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WINDSOR nsw Local Recruits.1916

Windsor and Richmond Gazette, Friday 21 April 1916
Local Recruits.

AKINS, CHARLES, Windsor
AKINS, THOMAS
ALDERTON, BERT, Windsor
ARMSTRONG, ROY, Windsor.
ARMSTRONG, GEORGE F., Cornwallis
ALLEN, WiLLIAM CHARLES, Windsor
ARNOLD, W., Windsor
BRADSHAW, R. N., Scheyville
BAIRD, NORMAN, Pitt Town
BAIRD, ERIC J., Pitt Town.
BALL, WILFRID A., Lower Portland
BAKER, W., Oakville.
BARTLE, THOMAS, Windsor.
BASS, OLIVER, Windsor
BENNETT, W. H.. Windsor
BELL, ROBERT, Wilberlorce
BLACKET, ULRIC A., Vineyard.
BLACKET, NIGEL A., Vineyard.
BOLTON, Hy. H., Windsor (wounded).
BROOKS, JOHN, Freeman's Reach.
BLACKMORE, WALTER, Wilberforce
BROWN, BOY, Wilberforce.
BROWN, WILLIAM EDWIN, Oakviile (rejected).
BRENNAN, SERGT. G., Scheyville
BUCHANAN. DONALD, Windsor
BOWMAN, WILLIAM J., Courangra
BUTTSWORTH, ROY, Bullridge
BUTTSWORTH, GLEN., Bullridge
BRAGG, ROWLAND, Maroota.
CALLAGHAN, CLIVE, Windsor
CALLAGHAN, REG., Windsor
CALLAGHAN, CLEN. C, Windsor (not accepted.)
CAMPBELL, WALTER, Lower Portland
CASE, G. (not accepted)
CASE THOMAS, Bullridqe
CAMBRIDGE, K., Windsor
CAMBRIDGE, THOMAS, Windsor
CAREY THOMAS, Magrath's Hill (killed)
CLARKE, B., Oakviile
CLARKE MANFRED H., Windsor
CLOUT, LESLIE, Windsor
CLIFFORD, FREDERICK, Windsor
CLIFFORD, OSCAR, Windsor
CLIFFORD, CHARLES, Windsor
COBCROFT, B. H., Windsor
CONROY, GEORGE. Pitt Town
COOPER, ALICE, Windsor (Matron Hospital Ship)
CONNELLY, FRED., Windsor (killed)
CAMPBELL, ROD, Leet's Vale (not accepted).
CHRISTIE, JERSEY, Lower Portland.
CROFT, G.
CUPITT, GUY FRANKLIN (rejected)
CLARKE, LAWRENCE CLYDE'
CARSON, FREDERICK JAMES, Cattai.
DAVIS, ERIC, Windsor
DAVIS, TRISTRAM J., Pitt Town' (not accepted)
DEAL. LESLIE, Laughtondale
DICKSON, P. A., Windsor
DICKSON, WALTER. Windsor
DICKSON, JOHN, Windsor
DUNN, RICHMOND, Windsor
DWYER, GREGORY, Clarendon
DWYER, JOHN, Clarondon
DWYER, WILLIAM, Clarendon
EATHER, CECIL George. Windsor (killed 1915 Gallipoli)
EATHER, FRANK Hilton, Windsor(Killed 1917, Bullecourt)
EATHER, FREDERICK Reuben, Upper Colo
EATHER, ROLAND JAMES, Upper Colo.(killed 1917, Ypres)
FIASCHI, Dr. THOMAS. Sackville
FULLERTON, Dr. A. Y., Windsor
FARLOW, ALWYN, Freeman's Reach
FARLOW, CECIL V., Windsor
FLEMING, GEORGE, Central McDonald(killed).
FORD, A. E., Windsor
FORD. HERBERT, Windsor.'
GREEN. MERVYN, Magrath's Hill
GOW, HAROLD, Windsor
GIBSON, GEOF. V., Windsor
GIBSON, V. J. V., Windsor
GREENTREE, C. A., Cattai
GREENTREE, D. S., Cattai
GREENTREE, ALFRED JAMES Cattai.
GOSPER, CHARLES, Windsor'
GOSPER, CLARENCE. Upper Colo
GOSPER JOSEPH. Upper Colo
GRONO, WILLIAM CHARLES, late Windsor
GADSDEN, E. JEFFERY, (not accepted)
GREENWELL, ERIC .
HAGEL, ERNEST, Lower Portland
HALL, RONALD, Wilberforce (not accept
HANCHETT, SAMUEL, Windsor
HARDRES ALFRED, Scheyville (not accepted)
HAXBY, E. C. H. Windsor (twice wounded)
HAXBY, HAROLD G.
HARRIS ARTHUR, Upper Colo
HEARNE, ARTHUR, Central McDonald
HERPS, ARTHUR M. C, Lower Portland.
HERPS, CLAUDE, Lower Portland
HERPS, CARL, Lower Portland.
HERPS, RUPERT, Lower Portland.
HOLDEN, REGINALD, Windsor
HONEMAN, GARNET, Windsor (rejected)
HONEMAN, GORDON, Windsor (rejected)
HOSKISSON, JAMES, Clarendon
HOUGH, ERNEST, Windsor
HIDER, F., Windsor
HIPWELL, H., Windsor
HIPWELL, WALTER Windsor
HUDSON, SID, Vineyard
HUGHES. ROBERT B., Windsor
HULBERT, WILLIAM, Windsor (wounded).
HUMPHRIES, T. (not accepted)
HENNING, WILLIAM, Lower Portland
HIBBERT, RICHARD THOMAS, Freeman's Reach
HESSION, CLEVE.
HOLDEN, JAMES, Windsor
HOBBS, REGINALD, Pitt Town
HUNT, GEORGE C, Windsor, (rejected).
IRELAND, G., Windsor
JAMES, HENRY, Windsor
JENNINGS, C. R. E., Windsor
JENKINS, THOMAS, Lower Portland (wounded;
JOBSON, HUBERT CLIFTON
JOHNSTON, CLARENCE (not accepted)
JONES, JOSHUA, Ebenezer
JONES, HILTON, Windsor
JONES, RUSSELL, Cattai
JONES, BERT, Sackville.
JURD C. C. St. Albans (wouridadj
JURD, OWEN PEARSON, Central McDonald (wounded)
JOHNSTON, STAUNTON, Magrath's Hill.
KELLY, EDMUND, Scheyville
KEMP, ARTHUR, Ebenezer
KINGHAM, ARTHUR, Freeman's Reach
KINGHAM, JOHN, Freeman's Reach
KINGHAM, STANLEY, Freeman's Reach
KERSHAW. PICTON, Sackville.
LARAGHY, VICTOR. Sackville
LARAGHY, JACK, Sackviile
LARAGHY, ROY, Sackville
LAYCOCK, G. C, Scheyville (not accepted)
LIDDLE, EDWIN S.. Windsor
L1DDELL, SYDNEY, Windsor
LIDDLE, FRED., Windsor
LINDSAY, A. J. H., Cattai
LINDSAY, W. S. T., Cattai
LEE, - , Lower Hawkesbury
LEET, SIDNEY, Leet's Vale (ill)
LILLIS, LEO, Freeman's Reach
LOCKART, HUBERT CLENDON, Wilberforce
LOCKART, WILLIAM RALPH, Wilberforce (not accepted).
LYE, ERIC, Upper Colo.
MAISEY, FRED. T.. Windsor
MALONEY, D., Central McDonald.
MALES, HENRY. Upper Colo
MALES, WILLIAM, Upper Colo
MALES, ARTHUR. Upper Colo.
MARR, ALEXANDER, Central Colo
MARSHALL, A. CAMPBELL, Caltai
MARSHALL, STEWART, Cattai (not accepted).
MARTIN, ERNEST, Freeman's Reach
MITCHELL, BENTLEY (Bullridge), recovered from illness.
MITCHELL, G. W. Bullridge.
MOLLOY, JAS. V., Windsor
MOSES, JAS. W., Windsor
MULL1NGER, ROYr, Windsor
McCULLOCH, D., gcheyvfllo
M'KELLAR. ERNEST
MARNEY, EUGENE, Windsor
McDONALD, LIEUT. A. J., Scheyville
McDOUGALL, HAROLD, Lower Portland.
MARTIN, WILLIAM, Freeman's Reach
NAGLE, E., Upper Colo
NOLAN, THOMAS, Lower Portland (died of illness)
NORRIS, ARTHUR, Windsor
NORRIS, HENRY, Windsor.
NYE, PERCY GEORGE, Cattai
O'BRIEN, V.. Windsor
OGDEN, JOSEPH, Oakviile (wounded)
ONUS, LAL?,(LANGLY)
O'TOOLE, LEIGHS
PAGE, PHILIP C, Lower Portland
PAINE, LIEUT. -COLONEL J. J., Windsor.
PARKIN, R. T., Windsor
POTTS, ROLAND, Windsor
PYE, Dr. CECIL R. A, Windsor
PEARCE, WILLIAM P., Pitt Town
PYE, ERIC J. D., Windsor
PICKUP CLIVE, Windsor
PICKUP, FRANK A., Windsor
ROBERTS, JOHN JOSEPH, Pitt Town-road
ROBERTSON, Wm, Windsor
ROBERTSON, F. J., Windsor (not accepted).
REES, VICTOR JOHN, Windsor
RHODES, WILLIAM R., Wilberforce (not accepted).
RUTHERFORD, ROBERT, Oakviile
RIGG, WILLIAM, Sackviile
RYAN, HUGH, Jun., Pitt Town (not accepted).
SANDOZ, GEORGE E., Windsor
SCHOLER, RICHD., Windsor
SCHOLER, JOHN, Windsor (not accepted)
SHIRLEY, WILLIAM, Windsor
SHEPHERD, GEORGE, Clarendon
SHIMMELS, ARTHUR, Scheyville
SMITH, WALTER C, Currency Creek
SIM, E., Windsor
SMITH, ROBT., Freeman's Reach
SPARKES, THOMAS, Lower Portland
START1N, Wm., Mulgrave
SMITH, ALBERT EDWARD, Freeman's Reach
SMITH, FREDERICK, Freeman's Reach.
SWORDS, R. E., Windsor
SULLIVAN, REGD., Windsor
SOUTH, R. B., Scheyville
SIMPSON, CECIL, Wilberforce
SIMPSON, NORMAN, Wilberforce(wounded).
SHADLOW, CECIL D. (no! accepted)
SMITH, FREDERICK A., Scheyville
SMITH. JOHN, Scheyville
STREETER, FREDERICK, Windsor,(wounded).
STREETER, ROY, Windsor (killed).
STREETER, OSCAR, Windsor
SMALLWOOD, WILLIAM J., Cattai
SOWDEN, ROLAND, Windsor
SIMMONS, RICHARD T., Upper Colo
STEWART, CHARLES, Windsor
TURNBULL, CECIL G. W. Wilberforco(wounded).
TAYLOR CHARLES, Lower Portland
TAYLOR, FRED. C, Windsor
TEALE, ALEX., Wilberforce
THOMSON, F. S., Cattai
THOMPSON, JOHN ALBERT, Caltai
TOOMEY, ALFRED, Windsor (killed)
TOOMEY, EDWARD, Windsor
TOWERS, JOHN
TURNBULL, FRED., Wilberforce (wounded)
TURNBULL, HARRY N., Wilberforce
TUCKERMAN, JACK, Windsor (not accepted).
ULSTROM, CHAS., Windsor
UPTON, CECIL, Windsor
UREN, Dr. CECIL, Windsor
WALKER, ARCHIBALD G., Windsor
WALL, STANLEY, Windsor (wounded)
WOODS, WILLIAM H., Sackville
WARD, OSCAR D., Windsor (injured).
WARD, WILLIAM, Windsor
WHITE, W. FRANK Vineyard (wounded).
WHITE, ROLAND (Cattai)
WOOLARD, ALFRED, Windsor
WOOD, EDGAR CLAUDE, Windsor
WOODS, JAMES
WHEELER, WILLIAM T., Windsor.
WALKER, WILLIAM GEORGE, Windsor.
WILSON, WILLIAM, Pitt Town.

RIVERSTONE LIST.

ALDERTON. R.
ALCORN, S.
ALCORN, CECIL
BAMBRIDGE, PHIL.
BROOKS, ALFRED .
BERTIE, J.
BERTIE, LEO
BROOKS, ERNEST
BORROWDALR. GEORGE PROUD. '
BROWN, JOSEPH
CARTER, FRANK .
CASSIDY. JOHN.
CLARKE. F.
CLOUT, CYRUS
COMYN, FRANK
CONWAY, JOHN
DAVIS. H.
DAVIES, W.,
DRAKE, E.
DRAYTON, S.
EDWARDS, WILLIAM.
FLETCHER, THOMAS JOSEPH.
FREEMAN, HERBERT
FOLEY, F. W.
GRIFFIN, E. W.
GRENSHAW, CECIL (not accepted;
GREEN, JOHN.
GIBSON, EDWARD CLAUDE.
HAYWARD, F. A.
HAYWARD, JOHN
HAYWARD, ROBERT
HURLEY, F.
HEWITT, EUWIN F. EL,
JOHNSTON, HAROLD (wounded)
JAMES, MATTHEW.
JONES, JOHN.
JONES, ROBERT.
KNIGHT, C. C.
KENNY, JACK (wounded). :
KENNY, R. E. G. (wounded
KEEGAN, F.
MACKAY, WILLIAM STEWART,
MASON. AMBROSE
MARLIN, ERNEST
MATTHEWS, REX.
MATTHEWS. ERIC
MORRIS, CLEMENT
PYE, J. J.
RIMMINGTON, H. J.
ROBBINS, J.
SCHOFIELD, A.
SCHOFIELD, E. .
SCHOFJELD. H.
SCHOFIELD, S. R. (not accepted)
SHOWERS, A. R. (killed)
SMITH, AUSTIN, (wounded)
SYMONDS, J.
TEALE, W.
TEALE, GEORGE
TAYLOR, FRANK W..
WIGGINS, C.F., seriously ill
Below:
Service No.1544 Private Cecil "Curly" George Eather, 3rd Battalion of Windsor, New South Wales.
He died at sea on 17 May 1915 aboard the SS Lutzow from wounds received in action at Gallipoli, Turkey, on the 8 May 1915, aged 22. He has no known grave and is remembered with honour on the Lone Pine Memorial, Gallipoli, Turkey.


1 comment(s), latest 1 year, 1 month ago

LAND GRANTS NEW SOUTH WALES 1821

SURVEYOR GENERAL'S OFFICE, SYDNEY NEW SOUTH WALES
28 April 1821
JOHN OXLEY, Surveyor General.

