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Looking for Alexander Sutherland Allan NZ

He died in Wellington, New Zealand 27 January 1900, age 69.
married Elizabeth Rosian HUNTLEY in New Zealand in 1858
She died in Wellington, New Zealand 25 April 1919 age 79
There is no births recorded in NZ for either.

I found birth and baptism for woman of the same name but cannot find immigration.

England & Wales, FreeBMD Birth Index, 1837-1915
about Elizabeth Rosian Huntley
Name: Elizabeth Rosian Huntley
Date of Registration: Oct-Nov-Dec 1839
Registration district: Clerkenwell
Inferred County: London
Volume: 3
Page: 36

London, England, Births and Baptisms, 1813-1906
about Elizabeth Rosian Huntley
Name: Elizabeth Rosian Huntley
Record Type: Baptism
Baptism Date: 15 Jan 1840
Father's Name: Robert Henry Huntley
Mother's name: Elizabeth Huntley
Parish or Poor Law Union: Clerkenwell St James
Borough: Islington
Register Type: Parish Registers

I need Immigration records to prove the above is HER
and same for Alexander + a birth
I have decendants.
I found a R. H. Huntley as a signatory on a Memorial to Governor Fitzroy
19 April 1845. If that is her father immigration would have to be between 1839 and 45

13 comment(s), latest 1 year, 5 months ago

The rescue of Georgie Porter 1907

14 April 1907, Western Australia
Re: The Swan Boys Orphanage more popularly know as the Coffinage at Middle Swan
conducted by that animated stove-pipe, the Rev. Alfred 'Bully' Burton.

This case came under the notice of The Sunday Times of Western Australia in 1907
and shows up the methods of these sectarian-bossed orphanages at their worst,
and reveals a scandalous abuse not to be borne in a free country.
There was an idea at this time that the days of civil and religious despotism
were done-at least in Australia- But it would seem to have been a fallacy,

There are many people associated with the early days of the eastern gold
fields who will recollect Charlie Porter. He was the typical Australian prospector;
a well-known figure at every rush, one of the first men on Broken Hill, and one of
the multitude, who hit out in the wake of Bayley.
Like so many of his class he died poor, and his widow, after a brave struggle
to support her little family, was obliged to seek the aid of charity.
Through the agency of Warden Finnerty, she got her two eldest boys admitted to
the Swan Orhanage.
The mother was almost heart-broken at parting with her children, but
solaced herself with the reflection--that when the good times dawned on her
she would be able to get them out and lavish a maternal care on them until
the day came for them to quit the family roof-tree.
But she didn't know the sort of 'philanthropy' that rules at Swan Orphanage. It is
four years and four months since her boys became wards of the Anglican Church.
And they are so yet.
In course of time a change came over the fortunes of Mrs. Porter.
She married again, and two of her brothers secured good positions in Westralia.
She thus became in a position to support her boys, and after a
natural delay, due to her anxiety to make sure that
her prosperity was permanent and not transitory--that after getting the,
children from the Orphanage she should not be obliged to send them back
she finally applied for permission to resume control of her children.
It goes without saying that the latter have not been happy in their Dotheboys Hall.
Apart from their natural preference for the society of their own mother and little
sisters, they, in common with the other victims, complain of the poor fare,
the bitter grind, and the gloomy Puritanism supplied in Burton's Boeotian retreat:
The elder boy, who is now 14, expressed a desire to go out to work,
in order to be a help to his step-father, whomore power to him !
is perfectly willing to support the children, but doesn't get more than 10s, a day.
This fact was innocently mentioned by the anxious mother to the
Reverend (?) Burton, and the following letter will show how
he made use of it :-

"Dear Madam,
Your application for your two sons, George and Charley Porter,
was considered by the committee at last meeting.
The committee feel quite confident that their interests and
welfare will be far more securely conserved while under the
control of the manager than if returned to you.
It has therefore been decided that they shall both remain here.
If you had applied for them at the time you married again,
as soon as you were in a position, to keep them, and not when
the elder one is, on your own proposition,
ready to go out and earn wages, the application
might have been differently received.

Yours truly,
"A. BURTON."


