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WW1 Eathers

WW1
Eather, Albert Charles. 1887-1948
Eather, Albert Ernest. 1897-1956
Eather, Athol Bert. 1893-1915
Eather, Cecil George. 1893-1915
Eather, Colin Charles. 1894-1966
Eather, Eugene Alfred. 1894-1988
Eather, Frank Hilton. 1883-1917
Eather, Frederick Reuben. 1893-1964
Eather, George. 1874-1939
Eather, George Roland. 1890-1970
Eather, Gordon Cecil. 1897-1936
Eather, Ivo Mack. 1883-1952
Eather, James. 1867-1949
Eather, James Joseph. 1897-1974
Eather, John. 1895-1915
Eather, John Thomas 1891-1920
Eather, Joseph Bernard. 1883-1944
Eather, Joseph Mark. 1887-1971
Eather, Kenneth Stewart. 1900-1989
Eather, McAlpine. 1890-1966
Eather, Neil Rogan. 1896-1970
Eather, Percy Douglas. 1892-1974
Eather, Reginald James. 1899-1948
Eather, Richmond Cornwallis. 1888-1966
Eather, Roland Alfred. 1889-1967
Eather, Roland James. 1896-1917
Eather, Royal John Leslie. 1896-1969
Eather, Stanley Robert. 1895-1966
Eather, Thomas Joseph. 1891-1956
Eather, Thomas Robert Lynch. 1887-1944
Eather, William Irwin. 1897-1981
Below
Colin Charles Eather


Narrabri Cyclone 1902

DAMAGE IN THE NARRABRI
DISTRICT.
BUSINESS PREMISES WRECKED.
MANY BUILDINGS UNROOFED.
DETAILS OF LOSSES.
NARRABRI, Saturday.
One of the most severe cyclones,-almost equal to
that of last year, when it was estimated that £4000
worth of damage was done -passed over the town this afternoon.
The weather throughout the day was oppressive and the sky overcast.
About 3.40 p.m. there were indications of a severe storm in the
west, and lightning accompanied by heavy claps of thunder,
followed almost immediately.
The residents became alarmed, and windows doors, &c., were
securely fastened down, preparations being made for the worst.
Immense clouds of dust were noticed coming from
the west and the roaring of the wind and the peals
of thunder almost made many of the residents panic
stricken, some people taking refuge in places that they
considered were the safest.
When the full force of the storm reached the town
it carried before it almost every conceivable article
that was movable. Hail fell with terrific force, and
rain amounting to almost 60 points fell within a short
space of time.
Houses were unroofed, some being completely
levelled to the ground.
THE RESIDENTS ALMOST PANIC
STRICKEN
The storm only lasted about five minutes. People
were almost panic-stricken. At the northern end of
the town many places suffered considerably, in some
instances only chimneys being left. This portion of
the town also suffered terrible damage during the
cyclone of 1809.
Mr. E. Rooney's residence, a four roomed cottage
was completely wrecked, also his detached kitchen
and store
Mr. W. T. Ground's residence of four rooms
suffered considerably, the roof being blown off and
the furniture destroyed. The fencing, outhouses,
&c., were also blown down.
Mr. T. Nation's residence suffered considerably,
all the windows being smashed and the outhouses
blown down.
Mr. F. Tribe's place was damaged to a great ex
tent, the verandah being completely carried away,
The whole of the structure was twisted a good deal.
Mr. A. Tindall's premises suffered considerably, the
doors being completely blown away.
Mrs. Knight's had a roof blown off, and her furniture
was ruined.
A house, the property of Mr. G. Smith, was completely
demolished, besides many trees in the street.
Mr. Henry Perrett suffered the loss of a chimney,
a verandah &c. Another place belonging to the
same person was completely unroofed, the chimney
and kitchen being levelled to the ground.
A hayshed of Dr. Segol was blown down. Nearly
all of the telegraph posts and wires at this portion of
the town were also blown down.
Mr. H. G. Spencer had the roof of his house blown
off, damage to the private residence and shop being
estimated at £150. A good deal of fencing was also
destroyed
Mr. E. W. Carrington's store suffered consider-
ably , tho windows being broken tho verandah blown
down, and most of the stock destroyed.
Mr. F. W. Tranter's business premises and stores
suffered to a great extent. The roof was blown off
both places. The estimated damage in this case is £300
Mr. J. Fardill, grocer, had the windows of his
premises smashed, the roof was partly taken off, and
considerable damage was done to the stock. A house
on the opposite side of the street was almost completely
wrecked, the roof and verandah being demolished.
The workshops of Messrs. Boake Brothers, coach
builders, were blown down, several sulkies and bug-
gies being destroyed.
Mr. H. Panton's residence suffered considerably
The chimneys and the roof were blown down.
Mr. H. Locke's blacksmith shop was partly blown
down and his private residence was unroofed.
DAMAGE IN TOWN
In Narrabri proper a good deal of damage was
done Mr. E. V. Coleman s shop, a two story
building in Maitland street, had the roof completely
blown away. The windows in the shop were
smashed, and considerable damage was done to the
stock.
The roof of Mr. M. Hardy's business premises was
taken off. The old buildings at the side of Mr. C.
Wall's Commercial Hotel were completely unroofed
Mr. J. Turner's stables were unroofed and Mr. E.
H. Wall's premises were partly unroofed.
The Commercial Hotel occupied by Mr. W. Con-
way had the roof partly removed and the chimney
blown down, the estimated damage being £150.
The windows in the local post office were blown
in. Mr. W. H. Coleman's hotel also suffered considerably,
the stables at the rear being blown down.
The goods shed at the local railway station was
blown down and a couple of trucks were removed
from the rails.
Mr. S. Faulkner's premises were damaged considerably.
Reports from the outlying districts are not yet to
hand. The telegraph lines along the railway line on
the eastern side of the town are blown down and
greatly damaged.
A MAN STRUCK BY LIGHTNING
Mr. W. Herbert, a man employed by Mr. E. H.
Wall, was killed near Narrabri by lightning.

Source:
The Sydney Morning Herald
Monday 6 January 1902
page 7
Transcription, janilye 2014.