THE following LIST of NAMES of NEW SETTLERS, who are to receive GRANTS of LAND, and of OLD SETTLERS, who are to have additional LANDS located for them in the Year 1821, is published for general Information:

James Atkinson, Thos. Arkell, Edward Alcorn, Robert Aull, James Arndell,
Thomas Allen, George Alleburn, Samuel Arndell, Richard Adams,
Francis Allen, Jos. Atkins, William Alsop, J. Aiken, Francis Able,
Michael Ansell, Edward Allen, Thos. Asplin, Thomas Ashford,
Charles Armitage, Pat. Allen, J. Andrew, J. Agland,
Alex Berry, George Barber, William Baker, David Brown,
Wm. Bradbury, Robert Bateman. Geo. Best, sen.
Bryan Byrne, Michael Bryan, J. Brown, Noah Bryan,
Charles Beasley, Timothy Brophy, J. Brown, John
Bryan, Wm. Bruce, Thos. Byrne, John Booth, N.
Boon, Wm. Beaumont, Thos. Bowers, Thos. Bates,
Wm. Beggs, Dennis Bigley, Jas. Bolsover, J. Brown,
J. Brackfield, George Bradley, Wm. Bannister, Thos.
Bowning, Sam. Barber, Thos. Bird, Michael Byrne,
Jas. Brackenry, J. Bent, Thos. Bates, Thos. Baker,
J. Barker, J. Byrne, Thos. Biggen, Andrew Biggen,
Jas. Beckett, J. Bell, Thos. Benson, Bursella Bensley,
Edw. Burke, Brien Bagnall, Jos. Bullock, Jas. Badgery,
H. Batman, Owen Byrne, Jas. Butler, Richard
Bryan, H. Butler, Aaron Burt, J. Burrell, Daniel
Brown, J. Bentley, Stephen Burr, Wm. Britain, J.
Bradford, Jon. Broker, J. Bowman, Wm. Barron,
Jas. Byrne, Martin Burke, Geo Best, jun. James Barker,
Jas. Brailey, Jas. Burgess, H. Bray, Thomas Byrne,
Robert Brodie, Jas. Burke, Thos. Brown, J. Brown, Thos Brian,
Wm. Burridge, D. Burne, Wm. Briant, Eber. Bunker, James Butler,
Silvester Butler, Owen Boyne, J. Bennett, D. Brown, John Bayley,
Edward Bailes, John Bull, John Bailes, jun.
Daniel Bisex, Michael Boland, Thos. Cowper, James Cobb,
Donald Cameron, George Cutter, Adam Clink, Isaac Cornwall,
William Chadworth, Timothy Connor, James Carroll, John Cahill,
John Cheers, Benj. Carver, Owen Connor, Peter Cooney, John Crawley,
Thomas Campbell, Richard Cavanagh, Jas. Cavanagh,
James Cox, George Clarke, Samuel Craft, Thomas Cross, John Cribb,
Peter Carrol, Roger Connor, John Cowley, John Craft, John Colcroft,
William Craig, Farrell Cuffe, John Cromen, Dennis Connolly,
James Connell, Michael Cartwell, Peter Carroll, John Collins,
Hugh Crabtree, Abraham Champray, Thos. Cowling, John D. Campbell.
Richard Carr, Dennis Conway, John Cummins, William Cheshire, Thos. Clarke,
Edward Churchill, John Chaseling, James Connelly, Thomas Cheshire,
John Day, John Dight, Andrew Doyle, William Davis, Edward Doyle,
Thos. Dutton, Jas. Donnelly, James Duffey, Wm. Douglas, Jas. Devlin,
Jas. Daly, Jas. Dempsey, Pat. Downey, Thos. Davy, Peter Dunn, Edmund Doyle,
Cyrus Doyle, Jas. Donahar, Stephen Dunn, Pat. Devoy, Pat Dacey, Michael Doran,
Nicholas Dukes, Thos. Downes, Charles Dodding, Geo. Dowling, J. Dell,
Francis Dalton, Jas. Dearing, Wm Dockrell, Michael Duggin, Richard Donelly,
J. Darrah, Isaac Dowse, Garrett Donally, John Dewhurst, Christopher Downes,
John Dogharty, Walter Duggan, Joseph Dargon, George Davis,
Shady Davey, Samuel Davis, John Davis, Thomas Davis, William Davis,
John Dalton, Patrick Downey, Edward Dillon, John Dunn, John Eyre,
John England, James Eldridge, Eliker Everitt, Joseph Eades,
Charles Eather ,Thomas Eather, Thomas Eather sen.
Joseph Emm, Joseph Earles, Daniel Eaton, Joseph Eyles, Henry Early,
William Edney, John Edney, Wm. Edwards, Wm. Eagleton, Wm. Etsell,
John Ellison, John Wm. Fulton, Wm. John Fitz, Henry Fleming,
Bernard Fitzpatick, John Frazier, Samuel Fry, George Freeman,
Wm. Field, Bernard Fitzpatrick, Robert Farlow, James Frazier,
Edward Field, sen. John Finch, Wm. Fulford, John Freebody,
S. Foley; James Freeman, Thomas Frost, Geo. Fieldhouse,
Francis Frendard, John Floyd, and J. Forster.
Robert Forrester, Wm. Forrester, John Farrell,
John Fowler, Richard Friar, John Foley, Edward Franks,
Edward Fletcher, William Flynn, Thomas Francis, jun.,
Patrick Flynn, Peter Fitzpatrick, John Ferguson, J. Golledge,
Wm. Guise, J. Galvin, Jas. Gooding, jun., James Goddard, Benjamin Grimshaw,
P. Garey, J. Grono, George Graves, James Greenslade,
J. Grant, Mich. Geary, Robt. Gray, Henry Gaskin,
Mich. Gavagan, Robt. Garratt, Benjamin Goddard,
Wm. Gwillim, Jas. Griffiths, Dennis Green, Wm.Goodere,
Wm. Galvin, Dennis Guinny, John Glade, Val. Goodwin, Richard Guise,
J. Goodwin, Thomas Galvin, Thos. Gilbert, J. Gosport, Joseph Gosport,
J. Gardner, Joseph Gilbert, Isaac Gorrick, John Higgins, George Howe,
J. Howe, Wm. Holmes, Wm. Hayes, Wm. Hardman, Joseph Hately,
Pat. Harper, Francis Hainsworth, William Hearn, Henry Howell,
Mich. Hogan, Richard Haviland, Philip Hogan, J. Harris, J. Harris,
William Hawkins, John Hanabus, Charles Herbert, Thomas Hinton,
Pat. Hand, Lawrence Harvey, David Horton, jun., J. Hope,
Thomas Hall, Wm. Hill, Peter Hough, Joseph Hunt, Henry Hunt,
Samuel Harding, D. Hawkins, George Hambridge, James Henry,
Maurice Hallihan, Edward Harrigan, Thomas Howell, George Hill,
Christopher Harris, Joshua Holt, Tim. Hoy, Wm. Harrington,
John Hodges, Mich. Hughes, John Hoile, Henry Hoile, Joshua Heap,
Abraham Herne, Lawrence Halfpenny, James Harper, John Herbert, jun.,
J. Hazard, Jas. Higgins. Robt. Higgins, Enoch Hutchinson,
Thos. Higgins, Peter Hibbs, jun., J. Holden, Wm. Hewitt, Edw. Hobbs,
J. Hearn, Thos. Hansey, Hugh Hughes, jun., Jas. Hall, Henry Huff,
George Hughes, J. Holt, George Higginson, Peter Hibbs, J. Holden,
Thos. Hooton, Wm. Howell, Francis R. Hume, J. Hendle, Jas. Hayden,
Jesse Hudson, David Horton, sen., Robt. Johnston, George James,
John Johnston, John Jacklin, Thomas John, George Johnstone, Wm. Jones,
Wm. Ikin, Joseph Inch, Wm. Jacklyn, Charles Ivory, Edward Jones,
Mich. Joyce, Thos. Jones, George Jubb, jun., Thos. Jones,
John Innes, John Johnson, Richard Johnson, Charles Jackson, John Joyce,
James Kay, William Klen endorlff, Pat. Kirk, John Kennedy,
Wm. Kearns, J. Keighran, Thos. Keane, J. Kirlaghan, R. Kibble,
Cornelius Keoe, Donald Kennedy, jun., John Kelly,
Joseph Lendall, Jas. Kavannagh, Duncan Kennedy,
John Kennedy, Wm. Kellow, Wm. Kenney, Thomas Kelly, Archibald Kane,
Daniel Kelly, Thomas Kelly, D. Knowland, Thos. Kendall, James Kelly,
James Kenney, J. H. Lawson, Walker Lawry, William Lilly,
Francis Lawless, Samuel Leverton, Henry Lendon.
J. Holmes, J. Lynch, Samuel Leverton, jun. Jas. Lewis,
Richard Lillis, Thos. Lawrence, J. Leadbeater, sen.
J. Larken, Peter Lawry, George Lilley, James Lyons,
Wm. Landron, Miles Leary, John Lavis, James Layton,
Nicholas Lacy, William Lees, Peter Lillis,
Elijah Lane, Wm. Lawrence, J. Lapish, Mich. Lamb,
J. Lees, J. Lacey, Owen Lenaghan, John Longford,
Wm. Lovegrove, H. Lamb, J. Lyons, Hannibal M'Arthur,
James M'Arthur, William M'Arthur, Charles M'Arthur, Andrew M'Dougal,
J. M'Henry, Henry Marr, Wm. Minchin, William Mobbs, J. Mobbs,
George Mobbs, Isaac Mobbs, J. M'Loughlin, Fred. Meurant,
Joseph Meyrick, Tristram Moore, Cornelius M'Arthy,
P.Moore, Pat. Mernan, J. Madden, Mich. Maloney,
Wm. Morgan, John Mills, Jas. M'Arty, jun.
Thomas Martin, jun. Jas. M'Arty, J. Mackey, Thos. Miller,
Christopher M'Guire, Thos Mortimer, J. May, Pat. Mason, Pat. Moore,
Thos. Maloney, Jas. M'Guire, Matthias Miller, Jas. M'Arty.
John M'Arty, William Makepiece, Thos. Moran, Fred. Murphy,
Patrick Mulhall, Thos. M'Caffery, George Maginnis, Edw. Merrick,
Thos. M'Kenna, Robert Maxwell, Henry M'Allister, James M'Manis,
John Murphy, George Marley, Kennedy Murphy, Patrick M'Hall,
George Murphy, Thos. Mustagh, Owen Martin, jun. George Mortimer,
Thos Murray, Charles M'Carty, William Mobbs jun. Jas. Mosely,
H. Morton, J. Merzagora, J. M'Peake, Isaac Mills, Jas. Macdonald,
Jas. Milson, Dennis M'Neary, Jas. M'Aloney, Brian M'Cormic,
John Moss Wm. Mannix, Michael Macdonald, John M'Donald, Joseph Mason,
John. M'Guigan, Joseph Mackinley, Thos. M'Guire, Jas. Marshall,
Thomas Moakson, Andrew' M'Dougall, Jame M'Dougall, J. M'Dougall,
J. Moss, Alexander M'Guigan, Patrick Mahar, Thomas McVitie,
Simon Moulds, Edward Meurant, jun, J. Matthews, Robt. Marshall,
William M'Haslan, Alexander M'Donald, Hugh M'Avoy,
J. Murphy, Mich. Minton, Jas. M'Donald, Patrick
Naughton, Richard Norris, J. Nash, Thomas Nugent,
Thos. Newman, Andrew Nash, Jas. Nugent, James Nowlan,
William Newport, John Norris, John Nowland, George Nash. J. Neil,
J. Nicholds, Walter Noy, F. O'Meara, J. O'Meara, p. Oakes,
James O'Brian, Charles O'Brien, James Owen, Thomas Owens, William Osburne,
Samuel Owen, James O'Harra, William Olds, Mark Opong,
Brien O'Brien, Wm. Oliver, Joseph Onus, Terence O'Brien,
Chas. Pennon, G. T. Palmer, George Panton,
Wm. Pithers, Mr. Parmeter, J. Price, Wm. Parkins
F. Pendergrast, J. Pike, J. Pike, Morgan Poor, N. Payton,
J. Pitcher, Saml. Paine, Wm. Page, John J. Peacock,
Robt. Plumb, J. Patfield, Thos. Prentice, J. Phillips,
Mich. Parker, George Pinkerton, F. Peisley,
George Phillips, J Pendergrast, Wm. Paris, J. Pye,jun.
Wm. Pritchard, Daniel Pegg, Saml. Perkins George Plummer,
H. Pullen, R. Partridge, Joseph Pashley, Mich. Power, J Pugh,
Deison Post, Tim Poor, F. Piper, Wm. Piper, H. Paul, J. Pender,
Jas. Pender, Edwin Rouse, Edw. Riley, Thos. Rose, Edw. Redmond,
J. Robinson, Chas. Rushton, John Riley, Malachi Ryan, Thos Riley,
J. Ready, J. Redmond, Wm. Reynolds, J. Ross, Barnabas Rix,
Wm Rafter, Mark Russell, Wm. Rose, Wm. Roberts, Joseph Rye, jun.
Mich. Rourke, Alex. Routledge, J. Riley, Nich. Ryan,
Wm. Rixon, Robt. Ray, Owen Riley, Thos. Rudd, J. Rudd,
Moses Rosetta, H. Rose, J. Roberts, Jas. Roberts, J. Ruby,
J.Robb, Edw. Redfern, Wm. Radley, Wm. Redfern, J. Rentwell,
Richard Ruff. H. Rochester, Barnabas Rix, Chas. Smith, Wm. Smith.
Mich. Stack, Jas. Stack, Jas. Shepherd, sen. G. Smith,
Wm. Scott, Jas. Shepherd, jun. F. Spencer, Andrew Scott,
J. Sunderland, Martin Sweeney, Dennis Shield,
Dan. Smallwood, George Sewell, Edw. Stinton, Jos. Smith,
H. Styles, Jas. Smithers, Wm. Skinn, Joseph Smith, jun. Wm. Smith,
Wm. Stenson, Jas. Smith, Edw. Shipley, Wm. Speers, Hugh Scott,
W. Scott, Wm. Smith, J. Smith, Jas. Smallwood, Roger Shea,
J. Scully, J. Stone, Thos. Stevens, Jos. Stubbs, Jas. Speers,
Wm. Stubbs, Wm Simms, Thos. Stone, Thos. Stack, Jos. Smith, Jas. Smith,
F. Stafford, James Smith, Dennis Stacey, Chas, Summerell, Stephen Smith,
J. Smith, Edw. Stowers, Daniel Step, Thos. Smith, Dan. Sweeney,
Thos. Sanders, jun. J. Smith, J. Stanbury, jun.
Robt. Smith, George Scott, Murty Shields, Wm. Sherries,
J. Sewell, Wm. Stabler, Chas. Throsby, jun.
Robt. Turnbull, Chas. Thompson, Wm. Tuckwell, J. Tindell,
J. Tarlington, Edw. Tompson, J. Turnbull, Jas. Thompson,
Chas. Thomas, Bishop Thompson, Thos. Thompson, J.Tague, J.Taylor,
H. Fretheway, Jas. Toucher, S. Tuckman, Chas. Tunks, H. Thorn, jun.
J. Thorm, jun. Jos. Tuzo, Jean Francois Theon,
J. Town, Jas. Turner, Wm Thorn, jun. Jas. Thomas,
D.Thompson, J. Taylor, Thos. Trotter, Jas. Turner,
George Tuckwell, Wm. Tyson, Philip Tully, George
Trace, Owen Tierney, Wm. Tompson, Thos. Turner,
James Vaughan, J. Vardy, R. Virgin, Thos. Vardy, J.Voildes,
Thos. Upton, Edw. Wollstonecraft, Wm.Walker,
George Woodhouse, G. P. Wood, George Ward, J. Whalan,
Wm. Welsh, Thos. Woolley, J.Williams, Edmund Wright,
Robt. Wilkinson, Daniel Wellings, J. Wright, J. Walker,
Jas. Williams, Wm. Wright, Chas. Wilson, Thos. Warner, P. Workman
Aaron Walkers, Job Wilson, Wm. Williams, Robert Wells, Thos. Wilson,
Thos. Wood, J. K. Williamson J. D. Wood, Wm. White, Chas. Watson,
J. Williams, Jas. Walbourn, J,. Weevers, Chris. Ward, H. Wells,
Wm. Walker, J. Warby, J. Warby, jun. J. Wood, James Wright.
Wm. White, Wm. Wakeman, James Whalan, James Were, J. Wright,
William Wall, Joseph Walker and Charles Yorke.