[When the mother brought that amazing document to the "Sunday Times," we were willing
to believe that the last word had not been said on the subject, and arranged that she
should interview Bishop Riley. But the Bishop merely told her, in effect, that
"the matter was in the hands of Mr.Burton." which means that the mother
will not get her children if Burton can prevent her. Which means that his Lordship
Bishop Riley actually considers the paternal (?) rule of Bowelless Burton better
for the boys than the loving care of their mother Which sets up the astounding
proposition that the Anglican Church has more right to children to whom it gave
temporary refuge "for charity's sake" than their own decent, capable and natural
guardianthe mother who bore them. Which asserts that the church owns its orphans,
body and soul until they attain their legal majority; postulates, in fact, that the
Anglican Church (which has no civil rights or powers beyond those of the Hokes or
the Seventh Day Adventists) runs a state within a state, and is above the law
of West Australia.
This enormously impudent assumption of private property in children may have been quite
legal in Italy 300 -years ago. It may also be conceded in the Russia of to day.
But in a free-State of the free Australian Commonwealth in the year of grace 1907 it is
nothing else than a shriekinging anachronism and a gross abuse of privilege.
It is opposed both to law and to human nature; it rests on an injustice;
it can't stand the test of critical examination, from any direction. As we take it,
the only "right" by which the church holds these chil dren is the right of possession;
And if the mother chooses to exercise her natural and legal rights as a parent and
forcibly removes her boys from the Swan Orphanage, what power in W. A.
can punish her for it ?. Certainly not the church, for it doesn't possess any
punitive powers in addition to the flesh and blood proprietorship which it arrogates.
Certainly not the State, since maternal love is a more precious consideration that
the 'pecuniary welfare of any religious organisation. And although the law is a
strange and inconsistent aflair, and a frail reed to lean a conjecture on we hardly
think any court of law would punish a decent and capable mother for forcibly assuming
her maternal right to feed, clothe, and cherish her fatherless little ones.

We haven't given the woman this advice. We are procuring an opinion as to the
legal aspects of the position in order to enable her to proceed with! certitude.
But the public may take this for granted.

The. "Sunday Times" is going to get those children out.

'This paper is going to burst the bubble of ecclesiastical arrogance which usurps
proprietary rights over human flesh and blood. The real guardian of these
children is the STATE.
The church is merely a deputy guardian liable to be removed at any time.
By a simple exercise of its supreme power, the State, through its executive, can
wipe away the whole com geries of sectarian orphanages and give the guardianship of
the children into secular hands.
And if all the sectarian orphanageswhich God forfend !are run like Bully Burtons barracks
for boy slaves, the soonest the State does this the better.
If the sectarian orphanages have it as a principle that their charter of guardianship
is superior to the God-given right of a mother to feed, clothe and cherish the babes that
she bore, and who were suckled at her breast, it is the bounden duty of the W.A.
Government to sweep them into nothingness, as the Clemenceau Government is doing in France.]

19 May 1907, Western Australia

'This is the narrative of " Uncle Jim"
Being the personal experience of a " Sunday Times" scribe who rescued George Porter from the clutches of Parson Bully Burton, and also forced him, later on, to disgorge George's little brother Charlie.

It was suggested in the office that as the pedagogue-parson seemed impervious to all sense of humanity, kidnapping of at least one of the boys would precipitate matters.
Writer therefore was introduced to, the mother of the boys ; and assumed the name and
family status of their "Uncle Jim" there being such a person in
the Stott menage.

To lend an air of realism to the family expedition in going out to reconnoitre,
writer's status was fully maintained : Christian names on both sides being, allowed.
In this way family feticity was well-established.

The first shock; came' on its way out.
The Rev. Burton was met half-way!

Knowing the mother would at all times endeavor to obtain possession of her babies;
and as she was knowns to the Rev. B. a judicious re-arrangement, and shuffle of Veils,
arms, and waists fully persuaded the passing parson. that it was nothing more deadly
than a two-and-carry-one - picnic.

The mother was dropped near the soon-to-be-historic river and bridge, and
Auntie Hettie and Uncle Jim drove boldly into the fearsome fortresses.

Half-a-hundred anxious-eyed boys attired in all sorts and conditions of clothing,
paused in their work as the buggy stopped and Auntie Hettie went to spy the land.

The matron came down like a Nor' West willy-willy when Charlie Porter
was asked for.

Suddenly both youngsters came running up from the marsh fields wherein
they were working, severe chest complaints being evidently thought a
trifle at this modern "Dotheboy's Hall".

Then the Superintendent sighted the party and also came down at a Postle-like swing.