Inquest on the body of James Fitzpatrick

WELLINGTON.
AN inquest was held at the Lion of Waterloo Inn, Montefiores,
on Wednesday, 27th March, 1850 before Dr. Curtis, and a
Jury of twelve, on the view of the body of James Fitzpatrick,
then laying dead near Mr. Drew's residence at Wellington.
James Drew stated:
"the deceased was my hired servant; yesterday, I sent him
to Montefiores on an erand, there was nothing to
detain him, but he was nearly two hours away;
when he returned, which was a little after
sunset, I desired him to fetch the mare up
from where she was tethered near the river ;
shortly afterwards, I heard somebody galloping
towards the house, and went to the door to see
who it was coming at such a pace, and, observed that
it was the deceased riding the mare, without saddle or bridle,
and who immediately fell and lay there ; Captain Mayne and
some gentlemen came up at the time, and
examined him, and found no bones broken and
left him where he was, after bathing his head
with cold water, under the impression that he
was drunk. I supposed that he was drunk
from the circumstance of his having been so
long on his errand, and his riding the mare at
such a pace without saddle or bridle; some
time after the Chief Constable and constable
Maher came by; I wished them to take him
in charge for drunkeness,but they did not I
did not go near him after that, all night, nor do
I believe anybody else did. He was alive this
morning and died about half past seven this
morning , I dld not send for a doctor because
I thought he was only drunk and would come
to in a short time , I wished to send him to the
lock up because if he did really require
medical assistance he would be nearer to it in
the lock up than a my place; my place is, I
believe, nearly two miles from the nearest
medical man, and the lock is not more than
a quarter of a mile; one of the constables pro-
posed to put him into a shed or outhouse, if I
had any, but I objected to it; I objected to it
because if he was only drunk I thought
the cool night air would tend to recover him
sooner than a close warm room , the mare had
an halter on when deceased was riding her;
she is shy, but otherwise free from vices;
deceased had no bed or covering taken to him
all night, but when I found that he was dead I
threw a rug over him.
Susannah Chandler corroborated the former.
going as to the deceased being drunk and the
accident, and stated in addition that she heard
him groan in the night and that morning
and reported it to her mistress, who made no remark
Chief Constable Rhodes stated that he knew
deceased, and assisted to bathe his head, and
slapped his hands to endeavour to bring him
to, he did not think himself justified in taking
him in charge, as deceased was so near his
home, and the lock-up so far away, had his
(the Chief Constable) met him elsewhere in
that state he should certainly have taken him
to the lock-up, but as it was, the Chief
Constable considered him in the care of his
master.
Constable Maher corroborated the above,
and stated in addition that deceaseds hands
were clenched, and he had a gurgling in his
throat, and he remarked to Mr Drew that
there was more the matter with the man than
drunkenness, and that deceased would not live
long, that witness proposed to put deceased
into some outhouse or shed, but Mr. Drew objected to it.
Robert Cowell stated that he was talking to
deceased about ten minutes about sunset on
the evening of the accident, and that he was
perfectly sober.
Mr Matthews also stated that deceased was
sober, and that if he had loitered on his errand
it was not in Montefiores.
The Jury returned a verdict that deceased
died from injuries received by accidentally
falling from a horse, and added the following
rider: -
The Jury cannot fully express their horror and disgust at the great want of feeling
shown by Mr. Drew, and are of opinion that had medical aid been procured, the
man's life might probably have been saved, or his sufferings considerably lessened.

Source:
The Sydney Morning Herald
Monday 15 April 1850
page 2
Transcription, janilye 2014


James Drew's Reply
ORIGINAL CORRESPONDENCE.
To the Editors of the Sydney Morning Herald.
Gentlemen,
Perceiving in your impress of the 15th instant, the report
of an inquest held at Montefiores on the 27th March, on the
body of one James Fitzpatrick, lately in my
employment, I beg to offer a few remarks on the censure
the Jury thought proper to pass on my conduct on
that occasion.
In my evidence I stated that on the man
falling from the mare, he was carefully examined
to ascertain if any limbs were broken,
and not finding such to be the case, I did not
think he required medical assistance , and this
was not only my opinion, but also the opinion
of the gentlemen who came up almost immediately
on the accident occurring, one of whom assisted
me to place the man against a log, in order to
keep his head up.
This unfortunate circumstance is the first of
this nature that I ever witnessed, therefore,
I had no previous experience to guide me, and
not finding any bones broken, or any blood flowing
either from the mouth or nose, it was but natural that
I should merely suppose the man was suffering
under the combined effects of intoxication and the stun
from the fall, and under these circumstances I most
humbly beg to submit that an impartial jury would not
be justified in passing such a censure as it certainly
is by no means an uncommon occurrence in this mild climate
for drunken men to sleep in the open-air all night; and
that the man was in a state of intoxication there can
be no doubt for although I was not in a position
to swear positively that such was the case, still,
I am confident he really was so; and the girl who swore
to his being intoxicated has, since the inquest,
stated that before he went for the mare, he
went into the kitchen, close to where she was
standing, for a drink of water, and that she
then noticed the fumes of liquor on him.
According to a statement the Coroner made to
the jury, it was also the impression of Captain
Mayne that the man was intoxicated, although
that gentleman's evidence was not considered
necessary. With respect to the evidence of the
Chief Constable, wherein he stated that had he
found the man elsewhere he should have taken
him to the lock-up, and that he was only Pre
vented doing so, from the proximity of my
premises, and considering him under my care,
I beg to observe that "If he should have taken
him into custody, the proximity of my premises
should be no excuse for him not doing so,"
and as for considering the man under my care,
after I had expressly requested him to convey
the man to the lock-up, is too absurd to require
comment.
The constabulary, I imagine, are instituted and
supported for the protection of the lives and property
of Her Majesty's subjects ; and if so, a drunken man
is as much entitled to that protection as a sober one,
consequently if any censure was deserved in this
affair, I think it should have been bestowed
where a positive neglect of duty was proved,
"but this did not suit the intentious of those
who sat in judgement,"
The Jury's reproof conveys an idea that it is
the duty of employers (who have the misfortune to
have drunkards in their service, which in these remote
districts, from the scarcity of labour is too frequently
a matter of compulsion) to look after their servants
and attend carefully to them in any troubles and
difficulties the said servants may bring themselves
into through their own debauchery, whilst they are
neglecting their employer's interests.
Now, with all due submission, I beg to observe
that such an idea is contrary to all existing
notions which have hitherto regulated society.
Has a man any right to convert his employer's
house into a hospital, and intrude on the privacy
of a family, because he meets with an accident
through his own intemperance.
The law of England does not acknowledge intoxication
as an excuse for any crime a man may commit whilst
in a state of inebriety ; neither should common sense
suppose that the peace and happiness of a household
is to be disturbed by the brawls of a drunkard.
I have no intention, however, of sheltering
myself either by the foregoing remarks, or at
the expense of the constabulary from any
justly merited blame, as I do not conceive
cause for such to exist, I have merely made
them to show the injustice of the censure ; had
I been aware that the man had received any
internal injury, I should not have suffered him
to expire without having sent for medical
assistance, and affording him every comfort in
my power; but as I have before stated, I had
not the slightest idea such was the case. It is
true that Maher expressed his belief that the
man would not live long, but as he was the
only one that did express such an opinion, it is
not to be supposed that I should place reliance
on what he said, in opposition to the opinions
expressed by every other person who saw the
deceased ; and as to my objecting to allow the
man to be put into a shed or out-house, I
have only to remark that I do not see what
the benefit of such a removal would have
been.
Trusting you will excuse my having trespassed on
your space to such a length in vindication of myself,
I beg to subscribe myself,
Gentlemen,
Your humble servant,
JAMES DREW.
Wellington, April 19.
Source:
The Sydney Morning Herald
Friday 26 April 1850
page3
transcription, janilye 2014