SOURCES:
The Sydney Gazette
(NSW : 1803 - 1842)
Saturday 28 April 1821
P.1
Saturday 5 May 1821
P.2
Saturday 12 May 1821
P.2
transcription, janilye
2012

Land Grants for 1820


Passengers on the Rooperell to New Zealand 1874

The following is a list of immigrants per ROOPERELL, which left Gravesend for New Zealand on the 23rd of February 1874 and arrived in Auckland on the 30 May 1874.
MARRIED
Sharp: Stephen W. 27, Emma. 26, William W. 4, Ernest A. 2, Ellen, infant.
Fryer: Thomas 42, Elizabeth 41, James 11, Ann 8.
Winter: James 40 Mary 34, Ann 13, Alice 12, Emily 10, Rose 8, Jane 6, William W. 4, Herbert 1.
Stevens: William 38, Martha S. 3l, Amy F. 2.
Laurence: Maliu? 28, Sophie 26, Sarah A. 8, Rose E. 6, Cornelius 4, Alice S. 1
Barrows: Henry W. 38, Sarah A. 37, Frances S. 10, Louise 7, Susan 5, Henry E. 3, Mark W. l.
Whittle: Charles 34, Maria 35, Ann M 4, Christianne 3.
Caro: George 31, Sarah 20 Emma 1.
Rogers: Henry 46, Mary 42, Joshua 10, Lydia 8, Edward 6, Kate 5, George 1.
Crayford: William 37, Anne 37, Ellen E. 4, Edith M. 2 Daisy M. 1.
James: James 40, Lucy 3O, Emily 6, Willie 1.
Archibald: Thomas 59, Harriett 46, Catherine 18
Archibald: William 22, Esther C. 22, William 1.
Curtis: Stephen 28, Sarah 20
Bland: John 33, Ann 22, Alfred 10, Charles 9, Stephen 7
French: Robert 31, Catherine 33, Peter 10, John 7, Robert 5, Catherine 3, Thomas 1
Hunt: Frederick A. 29. Maria 30, Millicent 11, Emma 10, Clara 6, Elizabeth 4, Ellen 1
Gabon ?: Robert 56, Rachel 35, Ann S. 12, Robert, W 10, John S 9, Eliza 7, Ellen 5,
Mo?e.: David 21, Maria J 22;
Curtis: Henry 31, Sarah 3l,Anne 9, Henry 7, James 3, Florence 1.
Connoll Wm. 36, Mary A 35, Phillip 8, Alice 11, Frances 6, Agnes 4, Catherine 2. Florence 1.
Hines: Robert 22, Emily C. 20.
Downy: Charlotte 37, Benjamin R 37.
McGraham: Thomas 26, Catherine 25.
Wey: William 32, Emily 30, Charles 6, Martha 4.
Beaney: George 38, Elizabeth 36.
Battishall: Thomas 30, Sophie 29, Florence J. 2, Charles T.1.
Hayes: Charles 40, Maria 38, Mary E. 15, William 11, Charles 7, John 4, George 1.
Payne: Albert 30, Alice 26,
Gregg: Alfred 24, Rebecca 24,
Port:Thomas 44, Susannah 28, Francis 20, Martha 16, Ann 15, Robert 13, Henry 5, Emma 4, Edith 2, Frederick C.1.
Dann: Thomas 30, Esther W. 23.
Harris: James 36, Margaret 33, Elizabethh 10, Mary ?.8, John 1.
Fuller: George 26, Hannah 26.
Grange: August 38, Melanie 36, Marie 15, Jules 8, Henrietta 5, Emile 1.
Watts: Thomas 32, Ruth 34, Thomas 13, Ann 11, June 9, A?? 4, Hannah 1.
Pewtress: William 24, Grace 26.
Grisby: George 26, Frances C. 31 Gertrude 5, Charles 3, William 1.
Mitchell: Henry 34, Elizabeth 30, Fanny 10. Hannah 8, Ruth 6, Charlea 4, Henry 1.
Wood: Thomas 26, Matilda 28, Matilda 6.
McDonald: William F. 30, Alice 23, Alice 4, William J. 2, Thomas 1.
Langdridge: James 30, Sarah 32, Elizabeth 2.
Saunders: John 38 Catherine 40, John 19, Henry 15, Walter 13, Clara 10, Alfred 8, James 6.
Williams: Alfred E. 30, Amelia 8, Elizabeth 5, Arthur 4, James 2.
Andrews: Alfred 33, Rachael 33, Harriet 12.
Jarvis: William 37, Anne 35, William 13, Kate 10, Minnie 7, Kermey 4, Rose 1.
Tapp: Thomas 21, Harriet 22.
Imison: William 32, Sarah 29, Sarah M. 9, Elizabeth J. 1.
Double: Charles 27, Ellen 21, Charles 3, William 1
Lovenzi?: Bertha 30, Rosa 30, Rosa 4.
Banks: Benjamin 29, Francis 25.
Williams: Elizabeth J. 24, Willie 1, Thomas 18;
McGaghan: Margaret 43, Thomas 21, John 19, Catherine 17, Margaret 16.

SINGLE MEN
Gamble, William 23; Rutlege, George 19; Groom, Walter 20;
Davies, John 37; Hunt, William R. 30; Papps, James 19; Hill James H. 19;
Green, Thomas 18; Madden, Charles 20; Wading, William 19; Draper, James 23;
Philpot Thomas G. 18; Owen P. 17; Urquhart, John 26; Dayton, John 25;
Exeter, William 26; Smallman, Edward 24, Robert 17; Apps, Robert 40;
Reading, Thomas 25; Barakt, Isaac 20; Jefferies, John 20; Carr, Robert 23;
Skeggs, James 21; Barnes, James 21; Parkins, John T. 21; Prevost, Thomas 19;
Wooer, Robert E. 19; Holloway, James 28; Hudson, John 20; Williamson, Mark 21;
Wheaton, Hector E. 19; Lloyd, John 27; Daly, Stephen 21; Smith, John K 37;
Bold, John T. 25; Foy, William 27; Slyth, John H. 19; Hand. John 21; Stephen, William 23;
Nicholas, R. 22; Wright, James 33; Grover, Albert 21; Williamson, John 33;
Strenlocks, Thomas 22; Pearce, Edward 24; Cockfield, John 20; Jamieson, Arthur 22;
Bracewell, James 22; Stillwell, William A. 28; Tyack Joseph P. 24; McMahon, John 24;
Pegg, Richard J. 19; Porter, Alfred 19; Cooper, Henry S. 20; Larter, Henry A 20;
Robinson, William T. 19; Miller, Henry V. 30; Putman, Frederick 23; Trimmer, W. 30;
Wenn, John E. 19; Attwood, George 25; Daubney, John H. 21; Alfrey, Alfred 27;
Savill, Walter, 18; lacey. William, 28; Simmonds, James 27; Taylor, Joshua W. 25;
Quayle, Alfred, 24; Card, Thomas, W. 21; Scotchmer, William 22; Ward, H. 34;
Janes, William J. 19; Brooks, James 27; McCarthy, Thomas 20; Byrne, John 21 ;
Albaret, Charles E. 22; Sirkett, Walter 22; Kewley, Charles 42; Marshall, William H. 23;
Sykes, Thomas A. 20 Norris Charles, 33 William, 8; Merganeth, J. 22; Martisi, Emanuel 23;
Accolino Anton 23; Pader, Louis 27; Gosetti, Jacob 23; Willendorf, Albert 26;
Voigt, Frederick 28; Delewalli, Peter 30; Luge, Luoni 29; Caloas, Leopold 26;
Spannazel, Carl 25; Crawford, Dan 22; Roe, Henry 23; Tucker, Stephen 19;
Schnell, Anton 33; Thiegel, Carl 36 Lehmann, F. 26; Erdman. R. 24, Quible, 24;
Baylis, George W. 23.

SINGLE WOMEN
Frost, Martha 19; Hunt, Catherine 24; Spackman, Sarah 19; Brewer, Sarah 20;
Rogers Mary 19, Helen 17, Emily 15, Fanny 12; Raines, Esther 19; Bowsher, Kate 14;
Bailey Mary G. 19, E. C. 24; Lanfear, Elizabeth 20; Jennings, Caroline 19; Saunders, Mary A. 17;
Fryer, E. 17;Middleton, Ann 18.

NOTE:
It's my belief that this was the one and only voyage to New Zealand for the Rooperell (aka Rooperel) After leaving New Zealand the ship was towed into Newcastle New South Wales, demasted.

The source for this transcription:
Papers Past

The COLLISION BETWEEN the BARRABOOL and BONNIE DUNDEE.