"Auntie Hettie was Privately "wording" the boys as to "Uncle Jim from the Fields" when
the Super. swooped down, confiscated the silver coin just handed to the lads and,
making an entry re: it being "invested for them until they were 21," offered to show
the party around.

While "the Super, primed Uncle Jim up with the beauties and benefits of being a
juvenile helot under Burton Squeers; the said quick-witted Auntie Hettie ambled around
ostensibly admiring the ducks, pigs, cabbages, mud and other products of the orphan farm.. '

When a mental map of the locality had been made the boys were told to
be in the lane between 7 and 8 that evening, and they might have a chance
for liberty.

Uncle Jim then drove his dearly beloved sisters back to Midland, gave the
buggy up to the livery stable, sent the ladies home by train and walked back
in the dark to the Orphanage.
Four hours of weary crawling and crouching amongst logs, wire fences pig-styes, etc,
failed to find the boys, the only break to the monotony being the sounds of evening
service held in the adjacent church. Eventually, after having, ruined a suit of clothes
per medium of farm slush and wire fencess : and having been severely trodden on
by a vagrant cow ; Uncle Jim deployed furtively back to town, heart-sick
and disconsolate.

Another rescue expedition was formed on the following Saturday morning-
the parties being a well-known scribe, the step-father of the boys, and Uncle Jim.

This time a complete swaggy's disguise was assumed out in the bush by Uncle Jim, who,
leaving the others secreted under the river bridge, trudged over the ploughed paddock
past the spot where by the aid of a powerful pair of field glasses he located George Porter.

Stopping momentary, and pointing over toward Ferguson's vineyard
as if inquiring his way, the disguised Uncle Jim passed a hurried word to the boy to be
at a certain spot on the river bank while the other boys were busy at lunch.
"Bring Charlie," he whispered. "If that isn't possible, come alone."

'An hour later Uncle Jim, the other pressman, and the step-dad, crouching in the river
reeds, saw with quickly-beating hearts a pathetic little figure stealing warily
from tuft to tuft of sheltering grass and bush, from boulder to tree stump,
and from hill to gully.
Nearer and nearer he came, stumbling and slipping by the muddy ooze of the river sedges,
until he came to a big Willow tree, lying prone by the bank. Here the little hero,
opened his guernsey, slipped something grey and alive into the hollow log, and
continued his journey of escape.
The something grey and alive was a half-grown possum, caught by George. at that spot
a week before, and thinking his brother might be soon also rescued, and not having
confidence in leaving his pet with others, he gave it its liberty !

A minute later he reached a spot opposite his rescuers, and began to strip for the swim across.

A whispered shout was wafted to him to cross by the bridge. -To this he shook his head meaningly.
His rescuers soon saw the reason. The bridge stood up and out, in full view of not
only the Orphanage, but of the parsonage, the church, and the cottages of half-a-dozen
local farm laborers.
- He was half undressed, when Uncle Jim and the daily scribe, stripping! in
lightening time, plunged in, crossed the river, and escorted the gallant little kiddie across.

After a necessarily, hurried towelling with soft dry grass, the party set out for home and mummy,
the scribe and the step-dad going away ostentatiously towards Midland Junction.
Uncle Jim and the boy Georgie snaking along, slow, tortuous skirt along the entire river
bank to Guildford,

Before half a mile was covered, a score of stops were made to allow the boy to convulsively
cough and rack his poor iittle frame until he lay panting and exhausted on the river bank.
So slow was the progress that at the end of two hours a mile and a half only had been covered.

After crawling and creeping through rail and wire fences, through and under prickly bushes
and hurdles that barred the track, Uncle Jim called a halt in a gully, planted his weary
little, charge in a hollow covered with boughs, and passing himself off as the skipper of
a broken-down motor-launch, hypnotised a farm slavey for a bottle of milk.
That slavey is hereby asked to forgive the fiction, as is also the presiding genius
of the Lord's Recording Diary.

Further down the river, as the poor little truant was now thoroughly done up,
a punt was commandeered and, using a bough as a paddle it was gondoliered down stream.

Owner of said punt is likewise apologised to, and asked to forgive the sin and trespass.

Near the Guildford bridge, George was again planted, while Uncle Jim, giving him an amazing
list of fictions in case of an inquisitive bail-up, made his apparently casual way to
the Rose and Crown, where the daily scribe and step-dad were unearthed (by appointment)
-assimlating their fifth pint of shandy.

