her husband, Thomas. He dealt in poultry and fruit. The late Mrs James Bates, a young maid then, lived with them. Her maiden name was Ivery, and she was a sister of old Mr Thomas Ivery. The next I remember living there was a Mr Shepherd, a currier. Old Mr. Guest kept a butcher's shop in the old place. Charley Shepherd, a son of the currier, went round for orders. Mr Guest had the new place built and had the saddler's shop there. He also had the tanyard as well and they do not tan the leather today equal to what he turned out. A set of leading harness, &c, made by Mr. Guest out of his own tanned leather meant almost a lifetime's wear.
Edward Guest used to go round with the meat on horseback, in a basket. Henry Etherden also lived there and carried on the tannery.
About where Mrs Onus' place is there was the old pub which bore the sign of the "Welcome Inn." It was a low, long house with a long verandah to it. In the end room my daughter, Ellen, was christened. Old Mrs Kenny of all had a daughter christened there the same day on a Sunday morning. It was kept by Dan Harriskey. Paul Devlin also kept it for some time, and William Allen kept it also, I think he was the last to keep it. The erection of this old pub goes back before my recollection, and it appeared very old place when I first knew it.
Where John Allen now lives I don't remember getting built. My first know ledge of the place was Mr Ben Richards keeping a mutton butcher's shop, there. He married there and went to live in the corner house, a remnant of which has been made into the comfortable residence occupied by Mrs Alex Benson. Old Mr Kidd lived there many years ago. He was a sort of a butcher; the chief thing he made was sausages. He also went round killing pigs and such like for anyone who needed his services. He was the father of good old 'Ned,' who is not forgotten in Richmond at the present time. When the Frenchmen lived in old Mrs Cuff's place, I used to sell them green frogs, and out of them they used to make soup. They gave me fourpence a dozen for them. They also bought them off other boys. One day Mrs ? went into their shop they were keeping a store there then to buy something, and they were at dinner. They asked her if she would try some soup. She said she would. They gave her a cupful and after she had finished it they asked her how she liked it. She said it was a nice drop of soup. They then told her what it was, and whether she ventured on frog soup again I don't know. On St. Patrick's night and other festive occasions there used to be great dancing in the hotels in Windsor-street and other parts of the town in the olden times. Step-dancing, four-handed reels, etc., were the fashion, It was quite a common thing to see men and women dancing. The race between the late 'Abe' Eather and a horse, fifty or a hundred yards and back, took place in Windsor street, and we have several still in the flesh who remember the event. "Abe" won the race.

FRANCIS STREET.
We will commence this street from the Windsor end.
About where Mr J. G. Percival's factory is was an old slab place with a verandah, and bark roof. Old Thomas Kenny's father, Charles, lived in it and worked a farm on the lowlands. He would be grandfather to Charles Kenny, well-known to local residents. Old Charles Kenny, after leaving there, removed to Windsor-street, opposite to where the late Mr Joe. O'Sullivan lived. In the same place a man named Robert Smith lived for some time. He was a farmer. This old place I don't remember getting built. Where Mr John Madden lived the first I remember there was William South, who married a Miss Byrnes, and did farming.He was a brother to Ben South, and James South. The Rigneys lived there for a long while, and were farmers also. From there they went up country and took up selections. The building of this old house took place before my recollections. Where Mrs Ridge lives there was a cottage of several rooms before the present front was put on. This old place I remember getting built for old Mr Benson, father of William Benson, the elder, of Richmond. It was ready for him when he came out from Scotland with his wife and family. Alongside this place was a cottage of several rooms where old Mrs Fossett lived. She died there. I remember Mrs Fossett's husband, James very well. Also her previous husband, Byrnes. Byrnes was a short, stout man, and he, too, died there. He was a Presbyterian, and I remember him going to I church where 'Granny' Ashton lives. He was father of the late William South's wife. The next house in this street was the old place which stood on the ground where Mr Robert Marlin has his nice house. I don't remember this place getting built. It belonged to Mr Vincent, grandfather of Mr Neville, who lived in Paget street. In this place Frank Gow's father and mother lived some time. His mother died there. She was a Miss Kingswood, 'Ned' Thompson lived there at one time. 'Bandy'Smith, as they used to call him, lived there also and did some farming. Jim Douglas, a brother to ' Billy ' the bricklayer, lived there for some time and farmed. He afterwards went up country, and, I believe, did well.
Then we come to where "Abe" Eather lived for a number of years. This place I have no knowledge of getting put up. The first I knew living in it was old 'great grandfather' Martin. His wife died there. After he left Frank Simons (father of the late Frank, of Windsor) came there to live and went in for farming. Then the father of Mr Alex Matheson, J. P., lived there for some time. Like some of his predecessors he went in for farming. This place has been pulled down some time. The house where Mr Thomas Horan lives was erected before my time. The first I remember living in it were Paddy and Jimmy White, brothers. Both died there. Jimmy married a widow named Mrs Kelly, who owned a public house on the road between Windsor and Parramatta. It was a great house of call for teamsters. After leaving the house next to Mrs Ridge's William South went to live in this place. He was farming and carrying. He brought a large quantity of loading up for old Mr Ducker. I remember a man named Stubbs, a farmer, living there. Then we come to where Mr Joseph Onus lives up on the hill, 'The Cedars.' This was built when I knew it first. William Sharpe was the first man I remember living there and he was there for a long time. It belonged to William Onus, father of Mr Joseph Onus, now living in it.
When William Onus married Miss Annie Hough, sister to the late Peter Hough, of Agnes Banks, he went there to live. Good old Edward Robinson, also lived there for a while, and kept a boarding house. On the same side, down rear the lagoon, was a brick house of four rooms and a verandah with a kitchen at the back , where Jacob Inness lived. He was a farmer and had three sons, Jacob, Isaac and John, and one daughter, Betsy. I went to school with them. Betsy was a fine working girl, and I have heard them say she was a great reaper girls thought nothing of that work in those days and could do her half acre a day. Mr. Inness died there. After they left, the place went to ruin, and Mr Joseph Onus, senr., had it pulled down.
Another place was built and that, too, has been down a long time. We will take the opposite side of this street, and work from the Windsor end. There were no houses on this side till we come to the old brick place opposite to where Abe Eather lived. It was a big place with a verandah back and front, and a barn. It belonged to Robert Martin, Mrs William Price's father, who lived there. He sold the property to old Mr. Fossett. Mr Fossett had the barn built. He died there. I don't remember it getting built, Crawford Bedwell lived there for a number of years, and a large portion of his family were born there. Afterwards old Mr. and Mrs. Field lived there. Here old Mr Field died.
Then we come to the long weatherboard place on the corner, which was built before my time. The first I remember there was old Mr Peter McAlpin, father of the well-known William. He was a blacksmith, and carried on business there. He was a fine singer, and had a very strong voice, and I remember him singing at the Presbyterian services, which they held where 'Granny' Ashton lives. When Thomas Eather left the pub he went there to live. Mrs Eather was a daughter of Mr Peter McAlpin. Old Mr. McAlpin, the black smith, died there Mrs Thomas Eather died there also. We then had vacant land till we come to where Mr Henry Hughes lives. This must be a very old place, and was built before my time. The first I remember living there was Henry Hughes' father, the old schoolmaster, and his wife. Both Mr and Mrs Hughes died there. This house has always been occupied by the Hughes family. Where Mr Fred Powell had his milking yard there was a four-roomed weather-board cottage, with a verandah. It be- longed to Mr Joe Sharpe, who lived in it. This also I cannot remember getting put up. Mrs Faithful's coachman, Riley. lived there after he left 'Lakeville.' This place, has been pulled down many years. The next place is the skillion where Miss Thorley lives. This is a very old place. The first I remember living there was Jack Cafe, better known as Jack Tailby. He was a splitter and fencer. He married a sister to old William Timmins, and she died there. Miss Thorley has been living there a great number, of years.
Where Matthew Hughes lived there was an old weatherboard place with a verandah I don't remember getting built. When Matthew got married and went there to live they made alterations and additions to it. Here the good old Matthew lived all his life, and died. His wife died somewhere about Goulburn. She had a married daughter living up there, and went up for the good of her health.
The next place is the historic building, the old church and school. The portion down stairs was used as a church and the upstairs as a school. The first minister I heard preach there was the Rev. H. Stiles, and the first schoolmaster I remember was old Mr Hughes. The next schoolmaster was Mr Braham and then came Mr Griffiths. He was the first registrar of births, deaths and marriages in Richmond. I understand a daughter of his was keeping a boarding house at Manly a short time ago. Mr Braham was a little man, and I remember hearing people say he was the last of a family of twenty two.
While in this locality I am reminded of old *Mr George James when we used to go down to the lagoon for casks of water. He was fond of children, and when leaving home would bring out a basket of fruit to take with him. When he got to the school he would scramble them among the school children and delight in the sport.