Montefiore or Old Wellington New South Wales

Wellington, situated on the main Western line is 248 miles from Sydney by rail.
It is an old place, and formed a penal settlement as far back as 1819.
The place abounds in old associations with the early history of Australia;
and if the newspaper man will not find many things to interest him, he is sure
to hear a good deal that will, as stories of convict life and encounters
with the blacks are even now rife in these parts.
The poor dusky natives were the first dispossessed; and the seemingly inevitable
fate of all these people, who disappear before the advances, or it might
be termed the inroads of civilization, as the verdure of their native forest
falls before the nipping frost, is represented as having already befallen them.
There is sufficient historical truth in the picture to justify the use that has
been made of it. True, there are a few blacks in the Catholic missionary
camp near Wellington, which I will touch on later; the rest have disappeared,
either from the regions in which their fathers dwelt, or altogether from
the face of the earth.
Up to 1845 the settlement about Wellington was very sparse.
There was not a house on the land now occupied by the town
of Wellington.
From Montefiore to the old stockade up the Bell River there was not
a vestige of a dwelling of any kind,
Mr. John Jardine then lived at Gobolion, the Davidsons had
Murrugulan (now Apsley), Messrs, Kaley, Templar, and Rickards held Nanima,
which later on came into the possession of Mr. Joseph Aarons, one of the
open-hearted early pioneers,
Mr. Maxwell resided at Narragol. and Mr. R. McPhillamy held Blackrock.
Murrumbidgerie Station, owned by Raymond and Co., was managed by Mr. Hogarth.
Michael Lahy resided at Umby.
Dubbo was not then in existence, but some four miles on
the Wellington side of the present town Messrs R. and L. Dulhunty
were the kings of that part of the country as far as Talbragar,
where they were met by another landed squire, old John Manghan,
a J.P. and a gentleman. Below Dubbo there were the Campbells of
Burglegurabie, near Sir Saul Samuel's station, Euromedah.
John Readford had a station a few miles below Mumblebone on the
river next to Mount Harris At Warren there was only a bark hut and
a stockyard.
The late Mr. John Andrew Gardiner then resided on a station a
few miles below Mumblebone, on the other side of the river. In
his employ was a cook called Soldier Donnelly, who used to be one
of the troopers stationed at Wellington. The blacks were at times
very troublesome, and Mr. Gardiner was one of those who had
occasionally to fight his way through them. Every hut or dwelling
was pierced with holes for muskets, to enable the inmates to take
aim at the black assailants.
Below Dubbo there were no sheep, nothing but cattle on the runs.
Mr. Michael McMahon was at Narromine managing for Christie and Wentworth.
In those days Dr. Curtis was the leading man in public matters.
The Commissioner of Crown Lands was Captain Allman; he had a body of
some thirty or forty troopers under him, who with their horses were
stationed in the Commissioner's paddock at Montefiore, or old Wellington.
Mr. M. O'Shea was the contractor who supplied the Commissioner and
troopers with forage and sundries. Montefiore was the farthest out
town or village in the north-west.
The only store was kept by Mr. James Drew, but there were two pubs;
the first was built by Mr. Hyeronimus, and it had such a run of
trade that Mr. T. Sullivan followed suit and built another. Both houses
are now things of the past, and the builders have joined the great majority.
All this has now changed.
Note:
For the full story with pictures
see the source below
Source:
Freeman's Journal
Saturday 12 August 1899
pages 13-19
Transcription, janilye

TROVE

WINDSOR nsw Local Recruits.1916

Windsor and Richmond Gazette, Friday 21 April 1916
Local Recruits.