A, 'phone to Perth brought out a pair of speedy nags and a double seated waggonette for
the drive home, the police by this time, right through from Midland to Perth, being busy
examining each and every carriage and trap on railway and road.

Uncle Jim, going back to the poor little, waiting waif, with lemonade and biscuits,
found him still huddled under his covering of leaves and bark, and it was, glad arms,
and hearts beating with thankful emotion, that an hour later swung" him from under the
seat into his. mother's arms.

When Uncle Jim and Georgie separated from the others at the "Sunday Times" office,
and had invaded a restaurant, a barber's shop, and
Sir.James Brennan's emporium (that gentleman having generously clothed the boy from top to toe),
the ultimate destination, Applecross, was reached about midnight.

Monday brought the staggering news that the Rev. Squeers Burton had invoked the
combined forces of Law and Order to hound down the dastardly miscreant who had dared
to prefer his mother's arms and domestic joys to the cold comforts of thc barracks on the Swan Riven,

Then Richard Haynes, K.C., took the said law by the large, ignominious ear, and pointed
out the fact that the law was the same old ass of aforetime, and any impulsive John Hop,
burgling the bough-shed of Uncle Jim at Applecross would land the Government into a
financial muddle that would take some thousands of bright, golden quids to square.

Before the squelching of the warrant came, a dozen policemen and troopers
had scoured the landscape in search of that abandoned felon, to-wit, George Porter,
their instructions being to place him in the lowest and darkest dungeon of the Swan Coffinage.

The acumen of Haynes, K.C., the good sense of Gus Roe, P.M., the whole-hearted ardor and
generosity of Dr. Taaffe, and sundry 'assistance from friends and sympathisers,
eventually squelched the illegitimate criminal warrant and to-day young Georgie Porter
is revelling in God's great glad sunshine on the hills of Applecross,
in place of fretting his little soul out, behind the prison boundaries of Squeers Burton.

Yesterday he was a child grown into man's moodiness, through harshness
and restraint." To-day he is a real, live boy, albeit a sickly one, but a boy with
bright, sunny surroundings, and all that youth should' have, before the woes of manhood
dry the blood, and sour the heart to sordidness.


This was the menu for the boys
in the orphanage up until the Burton Regime finished;
-Breakfast Porridge (made very thin, with no milk,
and the sugar boiled with it for economy's sake),
dry bread to mop it up with.
Dinner/lunch -Soup and bread (no meat or vegetables except what are in the soup-
very little soup if you happen to be late).
Tea-One slice of bread and jam or bread and honey, dry bread to fill up with, and a mug of cocoa.
Butter is seen by the boys, at the very-most, never more than three times a year !
Many of the boys attended the State School at Middle Swan and relied on crusts
of bread and anything else they were given by the non-orphanage pupils.

The West Australian, Monday 12 June 1911
THE SWAN BOYS' ORPHANAGE.
RESIGNATION OF THE REV. A. BURTON.
The inquest concerning the death of the boy George Jones, who died recently
in the Children's Hospital, whither he was taken by his mother from the Swan Boys' Orphanage,
will be resumed at the Coroner's Court on Tuesday, June 20.
The case is exciting a great deal of interest, and Detective Dempsey, who is conducting t
he investigations, has subpoenaed a large number of witnesses.
It was ascertained last night that the Rev. Alfred Burton, the manager of the orphanage,
tendered his resignation to the committee of management, after
Mr. F. D. North, C.M,G., had concluded' his recent inquiry into several charges
relating to the conduct of the institution, and that it was accepted.

NOTES:
George Jones was only 9
He died from a cut on his leg which was left untreated.
He was told he was shamming and although he was in excruciating pain
he was made to walk to school for four days, aided by his brothers.

Georgie and Charlie's mother was
Maria Charlotte Leary b: Hotham, Victoria in 1872 and
died in Brunswick, Victoria in 1948.
In Melbourne in 1890 she married 1st. Husband Charles Porter,
b: abt. 1865 died in Kalgoorlie in 1900.
When Charles Porter died he left five children living.
3 girls and 2 boys.
Mini Gertrude Porter b: 1891 in Norwood, South Australia and twin
Roseina Porter b: 1891 in Norwood, South Australia
George Henry Porter b: 1893 in South Australia
Charles Leary Porter b: 1896 Brunswick, Victoria
Ada Victoria Porter b: 1898 in Coolgardie WA.