CHAPEL STREET.
Commencing at the lowlands end of this street.
I can just remember the two-storey house on the corner belonging to the Onus' being finished. It was here old Joseph Onus went to live when he married Emma Powell, sister to Mr Henry Powell, and daughter of the late Edward Powell, His son, 'young' Joe, lived there also for a great number of years and died there. Coming along on the same side about half way between the house we have mentioned and Windsor-street there was an old weatherboard place of several rooms without a verandah. There were two doors in the front. One end of it was occupied by 'Jerry' Hill, a very tall Stout man. He had no family. He was a veterinary surgeon, and will be remembered by some of the very old hands. At the other end towards Windsor-street Tom Watson, 'Tom the Tinker' as he was called, lived. His sign was "T. Watson, tinman and brazier" lettered on a piece of tin. This old place has been pulled down many years, and I don't remember it getting built.
That is all the houses in this street at that time. On the opposite side was a paddock.
The house in which old Herbert Travis lived for so many years, and the places to be seen to-day, have all been built within my recollection.

BOSWORTH STREET.
At Cox's lane end the first house I remember was up before my time. The first person I knew there was James Griffiths. He was a shoemaker, and a brother to Mrs Parnell and Mrs Potts. He had three daughters and two sons. When he first came to Richmond he and the wife and family it wasn't quite as large then stayed with old Mr. and Mrs. George James for a week or two till they got a house. They went back to Launceston.
Mr Thomas Richards lived there for years and kept a butcher's shop. When he left there he went round into Windsor Street, and there ended his days. Old Mr William Heath lived there for many years, and carried on tailoring. He sent clothes to all parts of the district, and miles up country. He was a jolly old man and good company. He had been an old soldier, and learnt the tailoring while in the army. His training as a soldier stuck to him, and in his advanced years was a very nimble man, and could kick the top of a door frame quite easily and the hat off your head if you wished. He was a great admirer of game fowls, and an excellent hand at making 'heels,' and heeling the birds. Others have lived there also, but Charley Curtis crosses my mind at present as living there for a while. The old house was pulled down years ago. A few years ago a new cottage was
put up on the same block of land. When Mr Jim Shields and his sisters are living I don't remember getting put up. I remember Thomas Harris keeping a 'pub' there, but that is many, many years ago. Old Mr Potts kept a ' pub ' there also. After the 'pubs' a Jew, whose name I forget, kept a shop there. He was a very big man, jolly, and good company. Old Mr George Shields lived there pretty well a life time, Both Mr and Mrs Shields died there. The house is still in the possession of the family and occupied by the children already mentioned. I fancy old Mr Joseph Stafford kept a shop there, and dealt in poultry. Where the two skillions are next to Shields' old place was one block of land, on which stood a weatherboard place of four rooms, the two back rooms being skillion roof. This, like Shields' house, I don't remember getting put up. There was an old low paling fence in front. A man whom we always knew as ' Robison the carpenter ' lived there for some time. He and his wife died there, leaving no family. I have heard it said he was a good tradesman. This old place has been down many years. The two skillions standing there to-day I remember getting built. Harry Willis, a shoemaker, lived in the old house. He worked for old Mr Swinbourne.
We then come to where Mr Richard Allen lives and truly 'Dick' is a very long way over the three score and ten. Mrs Masters, my mother, stands first in my mind. I was taken down to see her one day, and told she was my mother, but I couldn't make out how it was possible to have two mothers. I had always known Mrs James as mother, and I was too young to know anything about being adopted at the age of fifteen months. This place is too old for me to recollect. Old Mr Allen has been living there a very fair lifetime and may he be spared many years yet. Old Mr Allen was a wheel wright, and I was going to be bound to him for seven years to learn the wheel wrighting, I was then fourteen years of age, and my term was to be till I was twenty one, The indentures was drawn up and ready to be signed when my foster father and mother jibbed on it. I went to school with Mrs Richard Allen, who was Miss Matilda Cornwell then.
The little skillion on the corner is a very old place long before my time. The first person I knew living in it was a man named Whalan, a basketmaker. He was a short man, and had a great habit of saying "How do ! How do !" to, himself as he went along. Little 'Bob the Hatter' lived in it. He was a very short, stout, jolly man, and made straw hats for sale. When walking up the street he would have his plait of straw with him and hard at it as he went along. Tom Watson, the tinker, removed from Chapel-street and lived in it for some time. Alex. McKay lived there for a number of years. He worked for Mr Thomas Richards for many years. He was a jolly old fellow, and a true-born Scotchman. In one of the skillions we have been speaking about in this block Thomas Young lived, but the exact one I cannot say. He was a quiet, harmless old man, and was thought a great deal of by Mrs W. H. Holborow, the Rev. Dr. Woolls and others. All were kind to Tom. Where Mr Charles Sly has been living for a number of years ; where the old skillion so many years occupied by 'Janey' Baldwin stands; where the old homes of Mr Houghton and his son Clem, and where the old home of good old 'Betty' Mortimer are to be seen, was all vacant land when I first knew it. It was at the old Houghton home that 'Clem' ran the livery stable for so many years.
We next have the old, low, house on the corner, opposite to the side 'Dick' Allen lives on, which was built before my time. When I first knew it it was a pub. kept by Thomas Mortimer. His wife died there. A man named Harris, or Owen, kept it as a 'pub' also.
John Markwell also kept a ' pub ' there for some time. While Markwell was there a very funny thing happened. A man who was famous for his non-shouting propensities was in there, sitting on the seat. Several jolly boys came in for a drink, and invited him to take one with them. The next one's turn came, and he, too, extended the invitation. And so it went the rounds of the boys, the invitation being given every time. They thought they would drag a shout out of the man by this method, but no. Some of them had been out back and knew a little about the black's language, and, as they knew their guest prided himself on knowing more about the blacks language than anyone else, they challenged him to a test. Their friend led off with some of the language and told them they did not know what he was saying. One of them said he was asking them would they have something to drink, and named their drinks and told Markwell to draw them.
The old man protested strongly that wasn't what he was saying, but it was no go. They were all of the same opinion that that was what he, said, and the wind up of it was the old man had to pay for drinks all round. Then a Douglas Hadkins kept a 'pub' there also. Douglas in years after drifted into Sydney. He invented an incubator, etc , for poultry raising and was, I believe, keeping a shop in that line in Bathurst-street. Old Mr. Joe. Stratford lived in this old place at one time. He kept a little shop, and still dealt in poultry.
His first wife died there. I remember the day Joe got married to his second wife. John Cashell also lived there for many years. The little building at the March-street end has been used by different people as a butcher's shop among them my old road mate William Sly.
Where Dr. Helsham lives is of comparatively recent date, and was built by the well-known contractor of Windsor, old Mr John Johnson, father of the late Mrs Edwin Pitt.
One more old place was only to be found in this street when I first knew it. It stood just below where. Mrs Alex Benson lives. The first I have any recollections of living in it was a man named George Smith. His wife was a servant to old Mr. Dan Harriskey, and Smith married her from there. Mr Isaac Cornwell owned it for a long time. Afterwards it came into the hands of Mr Henry Turner, and he used it as a bake-house for many years. I think Thomas Allen used it as a bake-house also. A man named Afflick lived in it for a while, in earliest history. Where old Mr. and Mrs. Buckton lived is an old place so also is the one next to it.
The other places on the opposite side cannot be included among our old building.