AKINS, CHARLES, Windsor
AKINS, THOMAS
ALDERTON, BERT, Windsor
ARMSTRONG, ROY, Windsor.
ARMSTRONG, GEORGE F., Cornwallis
ALLEN, WiLLIAM CHARLES, Windsor
ARNOLD, W., Windsor
BRADSHAW, R. N., Scheyville
BAIRD, NORMAN, Pitt Town
BAIRD, ERIC J., Pitt Town.
BALL, WILFRID A., Lower Portland
BAKER, W., Oakville.
BARTLE, THOMAS, Windsor.
BASS, OLIVER, Windsor
BENNETT, W. H.. Windsor
BELL, ROBERT, Wilberlorce
BLACKET, ULRIC A., Vineyard.
BLACKET, NIGEL A., Vineyard.
BOLTON, Hy. H., Windsor (wounded).
BROOKS, JOHN, Freeman's Reach.
BLACKMORE, WALTER, Wilberforce
BROWN, BOY, Wilberforce.
BROWN, WILLIAM EDWIN, Oakviile (rejected).
BRENNAN, SERGT. G., Scheyville
BUCHANAN. DONALD, Windsor
BOWMAN, WILLIAM J., Courangra
BUTTSWORTH, ROY, Bullridge
BUTTSWORTH, GLEN., Bullridge
BRAGG, ROWLAND, Maroota.
CALLAGHAN, CLIVE, Windsor
CALLAGHAN, REG., Windsor
CALLAGHAN, CLEN. C, Windsor (not accepted.)
CAMPBELL, WALTER, Lower Portland
CASE, G. (not accepted)
CASE THOMAS, Bullridqe
CAMBRIDGE, K., Windsor
CAMBRIDGE, THOMAS, Windsor
CAREY THOMAS, Magrath's Hill (killed)
CLARKE, B., Oakviile
CLARKE MANFRED H., Windsor
CLOUT, LESLIE, Windsor
CLIFFORD, FREDERICK, Windsor
CLIFFORD, OSCAR, Windsor
CLIFFORD, CHARLES, Windsor
COBCROFT, B. H., Windsor
CONROY, GEORGE. Pitt Town
COOPER, ALICE, Windsor (Matron Hospital Ship)
CONNELLY, FRED., Windsor (killed)
CAMPBELL, ROD, Leet's Vale (not accepted).
CHRISTIE, JERSEY, Lower Portland.
CROFT, G.
CUPITT, GUY FRANKLIN (rejected)
CLARKE, LAWRENCE CLYDE'
CARSON, FREDERICK JAMES, Cattai.
DAVIS, ERIC, Windsor
DAVIS, TRISTRAM J., Pitt Town' (not accepted)
DEAL. LESLIE, Laughtondale
DICKSON, P. A., Windsor
DICKSON, WALTER. Windsor
DICKSON, JOHN, Windsor
DUNN, RICHMOND, Windsor
DWYER, GREGORY, Clarendon
DWYER, JOHN, Clarondon
DWYER, WILLIAM, Clarendon
EATHER, CECIL George. Windsor (killed 1915 Gallipoli)
EATHER, FRANK Hilton, Windsor(Killed 1917, Bullecourt)
EATHER, FREDERICK Reuben, Upper Colo
EATHER, ROLAND JAMES, Upper Colo.(killed 1917, Ypres)
FIASCHI, Dr. THOMAS. Sackville
FULLERTON, Dr. A. Y., Windsor
FARLOW, ALWYN, Freeman's Reach
FARLOW, CECIL V., Windsor
FLEMING, GEORGE, Central McDonald(killed).
FORD, A. E., Windsor
FORD. HERBERT, Windsor.'
GREEN. MERVYN, Magrath's Hill
GOW, HAROLD, Windsor
GIBSON, GEOF. V., Windsor
GIBSON, V. J. V., Windsor
GREENTREE, C. A., Cattai
GREENTREE, D. S., Cattai
GREENTREE, ALFRED JAMES Cattai.
GOSPER, CHARLES, Windsor'
GOSPER, CLARENCE. Upper Colo
GOSPER JOSEPH. Upper Colo
GRONO, WILLIAM CHARLES, late Windsor
GADSDEN, E. JEFFERY, (not accepted)
GREENWELL, ERIC .
HAGEL, ERNEST, Lower Portland
HALL, RONALD, Wilberforce (not accept
HANCHETT, SAMUEL, Windsor
HARDRES ALFRED, Scheyville (not accepted)
HAXBY, E. C. H. Windsor (twice wounded)
HAXBY, HAROLD G.
HARRIS ARTHUR, Upper Colo
HEARNE, ARTHUR, Central McDonald
HERPS, ARTHUR M. C, Lower Portland.
HERPS, CLAUDE, Lower Portland
HERPS, CARL, Lower Portland.
HERPS, RUPERT, Lower Portland.
HOLDEN, REGINALD, Windsor
HONEMAN, GARNET, Windsor (rejected)
HONEMAN, GORDON, Windsor (rejected)
HOSKISSON, JAMES, Clarendon
HOUGH, ERNEST, Windsor
HIDER, F., Windsor
HIPWELL, H., Windsor
HIPWELL, WALTER Windsor
HUDSON, SID, Vineyard
HUGHES. ROBERT B., Windsor
HULBERT, WILLIAM, Windsor (wounded).
HUMPHRIES, T. (not accepted)
HENNING, WILLIAM, Lower Portland
HIBBERT, RICHARD THOMAS, Freeman's Reach
HESSION, CLEVE.
HOLDEN, JAMES, Windsor
HOBBS, REGINALD, Pitt Town
HUNT, GEORGE C, Windsor, (rejected).
IRELAND, G., Windsor
JAMES, HENRY, Windsor
JENNINGS, C. R. E., Windsor
JENKINS, THOMAS, Lower Portland (wounded;
JOBSON, HUBERT CLIFTON
JOHNSTON, CLARENCE (not accepted)
JONES, JOSHUA, Ebenezer
JONES, HILTON, Windsor
JONES, RUSSELL, Cattai
JONES, BERT, Sackville.
JURD C. C. St. Albans (wouridadj
JURD, OWEN PEARSON, Central McDonald (wounded)
JOHNSTON, STAUNTON, Magrath's Hill.
KELLY, EDMUND, Scheyville
KEMP, ARTHUR, Ebenezer
KINGHAM, ARTHUR, Freeman's Reach
KINGHAM, JOHN, Freeman's Reach
KINGHAM, STANLEY, Freeman's Reach
KERSHAW. PICTON, Sackville.
LARAGHY, VICTOR. Sackville
LARAGHY, JACK, Sackviile
LARAGHY, ROY, Sackville
LAYCOCK, G. C, Scheyville (not accepted)
LIDDLE, EDWIN S.. Windsor
L1DDELL, SYDNEY, Windsor
LIDDLE, FRED., Windsor
LINDSAY, A. J. H., Cattai
LINDSAY, W. S. T., Cattai
LEE, - , Lower Hawkesbury
LEET, SIDNEY, Leet's Vale (ill)
LILLIS, LEO, Freeman's Reach
LOCKART, HUBERT CLENDON, Wilberforce
LOCKART, WILLIAM RALPH, Wilberforce (not accepted).
LYE, ERIC, Upper Colo.
MAISEY, FRED. T.. Windsor
MALONEY, D., Central McDonald.
MALES, HENRY. Upper Colo
MALES, WILLIAM, Upper Colo
MALES, ARTHUR. Upper Colo.
MARR, ALEXANDER, Central Colo
MARSHALL, A. CAMPBELL, Caltai
MARSHALL, STEWART, Cattai (not accepted).
MARTIN, ERNEST, Freeman's Reach
MITCHELL, BENTLEY (Bullridge), recovered from illness.
MITCHELL, G. W. Bullridge.
MOLLOY, JAS. V., Windsor
MOSES, JAS. W., Windsor
MULL1NGER, ROYr, Windsor
McCULLOCH, D., gcheyvfllo
M'KELLAR. ERNEST
MARNEY, EUGENE, Windsor
McDONALD, LIEUT. A. J., Scheyville
McDOUGALL, HAROLD, Lower Portland.
MARTIN, WILLIAM, Freeman's Reach
NAGLE, E., Upper Colo
NOLAN, THOMAS, Lower Portland (died of illness)
NORRIS, ARTHUR, Windsor
NORRIS, HENRY, Windsor.
NYE, PERCY GEORGE, Cattai
O'BRIEN, V.. Windsor
OGDEN, JOSEPH, Oakviile (wounded)
ONUS, LAL?,(LANGLY)
O'TOOLE, LEIGHS
PAGE, PHILIP C, Lower Portland
PAINE, LIEUT. -COLONEL J. J., Windsor.
PARKIN, R. T., Windsor
POTTS, ROLAND, Windsor
PYE, Dr. CECIL R. A, Windsor
PEARCE, WILLIAM P., Pitt Town
PYE, ERIC J. D., Windsor
PICKUP CLIVE, Windsor
PICKUP, FRANK A., Windsor
ROBERTS, JOHN JOSEPH, Pitt Town-road
ROBERTSON, Wm, Windsor
ROBERTSON, F. J., Windsor (not accepted).
REES, VICTOR JOHN, Windsor
RHODES, WILLIAM R., Wilberforce (not accepted).
RUTHERFORD, ROBERT, Oakviile
RIGG, WILLIAM, Sackviile
RYAN, HUGH, Jun., Pitt Town (not accepted).
SANDOZ, GEORGE E., Windsor
SCHOLER, RICHD., Windsor
SCHOLER, JOHN, Windsor (not accepted)
SHIRLEY, WILLIAM, Windsor
SHEPHERD, GEORGE, Clarendon
SHIMMELS, ARTHUR, Scheyville
SMITH, WALTER C, Currency Creek
SIM, E., Windsor
SMITH, ROBT., Freeman's Reach
SPARKES, THOMAS, Lower Portland
START1N, Wm., Mulgrave
SMITH, ALBERT EDWARD, Freeman's Reach
SMITH, FREDERICK, Freeman's Reach.
SWORDS, R. E., Windsor
SULLIVAN, REGD., Windsor
SOUTH, R. B., Scheyville
SIMPSON, CECIL, Wilberforce
SIMPSON, NORMAN, Wilberforce(wounded).
SHADLOW, CECIL D. (no! accepted)
SMITH, FREDERICK A., Scheyville
SMITH. JOHN, Scheyville
STREETER, FREDERICK, Windsor,(wounded).
STREETER, ROY, Windsor (killed).
STREETER, OSCAR, Windsor
SMALLWOOD, WILLIAM J., Cattai
SOWDEN, ROLAND, Windsor
SIMMONS, RICHARD T., Upper Colo
STEWART, CHARLES, Windsor
TURNBULL, CECIL G. W. Wilberforco(wounded).
TAYLOR CHARLES, Lower Portland
TAYLOR, FRED. C, Windsor
TEALE, ALEX., Wilberforce
THOMSON, F. S., Cattai
THOMPSON, JOHN ALBERT, Caltai
TOOMEY, ALFRED, Windsor (killed)
TOOMEY, EDWARD, Windsor
TOWERS, JOHN
TURNBULL, FRED., Wilberforce 1890-1966 (wounded)
TURNBULL, HARRY N., Wilberforce
TUCKERMAN, JACK, Windsor (not accepted).
ULSTROM, CHAS., Windsor
UPTON, CECIL, Windsor
UREN, Dr. CECIL, Windsor
WALKER, ARCHIBALD G., Windsor
WALL, STANLEY, Windsor (wounded)
WOODS, WILLIAM H., Sackville
WARD, OSCAR D., Windsor (injured).
WARD, WILLIAM, Windsor
WHITE, W. FRANK Vineyard (wounded).
WHITE, ROLAND (Cattai)
WOOLARD, ALFRED, Windsor
WOOD, EDGAR CLAUDE, Windsor
WOODS, JAMES
WHEELER, WILLIAM T., Windsor.
WALKER, WILLIAM GEORGE, Windsor.
WILSON, WILLIAM, Pitt Town.