Her second husband was William Henry Stott,
b: in Victoria in 1878 and died in Richmond, Victoria in 1942
they married in Perth in 1904. Moved to Victoria abt 1917
Young Georgie was born George Henry Porter on the
4 April 1893 in South Australia.
I'm uncertain about the following, but perhaps George married
Joyce Mills in Western Australia in 1936 and remained in Western Australia.
Charlie was taken from the orphanage 4 days after Georgie.
Charlie's full name was Charles Leary Porter b: 1894 in Melbourne.
He joined the 16th Battallion A.I.F at Blackboy Hill, WA
on the 19 July 1916
Embarked from Fremantle on the 'Argyleshire for
France on 9 November 1916
Poor Charlie died of wounds on the 27 September 1917 at the
2nd. Canadian Casualty Clearing Station in Belgium.


Volunteering can be rewarding

TROVE

The National Library of Australia, in collaboration with Australian State and
Territory libraries, began a program in March 2007 to digitise Australian newspapers
for access and preservation purposes.

The Australian newspapers hold an enormous amount of information from around the world.
As of 12 October 2012 there are 7,543,642 pages consisting of 74,500,869 articles.
Over the past 4 years the National Library of Australia, with a modest budget and
small team of staff, has digitised more than 6.8 million pages of Australian newspapers.
This equates to just over 260 titles out of approximately 7,700 newspaper
titles published in Australia
This is a FREE online Service.

Our concern, at the moment is the transcription of news from America
received by ship and by telegram and appearing in our national
newspapers since the early 1800's.

Not being familiar with names and place names 'American', Australian
transcribers are finding the task of transcribing American articles sometimes difficult.

We need American volunteers to 'Fix The Text'.
Even just one article would be a big help.

The bonus for you is, you get to read a lot of interesting news
which may not be preserved in your own country.
For example;

Launceston Examiner Tas. Tuesday 14 November 1871

AMERICAN.


General Washburne has defeated General Butler for the command-in-chief of the United States army.


The Russian fleet has arrived in New York harbor.

The Tammany Ring has confessed to the municipal frauds with which it was charged, and has repaid 750,000 dollars.

The United States are taking active steps to suppress Mormonism. They have arrested Brigbam Young and a number of other Mor mon celebrities on charges of adultery. Wool is in fair demand at New York. At the recent sales there Australian scarcely covered importations.

Kerosene is steady. Dovoe's, 31 cents.

Many lives were lost during the progress of the great fire at Chicago. It broke out on Sunday, 8th October, while a strong wind was blowing. Everything was in a very dry and combustible state, owing to a long spell of dry weather. The fire brigades were powerless to arrest the progress of the flames. The water and gas works, the newspaper offices, banks, principal hotels, and all the public buildings of the city were destroyed. A second fire raged on Monday, 10th October. On the second occasion the fire was traced to incen diaries, whose intention was to destroy the remainder of the city left untouched by the former fire, and occupied principally by the wealthy classes. Their object was plunder. Two men were caught firing buildings, and were immediately shot by the infuriated populace. Others who were implicated were led off with ropes round their necks. Nine. tenths of the city have been destroyed.
Another telegram says:over 100,000 persons have been rendered homeless by the great fire at Chicago. Seventy vessels were burned at the wharves. A number of prisoners in the gaol were burned to death.
The fire extended over an area of three miles in length, by one in breadth.
Large contributions of food, clothing, and money have arrived from all parts of America.

The Mercury Hobart, Tas. Tuesday 30 March 1897
LATEST CABLEGRAMS
THE MAYFLOWER LOG

It is proposed to make a facsimile of the Log of the Mayflower, which
Mr. T. Bayard has obtained the loan of in England, for the purpose of
sending it to the United States for exhibition.


Northern Standard, Tuesday 5 September 1939
WRIGLEY DIVORCE


Chicago, August 31.
Byron E. Wrigley, jun., an executive of the chewing gum manufacturing firm,
was granted an uncontested divorce from Mrs. Dorothy T. Wrigley, of Sydney,
on the grounds of desertion. Their child, Michael, aged 5, was given into the custody of
the mother.
Wrigley said that he was married in Sydney on May 26, 1932.
He was transferred from Sydney to Chicago last April, but his wife refused
to accompany him.