WEST MARKET STREET.
Commencing from Lennox-street the old house in which Mrs John Collins lived for some years was built before my time. The first people I remember living there were old Mr and Mrs Thomas Ashton. Mr Ashton was dealing in poultry then. Then old Mr and Mrs George Campling lived in this house for a long time. One of his daughters was a teacher, and well up in the profession. George Smith, the brickmaker, lived in it also. Mr and Mrs John Collins lived there for a long while, and on more than one occasion.
On the opposite side of the street, only facing into this street, was a very large weather board room with a single roof and no verandah to it. In this old place a single man whom I never knew by any other name than old 'Warley Camp' lived for a long time. He was a brickmaker and very deaf. This room was built on the property of old "Scotch John". It has been pulled down many years.
Where Mr Tom Chalmers lives I remember getting built, and the brickwork was the first done in Richmond by the late Caleb Crisford.
In this street there was only one more house standing in my earliest recollections. It was a skillion which stood about where Mr John Cashell is now living. It contained two main rooms, and a little room at the back, with a shingle roof, and no verandah. Thomas Hogsflesh lived there for some time. He was a blacksmith by trade, having served his apprenticeship to Jack Freeman, and had his shop there. He left Richmond, and I think he died at Rope's Creek. I often saw his widow there.
The Salvation Army barracks is not an old place by any means, and is now used by the Richmond Light Horse as an orderly room.
Where Mr Alf Sly lives is a more recent addition to the street, and a few more houses like it would make this street look up. I think it was on this allotment of land where Peter O'Hara had a weatherboard building where he kept a bit of a shop. One of his sons, Harry, kept a billiard room there, and finally, it was burnt down. The old house on the corner of March Street was mentioned when we spoke of March-street, but the blacksmith's shop adjoining Mr. Alf Sly's place faces into this street, and has been a busy little shop more than once. Mr. Fred Small has only left it a few months. Fred is a son of William Small, of Lennox-street, whose reputation as a blacksmith spread far and wide.
The house belonging to some of the Onus family, and rented by Mr Fitzsimons, has been up some time, but does not come in our list of old Richmond buildings.
Coming along the street we have the School of Arts, and when I first knew the ground on which it stands it was a portion of the pound paddock. I was at the laying of the foundation stone. The stone is at ihe corner of the building on the March-street side as you enter the main hall. It was laid by Mary Ann Bowman, who afterwards became the wife of the medical Dr Cameron. A sovereign was put under the stone, a copy of the daily paper was put under it also.
The Presbyterian Church I remember getting built. Mr Long had the contract for the woodwork. Later on Mr Sam Boughton was the contractor for the tower. While the work was in progress Mr. Tom Masters and I went round to have a look at it. Mr.Boughton was working about where the clock is, and a ladder was standing up almost as high as the ball on top. Tom was chaffing me about not being game to go up to the ball, and Sam happened to hear him at it, and remarked he had seen me as high as that in the trees out on the common after possums. To show I still had nerve left, up I went and placed my hand on the ball.
The Commercial Bank, which faces into Windsor-streets is a comparatively recent ornament to the town. So also is the police station.
Years ago old Mr William Stevenson kept a shop in a weatherboard place close to where Mr Les. Wheeler lives. He dealt in poultry as well. The houses on the same side as Mr Wheeler's have been up some years, but are not the oldest.
The opposite side of this street was much improved by the two new cottages built to the order of the late William Sullivan. The skillion next to these cottages is not a youngster, though I remember when it was vacant land. William Douglas has built himself a comfortable home close by. He is a great gardener, and what he grows on his small plot shows what can be done both in quantity and quality.
The Public School is in this street, and as I see the youngsters playing about in such numbers I think of the big difference there is now for a child to get an education and when I was a youngster. If they do not get a good schooling now it is the parents' fault.