RIVERSTONE LIST.

ALDERTON. R.
ALCORN, S.
ALCORN, CECIL
BAMBRIDGE, PHIL.
BROOKS, ALFRED .
BERTIE, J.
BERTIE, LEO
BROOKS, ERNEST
BORROWDALR. GEORGE PROUD. '
BROWN, JOSEPH
CARTER, FRANK .
CASSIDY. JOHN.
CLARKE. F.
CLOUT, CYRUS
COMYN, FRANK
CONWAY, JOHN
DAVIS. H.
DAVIES, W.,
DRAKE, E.
DRAYTON, S.
EDWARDS, WILLIAM.
FLETCHER, THOMAS JOSEPH.
FREEMAN, HERBERT
FOLEY, F. W.
GRIFFIN, E. W.
GRENSHAW, CECIL (not accepted;
GREEN, JOHN.
GIBSON, EDWARD CLAUDE.
HAYWARD, F. A.
HAYWARD, JOHN
HAYWARD, ROBERT
HURLEY, F.
HEWITT, EUWIN F. EL,
JOHNSTON, HAROLD (wounded)
JAMES, MATTHEW.
JONES, JOHN.
JONES, ROBERT.
KNIGHT, C. C.
KENNY, JACK (wounded). :
KENNY, R. E. G. (wounded
KEEGAN, F.
MACKAY, WILLIAM STEWART,
MASON. AMBROSE
MARLIN, ERNEST
MATTHEWS, REX.
MATTHEWS. ERIC
MORRIS, CLEMENT
PYE, J. J.
RIMMINGTON, H. J.
ROBBINS, J.
SCHOFIELD, A.
SCHOFIELD, E. .
SCHOFJELD. H.
SCHOFIELD, S. R. (not accepted)
SHOWERS, A. R. (killed)
SMITH, AUSTIN, (wounded)
SYMONDS, J.
TEALE, W.
TEALE, GEORGE
TAYLOR, FRANK W..
WIGGINS, C.F., seriously ill
Below:
Service No.1544 Private Cecil "Curly" George Eather, 3rd Battalion of Windsor, New South Wales.
He died at sea on 17 May 1915 aboard the SS Lutzow from wounds received in action at Gallipoli, Turkey, on the 8 May 1915, aged 22. He has no known grave and is remembered with honour on the Lone Pine Memorial, Gallipoli, Turkey.