The inquest on the body of Sarah Brown, one of the
victims to the collision between the Bonnie Dundee and
Barrabool, was concluded yesterday, the jury finding a
verdict of manslaughter against the captain and mate of
the Bonnie Dundee. The inquest was commenced on the
12th instant, and that day's evidence we published, but the
following day the Coroner made an order against the pub-
lication of the evidence until the conclusion of the inquiry,
so we were unable to record the evidence from day to day.
The following are the statements of the witnesses, with the
exception of those taken on the 12th, which we have
already published :-
Dr. Owen Spencer Evans deposed that on Tuesday he was
called to a house in Darling-street, Balmain, and there saw
the dead body of a woman, about fifty years of age, which
he recognised as that of a woman known to him by the
name of Sarah Brownhe examined tho body and found
no direct marks of violence ; froth was oozing from the
mouth and nostrils, and the body generally presented the
usual appearances of death by drowning; witness was of
opinion that death had been so caused.
Thomas Crawford deposed that he was chief officer of the
lost steamship, Bonnie Dundee, a screw steamer, trading
between Sydney and the Manning River; she left
Sydney at forty minutes past 1 o'clock on Monday
afternoon, the 10th instant, her destination being
the Manning River: when the vessel got clear
of the heads her course was shaped N. by E. half
E.; the weather was fine and clear, a light breeze blowing
from the northward and eastward until tho evening, when
the wind fell and it became calm; witness took charge of
the deck at 6 o'clock; the vessel was then steering the same
course; shortly after 6 o'clock the coloured side lights and
white masthead light were lit and slipped in their usual
places; the steamer was then going at the rate of seven or
eight knots, and was about two or two and a half miles off
the land; the vessel had not a full cargo and was not deep
in the water; she answered her helm readily; about half
past 7 o'clock witness saw a masthead light, bearing about
north by east and about two and half miles distant ; at the
same time that witness saw the light, the look-out man on
the forecastle reported "a vessel a-head; the strange
vessel appeared to be steering a S. S. W. course; at this time
the moon was up a little, and the night was fine and clear,
with smooth water and little or no wind; a few minutes
after the look-out man reported the vessel, witness saw her
red light; he then ordered the man at the wheel to keep the
vessel off a point, and her course was accordingly changed
to north-east by north; the Bonnie Dundee kept on this
course until witness saw the green light of the approaching
steamer, about five minutes after he saw the red light; at
this time the captain of the Bonnie Dundee was on the
bridge on deck, witness was also on the bridge; the quarter-
deck of the Bonnie Dundee was raised about two feet above
the main deck; her deck was about 120 feet in length, and
her tonnage was 130 tons; at the time the strange steamer
was approaching, the Newcastle light was in sight about 15
miles on the port bow of the Bonnie Dundee; immediately
on seeing the green light of the approaching steamer,
witness gave the order to put the helm hard-a-starboard, and
then when the two vessels got to within half-a-length of each
other, he saw that the stranger had altered her course, so
that her red light was again showing; the captain, who
was on the bridge at the time, ordered the man at the wheel
to keep the helm as it was, and then he gave the order to
stop the engines and go full speed astern, but by that time
the stranger was close on to them on the starboard side,
and immediately afterwards struck the Bonnie Dundee
amidships; the water began to pour in on the main deck,
and the vessel heaved ovor heavily to port; witness saw
some of the men jump on board the other steamer, and he
had tho ship's hoat lowered, and took charge of it; the
Bonnie Dundee sank almost at once, foundering about four
minutes after the collision; there were four lady pas
sengers on board the Bonnie Dundee; one of them was a
Mrs. Brown, whose dead body witness viewed on Wed-
nesday, in a house in Balmain, in the presence of
the Coroner and jury; after the Bonnie Dundee had
foundered, witness's boat was pulled alongside the
strange vessel, which was then ascertained to be
the Barrabool, and witness was taken on board,
after assisting in recovering the body of Mrs. Brown;
(witness here expressed a wish to make a correction in his
former evidence: when the mast-head light of the Barra-
bool came in sight, the Bonnie Dundee was steering
N.N.E.;) at the time of the collision, the engines of the
Bonnie Dundee were going astern, but the vessel had still
a little way on, probably about two knots an hour; witness
could not say exactly at what rate the Barrabool was
going when she struck the Bonnie Dundee, but she was
going at great speed, and she struck with great force;
witness did not hear any order given on board the Barra
pool; in his opinion, after the collision, everything that
could possibly be done to save life was done by both ships.
To Mr. Rogers: Witness did not see the green light of the
Barrabool first, but the red one; when ships met in a line
the rule was to keep red light to red light, or green to
green; when the ships met end on, each ship ported her
helm. To a juror: Witness held a certificate of master in
a coasting vessel from the Marine Board; when the captain
was on deck, the charge of the ship devolved on him.
;John Alexander Stewart stated that he was master of the
BonnieDundee which left Sydney on Monday afternoon for
the Manning River: the Bonnie Dundee was 121 tons register,
an 45-horse power; her length was about 20 feet, and her
full power of steaming 8 knots an hour; witness went on
deck about 6 o'clock in the evening, and at about a quarter
to 8 he heard the officer of the watch, who was on the bridge,
sing out to the man at the wheel "hard a starboard;"
witness rushed up on the bridge and saw a vessel's green
light; he then asked the man at the wheel how his helm
was, and the reply was that it was hard a starboard, and
witness ordered the seaman to keep it so; very shortly after-
wards the green light of the approaching vessel disappeared,
and the red light became visible; on perceiving this,
witness gave orders to stop the engines, and this was done,
and about a minute afterwards the stranger having ap-
proached to within fifty yards of the Bonnie Dundee, the
engines were reversed full speed astern; very shortly after
this the stranger struck the Bonnie Dundee amid-
ships on the starboard side cutting about four feet
into the deck and smashing the starboard life-boat;
at once a number of the crew rushed to the part
of the deck where the collision took place and climbed up
the bows of the Barrabool; witness, not knowing exactly
the extent of the damage sustained by his vessel, ordered
the engines full speed ahead in order to try and reach the
beach which was about two and a-half miles distant; after
giving this order he perceived the uselessness of such an
attempt, and stopping tho engines, gave orders to lower
a boat which was promptly done; by this time
the lady passengers, four in number, were on the
bridge with witness and he, cutting away the lifo buoys
gavo them to the ladies; as soon as the boat touched the
water and got rid of the tackling, the stewardess, who had
a child in her aims, threw it into the boat, and immediately
afterwards the vessel went down with witness and the four
women on the bridge, all the others having left the ship
either in the boat or by climbing up the bows of
the Barrabool. Between three and four minutes elapsed
from the time of the collision until the vessel went down;
there were 21 hands on board all told at the time of the
collision; witness did not know, there was a vessel in sight
until he heard the mate give the order "hard a starboard;'
it was not the duty of the officer of the watch to report a
vessel in sight, to witness unless he thought there was
danger; when witness first saw the light of the Barrabool
she must have been about 300 or 400 yards distant, and the
Bonnie Dundee was going at the rate of 7 knots an hour
when the collision occurred, the Barrabool was, in witness's
opinion, going at a speed of about 3 knots.
To Mr. Sly: In witness's opinion the vessel was properly
handled after the light of the Barrabool had been sighted
the steam whistle was not used; it was not customary to use
it on a clear night like that on which the collision occurred
when the red light of the Barrabool was sighted, it was too
late to port the helm of the Bonnie Dundee, as the former
vessel was almost on top of her; at the exact time of the
collision the Bonnie Dundee was almost stationary; there
was no time to get the passengers into the boat before the
vessel went down.
To Mr. Rogers: The Bonnie Dundee was heading about
north-west when she was struck; everything was done by
the Barrabool people to save life.
To Mr. Manning: Witness did not think, under the cir
cumstances, that there was any occasion for the chief officer
(to communicate with him before allowing the ships to come
so close together if the green light of the Barrabool had
continued in sight; witness had given the Herald news
paper a report of the occurrence; - he was in bed when the
reporter came, and the chief officer was in the room; wit
ness was the only man left on board the vessel when she
went down.
Henry Dose, able-bodied seaman of tho Bonnie Dundee
joined tho vessel on Monday last; he was at the wheel at
the time of the collision with the Barrabool; he went to
the wheel about 6 o'clock, when about twelve or fifteen miles
south of Newcastle; the vessel's course was thena north
by east half east; about 7 o'clock witness was directed
by the mate to change the course to N.N.E.; the
vessel had passed Bird Island when that order was given;
the N.N.E. course was continued until the red light of a
steamer, afterwards found to be the Barrabool, was sighted
about four miles distant, and bearing about north on the
port bow; on seeing the red light, the mato gave the order
to keep the vessel off a little, and accordingly witness kept
her off another point, her course then being north-east by
north; that course was kept until the Barrabool, when
nearly abreast of the Bonnie Dundee, showed her green
light; the mate then gave the ordor, "Hard a starboard,'
and witness brought the vessel round till her head was
about north-west; the Barrabool was then almost on top of
them, and showing her red light, and immediately after
that she struck the Bonnie Dundee on the starboard side;
the captain went on the bridge about 10 minutes before the
collision took place; when the vessel waa struck, the captain
shouted, "look out for yourselves;" if the Barrabool
had not altered her course there was sufficient room for her
to have passed between the Bonnie Dundee and the land.
John Petersen, seaman of the Bonnie Dundee, was look-
out man on the forecastle when the collision occurred; he
went on the lookout about 6 o'clock; between 7 and 8
o'clock, while on the lookout, he sight a bright masthead
light, which appeared to be straight ahead; about five or
ten minutes after sighting the masthead light the red light
of the vessel came in sight; witness reported the light to
the officer in charge of the deck, and he said " All right:"
witness continued on the lookout on the forecastle, and soon
afterwards, when the vessels began to near one another the
red light disappeared and the green light came in sight
almost immediately after the green light of the approaching
vessel come in sight she ran into the Bonnie Dundee; when
first witness sighted the masthead light it was about two or
three miles off.
To Mr. Rogers: Witness did not notice whether the
Bonnie Dundee slackened speed; he could not tell that,
being forward.
To Mr. Monning: Witness did not see the red light of
the Barrabool a second time; he was looking at the Barra-
bool from the time she showed the green light until the
collision occurred; he climbed the bows of the Barrabool
after the collision.
To the Coroner: Witness heard the steam-whistle
sounded on board the Bonnie Dundee; there was so much
confusion and excitement that he could not tell whether a
bell was rung or a whistle sounded on board the Barrabool;
but he was quite certain that the whistle sounded on board
the Bonnie Dundee.
Thomas Crawford, recalled, deposed that when he first
saw the green light of the Barrabool it was on the port bow
of the Bonnie Dundee, nearly straight ahead; he lost the
red light, and a minuto or two afterwards saw the green
light; from the position the steamers were in to one
another, a slight movement of the helm would have caused
the change of lights; when he first saw the green light the
Barrabool was about her own length off; there was nothing
in the relative positions of the two vessels that would have
led witness to apprehend danger until he saw the green
light of the Barrabool.
John Charles Simmons, chief engineer of the Bonnie Dundee,
was attending, to the engines of the vessel when the collision
took place on Monday night; about a quarter to 8 o'clock
that evening he received an order by telegraph to stop, and
then "full speed astern" ; he obeyed both orders without
any delay; about a minute after he received the latter
order he felt a shock, and almost immediately afterwards
received the order "full speed ahead," quickly followed by
"stop"; after stopping the second time he went on deck,
and found the vessel sinking.
Henry Dose rocallcd: When he first saw the Barrabool
he saw the red light and the mast-head light.
To a juror: At the time he first saw the red light he did
not see the green light; when the mate saw the red light he
told witness to keep off a little, and witness then ported his
helm, which would have the effect of showing the red light
more; about a quarter of an hour elapsed between the time
witness first saw the red light, and the timo he received the
order "hard a starboard" he did not see the greenlight till
he got the order, "Hard-a-starboard;" if the Bonnie
Dundee had kept the course she was on before that order
had been given the Barrabool would have struck her on the
port bow; witness did not hear the lookout man sing out,
but that would be accounted for by the fact that he
(witness) was standing alongside the steam funnel, and the
noise from that would probably drown the shout of the
lookout man; witness got on board the Barrabool by the
bows.
Hercules Dalzell, one of the seamen of the Bonnie
Dundee, first saw the Barrabool's masthead light bearing
on the port bow about two points and about three miles
distant; he next saw the red light and some time after-
wards the green light almost abreast of the Bonnie Dundee;
as soon as he saw the green light, he heard the order given
by the mate, "Hard-a-starboard," and directly afterwards
the Barrabool ran into the Bonnie Dundee, which sank
about three minutes after the collision.
To Mr. Want: The first time that the vessel's helm was
shifted it was to starboard; witness was sure that it was
not ported before it was put to starboard; he could not say
whether the helm was not ported when the Barrabool's
red light was first sighted; it might have been at that time
without his noticing it.
To Mr. Sly: After the vessel's helm had been put to
starboard witness again saw the Barrabool's red light before
the collision.
To Mr. Manning: When the Barrabool's green light first
came in sight witness was forward on deck; if no other
change had been made from that time in the course of either
vessel, witness did not think there could have been a colli-
sion; after he first saw the green light of the Barrabool the
latter vessel appeared to change her course, and then her
green light came in sight; he heard the look-out report the
masthead light.
John Redmond Clarke deposed that he was master of the
screw steamer Barrabool trading between Melbourne,
Sydney, and Newcastle; she left Newcastle on the evening
of Monday, the 10th instant, clearing Nobby's Head at
half-past 6 ; it was a beautiful clear, moonlight night, with
a light north-easterly, wind blowing and the water
smooth; after clearing Nobby's the vessel's course
was shaped S.S.W. by compass, and that course
was kept until half-past 7, when it was changed
to S. by W. three-quarters W.; when the course was
altered the vessel had gone about ten miles; a quarter-of'
an-hour after leaving Newcastle the second mate took
charge of the deck; witness also was on deck; about twenty
minutes to 8 o'clock a masthead light was reported; witness
looked over the side and saw a masthead light about two
points on the starboard bow, and about 3 miles distant; a
few minutes afterwards he sighted a green light
he then spoke to the mate asking him if that
was not a green light the stranger was showing, the
mate replied in the affirmative, and witness then ordered the
man at the wheel to starboard the helm a little; the order
was hardly given, and was not executed, when the mate
drew witness's attention to the fact that the approaching
steamer (which afterwards turned out to be the Bonnie
Dundee) was showing her red light; witness then counter
maned his former order to the steersman, and gave the
order " hard-a-port," which was immediately obeyed
the light of the Bonnie Dundee, now about half
a mile distant, disappeared across the Barrabool's
bow; witness telegraphed to engine-room, "Stop her," and
directly afterwards, from the position of the Bonnie Dun
dee's light, thinking that they were going all clear, he was
about to telegraph to the engine-room to start her ahead
again, when suddenly the green light of the Bonnie Dundee
came in sight, and all three lights were in sight, revealing
that the vessel was bearing down right upon the Barrabool
witness instantly telegraphed the engineer, "Full speed
astern," and proceeded to blow the steam-whistle, several
times, at the same time the red light of the Bonnie Dundee
went out of sight, showing that she was bearing up towards
the bow of the Barrabool; immediately afterwards the
vessels collided, and witness gave orders to lower a boat
which was done without any delay; the boat was manned
by the chief mate and two seamen, who were instructed to
pull with all speed to the Bonnie Dundee, then in a sinking
condition on the starboard bow of tho Barrabool; witness
ordered the engines to go slow ahead, and when
his vessel had approached to within fifty yards
of the Bonnie Dundee, the latter went down; the
Barrabool was then stopped among the wreckage, and three
life buoys and some cork fenders were thrown overboard in
case there should be any person in the water; the boat of
the Barrabool, accompanied by that of the Bonnie Dundee
soon came alongside, and witness shouted out to them to
know if all hands were saved; receiving no answer
he went on the main deck, and hearing someone say there
had been four women on board, looked over the rail and in
quired if there were any women in the boats; the reply
was "no," and witness ordered the chief mate to go
back and see if he could find any one floating; the Bonnie
Dnndee's boat was also ordered away for the same purpose;
soon the chief mate of the Barrabool returned with a lady in
his boat; she was got on board, and though she appeared
to be quite inanimate, efforts were made to endeavour to
restore animation for more than an hour and a half, but
without avail: after bringing the lady on board, the boat
returned to search among the wreckage, but no one else was
found and witness asked Captain Stuart if he thought there
was any use staying longer; Captain Stuart replied that he
thought everv thing possible had been done, and after the
damage which had been done to the Barrabool's bow had
been repaired as well as could be under the circumstances,
the vessel proceeded on her course to Sydney; about a
hour and a half elapsed between the foundering of the
Bonnie Dundee and Barrabool's resuming her voyage to
Sydney. To Mr. Want: The look-out man of the Barra
bool was on the top-gallant forecastle, and to prevent any
mistake being made by the look-out man, the signals were
given by bells; there was nothing to interrupt witness's
view-nor that of the mate, the look-out man, or the man at
the wheel; there were passengers on board the Barrabool,
two of them-Mr. and Mrs. Lovell-were on the saloon
deck; when two bells, the signal of the Bonnie Dundee
coming in sight, were struck, Mr. Lovell asked
if that was 8 o'clock, and witness replied
"No, it is a light on the starboard bow;"
when first the Bonnie Dundee was sighted, if each
vessel had kept on her course they would have cleared each
other by a good half-mile; witness gave the order "star-
board a little to clear them a little more, but before the
order was obeyed the red light of the Bonnie Dundee came
in sight (here the models were again brought into use, and
at this time and throughout the remainder of his evidence
the witness explained the positions and manoeuvres of the
two vessels by their aid); seeing that the red light of the