EAST MARKET STREET
Commencing at the Lennox street end, we have the old place where "Granny" Ashton lives, which dates back before any time. When I first knew it there was only one room, and in it Mr.and Mrs. Johnson lived. This would be 'Bill' Johnson's father and mother, Afterwards they went to Londonderry 'Town's paddock' in those days where they lived for years. After they left it was done up for the Presbyterian Church, and services were held there for a long time. I have heard Dr. Lang, Dr. Fullerton, and the Rev. Mr Adam, of Windsor, preach there. The pulpit stood at the end of the room on Lennox-street side. As you went in at the door, on the left side along the wall, there was a long cedar seat with a back to it which was occupied by George Bowman and his family. William Bowman, his wife and daughter, Ann (who married a Mr. Caddell) went there to worship also.
On the opposite side of the room to the Bowman's seat was another long seat where William McAlpin and his father, Peter McAlpin, sat. On a front cross seat, facing the pulpit, sat Mrs. Field's father, John Henderson. He, too, like McAlpin, was a great singer, and his voice was always loud and clear during the singing. Mrs. Martin had a Sunday school there, and taught a few children.
The old weatherboard house which stood by the fig tree which grew in the paddock at the back of the Imperial Hotel I remember getting built. It was an old place, and has been pulled down many years. Among those who have lived there we have with us in Richmond to-day Messrs. Ernest Marlin and John Ashton. Mr. Sam Farley lived there also. Mrs. Elliott lived there for years, The good old lady went to her last resting place some few months ago. The railway station is in this street, but though built a goodly number of years looks different to my boyhood days. What is to be found in the way of buildings below the Royal Hotel is the outcome of later years.

PAGET STREET.
We will start in this street at the College end, and up to the corner of Lennox street there was only two houses when I was a boy. George James lived in one and Thomas Silk in the other. About where Mr John Cornwell now lives there stood a very large bushy apple tree, which were plentiful on the common then. On Sunday evenings people used to sit there in the hot weather. The blacks were about then, and had their camp not more than a hundred yards the other side. All about there then was a wild bush, but just about that spot it was principally gum trees.
About where Mr Dan Carter lives there, was a saw pit where they used to cut timber for the town. It was kept by a man named Robert Westmore. Before Westmore came here he worked at Cockle Bay, and here he was known as 'Cockle Bay Bobby.' His wife used to help him saw, and at work in the pit he acted as top sawyer, his wife underneath. To prevent the sawdust getting into her eyes she wore a veil.
Coming along towards the railway there was only the old white house standing. I have no recollection of this getting built. These were the only three houses facing into this street in those days.
The large hole in Paget street between where Thomas Richardson lived for years and the double house just mentioned, is the result of brickmaking. Many a kiln of bricks were made there by Jack Short. Speaking of Jack Short reminds me we had at that time living in Richmond Jack Short, Jack Long, Jack Large, Jack Small. Jack Short was short, Jack Long was short, Jack Large was a big man, Jack Small a big man also.