2 comment(s), latest 6 months, 3 weeks ago

The issue and registration of Liquor licences in Victoria

From the time of first permanent settlement in Victoria licences authorising the sale and supply of liquor were granted by justices of the peace at Annual General Licensing Meetings held in June every year.
Following the English tradition of heavy control and excise of the licensing trade, over 40 Acts and Statutes were passed by the Victorian legislature between 1852 and the turn of the century.
The Act 3 Wm IV, No.8 (June 1833) provided for a General Meeting of the justices acting in and for each district in the Colony to be held in June each year and to be called the General Annual Licensing Meeting for the special purpose of considering all applications for licences for public houses. Three justices at least were required to be present. The justices were empowered to grant certificates authorising the issue of a licence. These certificates and the fee were then required to be lodged with the office of the Collector of Internal Revenue (Colonial Treasurer, New South Wales) who upon receipt would issue and register the licences. The Act also established Special General Sessions of the justices for the transferring of licences. All offences under the Act were to be heard at Courts of Quarter Sessions.
The Act 8 Wm IV, No.8 (1837) provided for the application of the 1833 legislation in the newly established Port Phillip District and empowered an officer, to be appointed by the Governor-in-Council, to issue publicans licences in lieu of the Colonial Treasurer in Sydney. The first officer authorised to do so was the Police Magistrate, Port Phillip District, William Lonsdale in September 1837. However by 1839 the Sub-Treasurer had been appointed to issue licences for the Port Phillip District. The Act regulating the sale and supply of liquor in the Port Phillip District at time of separation in 1851 was 13 Vic.,No.29 (1849). This Act did not substantially alter the liquor licensing law, continuing the system of General Annual Licensing Meetings within each district for the hearing of applications for licences but allowing for a bench of two justices of the peace when a third was unavailable. The Act provided for three types of licences, a publican's general licence, a packet licence (ship) and a confectioner's licence. The latter licence was confined to the sale of spruce beer and ginger beer. An 1854 Act 17 Vic.,No.24 provided for the registration of spirit merchants. Act 25 Vic.,No.147 (1862) introduced a requirement for distiller's licences, wine grower's and brewer's licences. Licensing Benches in Courts of Petty Sessions In 1864, all then existing statutes were repealed and replaced by the Wines, Beer and Spirits Sale Act 1864 27 Vic.,No.227 which first introduced the single bottle or grocer's licence to be held only by a spirit merchant. This Act abolished the General Annual Licensing Meetings and provided for the granting and transferring of licences to be a judicial proceeding within any sitting of the Court of Petty Sessions within a district.
Under the provisions of the Wines, Beers and Spirits Sale Act 1870 (34Vic.,No.390) the power to grant licences to be issued under the Act within each district was restricted to a Licensing Bench composed of a stipendiary magistrate and two other justices of the peace, nominated by the majority of and from amongst the justices resident within each licensing district. All applications for the granting, renewal, transfer or forfeiture of licences were to be heard by these appointed magistrates. Quarterly licensing meetings were to be held at each of the courts of petty sessions within a licensing district each year. Magistrate's were bound to give a months notice of the licensing meetings in the Government Gazette. The Act also allowed a municipal body to object to the granting of a licence in a district where there were already a sufficient number of licensed premises. The Act provided that on such an objection a poll should be taken in the neighbourhood, introducing for the first time the concept of the reduction of liquor licences. Licensing Courts were also supported, from 1876, by Inspectors of Liquor whose job it was to maintain the standard of liquor sold to the public and to ensure that it was unadulterated and fit for consumption. The position was apparently joined with that of Inspectors of Distilleries (Licensed Premises) and operated within the Trade and Customs area as part of the excise and customs function.
In the years 1900 to 1901 when the customs function passed to the Commonwealth the Inspectors of Liquor were placed under the authority of the Minister of Public Health The function has apparently remained with the Health portfolio and although there were no Inspectors of Liquor as such post c1978 the duties may possibly still be undertaken as part of the general health investigations area. District Licensing Courts The Licensing Act 1885 (40 Vic.,No.857) replaced the previous Licensing Benches with a separate Licensing Court for each licensing district to be constituted by three police magistrates except in the districts of Melbourne, Geelong and Sandhurst (Bendigo) where the chairman of the court was to be a County Court Judge. The Act also subjected licensed premises to the control and supervision of a Licensing Inspector who was empowered both to inspect premises and to give such reports and make orders as would ensure the maintenance of standards. Licensing Inspectors were appointed from the police force by the Governor. The Licensing Court would send duplicates of all certificates for licenses granted to the Treasurer, who continued to register and issue all liquor licenses. All fees, fines, penalties and forfeitures were to be paid to the Treasurer to be placed in a trust fund called the Licensing Act 1885 Fund which was to be applied to the carrying out of the provisions of the Act. The Licensing Courts had jurisdiction over all matters relating to: the granting or refusal of all applications for licences to be issued under the provisions of the Act the revocation, forfeiture, or cancellation of such licences the imposition of penalties authorised by the Act hearings of appeals from inspector's orders the disqualification of licensed persons and premises. The 1870 legislation empowered the licensing magistrate to approve or refuse all applications for entertainment licences for licensed premises and required the magistrate to forward lists of all applications to the agency responsible, the Chief Secretary's Department Licensing Court of Victoria The Licensing Act 1916 (No.2855) made provision for the concentration of the whole jurisdiction with regard to the granting of licences and their control and supervision under the newly constituted Licensing Court of Victoria (ss.34-37). The new Court consisted of three magistrates, where formerly this function had been administered throughout Victoria by twenty police magistrates and three County Court judges Each of the persons holding office as a member of the Licences Reduction Board was, under the Act, immediately deemed to have been appointed a Licensing Magistrate (s.35). Centralised administration was achieved with the appointment of the Secretary of the Licences Reduction Board as the Registrar of the new court. The system of licensing inspectors was continued, the duties of inspecting premises and enforcing the provisions of the Act being undertaken by nominated members of the police force who were not to be below the rank of sub-inspector. An additional duty of the inspectors was to submit an annual report to the Court. Hearings were held on a circuit basis in courts of petty sessions appointed by the Governor-in-Council as licensing courts to serve various licensing districts. Notification of the annual sittings of the courts and their location appeared in the Government Gazettes. The clerks of such courts would undertake the role of Licensing Clerk and would administer all licensing business in the locality and report directly to the Registrar of the Licensing Court. Prior to the passing of the Licensing Amendment Act 1922 (No.3259) there were two hundred and seventeen licensing districts in Victoria each consisting of one division of an electoral district. However section six of the new legislation provided that an entire electoral district should be the licensing district, thereby reducing the number to sixty-five. The Licensing Court had jurisdiction over all matters relating to: (the granting or refusal of all applications for licences to be issued under the provisions of the Act; ( the revocation ,forfeiture, or cancellation of such licences; (the imposition of penalties authorised by the Act; (hearings of appeals from inspector's orders; (the disqualification of licensed persons and premises.
The 1922 Act also empowered the Court to approve plans and to order the provision of additional accommodation and improvements where it thought them desirable section fourteen. Victorian Licensing Court The Victorian Licensing Court came into operation on 30 June 1954. It was constituted under the Licensing Amendment Act 1953 (No.5767) and assumed the functions of the Licensing Court of Victoria. The new Court was to be under the Chairmanship of a Judge of the County Court, the two other members being magistrates, with tenure extended from three to seven years (s.8). The Act also made provision for the appointment of a Supervisor of Licenced Premises (s.11) who was aided by nine assistant supervisors. The duties of the office included examining and reporting upon the nature and extent of hotel accommodation for the public and the provision made for the supply of meals and refreshments in hotels; consulting with licensing inspectors on proposed plans for new licensed premises, or alterations and extensions to existing hotels and clubs and reporting to the Court re same; and generally assisting the Licensing Court (s.11.2-4). The new Supervisor's Department of the Victorian Licensing Court was staffed by members of the Police Force. The Court had complete jurisdiction over the granting, transfer, cancellation and supervision of all liquor licences, with authority to impose penalties, hear evidence taken under oath and administer all related permits. Under the new legislation the functions of the Court were extended to include the control and supervision of "sanitation, hygiene, ventilation, cooling, heating, fire prevention and the cleanliness of food in all licensed premises". For the purpose of reviewing licences annually the Licensing Court held Annual Sittings usually in November and December. Applications for renewal were made by all licensees , country licensees setting down their applications with the Licensing Clerk for that particular area. A magistrate held a sitting on the appointed day in the Court House at each of the prescribed centres. The Court was not restricted as to the number of licences that it had the power to grant, the State having been constituted as one licensing district by the 1953 legislation (s.2). In the event of a cancellation of a licence the Court sat as the Licences Reduction Board in order to fix compensation. In 1968, the Victorian Licensing Court was abolished and the Liquor Control Commission (VA 1110) assumed all the responsibilities associated with liquor licensing in Victoria.
SOURCE:
Public Record Office of Victoria