Bonnie Dundee was on the starboard bow of the Barrabool
it was the duty of the latter to keep clear, and accordingly
witness had the helm put to port aud stopped the engine
and supposing they had gone on as they were then, they
would have passed each other quite clear; the green light
of the Bonnie Dundee, however, then came into sight; the
evidence of some of those on board the Bonnie Dundee had
stated that the green light of the Barrabool was seen
by them after they sighted her red light, but that was
quite impossible, as the Barrabool was on her port
helm after it was first ported; it was not true that after
showing her red light to the Bonnie Dundee the Barrabool
came across and showed her red light; when the
vessels collided, the Barrabool's speed was under a mile an
hour; the Bonnie Dundee was going about five or seven
miles; if the Bonnie Dundee had stopped her engines
the same time as the Barabool did there would have been
no collision, as the two vessels would not have reached one
another; the damage to the Barrabool was on the port bow,
about 20 inches from the stern, and was caused by the
Bonnie Dundee tearing across the Barrabool's bow; if the
Bonnie Dundee had not been going so fast she would not
have made the hole in the Barrabool's bow that she did.
To Mr. Sly: The Bonnie Dundee was about 3 miles
distant when witness first sighted her masthead light, and
about a mile distant when her green light was first seen
witness would positively swear that, at the time of the
collision, the Bonnie Dundee was going at a rate of about 5
knots an hour, and the Barrabool was going at a rate of less
than one mile an hour; immediately after the collision the
Barrabool had stern way on; when first the red light of the
Bonnie Dundee was sighted the vessels were about three
quarters of a mile apart.
To Mr. Manning: The masthead lights of each vessel
would probably have been sighted by the other at about the
same time, but the Bonnie Dundee would most likely have
sighted the side lights of the Barrabool before her own
lights could have been visible to the latter, as the moon was
rising and was putting the Bonnie Dundee's lights in the
shade; witness had heard the examination of the mate
the Bonnie Dundee; he (the mate of the Bonnie Dundee)
did port his helm in the first instance, and then after showing
a red light put his helm hard-a-starboard, and as a
matter of fact the helm of the Barrabool was first put a little
a-starboard and then hard-a-port; if the mate of the Bonnie
Dundee was right in saying that when he first sighted the
Barrabool, she was two miles on his port bow, that would
put the Bonnie Dundee about a mile further out to sea than
she really was; the Barrabool was about three miles out
from land when she first sighted the Bonnie Dundee.
To a juror: The Barrabool's full speed is ten knots an
hour; after giving the order to stop, if the engines were
reversed full speed astern, she would go about one-third of a
mile before she stopped altogether; there was a rule of the
road that when ships are meeting end-on, all lights being
in view, each vessel must port; that was the only case in
which that rule held good; when witness gave the order to
stop the engines immediately before the collision, it was
not, he considered, an error of judgment; if he had not
dono so the Bonnie Dundee would have run into the Barra-
bool; when witness gave the order "stop" the Barrabool
was going about 10 knots an hour; he did not think he
could have got ahead of the Bonnio Dundee by going full
speed ahead; when the Bonnie Dundee's red right was on
the Barrabool's starboard bow, it was the Barrabool's duty
to give way, and the Bonnie Dundee should have held on
her course.
Arthur Nelson Pidcock, second mate of the Barrabool,
with a master's certificate, was in charge of the deck when
the masthead light of the Bonnie Dundee was reported;
on looking at the light he saw it was bearing two
points on the starboard bow, and about 4 miles distant;
about 10 minutes after sighting the masthead light
of the Bonnie Dundee, the green light became visible ;
Captain Clarke who was on deck asked what lights
the steamer was showing, and witness replied, " Green, but
burning indistinctly ;" the captain replied, "Yes, oh yes,"
and then gave orders to the man at the wheel to starboard a
little; this order was scarcely given before the Bonnie
Dundee showed a red light; witness mentioned the fact to
the captain, who immediately had the helm put hard-a-port,
and gave the ordor to stop the engines; very soon after the
engines had been stopped the Bonnie Dundee showed both
her lights, but the red light soon went out of sight and the
green light showed close on the starboard bow of the Barrabool,
which at that time was going very slowly; shortly
afterwards the two vessels collided; tho Bonnie Dundee
appeared to have a pretty good speed; when the collision
took place the Barrabool's boat was lowered and sent away
to render assistance; after being absent someo time, the
boat returned with the body of the deceased Mrs. Brown;
after hanging about the scene of the wreck for over an hour
the vessel continuod on her course to Sydney.
To Mr. Waut: From the position of the Bonnie
Dundee when first she was sighted, it would have
been impossible for her to have seen the red light of the
Barrabool, and if the mate of the Bonnie Dundee had stated
that the gresn light of the Barrabool was the one first
sighted he would be correct; witness had read a report in
the Echo of the 11th instant, with reference to the mate's
statement about his seeing the green light of the Barrabool
first-that was correct; if the Bonnie Dundee had not
ported, the two vessels would have passed one another about
half a mile distant; t was only the Bonnie Dundee star-
boarding after her porting that brought her across the bows
of the Barrabool; it was untrue that the Barrabool after
porting her helm ever showed her green light to the Bonnie
Dundee; the Barrabool had not more than half a knot way
when the collision took place; the Bonnie Dundee appeared
to be going over four knots.
To Mr. Sly: Witness did not hear the Bonnie Dundee
blow her whistle at all; when first the green light of the
Bonnie Dundee came in sight the two vessels were about a
mile distant; the engines of the Barrabool were stopped on
the red light of the Bonnie Dundee becoming visible; witness
was of opinion that, according to the regulations of the
Navigation Act, the Bonnie Dundee was the vessel which
should have kept on her course while the Barrabool was the
giving way vessel, consequently the Bonnie Dundee should
not have altered her course.
Thomas Crawford recalled, in answer to a question as to
whether he had given a report of the occurrence to a reporter
of the Echo newspaper, stated that some persons had come
to him two or three hours after he arrived in Sydney,
and he gave them some account about the ships; he did not
know what he said to them; he could not say whether they
told him they were reporters for a paper; he could not say,
so far as he was aware of, that he gave the statement to the
reporters that appeared in the Echo of March 11th, he never
saw any account of the occurrence in the Echo.
To Mr. Sly: Witness was in the Caledonian Hotel when
they came and asked him some questions; he gave them no
written account ; it is not a fact that he first saw the green
light; he could not possibly have said so to a reporter ; he
did not say so; he could not say whether an account
appeared in the Evening News about the same time; ho did
not take notice of any newspapers; he was quite sober when
he made the statement in the Caledonian Hotel.
John Tucker, able seaman on board the Barrabool, went
to the wheel a few minutes after clearing Nobby's Head;
about an hour afterwards witness saw the mast-head light
of a steamer on the starboard bow, which had been signalled
by the lookout; she appeared to be running an opposite
course to that of the Barrabool; some time afterwards the
mate reported the green light of the steamer, and the
captain gave tho order, "starboard a little" ; witness was
just obeying that order when the mate reported a red light,
and the captain ordered the helm "hard a-port"; witness
obeyed the order, and, as he did so, saw the red light of the
Bonnie Dundee on the starboard bow; when the Barrabool
came round in answer to her helm, both the side-lights of
the Bonnie Dundee came in sight, and the red one disap-
pearing, she crossed the bows of the Barrabool; the captain
ordered the engines to stop, and a minute after gave "full
speed astern "; before the Barrabool had completely lost her
way, she struck the Bonnie Dundee amidships.
To Mr. Want: The helm was not put astarhoard at all
after it was ported; if any of the witnesses on board the
Bonnie Dundee had sworn that they saw the green light
of the Barrabool after having seen the red light, they
would have stated what was untrue; witness thought
that the Bonnie Dundee had more way on at the
time of the collision, but he would not swear to it;
it was about two or three minutes from the time witness
first saw the red light of the Bonnie Dundee until he saw
both lights, and about the same time between when the two
lights first showed and the collision.
William Lovell deposed that he was a passenger on
board the Barrabool at the time of the collision; he was on
the saloon deck of the Barrabool when the Bonnio Dundee
was first sighted, and on hearing the bell struck asked
if it were 8 o'clock, but the captain replied that it
was a vessel on the starboard bow; tho captain then
went to the starboard side of the vessel and look-
ing over said, "she is showing a green light;"
and then gave the order to the steersman "starboard a
little;" shortly after the mate on the bridge reported that
the vessel was showing a red light in place of the green,
and Captain Clarke gave the order "hard a port;" a few
minutes subsequently someone said that the vesssel was
showing a green light again, and the captain said "where
is she coming to ?" a few minutes after that the collision
took place; witness saw the white mast-head light of the
Bonnie Dundee when it was reported, and very soon after-
wards saw the green light; it was immediately after the
Bonnie Dundee showed the red light that the Barrabool's
engines were stopped.
To Mr. Want: He never heard any order given to star-
board the helm after the order to port it had been given ;
when he first saw the light of the Bonnio Dundee he had
no fear of a collision; there was no confusion on board the
Barrabool; Captain Clarke was very calm and cool, and
appeared to be exercising his judgment calmly.
Charles Wilson, able seaman on board the Barrabool, was
on the look out when the collision occurred; he saw the
masthead light of the Bonnie Dundee and reported it by
striking two bells, which signalled "a light on the starboard
bow;" when he first sighted it the light was two points
on the starboard bow and about four or five miles
distant; the vessel appeared to be steering in an
opposite direction to the course of the Barrabool;
about seven minutes after the masthead light was
sighted the green light became visible; several minutes
after the green light first came in sight, it disappeared, and
the red light took its place; Captain Clarke then sang out
"Hard a-port," and the Barrabool went round until the
red light of the Bonnie Dundee was on her port bow;
directly after that, both the Bonnie Dundee's side-lights
became visible, and then the red light disappeared, and the
Bonnie Dundee crossing the bows of the Barrabool, was
struck amidships, and shortly afterwards sank.
To Mr. Sly: The Barrabool was forging ahead very
slowly when the two vessels collided.
To the Foreman: The Bonnie Dundeo must have been
going at a rate of 4 or 6 knots an hour when she was crossing
the bows of the Barrabool.
Thomas Ashford, an able seaman belonging to the Barrabool,
was on the after part of the saloon deck when the
Bonnie Dundee's light was signalled; directly after the
light was signalled witness looked at the time and saw it
was twenty minutes to 8; shortly afterwards the officer on
the bridge reported a red light, and then witness went to the
assistance of the man at the wheel, and caught sight of the
red light bearing about two points on the starboard bow; as
soon as the mate announced the red light the captain gave
the order "hard-a-port;" the helm was put hard-a-port
and kept so until the collision took place.
To the Foreman: The Bonnie Dundee seemed to be going
very fast when she crossed the Barrabool's bows.
Isaac Wagland, second engineer of the Barrabool, was in
charge of the engine room when the collision occurred,
the chief engineer being off duty at that time; some time
between half-past seven and a quarter to 8 o'clock the
telegraph signalled "slow"; witness obeyed the order,
and then the telegraph signalled "stop" and "full speed
astern " in one order; the engines were at once stopped and
reversed, and about two minutes afterwards there was a
shock as if the vessel had struck something.
To Mr. Sly: If the Barrabool were going full speed
ahead, and the engines were stopped and reversed, it would
take two or three minutes before tho steamer would be
stopped.
William H. Dick, a reporter on the staff of the Sydney
Morning Herald, remembered hearing a rumour on the
night after the 10th instant that the Barrabool and Bonnie
Dundee steamers had collided; and in consequence of this
rumour he made inquiries to ascertain the truth of the
report; he saw the man before the Court, who
gave his name as Thomas Crawford; he stated
that be was the chief officer of the Bonnie Dundee;
the man giving his name as John Stewart was
present when witness interviewed the chief officer;
they were in the bedroom of an hotel, and Stewart,
who stated that he was the master of the Bonnie
Dundee, was lying on a bed; witness got the mate's state-
ment, which was to the effect that he was in charge of the
vessel at the time of the collision, that he saw the green
light about two miles ahead, and that he steered his vessel
so os to show his own green light: that suddenly he saw a
red light exhibited, and that soon after that Bonnie
Dundee was 'struck amidships on the starboard, the
captain was present when the mate made the statement
and did not contradict it in any way.
To Mr. Want: Witness reduced the mate's ?? to
writing; he went back a second time (after he to??
of the mate's statement), in company with the ??
reporter, in order that he might heur the stat ??
had a greater knowledge of nautical matters ??
was possessed of; the same statement was made and
time as had been on the first occasion; which he took
down the statement in shorthand and t?? it
into writing; he saw it afterwards in print it
was correct; the fifth paragraph after the ??
of the occurrence in the Echo of March ll, citing
" The chief officer of the Bonnie Dundee states, ??
ing with the words " escaping the suction,' was ??
ment made to witness by the mate; the same ??
wards appeared in the Herald of March 12th; ??
never asked to contradict these statements, nor ever
heard of any complaints about their being incorrect took
down the mate's statement in shorthand; ??
sitting in the same room with the captain; ??
very little about shipping matters, and the ??
to him what the three lights were.
To Mr. Manning: The mate did not appear under
the influence of liquor.
Thomas Crawford recalled : Had been ??
Sydney and the north for about 10 years; he ??
course steered by the Bonnie Dundee ??
particular occasion; it was the course generally used
in fine weather; the Bonnie Dundee was bound for the
Manning River, and had gone the same trips ??
18 months: when witness first saw the Barrabool ??
light she was about 225 yards off ; if he had seen ??
light on his port bow it would have been his duty ??
on his course, but he did not see her green light ??
bow; he saw it almost ahead; the Barrabool ??
been 1 or 2 points on the port bow when she ??
her red light; sometimes a couple of minutes ??
tween the time of losing one light and sighting the other;
it was a fact that the losing of one light necess??
immediate picking up of the other; when the ??
was first sighted it was ahead, but was if anything ??
on the port bow; as soon as witness saw the green he
put his helm to starboard; Witness had had no ??
the captain; there was no confusion or quarrelling on board
the Bonnie Dundee before she left the wharf; as ??
captain had heard the order 'hard-a-starboard," ??
up on the bridge and took charge; witness never ??
sounding the steam whistle; if he had not given ??
"hard-a-starboard," he believed the Barrabool would have
run into them on the port side.
John Alexander Stewart, recalled, stated that he had
been trading to the north for about twelve ??
course the Bonnie Dundee steered was, under the circum
stances, the proper course to steer; had heard ??
the Herald reporter, give his evidence; was present on the
11th instant when the chief officer gave him an account of
the collision; the report in the Echo of the llth instant
was not a correct report of what the mate told the reporter;
the orders that witness gave-"Stop her," " ??
astern "-wereo given, the one immediately after that.
To. Mr. Manning: When the reporter came witness was
too unwell to notice what took place; he did not ??
the mate said to the reporter, but he knew that he ??
say what afterwards appeared in the Echo.
To Mr. Want: There was no break between the orders,
"Stop her" and "Full speed astern;" witness ??
ously sworn there was a break of a minute between;
he did not consider that when the order "hard-a-starboard"
was given it was a serious thing, although he had previously
stated it was; there was no great probability ??
when the helm was starboarded; there might have been a
little danger.
To Mr. Want: The Bonnie Dundee was steering ??
close in to shore to avoid currents; she kept within ??
or three miles from the coast, and went from point ??
it was the general practice for coasting steamers going
south to go outside steamers going north; if witness ??
miles from Bird Island, and had the Barrabool been ??
out he would stand a pretty good chance of seeing ??
light.
The foregoing being all the evidence that was ??
anent the collision, the Coronor stated that previous ??
jury retiring to consider their verdict they would be
addressed by Mr. Manning, the legal rcpresentative of the
Crown. It had hitherto been his custom not to permit any
lawyers to address the jury, but in the present case
would follow the precedent offered lately in England ??
inquest on the body of the victims in the collision of Her
Majesty's yacht Misletoe, when the Crown Prosecutor
summed up and addressed the jury. Mr Manning accordingly
proceeded to review the evidencee,
and summed up greatly against the officers of
the Bonnie Dundee. He remarked that, in that
place, the jury were to consider whether the collision was
the fault of the Bonnie Dundee or the Barrabool. Accord-
ing to the evidence of the officers and crew of the Barra-
bool, the Bonnie Dundee was entirely to blame for the
occurrence, for she had twice offended against the regula-
tions of the Navigation Act in not holding to her course
when her green light, was to the Barrubool's green light,
and, subsequently, when red light was to red light,
of which positions she should have hold on her course. He
also pointed out that even by the showing of the Bonnie
Dundee's own men, she was in fault in crossing the Barra-
bool's course the second time. If the jury took the view
that the Bonnie Dundee committed a breach of the regula-
tions, they must further decide who was actually to
blame for the act, and return a verdict accordingly.
The jury were then left to consider their verdict
and after a deliberation of an hour and a half
returned the following verdict:-" We find that
the deceased, Sarah Brown, came by her death
on the night of the 10th instant by drowning, the result of a
collision between the steamer Bonnie Dundee and
the steamer Barrabool, in the former of which she was at the
time a passenger, which collision was brought about by the
gross negligence of the first mate of the Bonnie Dundee,
Thomas Crawford, and Captain John Alexander Stewart
of the same vessel; and we consequently return a verdict of
manslaughter against the said Thomas Crawford and John
Alexander Stewart." The Coroner accordingly proceeded
to commit the prisoners to take their trial at the next sittings
of the Central Criminal Court. Bail was allotted to
each prisoner in 300, with two sureties of 150 each.
Before the Court broke up the Coroner, in the warmest
terms, expresscd his thanks to the jury for the ??
careful, and intelligent way in which they had investigated
the case. He entirely concurred with them in their verdict
and he had much pleasure in stating his conviction that
was as good and true a verdict as could have been given
Source:
The Sydney Morning Herald
Saturday 22 March 1879
Page 6
Transcription, janilye
NOTE: This newspaper article is badly creased down the
right hand side; for the parts
unreadable I've used question marks.
Mrs. Sarah Brown wife of David Brown of Balmain was 53 and
came from County Derry,
Ireland.