MOORAY STREET.
In my earliest days no houses. Later on Charley Roberts kept a butcher's shop between March-street and the railway line for many years-His first house was close to the butcher's shop, but some time after he built another house lower down and facing into March-street. His wife died in the latter house, so also did old Charley.
The few other houses in this street have been built long enough since I first knew it.
We have now been round the town, a street at a time, and dealt mainly with it in the very early days.
A casual jaunt around it in more recent years will not be out of place before we leave it.
Where James Moulds now lives (the last house in Lennox-street going towards the Blacktown road) Ned Kidd kept a blacksmith's shop alongside it for many years. His wife died there.
the corner house where Tom Richardson lived Mr Willliam Mitchell lived for some time. It was on this spot Mr. Mitchell laid the foundation of what afterwards developed into the famous coachbuiiding, horseshoeing, general smithing and implement making business. When he first came to Richmond he worked, I think, for William Price. He then started on this own account on the corner I have just mentioned. His wife's brother, named Ross, who was a clever man, used to do woodwork and painting. Mr Mitchell was by no means a man of money then, but he was a great tradesman and a very hard worker. It was nothing unusual for him to work all hours of the night, and he got along by degrees.
I have just alluded to Ned Kidd's blacksmith's shop in Lennox street, and at one end of the shop Fred Thomson had his wheelwright's shop and carried on his work for some time. William Heath, 'the old taiior,' as he was often called, lived in the skillion a little this side of Kidd's blacksmith's shop. Years after two brick rooms and a verandah were put on the front of the skillion, and Tom Kewen lived there for years. Tom was a fetler on the line, Heath lived there for years and did his tailoring. I think it was from here Dan Carter married a grand-daughter of Heath's. I often met his son John in after years while I was droving. The last time I saw him was at Gunnedah where he was keeping a pub. Before he started pub keeping I often camped at his place at Middle Island.
In the house on the corner where Mr Mitchell first started in business Mr Swinbourne, Mr Collins, and McCredie lived at different times. John Waldren, a blacksmith, lived in this corner house for a time also. When he left Richmond he went to Rouse's, at Guntawang. Tom Masters went up with him, having agreed with Mr George Rouse.- Tom was striking for Waldren up there. I shall never forget one little thing which happened to Mr Roland Ducker in this locality. He had been out to the 'three holes' to get their mare, "Busy," and could not catch her. He asked me to go and help him catch her, and we succeeded. Both of us mounted her bare back and came along alright till we got about where Mrs. Magick now lives-plenty of trees and stumps there at that time and I wanted to get off.
As I was getting off the mare started to buck and I fell off unhurt. Roland was thrown, and as he fell the mare kicked him on the forehead. He bled a good deal and was unconscious for about half an hour I called Eliza James and Mrs. Martin to come over, and with a jug of water they bathed him and brought him round. I have no doubt Mr Roland Ducker carries the scar today.
Close to the College avenue entrance stood the old pound. I remember Tom Pryke being poundkeeper there many years ago Harry Gunton kept it for a long time. He also kept the present pound many years.
Opposite to this old pound is the old house which has been there many years, but which I remember getting built. Mr Dean lived in it for a long time and had a tan yard. The old shed, which still stands, was built for Mr Dean, and in it many a score of hides I have seen hanging up to dry. George Dean, his son, was married from there. Both of his sons, Billy and George, were very venturesome boys with snakes. I have often seen them catch a snake by the tail and pull it out of a log and kill it. They would then cut the heads off and take the body home. These their mother boiled down for the oil, which was considered a cure for cer tain complaints in those days. Old Mrs Dean died in this old house. George was always a jolly chap and ready for a lark. He played a good one on Johnny Roberts one day. We had been out in the bush and had brought a good lump of a snake home, and after I left him he saw Roberts coming. He knew Roberts would have to go round Richardson's corner on his way home, so he laid the snake about a couple of yards round the corner across the footpath with the head part of the body in some rubbish against the fence. He called me over and told me what was in the wind. Roberts was coming along the Paget-street footpath so we waited and watched him turn the corner. He came on to the snake unexpectedly, and got a great fright. He pulled a rail out of the fence and started to settle the snake, when he found out it was dead. When he saw its head had been cut off no doubt he had his, suspicions as to who played the joke.
cannot pass this part of the town without mentioning a good old woman whom we knew as "Granny" Roberts. She was grandmother to Charley Roberts, of Clarendon, grandmother to the late Thomas Primrose, of Windsor, and several other well known and respected people in the district.
The house I am living in I remember getting built. About where my big gate is there was an old weatherboard place which was nearly down when I first recollect it. The bricks were made on the allotment by 'Tim, the brickmaker'. Mr William Sharpe, 'Daddy', as he was often called in after life, often told me he helped 'Tim' to make the bricks. The bricklayer was Henry White who lived in Silk's old bouse in Paget-street. He was a married man, but had no family. A man by the name of Clayton, a tailor, lived in Silks' house before White. The house was built for Mr Baines He previously lived in the Lodge at "Fairfield," Windsor. Baines died in this house, and Mrs Baines died there in June, 1867. Then their son, Johnny, lived there. Johnny, like his father, was a chair-maker, but didn't work much at it. It was the rush bottom chairs in those days.
If my old stable could only speak it could tell some very funny tales about the gaffing schools they carried on in it. It was here that ' Bricky ' Colley stayed with us, and not at the old pub, as I stated when speaking of my pub-keeping days. I shall never forget 'Bricky' giving me the tip about Sterling for the Metropolitan once. He told me, bar accidents, he was going to win. Sterling was a 10 to 1 chance, and I decided to go down and have 5 on him. But a day or two before the races I had to start up country, and as Tom Masters was keeping shop round the corner, I commissioned him with instructions what to do, as he intended going down. As I was going up country I met the mailman as asked if he had, heard what won the Metropolitan, and he told me Sterling. When I got up country there was a letter from home and I learned Tom had not gone to the races, so I was as far off as if 'Bricky' had never given me the tip.
Old Mr. and Mrs. Baines had two daughters and one son. Emma married William Crowley from here, and as tin kettling was all the fashion then they got a good one. Louisa married a Mr Wood, who was a brother to the late Mr John Wood, of the Grose River. Wood was a saddler and lived for years in Singleton. Mrs Baines was a dressmaker, and the present Mrs Henry Powell, senr., learned the art from her, Sam Freeman lived in Francis-street.
He could tell some stirring tales about the old rimes. I knew Sam very well and for many years. I remember when he was a boundary rider for Mr. A. Town for years at Bomera. He also worked at Lakeville for some time for Mr Town, who had the property rented. After leaving Bomera he came down over Bell's Line known as Maddocks' line then and got lost for two days. It was a cold "shop " to be lost in, and when Sam got out of it he was nearly done up. When he came to Richmond, after this adventure, he stayed with us for fully a month. Sam had seen a deal of the old convict days, and the treatment the men received. He was a jolly old fellow, and it didn't take much to start him going about the flogging days. And it was no secret about town how to start him, and when one felt inclined they only had to say to him, "Where is Dr. B -?" The answer he would give you was, "Dr. B- 's in hell." Then he would tell you about the brutal work, and the scant regard this doctor had for human life. Sam never forgot to tell you that Dr. B- would say, "Men's no object to me. If there's 50 killed to-day, I can get 50 more to-morrow". Sam was a brother to Tom and George Freeman, who kept a Public house in Windsor. The Town family thought a lot of Sam, and other families were good and kind to him, while the boys found him interesting and amusing.
In Richmond we had another Sam Freeman, but in no way related to this one. He was a carpenter, and lived for some time in the weatherboard house where Robinson, the carpenter, lived, which stood on the ground where the two skillions stand next to where Jim Shields and his sisters live in Bosworth-street. His sons William and Jack were blacksmiths. William left Richmond and secured property on the Comleroy Road, and was living there when I was at the punt. He kept a public house there. Billy sold the property to Michael McMahon, now ' Garryowen.' He then went out somewhere about the Cockfighter to live. While out there he had the promise of a great crop of wheat one year, but the grain got blighted. He mowed it and made it into hay and I have heard that this was the first time he found out the value of wheaten hay. He later came to live on what we call the Grose Farm which lies between the Grose and Nepean rivers, now occupied by Mr Donald Clemson. I hear his father, Edward, owns it. Billy left there and went to live in the old house by the river, on a farm belonging to Mr George Williams. There he lived till he accidentally met his death. He reared a large family. The boys were a fine big lot of men, and the girls were good styles.
Among the family I knew Bob, William, Joe, Tom. George, Wellington and Annie, who married Mr W. Maughan and still lives in Richmond. Charlotte was another of the girls, she married Mr John Devlin, who is still living at Agnes Banks. George is still at Riverstone meatworks and liked by all who know him. Bob and Tom are dead William, Joe and Wellington are still living at Agnes Banks, the latter occupying the same house as his late father and mother.
Then not long ago there died an ex Richmondite who took great interest in town matters when he was here David Cobcroft. He was for years an alderman in the Council, and the opposition side wished him out of it many a time. In those days party feeling in the Council was very strong, but the Onus side carried the sway. But for all that, Dave fought them, and, if he couldn't best them, often tormented them.
He lived in the two-storey house in March street which stands about half way between East and West Market streets. He was a good chemist and had his shop there. Before he took up chemistry he was in a bank. One time I was going up to Warrah and had a five pound note I wanted to change, so I went into a bank at Muswellbrook, and he was in charge of it. Before he came to live in the two storey house in March-street he lived in the old long house in Windsor-street which belonged to old Mr Long. He was married to a sister of William Benson, senr., who has been dead many years. The loss of two sons cut him up very much. One fine young fellow accidentally met his death at South Creek railway viaduct one encampment at Gosper's Groves. The other one died at home after a lingering illness. After Dave left Richmond he was in Sydney for years, and died somewhere in Forest Lodge.
R. B Hughes, "Bobby" Hughes as he was generally called, was a good chemist and as good as plenty of the doctors with some complaints. He often saved a poor person the expense of a doctor. I re member him coming to Richmond. At one time Richmond was lively on Saturday when German Charley, the doctor, used to visit it. He was a queer old sort in many ways, but could cure many things. He used to attend patients at my place, and I have seen as many as 18 vehicles in front from Penrith, Kurrajong, Pitt Town. Wilberforce and Freeman's Reach.
Old 'Bob' Eggleton, the wheelwright, who was buried quite recently, was reared up Kurrajong, and when a lad of about 14 started to serve his apprenticeship with William Small who had a wheelwright's shop on the property Mr Bowman Douglass owns and occupies.
Johnny Madden served his apprenticeship to the wheelwrighting to the same man and at the same time as Eggleton. Bob lived at one time in the old house in Lennox-street where I lived and saw the ghost. He was there for a long while. Later on he bought the ground opposite, the Roman Catholic Church at the Windsor end of Richmond. Here he built, and carried on business as a wheelwright and blacksmith for years. He was a good tradesman. Bob was a good sportsman a great pigeon shot, quail shooter, wild duck hunter and an ardent fisherman with both the rod and the net. The latter he could make and was considered a good hand at hanging them. He had an old gun and good one it was he kept for duck shooting which they called 'Long Sal.' He married a Miss Roberts who died some time back. They reared a family of fine big children. Among the boys I knew Jack, George, Bob, Ted ; and Kesiah, the girl. Jack was for years in charge of the Hawkesbury racecourse, and could do wheelwrighting as well. Bob was a great hand among horses. George is in the railway service.
I was at the punt when the railway was opened to Richmond. Among the station masters in Richmond I remember Mr. McKenzie, who is buried in the Church of England cemetery here. Mr Morris was here, but had to leave on account of ill-health. Mr Lackey was here for many years, and is now in charge of Burwood station, I think. The present station master's residence, at the corner of Bourke and March streets, was built for him. Then We had Mr. Gazzard for a while. Mr Stafford was a great bike rider, and used to take part in the bike races on the park, which were all the go here at that time. Then Mr. Chivers was here for years, and when he left took charge of Blacktown station where he is at present. Then came Mr. Cox, who stayed with us till he retired from the service, when he was given a hearty send-off by his fellow railway men only a month or two ago.
Tom Cavanough was here for some time and was head porter, and afterwards worked up to be stationmaster.
Among the men on the engines who have been in Richmond, a man named Frost was the first driver from Blacktown to Richmond, and lived in the old house in Lennox-street occupied by Tom Miles. Then there was old Mr Ritchie who spent many years among us and was well liked.
(To be continued).