Arthur John Cleland 1915-1976

NOTICE
Requesting relatives to contact me,
regarding 4 war service medals, which are in my possession.

but NOT the DFC
Arthur John CLELAND was the son of Alfred John CLELAND and Amy Eliza BARCLAY married at St. Leonards, NSW in 1899
I believe Arthur John CLELAND died at Denistone, Sydney, on 29 July 1976

Name... ARTHUR JOHN CLELAND
Service.. Royal Australian Air Force
Service Number.. 411004
Date of Birth.. 8 November 1915
Place of Birth.. SYDNEY, NSW
Date of Enlistment.. 31 March 1941
Locality on Enlistment.. Unknown
Place of Enlistment.. SYDNEY, NSW
Next of Kin.. Joyce CLELAND, nee COLLETT m. 1940, Ryde, Sydney
Date of Discharge.. 15 May 1945
Rank.. Flight Lieutenant
Posting at Discharge.. General Reconnaissance School
WW2 Honours and Gallantry.. Distinguished Flying Cross

St Peters Church Richmond. NSW

AT A PUBLIC MEETING of the Inhabitants of Richmond,
held at the School House, on the 23d October, 1835,
the Rev. Samuel Marsden in the Chair,
It was proposed by Mr. Cox, sen.; seconded by
the Rev. H. T. Stiles ; and resolved unanimously ---
1st.... That it is expedient to erect a Church in
this Town, for the celebration of Divine Worship,
according to the Form of the Protestant Episcopal
Church of England, on the Ground at the end of
George-street, originally set apart for that purpose.
Proposed by Mr. W. Cox, jun.; seconded by Mr.
G. Bowman ; and resolved unanimously ---
2nd.... That, to carry this object into effect, a Committee
be formed, consisting ot the following Members, of whom any
seven be competent to despatch business : ---
Mr. Cox, sen., Fairfield,
Mr. Cox, jun., Hobartville,
Mr. Bell, Belmont,
Mr. George Bowman,
Mr. William Bowman,
Mr. Faithful,
Rev. H. T. Stiles,
Mr. Martin, sen.,
Mr. C. Palmer,
Mr. Dight,
Mr. C. Powell,
Mr. Parnell,
Mr. G. P. Wood.
Proposed by Mr. William Bowman ; seconded by
Mr. Faithful ; and resolved unanimously
3rd..... That, to forward the object of this Meeting,
Funds be immediately raised by voluntary Subscription ---
that the Members of the Committee do agree to use their best
exertions to this end ---
that Subscription Lists be opened at the several Banks ---
and that an Appeal be made to the Public through the medium
of the following Newspapers :---
Sydney Herald, Monitor, Colonist, Australian, and Sydney Gazette,
to be inserted three times in each Newspaper.
Proposed by Mr Martin ; seconded by Mr. William Bowman ;
and resolved unaminously ---
4th.... That William Cox senior, Esq., be requested to take the
office of Treasurer, and the Rev. H. T. Stiles that of Secretary.

THE Protestant Population of Richmond and its Neighbourhood, as shewn by
the last Census, is upwards of 1300. The present Building used as a
Church will barely accommodate one hundred Persons : and as the other
engagements of the Chaplain prevent him from having more than one service
on the Sunday, it is obvious that out of every thirteen Inhabitants who
may wish to participate in the ordinance of Divine Worship, twelve
must be deprived of that privilege, because there is no room for them.
This simple fact constitutes, in itself, a strong appeal to the
liberality of the Residents, not of Richmond only, but of the Colony
generally. It is earnestly hoped that the individual, domestic, and
social advantages to be derived from a due observance of the Public
Worship of Almighty God, will be so appreciated by the Colonists
universally, as to produce a corresponding willingness to contribute,
when, as at present, an opportunity is offered them towards an object
so fraught with benefits to our adopted country, our families, and ourselves.

Contributions will be thankfully received by William Cox, Esq., Hobartville ;
by the Rev. H. T. Stiles, Windsor; by the Rev. S. Marsden, Parramatta;
by the Members of the Committee ; and at either of the Banks in Sydney.

Subscriptions already promised :—
£. s. d.

The Archdeacon....... ...........200 0 0
Mr. Cox, senior, Fairfield.........35 0 0
Mr. Cox, junior..... .....................25 0 0
Mr. George Bowman ..............20 0 0
Mr. William Bowman .... ......... 20 0 0
Mr. Faithful .... ............. .......... 20 0 0
Mr. John Town, junior.......... ..20 0 0
Rev. H.T. Stiles............... ..10 0 0
Mr. Onus.... .................. ..........10 0 0
Mr. John Town, senior. ...........10 0 0
Mr. Martin..... .... ......................6 0 0
Mr. Martin, junior. ... ............ ......6 0 0
Mr. Seymour... ..... ... ..... .........5 0 0
Mr. Cross .... .............. .... .......5 0 0
Mr. Hughes...... . ......... ... .........5 0 0
Mr. Dight ..... ........... ....... .... ....5 0 0
Mr. George Pitt. ..... .......... ..... ..5 0 0
Mr. Robert Williams. ..... .... .....5 0 0
Mr. Price ...... ..... .............. .. ....5 0 0
Mr. G. P. Wood . .... ..... ..... ......2 0 0
Mr. J. Markwell ... ..... ......... ....1 0 0
Mr. Robert Aull ...... ..................1 0 0
Mr. William Farlow..... .............1 0 0
Mr. C. Palmer ...... ...................1 0 0
Mr. Benjamin Cawer.... ...........1 0 0
Mr. George Mortimer..... .........1 0 0
Mrs. Crawley. ... ..... ... ............1 0 0
Mr. John Brown. .... ..... ..........3 0 0
Mr. Thomas Eather..... ... .......2 0 0
Mr. P. M'Alpin...... ... ...............2 0 0

Collected by the Rev. S. Marsden.

Rev. Richard Hill.... ....... .....2 0 0
Mr. R. Jones, M C...... ...... .6 0 0
Mr. R. Smith. ... ..... .......... ..2 0 0
Mr. Thomas Marsden......... .2 0 0
Mr. Caleb Wilson..... ...........2 0 0
Mr. Richard Fitzgerald. &
Mr. Robert Fitzgerald ..... ...5 0 0
Mr. James Chisholm. ... .....5 0 0
Mr. Samuel Terry.... ..........10 0 0
Mr. Edward Terry..... ............2 0 0
Mr. John Terry.... .. ... ...........2 0 9
Mr. P. W. Flower...... ...........2 0 0
Mr. C. S. Marsden. .... .........1 0 0
Mr. John Connell...... .... .......2 0 0
Mr. William Walker...... .......3 0 0
Mr. Thomas Walker..... .......2 0 0

Source:-
The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser
Saturday 21 November 1835
Page 1
Transcription, janilye 2014.