Below is The steamer Barrabool in Duke's Dock after the collision.


St Matthew's Catholic Burial Register 1845 - 1854

S/name. F/names. Abode. deathdate. burialdate. Age. Ship. Occupation. Clergyman.

247 Bourke John Windsor 9 Jan 1845 40 Labourer Thos Slattery
248 Fitzgerald Michl Windsor 23 Jan 1845 67 Pauper Thos Slattery
249 Pendergast Mary Cornwallis 16 Feb 1845 10 weeks Native of the Colony Thos Slattery
250 Breach George Windsor 20 Feb 1845 12 months Native of the Colony John Kenny
251 White James Richmond 21 Mar 1845 50 Farmer Thos Slattery
252 Turner Ann Wilberforce 26 Mar 1845 42 John Kenny
253 Cullen Edward Vinegar Hill 4 Apr 1845 Farmer Thos Slattery
254 Norris James Cornwallis 10 May 1845 5 Native of the Colony Thos Slattery
255 Dempsey John Richmond 11 May 1845 69 Farmer Thos Slattery
256 Slater or Donohoe Mary Clarendon 11 May 1845 22 Margaret 2 Servant Thos Slattery
257 Fogerty Michl Currajong 24 May 1845 37 Labourer Thos Slattery
258 Kenna Patk Currajong 30 May 1845 80 Tilly Sherry Labourer Thos Slattery
259 Kough William Windsor 8 Jun 1845 Labourer Thos Slattery
260 Tighe Anne Windsor 4 Jul 1845 58 Elizabeth Servant Thos Slattery
261 Holt William Currajong 15 Jul 1845 14 weeks Native of the Colony Thos Slattery
262 Collins Patrick Wollombi 31 Jul 1845 5 Native of the Colony John Kenny
263 Pendergast John Windsor 30 Nov 1845 37 Native of the Colony Mr McGrath
264 Brady Thomas Windsor 17 Jan 1846 58 Native of Ireland Mr McGrath
265 Fitzpatrick James Penrith 4 Apr 1846 7 Mr McGrath
266 Fitzpatrick Mary Windsor 14 Apr 1846 15 weeks Mr McGrath
267 McGoven Peter Wilberforce ? 15 Apr 1846 26 Captain Cook Mr McGrath
268 Gaham or Graham Hugh Freemans Reach 13 May 1846 51 Mr McGrath
269 Darey or Doney Thomas Freemans Reach 14 Jul 1846 41 Mr McGrath
270 Davies Mathew Poor House 28 Jul 1846 70 Mr McGrath
271 Keating G Poor House 14 Aug 1846 67 Mr McGrath
272 Foley Catherine Poor House 19 Aug 1846 35 Mr McGrath
273 O'Donnell Patk Poor House 23 Aug 1846 80 Mr McGrath
274 Perkins ? Windsor 18 Oct 1846 43 Mr McGrath
275 Byrne Patk Windsor 15 Nov 1846 32 Mr McGrath
276 Humphreys Ann Wilberforce 18 Nov 1846 6 Mr McGrath
277 Walsh Ann Windsor 28 Jan 1847 58 Mr McGrath
278 Connor Charles Asylum 10 Feb 1847 50 Mr McGrath
279 Cassidy James Windsor 30 Apr 1847 54 Schoolmaster Mr McGrath
280 Curran Mrs Rebecca Richmond 19 May 1847 19
281 Cusack Patrick Windsor 23 Aug 1847 32 Labourer John Joseph Therry
282 Dormer John Windsor 11 Sep 1847 His body was found in the Hawkesbury River How he came by his death the Coroners Jury could not obtain evidence John Joseph Therry
283 Kennedy Patrick Asylum 17 Sep 1847 63 John Joseph Therry
284 Smith Ann Asylum 13 Oct 1847 48 John Joseph Therry
285 Daley Patrick Richmond 25 Oct 1847 28 John Joseph Therry
286 Riley Mary Ann Richmond 12 Nov 1847 20 months John Joseph Therry
287 O'Brien Michael Windsor 12 Nov 1847 one day John Joseph Therry
288 Power or Poore Mary Ann Clarendon 23 Nov 1847 eleven days John Joseph Therry
289 Collins Thomas Windsor late of Wiseman's establishment at Windsor Hospital 24 Nov 1847 about 46 Herdsman John Joseph Therry
290 Maguire Edward McDonald River, died in Windsor Hospital 21 Dec 1847 66 Labourer John Joseph Therry
291 Riley John Cornwallis 24 Dec 1847 78 Labourer John Joseph Therry
292 Cuffe Farrell Richmond 5 Jan 1848 73 Schoolmaster John Joseph Therry
293 McKeon Hugh Windsor 6 Jan 1848 86 Labourer John Joseph Therry
294 Duffy James Kurrajong 13 Jan 1848 75 Farmer John Joseph Therry
295 Connor Bridget Vinegar Hill 15 Jan 1848 45 John Joseph Therry
296 Donelly Thomas Asylum Windsor 7 Feb 1848 72 Labourer John Joseph Therry
297 McDonogh Patrick North Rocks near Windsor 7 Feb 1848 62 Labourer John Joseph Therry
298 O'Grady Thomas Richmond 8 Mar 1848 22 months John Joseph Therry
299 Peible George Windsor 5 Apr 1848 4 1/2 John Joseph Therry
300 McCormick John Windsor 18 Apr 1848 40 Pauper Asylum John Joseph Therry
301 Murphy Samuel Windsor 19 Apr 1848 41 Pauper Asylum John Joseph Therry
302 Elliott Catherine Windsor 24 Apr 1848 63 Pauper Asylum John Joseph Therry
303 Holmes William Windsor May 1848 46 Pauper Asylum John Joseph Therry
304 Cullen Ellen Caddie Creek 28 May 1848 7 John Joseph Therry
305 Carthy Denis Windsor 29 May 1848 84 Pauper Asylum John Joseph Therry
306 Byrnes Patrick Cornwallis 6 Jun 1848 77 Farmer John Joseph Therry
307 Connelly James Windsor 8 Jun 1848 69 Atlas Shepherd John Joseph Therry
308 Carney Rebecca Eastern Creek 7 Jul 1848 84 Atlas Farmer Rev M Stephens
309 Kean Charles Windsor 22 Jul 1848 82 Pauper Asylum Rev E Luckie
310 Kelly James Lakeville 23 Jul 1848 75 Farmer Rev E Luckie
311 Landres James Richmond Aug 1848 88 Haldo 2nd Farmer Rev E Luckie
312 Gribbon Hugh Windsor 15 Aug 1848 78 Pauper Asylum Rev E Luckie
313 Good Arthur Windsor 2 Sep 1848 57 Pauper Asylum Rev M Stephens
314 Mahan John Windsor Sep 1848 36 Shop Keeper Rev M Stephens
315 Keane Peter Kurrajong Sep 1848 30
316 Spinks John Windsor 12 Oct 1848 42 Lady Melville Bricklayer John Grant
317 Barry Thos 26 Nov 1848 61 Dafiesta 1st Pauper Asylum John Grant
318 Haleroft Mary 5 Dec 1848 35 Pyramus Pauper Asylum John Grant
319 Huston Catherine 10 Dec 1848 43 Hooghley Pauper Asylum John Grant
320 Byrnes Walter 12 Dec 1848 38 Lady Harwood John Grant
321 Lynch ? 26 Dec 1848 48 Charles Forbes John Grant
322 unreadable 10 months John Grant
323 Braywood Henry Windsor 31 Dec 1848 14 months Native child John Grant
324 Turner Anne 14 Jan 1849 51 John Grant
325 Cullen James 4 Feb 1849 40 John Grant
326 C? Maria 12 Feb 1849 40 John Grant
327 Hayward Jane 16 Feb 1849 4 days John Grant
328 Spinks Mary 4 Mar 1849 46 Asylum John Grant
329 Harper ? 22 Mar 1849 53 Unreadable John Grant
330 McKeene Mary Richmond 24 Mar 1849 60 unreadable John Grant
331 Foley John Windsor 14 Apr 1849 54 Elizabeth [3] Asylum John Grant
332 McKibbett Bridget 14 Apr 1849 61 John Grant
333 Trodden Henry 24 Apr 1849 12 days John Grant
334 Costigan William 29 Apr 1849 45 Labourer John Grant
335 Doyle George 3 Jun 1849 70 Asylum John Grant
336 Herring Thos 11 Jun 1849 50 John Grant
337 Brennan John 22 Jun 1849 66 unreadable John Grant
338 Connor Timothy Windsor 24 Jun 1849 76 Unreadable Pauper John Grant
339 Riley Patrick Windsor 1 Jul 1849 59 Unreadable John Grant
340 Clifford Fredk ? Windsor 5 Jul 1849 70 Patra John Grant
341 Coffey Isabel Windsor 10 Jul 1849 38 John Grant
342 Davis Margt Colo 10 Aug 1849 44 Fourth John Grant
343 Donohue Patrick Windsor 19 Aug 1849 49 Andromeda Pauper John Grant
344 McDonald Richd Windsor 21 Aug 1849 10 months John Grant
345 Sullivan Mary Windsor 14 Sep 1849 44 John Grant
346 Baker Margaret Richmond 15 Sep 1849 31 Isabella John Grant
347 Woods James Richmond 6 Oct 1849 8 months John Grant
348 Savage Patrick Richmond 16 Oct 1849 57 Labourer John Grant
349 Pendergast Thos Richard Pitt Town 4 Nov 1849 4 months Native of the Colony John Grant
350 Byrne Maryanne Windsor 11 Nov 1849 5 Native John Grant
351 Maguire Joseph Windsor 12 Nov 1849 2 months Native John Grant
352 *bridge or Petherbridge unreadable Windsor 18 Nov 1849 4 months Native John Grant
353 Carney Edwd Prospect 11 Dec 1849 75 Farmer John Grant
354 Connors Charlotte 14 Dec 1849 60 Maria 2nd Pauper Asylum John Grant
355 Murray Mary Kurrajong 20 Dec 1849 12 months Native of the Colony John Grant
356 Henright Jane Windsor 7 Mar 1850 6 months Native of the Colony John Grant
357 Davis William Tumbledon Barn District of Windsor 7 Mar 1850 14 days Native of the Colony John Grant
358 Colrenny Bridget Windsor 20 Mar 1850 15 Anglia John Grant
359 Rafter Catherine Windsor 7 May 1850 14 months Native of the Colony John Grant
360 Mills Mathew Richmond 17 May 1850 16 months Native of the Colony John Grant
361 Heany Mary Windsor 1 Jun 1850 40 Elizabeth House Servant John Grant
362 Keenan William Windsor 12 Jun 1850 85 Martha Pauper Asylum John Grant
363 Hefferan Patrick Wilberforce 21 Jun 1850 60 Labourer John Grant
364 McAlpin Ellen Richmond 1 Aug 1850 69 Farmer John Grant
365 Timmins Michael Yellowmanday 20 Sep 1850 42 Native of the Colony John Grant
366 Mullens James Windsor 6 Oct 1850 40 Labourer John Grant
367 Ives Mary Richmond 28 Oct 1850 50 Henry Walsh John Grant
368 Reily Francis Richmond 2 Nov 1850 63 Edward Farmer John Grant
369 Smith Henry North Rocks 16 Dec 1850 25 John Grant
370 Gardoll Anton Richmond 21 Dec 1850 12 Weeks John Grant
371 Ahearn James Windsor 25 Dec 1850 8 ? John Grant
372 Brants Mary Windsor 19 Jan 1851 7 days John Grant
373 Wright Johanna Richmond 6 Mar 1851 33 Farmer John Grant
374 Clynes John Windsor 19 Mar 1851 28 Labourer John Grant
375 Pigeon Bridget South Creek 12 Apr 1851 8
376 Mason Mary Buried at Kurrajong 4 May 1851 68
377 Ray David Richmond 10 May 1851 1
378 Redman Martin Windsor 11 May 1851 30 Ogley Pauper Rev N J Coffey
379 Neil Patrick Richmond 1 Jun 1851 37 Farmer Rev N J Coffey
380 Cormack Patrick Cornwallis 10 Jun 1851 47 Labourer Rev N J Coffey
381 Doyle William Windsor 25 Jun 1851 55 Henry Porcher Pauper Rev N J Coffey
382 Egan Michl Windsor 30 Aug 1851 34 Inn Keeper Rev N J Coffey
383 Guthrie John Wilberforce 7 Sep 1851 70 Labourer Rev N J Coffey
384 Kelly Michael Richmond 11 Sep 1851 3 Rev N J Coffey
385 Connor Roger Nepean 1 Oct 1851 77 Neptune Farmer ?
386 Lynch Thomas Windsor 8 Oct 1851 91 Farmer Rev N J Coffey
387 Doyle Bridget Windsor 9 Oct 1851 55 Elizabeth 4th Pauper Rev N J Coffey
388 Collins Thomas Windsor 18 Oct 1851 88 Ann Pauper Rev N J Coffey
389 Ray Alexander Windsor 20 Oct 1851 50 Isabella Pauper Rev N J Coffey
390 Moloney Sarah Buried at Kurrajong 13 Nov 1851 52 Rev N J Coffey
391 Callum James Pitt Town 1 Dec 1851 5 months Rev N J Coffey
392 Smith Patrick Pitt Town 8 Dec 1851 2 months Rev N J Coffey
393 Glasgow Henry Pitt Town 8 Jan 1852 9 Rev N J Coffey
394 Molloy Mary Pitt Town 21 Jan 1852 7 months Rev N J Coffey
394 Mangin Martin Windsor 30 Jan 1852 40 Labourer Rev N J Coffey
395 Fair Richard Calai Creek 1 Feb 1852 2 Rev N J Coffey
396 Heaney Thomas Windsor 4 Feb 1852 61 Pauper Rev N J Coffey
397 McCabe Catherine Buried at Kurrajong 10 Feb 1852 64 Rev N J Coffey
398 Costello Jeremiah Windsor 8 Feb 1852 67 Black Smith Rev N J Coffey
399 Harper Patrick South Creek 16 Feb 1852 72 Farmer Rev N J Coffey
400 Bullok Catherine Windsor 19 Feb 1852 32 Inn Keeper Rev N J Coffey
401 Pendergast Thomas Pitt Town 25 Feb 1852 6 months Rev N J Coffey
402 Higgens Michael Sydney 3 Mar 1852 35 Rev N J Coffey Buried at Kurrajong
403 Dunn Ellen Windsor 4 Mar 1852 72 Labourer's wife Rev N J Coffey
404 Hadden John Kurrajong 11 Mar1852 86 Labourer Rev N J Coffey
405 Sullivan Ellen Windsor 4 Apr 1852 14 months Rev N J Coffey
406 Harris Mary unreadable 22 Apr 1852
407 Maguire Thomas Cornwallis 19 May 1852 62 Farmer Rev P Hallinan
408 Ring John Windsor 20 May 1852 70 Meadicant Rev P Hallinan
409 Broderick Daniel Windsor 31 May 1852 55 Pauper Rev P Hallinan
410 Connely Patrick Cliften 21 Jun 1852 60 Labourer Rev P Hallinan
411 unreadable unreadable Vinegar Hill 13 Jul 1852 58 Labourer Rev P Hallinan
412 unreadable John Michael Windsor 16 Jul 1852 1 day Rev P Hallinan
413 O'Brien Agnes Josephine Windsor 22 Jul 1852 3 weeks Rev P Hallinan
414 Mulhern William McGraths Hill 6 Sep 1852 78 Labourer Rev P Hallinan
415 Davis Margaret South Creek Windsor 15 Sep 1852 70 Rev P Hallinan
416 Kempster James Nepean District 19 Sep 1852 2 yrs 8 mths Rev P Hallinan
417 Day Bridget Cornwallis 29 Sep 1852 55 Widow Rev P Hallinan
418 Leary Mary Windsor 6 Oct 1852 44 Pauper Rev P Hallinan
419 Davies Richd Richmond 14 Oct 1852 34 Labourer Rev P Hallinan
420 Bourke Ellen Windsor 26 Oct 1852 29 Labourer's wife Rev P Hallinan
421 Keogh Walter Windsor 28 Oct 1852 56 John Bayer? Pauper Rev P Hallinan
422 Hamilton John Windsor 12 Nov 1852 75 Rev P Hallinan
423 Sullivan Cornelius Windsor 19 Nov 1852 - Atlas Pauper Rev P Hallinan
424 Cunningham Mary Windsor 20 Nov 1852 Farmer Rev P Hallinan
425 Woods Robert Richmond 21 Nov 1852 18 months Rev P Hallinan
426 Reedy Bridget Windsor 21 Nov 1852 2 Rev P Hallinan
427 Beans Mary unreadable 26 Nov 1852 74 unreadable Rev P Hallinan
428 Hynds Charles Box Hill 1 Dec 1852 18 Farmer Rev P Hallinan
429 McCarthy Thomas Windsor 4 Dec 1852 58 Rev P Hallinan
430 Whelan John Windsor 15 Dec 1852 73 Portland Rev P Hallinan
431 Doyle Patrick Windsor 17 Dec 1852 81 Hodbro? Rev P Hallinan
432 Carthy Mary Windsor 12 Dec 1852 60 Rev P Hallinan
433 Gabon Patrick Windsor 19 Dec 1852 72 Earl of St Vincent Rev P Hallinan
434 Brennan John Windsor 1 Jan 1853 60 Atlas [3] Pauper Rev P Hallinan
435 Cunningham Robert Windsor 6 Jan 1853 30 Royal Saxon Rev P Hallinan
436 King Patrick Windsor 3 Feb 1853 74 Rev P Hallinan
437 Egan Edward Windsor 18 Feb 1853 55 Rev P Hallinan
438 Gaunt Michael Kurrajong 1 Jan 1853 2 months Rev P Hallinan
439 Finley John Windsor 14 Apr 1853 64 Pauper Rev P Hallinan
440 Moffitt Mary Windsor 16 Apr 1853 30 Rev P Hallinan
441 Murray Anne Sally's Bottoms 13 May 1853 33 Rev P Hallinan
442 Goodwin Mary Freemans Reach 15 May 1853 75 Rev P Hallinan
443 McCabe Owen Kurrajong 22 May 1853 27 Rev P Hallinan
444 Norris Mary Ann Cornwallis 27 May 1853 40 Rev P Hallinan
445 Connors Michael Windsor 22 May 1853 80 Rev P Hallinan
446 Harrison Catherine Windsor 24 May 1853 67 Rev P Hallinan
447 Hayes Mary Jane Freemans Reach 2 Jun 1853 37 Rev P Hallinan
448 Barton Stephen Cliften 2 Jun 1853 5 Rev P Hallinan
449 Byrns Peter Windsor 9 Jun 1853 10 Rev P Hallinan
450 Eather Mrs Mary Kurrajong 11 Jun 1853 50 Rev P Hallinan
451 Hanly Jane Richmond 14 Jun 1853 4 months Rev P Hallinan
452 Wayburn Bridget Pitt Town 19 Jun 1853 52 Rev P Hallinan
453 Moore William Pitt Town 21 Jun 1853 50 Rev P Hallinan
454 Read Laurence Windsor 15 Jul 1853 60 Rev P Hallinan
455 Mahon Patrick Windsor 15 Jul 1853 77 Rev P Hallinan
456 Murphy John Hospital Windsor 17 Jul 1853 60 Rev P Hallinan
457 unreadable Mrs Richmond 5 Aug 1853 26 Rev P Hallinan
458 Parkland Mary Windsor 3 Aug 1853 61 Rev P Hallinan
459 Moran Michael Pitt Town 13 Aug 1853 62 Rev P Hallinan
460 Norris Elizabeth Richmond Bottoms 21 Aug 1853 23 Rev P Hallinan
461 Kelly Daniel Pitt Town 3 Sep 1853 79 Rev P Hallinan
462 Gunan Michael Richmond 13 Sep 1853 55 Rev P Hallinan
463 Mellish Maria Sydney 13 Sep 1853 36 Rev P Hallinan
464 Hill Elizabeth Windsor 18 Sep 1853 60 Rev P Hallinan
465 Clarke Thomas Pitt Town 22 Sep 1853 3 Rev P Hallinan
466 Gatton Thomas Windsor 2 Oct 1853 77 Rev P Hallinan
467 Riely John Penrith District 8 Oct 1853 45 Rev P Hallinan
468 Murray Thomas Sally's Bottoms 31 Oct 1853 7 Rev P Hallinan
469 Waddle Thomas Richmond 16 Nov 1853 60 Rev P Hallinan
470 Jones unreadable Windsor 17 Nov 1853 63 Rev P Hallinan
471 Slater unreadable Fairfield 22 Nov 1853 54 Rev P Hallinan
472 Sharry Mary Windsor 23 Nov 1853 19 Rev P Hallinan
473 Dockin John Richmond Bottoms 26 Nov 1853 7 Rev P Hallinan
474 Crawley John Windsor 1 Dec 1853 67 Rev P Hallinan
475 Connors Charles Box Hill 11 Dec 1853 74 Rev P Hallinan
476 Sharry Mary Ann Windsor 12 Dec 1853 1 month Rev P Hallinan
477 nil Rev P Hallinan
478 Buttersworth Bridget Pitt Town Bottoms 2 Jan 1854 26 Rev P Hallinan
479 Buttersworth Bridget Pitt Town Bottoms 12 Jan 1854 17 days Rev P Hallinan
480 Mellish Mary Sydney 26 Jan 1854 6 months Rev P Hallinan Age crossed out
481 Kilduf John Pitt Town 8 Feb 1854 60 Rev P Hallinan
482 Walsh John Windsor 7 Feb 1854 48 Rev P Hallinan
483 Brennan John Windsor 8 Feb 1854 70 Rev P Hallinan
484 Whitford Mary Windsor 18 Feb 1854 60 Rev P Hallinan
485 Power Michael Wilberforce 24 Mar 1854 63 Rev P Hallinan
486 Davies Henry Wilberforce 27 Mar 1854 53 Rev P Hallinan
487 Cavanagh Michael Windsor 10 Apr 1854 78 Rev P Hallinan
488 Pender [gast] Thomas Pitt Town 29 Apr 1854 14 months Rev P Hallinan
489 McQuade Charles Hale Windsor 29 Jun 1854 1 month Rev H Johnson
490 Kenny Anne Richmond 9 Jul 1854 77 Rev P Hallinan
491 Dempsey Denis Richmond 7 Aug 1854 62 Rev P Hallinan
492 Doyle Peter Wilberforce 12 Aug 1854 70 Rev P Hallinan
493 Riley Elizabeth Windsor 17 Sep 1854 63 Rev P Hallinan
494 Norris Michael Cornwallis 28 Sep 1854 30 Rev P Hallinan
495 Doyle Timothy Windsor 17 Oct 1854 80 Rev P Hallinan
496 Hewson Henry North Richmond 24 Oct 1854 11 Rev P Hallinan
497 Tierney Mary Windsor 5 Nov 1854 4 Rev P Hallinan
498 O'Keefe Mary Jane Windsor 13 Nov 1854 7 weeks Rev P Hallinan
499 Tait John Pitt Town 26 Nov 1854 3 Rev P Hallinan
500 Kelly John Richmond Bottoms 28 Dec 1854 2 Rev P Hallinan
501 Gahan Hugh Freemans Reach 31 Dec 1854 1yr 9 months Rev P Hallinan
502 unreadable Thomas Windsor 27 Dec 1854 80 Rev P Hallinan