Source:
Some Ups and Downs of an old Richmondite,
by Mr. Alfred Smith
Chronicled by Robert Farlow
Windsor and Richmond Gazette (NSW : 1888 - 1954)
Saturday 12 February 1910
Saturday 19 March 1910
Saturday 26 March 1910
Saturday 16 April 1910
Saturday 23 April 1910
Transcription, janilye, 2012

NEW SOUTH WALES. AUCTIONEERS' LICENSES 1857

The following is a list of the persons to whom auctioneers' licenses have been granted
for the year 1857:
Charles Adrain,
Edward Agnew,
Joel H. Asher,
Thomas W. Bowden,
Frederick Bradley,
William G. Burgis,
Ewen W. Wallace,
Henry D. Cockburn.
John G. Cohen,
Richard Cowan,
William E. Day,
William Dean,
Octavius B. Ebsworth,
Charles Frith,
James Gannon.
Herbert Gibson,
James Gordon,
Henry A. Graves.
Francis Grose,
David B. Hughes,
John Isaacs.
George Kent,
William G. Lambert.
Thomas Lister,
Charles Martyn,
John H. Miller,
John C. Molloy,
Alexander Moore,
Robert Muriel,
William Newell,
Samuel Payten,
James Pearson,
John Purkis,
Francis E. Rishworth,
Edward Salomon,
Alfred Schrder,
Charles Teakle,
Launcelot E. Threlkeld,
John G. Valentine,
Samuel J. Wooller,

Source:
Empire (Sydney, NSW : 1850 - 1875)
Friday 28 November 1856
Page 6
Transcription, janilye 2013


MAIL CONTRACTS New South Wales 1861

Particulars for the contracts entered into for the conveyance of Post Office Mails, from 1st January 1861.
The + symbol signifies Per Week.

WESTERN ROADS.
John Hilt, Parramatta, Baulkham Hills, Rouse Hill, and Windsor, six days per week, for 200.
James Connolly, Windsor, Pitt Town, Wiseman's Ferry, and St. Alban's, two days, +90.
Edward Croft, Wiseman's Ferry, and Mangrove Creek, one day, + 16.
Thomas Crisford, Windsor and Richmond, six days, + for 55.
Charles Bowen, Windsor, Wilberforce, Sackville Reach, and Portland Head, via Ebenezer, three days, + for 70.
Thomas Crisford, Richmond, North Richmond, and Wheeny Creek (Lamrock's Inn), three days, + for 35.
H. J. Kirwan, Sackville Reach and Lower Portland,three days, + for 30.
Edward Crisford, Richmond and Camden, via Castlereagh, Penrith, Mulgoa, and Greendale, three days, + for 198.
William Crane and J. J. Roberts, Parramatta Railway Terminus, and Post Office and Penrith, twice a day; Penrith, Hartley, and Bathurst, six days; Bathurst and Sofala, three days; Hartley and Mudgee, six days; with branch Post from Kean's Swamp to Rylstone, three days, and Bathurst, Guyong, and Orange, six days, for 3250.
John Beard, Sofala and Tambaroora, one day, + for 190.
James Falconer, Mudgee, Cobbora, and Mundooran, one day, + for 175.
Edward Duckett, Mundooran and Coonamble, one day, + for 200.
David McCullough, Coonamble and Merri Merri by Bimbleyom, Bundy, Ningey, and Coanbone, one day, + for 99.
George O'Shea, Mudgee, Merrindee, and Wellington, one day, + for 180.
Edwin J. Greenwood, Mudgee and Cassilis, one day,+ for 200.
John Smith, Mudgee and Long Creek via Avisford, Grattai, Louisa Creek, Windeyer, and Campbell's Creek, two days, + for 275.
Hugh Wright, Orange and Wellington via Stoney Creek, Ironbarks, Moombla Hill, and Black Rock, three days, +for 795.
Edward Nicholls, Orange and Molong, three days, +for 285.
Thomas O'Brien, Molong and Black Rock, three days, + for 200.
Joseph Morris, Molong and South Wangan, one day, + for 115.
John Gardner, Molong and Obley, one day, + for 49.
D. L. Dalziell, Obley und Algullah, one day, + for 100.
Alexander White, Wellington and Dubbo, two days, + for 150.
James McCubbin, Dubbo and Cobbora, one day, + for 99.
Edward Duckett, Dubbo, Drungalee and Cannonbah, one day, + for 200.
John Minehan, Bathurst and Carcoar, three days, + for 348.
Thomas Walsh, Carcoar and Canowindra via Cliefden and Cowra, three days, + for 420.
Thomas Walsh, Cowra, South Wangan, Bundaburra, and Condobolin, one day, + for 360.
Thomas Grace, Condobolin and Lang's Crossing-place, one day, + for 560.
James James, Bathurst, Lagoons, and Rockley, two days; Rockley and Tuena, one day; Rockley and Swatchfield, one day ; Bathurst, Caloola, and Long Swamp, one day; Bathurst and O'Connell, two days; and O'Connell and Fish River Creek, via Mutton's Falls, one day, + for 400.