Morning Bulletin Rockhampton, Qld. Friday 30 August 1946
American Was Already Married

An American serviceman, who was stated to be residing with his legal wife in
Los Angeles, was named as the defendant in the Supreme Court yesterday in an action
by a Rockhampton girl for an order to annul her marriage with him.
Murial Jane Ricks, otherwise known as Forman, sought from Mr. Justice Brennan
annulment of her marriage with Homer Forman.
The action was undefended. Mr. T. J. Hally appeared for the plaintiff.
The plaintiff gave evidence of going through a form of marriage on September 19, 1942,
with Forman, who was with the American forces in Rockhampton at the time.
There was one child of the marriage.
Witness, now aged 21, said she then believed Forman to be a single man. There was
then no check by the authorities and she had to rely upon assurances by his friends
that he was single. Since then she had found out through the British consulate in
America, that he was married in San Francisco in November, 1941, and at present
was living with his wife in Los Angeles.
His Honour: Such girls deserve all they get. They are looking for trouble.
They play around with Yanks without knowing anything about them.


A judgement nisi declaring the marriage null and void, returnable after
three months, was granted.


2 comment(s), latest 1 year, 10 months ago

Itellya's Watson's of Sorrento and Portsea.

Here are a few things I've collected today and for some obscure reason I was not able to private message you.
You may not already have what's here.
Rather than me putting useless comments on your page, add what you want.
I shall remove this after you have whatever you think is relevant. Let me know 'when'

This letter to the editor came without any dates or sources, perhaps you can work out a date;

Sir,-In the issue of yesterday and under News of the Day column, you publish the following:-
"The Lands Department recently prosecuted one J. Watson who jumped a public reserve in the vicinity of the baths at Sorrento. Mr. Watson, although warned that he was a trespasser, commenced to erect a wooden building on the land.Legal proceedings were thereupon taken against him and the local magistrates ordered him to quit the land within thirty days.
Great inconvenience was experienced by the occupation of this land, as it overlooks the baths, but Mr. Watson showed no inclination to move off without compensation. Further legal proceedings were thereupon initiated against him but he has now informed the lands department of his intention to retire from the fight and give up posession. Mr Watson some months ago obtained 1500 pounds compensation from the government for giving up a piece of land as a site for a fort in the Bay."

Now, as these statements are not in accordance with the facts of the case, I trust you will grant me a small space in order to show the whole matter in its true colours:-For five and twenty years I have resided at Portsea,where I got my living and maintained my family by fishing; my property consisted of a six-roomed stone house and three quarters of an acre of land at Point Franklin. This was my own property. I had also a hut on the beach, in which was stored my nets and gear for fishing. Some months ago the Government purchased my land for defence purposes for 1400 pounds not 1500. This included the house and improvements, and was not merely for the land as your paragraph would lead one to suppose. I was compelled to sell, and the price paid was the Government valuation. The land had a special value for me on account of its elevated oposition and its closeness to bold water, the fishing lookout being the best around the Bay.
Having now to make another home, I selected Sorrento, and purchased two acres of ground from Mr. Duffy, upon which I built a six-roomed weatherboard cottage.The land and house are away back, the Bay not being visible from there. After my house was finished and my family settled, I commenced building a hut in the foreshore in which to store my nets and gear,and also to enable us to be at hand in some sort of shelter, in case rough weather set in, to save our boats and nets. I may mention that my old hut at Portsea situated on the beach is still being used by some fishermen for a similar purpose.After my hut was finished I was quite astonished at being requested by the lands Department to remove same. I had no idea in what I was doing wrong in putting it up as all round the Bay the fishermen have similar huts on the foreshore and this is the first time a fisherman has been compelled to remove. I naturally refused to shift,and allowed myself to be summoned in order to test the question. I was summoned and ordered to remove my hut within thirty days.The hut has since been removed. Your paragraph states that " great inconvenience" was experienced by the occupation of this land as it "overlooks the baths" This is really distorting the facts with a vengeance.
The hut was three quarters of a mile from the baths and being built on the beach was on the same level, consequently could not overlook anything. The true reason why I was compelled to pull down my hut was because it was situated about 40yards from Dr. Blair's Bathing Box, which is built on the beach also, and the fact of my building a hut was looked upon as an intrusion by him.
Now I should like to know why Dr. Blair and others are allowed to have bathing boxes on the beach, while I am debarred from having a hut there. Unless I can have a place to secure my fishing gear, and that close to the water,I shall be compelled to give up fishing, as the damage to my nets,boats etc. in rough weather would be ruinous. As your paragraph states, I have given up the fight.
I am only a poor fisherman, and cannot afford to lose the few pounds I have left, and ruin my family in endeavouring to get justice. I intend, however, applying for permission to build a bathing box for my family, the same as the Doctor, as I have a house and ground at the back. I don't think the department can with justice refuse this. If, however, I fail, I shall then be convinced that it is imposssible for a poor man to get justice. Yours, &c. J. Watson.
-------------------------------------------------------