Credits: Transcriptions by Kristine Wood - October 2003.

CRIMINALS CONDEMNED TO DEATH Australia 1840-1859

1. RETURN of all persons condemned to Death at the Supreme Criminal Court, Sydney,
from the year 1840, to 1st September, 1859, inclusive.
1840.

February 4. James Hunt, for murder, executed 10th March.
February 24. Thomas Whitton, murder and arson, executed 19th March.
May 2. John Bright, murder, pardoned.
May 4. Martin Ryan, intent to murder, transportation for life in irons.
August 6. Thomas Williams, cutting and maiming, transportation for life.
August 12. Tallboy (an aboriginal), murder, transportation for life.
November 7. James Martin, murder, executed 8th December
John Walker, murder, transportation for life with hard labour in irons.
James Mason, accessory to murder, executed 8th December.
Neville Billy (an aboriginal), murder, three years at Cockatoo.
Michael Minighan, murder, executed 11th December.
November 5. Enoch Bradley, murder, executed 11th December.
November 6. Francis Legg, rape, executed 11th December.
William Newman, murder, executed 8th December.
1841.
February 24. Edward Davies, Robert Chitty, James Everett,
John Shea, John Marshall, Richard Glanville, for murder and
felony, executed 16th March.
May 13. Michael Lynch, murder, executed 4th June.
May 14. Bemmatto and Nungavil (aboriginals), murder, ex-
ecuted. (Sent to Moreton Bay, 18th June, for execution.)
October 21. Michael McMullin, rape, transportation for life.
George Stroud, murder, executed 29th October.
October 14. Robert Hudson, murder, executed 29th October.
1842.
October 1. John Solomon, sodomy, transportation for life.
October 1. William Williams, sodomy, transportation for life.
October 20. Stephen Brennan, murder, executed 9th November.
James Wolfe, Thomas Whelan, intent to commit murder and piracy, transportation for life.
John Jones, Michael Lewis, George Beavon, Henry Seen, assault with intent to commit murder,
executed 3rd November.
1843.
January 12. James O'Donnell, murder, transportation for life.
July 8. Michael Keefe, rape, transportation for life.
1844.
January 15. Michael Moore, murder, transportation for life.
January 24. John Knatchbull, murder, executed 13th February.
July 15. George Vigors, Thomas Burdett, murder, executed
13th August; John Rankin, murder, transportation for life.
1845.
January 10. John Vidall, murder, executed 7th February.
January 16. George Byford, murder, transportation for life
with hard labour in irons.
July 11. John Ahern, murder, executed 12th August.
1846.
April 1?. Hendrick? Wiwwuuii, rape, transportation for life.(illegible)
1847.
March 4. John Kean, murder, executed 30th April.
1848.
June 5. William Fyfe, murder, executed 4th July.
August 26. Francis Dermott, rape, executed 22nd September.
1849.
March 8. James Richardson, murder, executed 7th May.
August 28. Owen Molloy, murder, executed 18th September.
1850.
October 7. Mogo (an aboriginal), murder, executed 5th November.
October 8. James Whelan, murder, executed 5th November.
1851.
December 3. William Burns, murder, to Cockatoo Island,
1852.
August 4. Thomas F. Green, murder, executed 21st September.
1853.
June 6. John Flannary, William Fitzgerald, rape, fifteen
years' hard labour on the roads or public works, the first three years in irons.
1854.
June 8. James Gray, murder, fifteen years' labour on roads.
August 12. James Ross, murder, two years' imprisonment.
1855.
February 9. William Ryan, murder, executed 28th February.
February 7. John Holland, rape, fifteen years' labour on roads.
June 7. Samuel Wilcox, murder, executed 5th July.
William Preston, rape, three years' labour on roads.
June 8. William Rogers, murder, executed 5th July.
August 7. John Lakeman, rape, ten years' labour on roads.
1856.
April 10. James O'Donnell, murder, fifteen years' labour on roads.
June 8. Jose Pareires, murder, fifteen years' labour on roads.
1858.
April 22. Joseph Wilkes, murder, imprisonment for life.
August 3. James Moyes, murder, executed 7th September.
1859.
April 16. Mary Ann Perry, murder, fifteen years' imprisonment.
June 10. John Norris, rape, executed 22nd July.
2 RETURN of all persons condemned to death at Berrima and Goulburn, from the year, 1840 to 1st
September, 1859, inclusive.
1841. BERRIMA

Thomas Leary, murder, transportation for life.
Patrick Curran, murder, executed 21st October.
1842.
Patrick Clearhan, murder, executed 22nd April.
John Lynch alias Dunleavy, murder, executed 22nd April.
Martin Beech, murder, executed October.
Lucretia Dunkley, murder, executed October.
1844.
James Reeves, murder, transportation for life, April 3rd.
Henry Atkins, murder, executed 8th October.
Francis Hughes, violent assault, transportation for life, 29th
October.
1845.
James Gorman, rape, transportation for fourteen years, 12th
September.
Owen Walsh, murder, transportation for fourteen years, 8th
October.
1846.
John Hourigan, murder, transportation for life, 3rd April.
Thomas Randall, rape, transportation for life, 15th December.
Bridget Mitchell, murder, transportation for three years, 23rd
December.
1847.
George Bolton, murder, transportation for life, 17th March.
1849. GOULBURN
Edward Thornett, rape, fifteen years on roads, &c., 5th September.
1853.
Thomas Fox, murder, fifteen years on roads, &c, 10th August.
John McSpadden, murder, fifteen years on roads, &c., 6th September.
1854.
James Talbot, murder, executed 30th May.
John Webber, rape, ten years on roads, &c, 16th November.
1855.
Mary Ann Brownlaw, murder, executed 11th November.
Lawrence King, murder, fifteen years on roads, &c., 12th September.
Patrick Maher, murder, fifteen years on roads, &c. 10th September.
1857.
Patrick Walsh, murder, executed 4th November.
1858.
Joseph O'Halloran, murder, six years on roads, &c., 24th
March.
William Henry McDonald (a man of colour), sodomy, hard
labour for life, 27th September.
1859.
Harry (an aboriginal), rape and attempt to murder, executed
18th May.
Jeremiah Martin, murder, five years on roads, &c,
2nd May. John Torpy, murder, two years on roads, &c., 2nd May.
3.RETURN of all persons condemned to death at
Bathurst, from the year 1840 to 1st September, 1859, inclusive.
1840.

April. Charles Cameron, murder, executed May 25th.
1842.
March. John Walsh, murder, executed May 3rd.
1843.
March. Matthew Whittle, firing with intent to kill, executed May 2nd.
1844.
September. Abraham Gasten, murder, executed October 31st.
1845.
March. Henry Hogan, murder, transportation for life.
September. Lawrence Power, murder, ten years' hard labour
on the roads.
1847.
February. Michael Butler, murder, transportation for life.
July. Joseph Murphy, murder, removed to Sydney gaol on the
ground of insanity, by order of the Governor.
1848.
September. Charles Henry Mackie, rape, executed November
10th. Patrick White, murder, seven years' transportation.
1849.
September. Patrick Walsh, murder, executed October 26th.
1850.
August. William Gleeson, murder, fifteen years hard labour
on the roads, &c.
1851.
February. Peter (an aboriginal), rape, fifteen years' hard
labour on roads, &c.
1852.
February. Thomas Wilmore, murder, executed April 14th.
August. Timothy Sullivan, murder, executed September 30th.
Newing (Chinese), murder, executed September 30th.
1853
February. Patrick Mccarthy, murder, executed April 8th.
Paddy (an aboriginal), rape, executed April 8th. Thomas Daffy,
murder, ten years' hard labour on roads, &c. Christiana Boddy,
murder, ten years' hard labour Parramatta gaol.
1854.
February. James McLaughler, murder, executed April 24th.
Billy Palmer (aboriginal), murder, executed April 25th.
August. Adam Young, murder, ten years' hard labour on
roads, &c.
1855.
September. William Johnson Miller, murder, fifteen years'
hard labour on roads, &c.
1856.
March. Billy Morgan (an aboriginal), murder, fifteen years'
hard labour on roads, &c.
September. Henry Carroll, rape, fifteen years' hard labour on roads, &c.
1857.
March. Henry Curren, rape, executed May 7th. Addison)
Mitchell, murder, executed May 7th. John Linden, murder, fif-
teen years' hard labour on roads, &c.
September. Samuel Rhodes, stabbing with intent fitteen years'
hard labour on roads, &c.
1858.
March. George Roberts, murder fifteen years' hard labour on
roads, &c. Charles A. Woollenwebber, murder, fifteen years'
hard labour on roads, &c.
1859.
April. John Arrow, murder, executed May 11th. Thomas
Ryan (or Martin), murder, executed May 11th.
4. RETURN of all persons condemned to death at
Newcastle and Maitland, from the year 1840 to the
1st September, 1859, inclusive.
1841.