SOUTHERN ROADS.
William Crane and J. J. Roberts, Railway Terminus and Post Office, Campbelltown and Camden, via Narellan and Campbelltown and Goulburn, six days, + for 825.
W. B. Campbell, Campbelltown, Riversford, Douglass Park, and Picton, six days, + for 150.
Philip Reily, Camden and Oaks, via Brownlow Hill, and Lowe's Hill, six days; and Oaks and Burrogorang, three days, + for 145.
John Wallace, Berrima and Sutton Forest, six days, + for 70.
Charles Loseby, Berrima and Bong Bong, six days, + for 40.
James Waterworth, Bungonia and Marulan, three days, + for 50.
James Woods, Campbelltown, Appin, Woonona, Wollongong, and Dapto, six days, + for 600.
Edward Graham, Dapto and Shellharbour, two days, + for 30.
Joseph Howard, Dapto, Jamberoo, Kiama, Geringong and Shoalhaven, six days, 500.
Christopher and William Murray, Shoalhaven, Sassafras, Nerriga, and Braidwood, one day, + for 230.
William Murray, Shoalhaven and Nowra, via Greenhills, three days, + 25.
John Allen, Shoalhaven, Nowra, and Ulladulla, via Greenhills, two days, + for 133 6s. 8d.
Philip Murray, Shoalhaven, Nowra, and Ulladulla, via Greenhills, one day, + for 66 13s. 4d.
Alfred Moult, Ulladulla and Bateman's Bay, two days, + for 120.
Mary Coffee, Bateman's Bay and Moruya, two days, + for 68.
Thomas Moran, Goulburn and Braidwood, via Boro, six days; Boro, Bungendore, and Queanbeyan, six
days; and Queanbeyan and Cooma, six days, + for 900.
David Wilson, Braidwood and Major's Creek, via Bell's Creek and Bell's Paddock, three days, + for
120.
David Wilson, Braidwood and Little or Mongarlowe River, two days, +for 75.
Thomas Moran, Bungendore and Molonglo, three days, + for 84.
Thomas McGee, Nelligen (Clyde River), and Braid- wood, two days, + for 250.
John Doughty, Major's Creek, Oranmore and Stoney Creek, via Ballalaba, two days, + for 58.
P. Heffernan, Braidwood, Araluen, Mullenderree, and Moruya, via Reidsdale, two days, + for 225.
C. J. McGregor, Moruya, Bodalla, Bega, Merimbula, and Pambula, one day, + for 160.
John Otton, jun., Moruya, Bodalla, Bega, Merimbula, and Pambula, one day, + for 180.
J. J. Roberts, Goulburn, Collector, Gundaroo, Gin- ninderra, and Queanbeyan, two days, + for 220.
Thomas Moran, Queanbeyan and Lanyon, two days, + for 68 12s.
Thomas Moran, Cooma, Adaminiby, Russell's and Kiandra, one day, + for 228 11s. 6d.
J. J. Roberts, Cooma, Adaminiby, Russell's and Kiandra, two days, + for 600.
William McGregor, Adaminiby and Cathcart, one day, + for 300.
William Roohan, Cooma and Buckley's Crossing Place, via Woolway and Jejizrick, one day, + for 138.
David Delves, Cooma and Bombala, two days, + for 350.
Edward Jones, Bombala and Delegate, two days, + for 110.
Charles Robertson, Bombala, Cathcart, Pambula, and Eden, via Big Jack's, one day, + for 210.
Charles Robertson, Pambula and Eden, two days, + for 55.
J. M. Munoz, Goulburn and Kenny's Point, via Bangalore, one day, + for 69.
James Martin, Goulburn, Tarlo, and Taralga, via Chatsbury, one day, + for 58.
Isaac Pratton, Goulburn, Laggan, and Tuena, one day, + for 160.
George Evans, Goulburn and Binda, via Mummell, Pomeroy, Gullen, and Wheo, two days, + for 160.
George Webster, Binda and Tuena, two days, for 80.
W. Henry Smith, Binda and Bigga, one day, + for 37. 10s.
James Maloney, Wheo, Reid's Flat, and Cowra, one day, + for 126 6s. 4d.
William Crane and J. J. Roberts, Goulburn, Gunning, and Yass, daily, + 531 4s.
James Garry, Yass, Binalong, and Burrowa, two days, for 240.
Patrick Forbes, Yass and Gundaroo, two days, + for 80.
Jacob Marks, Binalong, Murrumburrah, and Wagga Wagga, via Dacey's and the Levels, two days, + for 600.
Allan Hancock, Burrowa, and Reid's Flat, via Hovell's Creek and Phil's Creek, one day, for 60.
Daniel Crottay, Burrowa and Cowra, via Marengo, and Bumbaldrie, one day, + for 135.
Thomas West, Marengo and Morangarell, one day, + for 100.
John Sheehan and Laurence Garry, Yass and Albury, three days, + for 2,285 3s. 2d.
Robert Elliott, Yass and Albury, three days, + for 2,400.
Edward Doyle, Gundagai and Tumut, three days, + for 210.
Edward G. Brown, Tumut and Kiandra, one day, + for 480.
C. W. Crawley, Tumut and Adelong, three days, + for 100.
Frederick Abbott, Tarcutta and Adelong, three days, for 285.
Alexander Bruce, Adelong, Upper Adelong, Tumberumba, and Ten Mile Creek, with a branch post to and from Copabella, Jingillack, and Welaregane, one day, + for 350.
James Gormley, Tarcutta and Wagga Wagga, one day, + for 95.
James Gormley, Tarcutta and Wagga Wagga, two days; Wagga Wagga, Gillinbah, Lang's Crossing Place, and Balranald, one day, + for 852 12s. 8d
James Gormley, Wagga Wogga, Gillenbah, Lane's Crossing Place, and Balranald, one day, +for 685.
James Gormley, Wagga Wagga and Deniliquin, one day, + for 470.
James Gormley, Wagga Wagga and Deniliquin, one day, + for 487 1s. 2d.
James Clifford, Lang's Crossing Place and Deniliquin. one day, + for 228 11s. 6d.
Richard Bill, Lang's Crossing Place and Deniliquin, two days; and Deniliquin and Moama, three days, + for 925.
Ralph Powell, Albury and Deniliquin, one day, + for 220.
Bevan and Co,, Deniliquin and Moama, three days, + for 260.
William Burgess, Deniliquin, Moulamein, and Balranald, one day, +for 250.
Thomas Pain and Robert Driscoll, Wentworth and Mount Murchison, once a fortnight, for 600.