Historical notes: The site of St Peter's church was nominated in Governor Lachlan Macquarie's planned layout for Richmond. He intended to have the church, schoolhouse and burial ground on a very beautiful elevated block immediately above Pugh's Lagoon, a fine basin of fresh water. The burial ground, then 1 hectare, was surveyed by James Meehan and consecrated by the Rev Samuel Marsden and fenced by William Cox. The first burial was George Rouse and contains the headstones of many early Hawkesbury settlers The first school/church opened in 1810. It played an important part in the early life of Richmond. It was situated in Francis Street near the northern corner of the cemetery. The lower floor was the residence of the schoolmaster whilst the upper room was used for school and church purposes.

This building soon became too small to meet the ever increasing congregation and at a meeting chaired by the Reverend Samuel Marsden on 26 November 1835 the inhabitants of Richmond resolved to erect a church for the celebration of divine worship. A notice calling for tenders to erect the church appeared in The Australian on 18 October 1836. The committee formed to forward the project included Mr Cox, Sen,"Fairfield', Mr Cox, Jnr 'Hobartville', Mr Bell, 'Belmont', Mr George Bowman, Mr William Bowman. Mr. Faithful, Rev H.T.Styles, Mr Martin, Snr., Mr. G Palmer, Mr. Digit, Mr C Powell, Mr Parnell and Mr CP Wood. By 1833 the sum of 570 pounds had been subscribed and 200 pounds had been donated by the English Church Society. Tenders were called for the erection of the church in 'The Australian' on October 1836.

Built as a result of the establishment of the Church Act of 1840 St Peter's church was one of four churches consecrated in 1841. The church was built on a site overlooking Ham Common and the Hawkesbury River flats. It was agreed 162 hectares of the common would be given as Glebe land for the church. It was opened by Bishop Broughton on 15 July and designed by Francis Clark and built by James Atkinson who also built St Bartholomew's, Prospect and St Thomas, Mulgoa at the same time. It was designed in the Georgian style in contrast to most of the other churches, except St Batholomew's, which have Gothic style detailing. Clarke was responsible for a number of Sydney houses and the church of St Mary Magdalene at St Marys. A simple rectangular building with a square tower topped with a timber spire the original layout of the pews was to face inwards to the centre of the church. In 1850 a porch designed by E Blackett was added to the northern side and not long after, in 1857, a chancel was added. Once the chancel had been added the internal pew layout was altered to face the chancel. William Woolls, a prominent late nineteenth century writer on the botany and flora of Australia was incumbent at St Peter's from 1873 and from 1877 to 1883, Rural Dean of Richmond. . In the churchyard a small obelisk was built of bricks from the old school church building. THE CEMETERY is older than the church and contains the graves of many early pioneers including John Bowman, Thomas Matcham Pitt and Lt Thomas Hobby of the NSW Corps. Chief Officer at Hawkesbury in 1800 and a supporter of Maquarie. It was the second cemetery dedicated in the Hawkesbury district, around 1814, four years after St Matthews. THE RECTORY was designed by Francis Clarke and completed in 1847 and is said to have been a copy of an English rectory known to Bishop Broughton in the mid 19th century vogue for picturesque rectories. It was added to in 1863 by Edmund Blacket. Later alterations have changed its quality.
Reference: http://www.environment.nsw.gov.au/heritageapp/ViewHeritageItemDetails.aspx?ID=3880010


Guang yi hua bao The Chinese Australian Herald

TROVE have digitised some copies of one of the chinese Language Australian newspapers The Chinese Australian Herald published in Sydney.
Issues from 1 September 1894 to 25 August 1923 are available for your research and interest.
For more information about Chinese language newspapers in Australia visit the Chinese Museum
The museum also contains some wonderful historic photographs like the one below of
Stanley Ah Mouy reading a book, c.1923, Ah Mouy Family Collection, Chinese Museum


Religious Smokers

At one period of its history smoking was so common that it
was actually practised in church.
Previous to the visit of James I. to the University of
Cambridge, in 1615, the Vice Chancellor issued a notice
to the students, which enjoined that "No graduate, scholer, or
student of this universitie presume to take tobacco in
Saint Maries Church, upon payne of finall expellinge the universitie."
The Rev. Dr. Parr, when perpetual curate of Hatton, Warwickshire,
which living he held from 1783 to 1790, regularly smoked in the
vestry while the congregation were singing long hymns, chosen for
the purpose, immediately before the sermon. The doctor was wont to
exclaim : " My people like long hymns, but I prefer a long pipe."
The Rev. Robert Hall, of Leicester, the well known Baptist minister,
regularly indulged in smoking during the intervals of Divine worship.
Sir Walter Scott, in his " Heart of Midlothian," refers to one
Duncan, of Knockdunder, an important personage, who smoked during the
whole of the sermon, from an iron pipe, tobacco borrowed from other
worshippers. We are told that, "at tbe end of the discourse he knocked
the ashes out of his pipe, replaced it in his sporran, returned the
tobacco pouch to its owner, and joined in the prayer with decency and
attention."
The Puritan Fathers, who settled in America, were greatly addicted
to smoking, indeed, the practice became so common that even these
strait-laced observers of time and seasons actually smoked in church.
The custom soon caused very considerable annoyance, as the religious
exercises were greatly disturbed by the clinking of steels and flints
and the clouds of the smoke in church.
Hence, in the year 1669, the colony passed this law :
"It is enacted that any person or persons that shall be
found smoking of tobacco on the Lord's Day, going to or
coming from the meetings, within two miles of the meeting
house, shall pay twelve pence for every such default."
Under this law several persons were actually fined, but
the punishment failed to secure the carrying out of the
arbitrary second portion of the enactment.
The custom of smoking during church service was not confined
to the laity and minor clergy, for it is recorded that an
Archbishop of York was once reproved by the Vicar of St.
Mary's, Nottingham, for attempting to smoke in the church vestry.
The Rev. John Disney, of Swinderly, in Lincolnshire, writing on the
13th of December, 1773, to James Grainger, says :
"The affair happened in St. Mary's Church,
Nottingham, when Archbishop Blackburn was
there on a visitation. The archbishop had ordered
some of the apparitors or other attendants to
bring him pipes and tobacco and some liquor
into the vestry for his refreshment after the
fatigue of confirmation. And this coming to
Mr. Disney's ears, he forbade their being
brought thither, and with a becoming spirit
remonstrated with the archbishop upon the
impropriety of his conduct, at the same time
telling his Grace that his vestry should not be
converted into a smoking-room

SOURCE
Dungog Chronicle
Friday 4 November 1898
Bowral Free Press
The Gundagai Independent