Michael Bradley, murder, executed at Newcastle.
Eugene Quinn, opening a letter, and abstracting money there-
from, fourteen years' transportation.
1842.
Thomas Homer, murder, executed at Newcastle.
Hugh Bannon, manslaughter, transportation for life.
Stephen Waters, beastiality, fifteen years' hard labour on roads.
1843.
George Wilson, shooting with intent to murder, executed at
Newcastle.
Thomas Forrester, murder, executed at Newcastle.
Melville (an aboriginal), murder, executed at Maitland.
Harry (an aboriginal), murder, executed at Maitland.
Therramitchie (an aboriginal), murder, executed at Port Macquarie.
1844.
Benjamin Harris, murder, executed at Newcastle.
Mary Thornton, murder, executed at Newcastle.
Joseph Vale, murder, executed at Newcastle.
1845.
Benjamin Stanley, murder, executed at Newcastle.
John Fitzpatrick, murder, executed at Newcastle.
1846.
James Johnston, murder, fourteen years' transportation.
William Shea, no record, executed at Newcastle.
1847.
John Purcell, murder, hard labour for life ; three years in irons.
1848.
Charles Robinson, unnatural crime, twelve years' hard labour
on the roads or public works.
Patrick Ryan, no record, executed at Newcastle.
1849.
George Waters Ward, murder, executed at Maitland.
Joseph Marsh, murder, ten years' hard labour on roads, &a. ;
first two years in irons.
1850.
William Hayes, murder, executed at Maitland.
1851.
Michael Collihane, alias " Mickey-bad-English," rape, executed
at Maitland.
Thomas Ballard, murder, ten years' hard labour on roads, &c.
1852.
Patrick Macnamara, murder, executed at Maitland.
1854.
Daniel or Thomas Gardner, murder, executed at Maitland.
Christopher Walsh, murder, executed at Maitland.
Ambrose Graves, murder, fourteen years' hard labour on roads ;
first three years in irons.
1855.
John Shephard, murder, fifteen years' hard labour on road ;
first three years in irons.
Harry Brown, alias Yarry (aboriginal), rape, fifteen years'
hard labour on roads : first three years in irons.
1856.
Jemmy (aboriginal), murder, free pardon granted.
Roger (aboriginal), murder, free pardon granted.
5. RETURN of all prisoners who were condemned to death, and against whom death was recorded in her
Majesty's Gaol, Brisbane, since the commencement of the Criminal Court in 1850.
1852.

May 17. William Wild, carnally knowing a girl under ten years : Death; commuted to fifteen years' hard labour on the roads.
1853.
May 22. Micki (aboriginal), murder : Death recorded ; com-
muted to seven years' hard labour on the roads.
1854.
May 20. Davy, (aboriginal), murder : Death ; executed August
22nd.
May 22. John Hanley, murder : Death ; commuted to five
years' hard labour on the roads.
November 20. Dundalli (aboriginal), murder : Death ; executed January 5th, 1855.
1856.
September 15. Robert McCoy, murder : Death ; commuted
to fifteen years hard labour on the roads.
1857. ?
1858.
April 26. O'Young (Chinese), feloniously stabbing : Death
recorded ; commuted to five years' hard labour on the roads.
1859.
May 31. Dick (aboriginal), rape : Death, executed August 4th.
Chamery (aboriginal), rape : Death, executed August 4th.
June 1. James Burns, feloniously assaulting : Death recorded,
commuted to fifteen years' hard labour on the roads

1 comment(s), latest 1 year, 5 months ago

Alexander Munro 1812-1889 NSW

Alexander MUNRO was born in Ardersier in the Scottish Highlands, on the Moray Firth, east of Inverness, near Fort George, and Nairn,Scotland on the 18 July 1812 the son of George MUNRO and Isabel MAIN.

On the 3 September 1829 Alexander was transported for seven years, he had been sentenced the day before in Inverness, where the family had moved after the death of his father. Along with two other boys, Alexander robbed a grocery store.

He arrived with 200 other convicts onboard the ship, York on the 7 February 1831. Measuring only 5'3" tall, he could read and write and his occupation was given as a Farm Boy. Alexander was assigned to John BROWNE a settler of Patricks Plains.

Alexander gained his Certificate of Freedom in 1836 and soon began buying up depasturing licenses all around the Singletom Area.

On the 6 July 1838 the Reverend HERRINGTON at Whittingham married Alexander MUNRO to Sophia LOVELL 1812-1889, Sophia, a convict sentenced to seven years had come from Isle of Ely, Cambridgeshire, on the 'Diana', arriving in 1833.

Sophia and Alexander failed to have children of their own and in 1840 adopted 3year old Harriet. Harriet was the natural child of Thomas PHILLIPS and his wife Catherine.

Harriet 1837-1873 became known as Harriet MUNRO and married Walter COUSINS 1829-1904.

Alexander in 1839 began a successful carrying business in 1839 and with his depasturing licenses soon began to acquire wealth. In 1841 he built the Sir Thomas Mitchell Inn on the corner of Cambridge and George Streets in Singleton and managed several other hotels and began his mail coach service from Singleton.

In 1851 Alexander built Ness House in George St., Singleton which is still standing today and he replaced the old Sir Thomas Mitchell Inn with the large Caledonian Hotel. In the 1868 Rate Book it was stated as "two,story,brick iron roof,13 rooms". The Singleton Argus 9th November 1901 advertisement stated" 14 bedrooms, 2 dining rooms, 2 parlours, sample room,kitchen,bathroom, laundry, pantry, man's room, stables, 4 stalls, buggy house etc". It had a 73ft frontage to George St, 73ft to High St, and 332ft to Cambridge St. The sale was on account of Mrs R.H.LEVIEN his grandaughter Harriet Emma COUSINS 1860-1946

MUNRO began the 'Bebeah' Vineyard and his wines won more than 2000 prizes all over the world; more than 500 first prizes. He built his house 'Ardersier House' on the grounds of Bebeah.

Alexander MUNRO was elected the first mayor of Singleton in 1866, when Singleton became a municipality.

Alexander MUNRO was a good man with a big heart, always putting back into the community and always helping those less fortunate than himself. He was very much admired by both the wealthy and the not so wealthy.

When the council in 1884 was not interested in building a gas making plant themselves, they passed an act on the 16 May 1884, to allow him to build it himself thereby giving the town light. He then turned the plant over to the town at cost price.

He donated the land for the Glenridding Church and Cemetery, the Masonic Hall and was a huge benefactor in the building of the Singleton Grammer School. He was the founder of the Oddfellows Lodge and his Hunter River Building Society financed the building of a north wing on the hospital in John Street and gave money to the hospital. He had a beautiful fountain made in Glasgow and gave it to the Town

In 1878 Alexander Munro retired from politics and was given a large banquet by the town, he returned to Scotland with Sophia for a short holiday.

On the 2 February 1889 Alexander MUNRO died at Ardersier House. Two days later on the 4 All the shops in Singleton were closed at 1:00pm to allow the town to mourn in what was to be the largest ever funeral Singleton had ever seen. The cortege being a half a mile long.

Sophia followed on the 26 July 1889.

Alexander in his will left 6,000 to various lagacies and 500 to the Singleton Benevolent Society. All this from a man who had been transported for stealing groceries.

The Maitland Mercury paid homage to Alexander Munro with this stirring obituary
in their newspaper on the 5 September 1889

SINGLETON.

"DEATH OF MR. ALEXANDER MUNRO.The kind and sympathetic voice is
hushed for ever, and the noble eye will no longer speak the sentiments
of a heart that for three-quarters of a century was beating full of
truly Christian love.
Alexander Munro is no more-the Great Conqueror claimed him to join
the silent majority.
Singleton has lost one of its greatest citizens, and the colony,
a prominent philanthropist and one of Nature's gentlemen.
The sad event took place at the residence of the deceased,
Ardesier House, near Singleton, on Saturday, the 26th instant, at half-past
two o'clock in the afternoon. For more than a week all hope had been
abandoned by Mr. Munro's medical attendants, and it was only a
question of time when the end should come. During nearly the whole
of that period the deceased was in a comatose state, but when
consciousness returned at intervals he appeared to suffer much pain.
Life, however, ebbed gradually away until the last grain
had dropped out of the glass and a merciful Providence ended
the earthly troubles of our noble friend and fellow townsman.
Mr. Munro was born at Ardesier, Invernesshire, Scotland, in the
memorable year 1812, and arrived in the colony in 1831, and has
resid ed here ever since, with the exception of a trip to his native
land about 11 years ago.
Arriving here when quite young, he soon adapted himself to the
rough mode of life then prevailing in New South Wales, with that
readiness and endurance for which the national character of Caledonia's
sons has so eminently qualified them as the best colonizers in
the world.
One of his first ventures in Singleton was to build the Caledonia Hotel.
Having made some money at hotelkeeping, he subsequently took up stations
in the Liverpool Plains district, where he was squatting for many years.
In all his undertakings he was singularly prosperous, and wealth flowed
in from all sides.
About thirty years ago Mr. Munro, being fully convinced
that viticulture as an important industry would eventually take root
as an important industry in the valley of the Hunter, he started
to work with that determination and enterprise so characteristic of
the man, and having obtained a suitable piece of land-a portion of the
well-known Kelso estate, near Singleton-planted there the Bebeah vineyard,
now so famous throughout the length and breadth of the Australian colonies.
At an early period of the establishment of Bebeah, Mr. Munro
engaged the services of Mr. Mackenzie, under whose excellent management
Bebeah wines attained such a celebrity that at length
they appeared at the table of the gracious Sovereign who rules the
destinies of this great Empire. The late Emperor William of Germany also
patronised Bebeah wines, and expressed himsnlf in approving terms of
their excellent character.
As the demand for Bebeah wines was increasing at a rapid rate, in
order to add to the supply, Mr. Munro about a dozen years ago purchased
the adjoining Greenwood Vineyard from Mr. James Moore, and between
the two vineyards there are now about eighty acres in full bearing.
After purchasing the Greenwood Vineyard, Mr. Munro built there, on
an excellently elevated site, the residence where he ended his days.
When in England some eleven years ago, Mr. Munro ordered a gas plant
for Singleton, and, having subsequently got an Act passed through
Parliament, the gas works were established.
the first lamp in Burdekin Park being lit by Mr.James P. Quinn, then
Mayor of Singleton, in October, 1881.
Throughout his long residence in Singleton, Mr. Munro took an active
part in all public matters. On the establishment of the municipality
in the year 1867, he was elected the first mayor, and was twice re-elected
after wards, thus remaining in office for three years.
The subject of this notice took an active part in the establishment
of the Singleton and Patrick's Plains Benevolent Society some forty-five
years ago, and throughout that long period Mr. Munro was always, we believe,
on the Committee of Management,
He was subsequently for many years Vice-President of the Society,
and on the retirement of the late President, Mr. J. C. S. M'Douall,
Mr. Munro was elected as President, an office which he held up till
his death.
Mr. Munro's sympathetic disposition made him at all times take a
deep interest in the poor inmates of the Asylum and nothing gave him greater
delight than to provide an ample feast for the old men and women on holidays,
namely Christmas and New Year, Easter, and Queen's Birthday, etc.,
making it a point to be present at the meal and enjoying
the hearty manner in which the old people appreciated his kindness.
Many years ago Mr. Munro showed his deep interest in the welfare of
the Benevolent Society by giving a munificent donation of 1000 towards
completing the Benevolent Asylum in accordance with the original design
prepared by Mr. Rowe, architect, Sydney.
In order to recognize this noble act the people of Singleton determined
to perpetuate Mr. Munro's memory by erecting a marble bust of the
generous donor in that building, and the ceremony of unveiling it
was performed last year by Miss White, eldest daughter of the
Rev. Dr. J. S. White, in the presence of a large number of people;
the day having been made a half-holiday in Singleton.
Mr. Munro was an ardent Freemason, and took an active interest
in masonic affairs. He joined the first lodge established in Singleton
in the year 1864, and passed the chair, and remained in connection
with various lodges here ever since.
Some time ago he presented the brethren with an allotment of land
in a central position in John-street for the purpose of erecting
there on a Masonic Hall, and further contributed a donation of 100
towards the building fund.
Mr. Munro was also one of the founders of the Oddfellows' Lodge
in Singleton many years ago, and remained a consistent member till
his death.
He took great interest in the Northern Agricultural Association from
its establishment in the year 1868, and for several years was one
of the vice-presidents ot that society.
He was a liberal contributor to the funds of the Mechanics' Institute
and all public movements which in his opinion were worthy of support.
Quite recently he gave the handsomesum of 1000 to the funds of
St. Andrew's Presbyterian Church for the purpose of building
a new church ; but although a consistent supporter of the church of
his forefathers, he was at all times ready to support any calls made
upon him by other denominations, and his charitable feelings made no
distinction between creed or country : no poor man was ever turned
away from the door of good Alexander Munro without a crust of bread.
An instance of the genuine charitable character of Mr. Munro was
lately conveyed to us from a trustworthy source, and it may not be
out of place to give it here. It appears that when in Scotland
some 11 years ago he ascertained that some of his relatives were
rather reduced in circumstances, and in order to provide against
want for the rest of their lives he built four cottages, one for each,
and allowed each an annuity of 40 per annum, the money having been
remitted regularly since then.
All honor to the noble departed. May a glorious resurrection be his reward."


Singleton, 3rd February, 1889.




researched, written and transcribed
by janilye 1999


Family Note:

Thomas EATHER 1824-1909 established a vineyard which was soon producing wine grapes of good quality and Thomas sometimes sold Alexander grapes from his vineyard at "Meerea" to help his growing business. Family legend has it that his wife, Eliza nee CROWLEY threatened to leave Thomas if he persisted in selling grapes to MUNRO for his "immoral liquor trade". Faced with this threat, Thomas is said to have dug out his wine grapes and replaced them with table grapes. However later on the family again began to grow good wine grapes as you see here in Meerea Park Today
The photograph below taken in George Street, Singleton around 1900 shows The Caledonian Inn on the left and the horses drinking from Munro's fountain.


Eather Family History - Thomas Eather 1764-1827


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