NORTHERN ROADS.
James Cole, Sydney, Lane Cove, and Gosford, via Peat's Ferry, one day, + for 129.
Peter Fagan, Sydney, Lane Cove, and Gosford, via Peat's Ferry, one day, + for 100.
Peter Fagan, Gosford and Kincumber, one day, + for 16.
Morris Magney, Newcastle Wharf, the Post-office, and Railway Terminus, twice or oftener daily, for 100.
Morris Magney, Newcastle Post-office, and Branch Office at Lake Macquarie Road and the Junction, twice or oftener, daily, for 48 11s. 6d.
Thomas Baker, Raymond Terrace and Stroud, four days, + for 178.
John Williams, Stroud and Tinonee, two days, + for 245.
Robert Summerville, Tinonee and Wingham, two days, + for 27.
G. M. Fitzpatrick, Tinonee and Redbank, two days, + for 32 10s.
Reuben Richards, Tinonee and Port Macquarie, two days, + for 210.
Thomas Carney, Port Macquarie and Huntingdon, one day, + for 28.
Henry McCabe, Tinonee, Taree, Candleton, and Jones' Island, two days, +for 35.
Christopher Felton, Port Macquarie, Rolland's Plains, and Kempsey, two days, + for 108.
Otho O. Dangar, Kempsey and Frederickton, one day, + for 36 11s. 6d.
Otho O. Dangar. Kempsey and Armidale, once a fortnight, for 73.
Robert Hyndes, Post Office and Railway Station, West Maitland, twice or oftener, daily, for 52.
Alexander McGilvray, West Maitland, East Maitland, and Morpeth, seven days, for 49.
Alexander McGilvray, Railway Station and Post Office, East Maitland, Morpeth, and Hinton, seven days, for 67.
Lawrence Arnold, Hinton, Seaham, Clarence Town, Brookfield, and Dungog, three days, + for 145.
Thomas Irwin, Dungog and Bandon Grove, three days, + for 28.
Robert Lloyd, East Maitland, Largs, and Paterson, seven days, for 125.
William Shearwood, Paterson and Gresford, three days, + for 35.
Francis Randall, Gresford and Eccleston, one day, + for 20.
Patrick McCloy, Gresford and Lostock, two days, + for 25.
Thomas Moore, East Maitland and Mount Vincent, one day, + for 24.
Thomas Moore, Maitland, Millfield, and Wollombi, three days. + for 180.
John Gill, Railway Terminus and Post Office, Lochinvar, and Singleton, seven days ; and Singleton and Murrurundi, four days. + for 1844 5s.
John Gill, Singleton and Murrurundi, two days; and Murrurundi Land Armidale, three days ; + for 3450.
Joseph Clark, Singleton and Fordwich, two days.+ for 85.
Thomas Howard, Singleton and Jerry's Plains, -via Cockfighter's Creek, and in time of flood via Thorley's, three days.+ for 77.
Patrick Ward, Muswellbrook, Merton, Merriwa, and Cassilis, three days.+ for 777.
William Acheson, Cassilis, Coolan, and Coonabarabran, one day.+ for 142.
James M'Cubbin, Coolah, Denison Town, and Cobbora, one day,+ for 90.
J. A. Johnstone, Coolah and Gulligal, one day. for 149.
Seymour Denman, Wallgett and Coonabarabran, via Kienlry, &c, one day.+ for 179.
John Gill, Murrurundi, Tamworth, Bendemeer, and Armidale, three days. + for 3980.
Joseph Taggart, Murrurundi and Oakey Creek, one day.+ for 120.
John Gill, Murrurundi, Breeza, and Gunnedah, one day, for 159.
John Gill, Murrurundi and Gunnedah, via Warra, Breeza, and Carroll, one day; and Gunnedah, Gulligal, and Wee Waa, one day. + for 550.
Abraham Johnstone, Gulligal and Warialda, one day.+ for 168.
William M'clelland, Goonoo Goonoo and Nundle, via Bowling Alley .Point, two days. + for 175.
A. S. Bourke, Goonoo Goonoo and Nundle, via Bowling Alley Point, one day, + for 71 8s. 7d.
John Gill, Armidale and Drayton, two days ; Tamworth, Warialda, and Calandoon, one day; Warialda and Wee Waa, one day ; Tamworth, Carroll, and Gulligal, one day: Wallgett. Caidmurra, and Callandoon, one day ; Wee Waa and Wallgett, one day; Warwick and Ipswich, via Cunningham's Gap. one day; Wallabadah and Quirindi, one day ; Uralla and Rocky River, three days ; + for 3900.
James Keating, Walgett and Fort Bourke, once a fortnight, for 350.
William Sly, Fort Bourke and Mount Murchison, travelling either side of the Darling, once a fortnight, for 275.
W. M. Stevenson and William Martin, Armidale and Grafton, and Bendemeer and Bundarra, one day, + for 390.
W. M. Stevenson, Armidale and Walcha, one day ; and Bendemeer and Walcha, two days, for 232.+
Gabriel Wardrope, Armidale, Byron, and Frazer's Creek, via Moredun, Paradise Creek, Newstead, Inverell, Buckalla, one day. for 150.
Edward M. Wright, Tenterfield and Frazer's Creek, one day, + for 144.
Charles Tuckwood, Tenterfield, Tabulan, and Grafton, one day, + for 288.
Ellen Thompson, Lawrence and Casino, one day ; Grafton and Casino, one day, + for 400.
Henry Sheldon, Lawrence Tabulam, and Tooloom, via Pretty Gully, one day + for 200.
James Duffy, Casino and Richmond River Heads, one day. + for 150.
John Brown, Casino and Brisbane, one day, for 265.

SUBURBAN.
Peter Fagan. Sydney, St. Mark's, Waverley, and Watson's Bay, six days for 99.
G. H. Stevens, Sydney and St. Leonard's, twice a day, + for 40.
Robert Gannon, Sydney and St. Peter's, twice a day, for 12.
John Grice, Sydney and Randwick, twice a day, for 20.