don't know if this below is one of your WATSONs, but here it is;

The Argus, Friday 10 April 1896
A FISHERMAN LOST.FLINDERS, THURSDAY.
A fisherman named George Watson left Flinders in his boat, 'the Fugitive', yesterday morning to attend to his crayfish pots within a few miles of Cape Schanck and intended returning to his family for dinner, but nothing has since been heard of him or his boat. Very rough weather prevailed in the straits last night, and it is feared that a serious mishap has occurred. All the coast stations have been communicated with, and a boat manned by experienced local fishermen started this forenoon to cruise in search to the southward of Phillip Island. Constable Jones,from Dromana, also searched the beaches and rocks between Flinders and Cape Schank. Information from Phillip Island states that Constable Thornton, of Cowes, picked up a rudder and gear answering the description of the rudder belonging to the missing boat. No hope is now enter- tained that Watson is alive.
Mornington Standard, Thursday 16 April 1896
George Watson, the fisherman who has been missing from Flinders since yesterday week has not yet been heard of, although portions of his clothing and fragments of his boat were picked up on the back beach on Sunday, and on Monday his boat was discovered beached at East Creek, near Shoreham. A rudder and other gear have also been found at Cowes, and have been identified as belonging to his boat. Diligent but unsuccessful search for the body has been made along the cost, He leaves a widow and children.

Mornington Standard,Thursday 14 May 1896
A concert was held in the Flinders Mechanics' Institute on the 1st inst.,
in aid of the widow of the late George Watson.
The hall was fairly filled, and the chair was taken by the Rev. Mr. Edwards.
The following programme was gone through:-
Overture, Miss Robertson; song, Will He not Come Back Again,
Mr. J. L. Banks; recitation, The Life Boat, Mr. E. Jones ; song, Mrs. Noyess; recitation, The Holly and Ivy Girl, Miss Katie Tuck; song,-The Cows are in the Corn, Miss N. Bryne, sung with great taste and expression, and the young per former was loudly applauded; song, Mr. Flanigan; song, Golden Love, Miss Veida.Violin solo, Mr. and Master Hopcraft; song, Soon We'll be in London Town, Mr. Edwards; song,'I Couldn't, Could I,
Miss Smith, very nicely rendered; song, The Old Log Cabin in the Dell, Mr. Brunk.
This brought the first part of the programme to a close.
" The second part opened with a violin solo, Messrs Hopcraft; song, The Bellringers, Mr. J. L. Banks;
song. The Toilers, Mr. Edwards: recitation, Mr. Jones; song, The Old Folks at Home, Miss N. Byrne;
song, A Soldiers and a Man Mr. Parkinson ; song, The Postal, Mrs. Noyes ;
recitation, The Razor Seller, Mr. Flanigan , song. Where There's a Will There's a Way, Miss Smith ; re citation, I Want to Fly. Mr. Parkinson; song, Daddy, Miss Veido; song. It. Always Comes Round to Me, Mr. Brunt.
The singing, of the National Anthem brought the concert to a close.
Miss Robertson made a very efficient pianist.
After the concert a dance was held, which was also a great success

Mornington Standard,Thursday 4 June 1896
FROM OUR OWN CORRESPONDENTS
HASTINGS
George Watson Relief Fund the sum of 2 1s, contributed by the teachers
and scholars of Holy Trinity Church, Sunday-school, Hastings (1),
and by David Mairs, Esq. (1 1s).
-----------------------------------------------------------------
Alexander bought a 1 acre beach front block where he built and operated the
Portsea Hotel from 9th December 1876 until he sold in 1890.The present hotel was built in 1927 on the same site and has since been extended. A photograph in the public bar of this hotel is of Alexander Cosmo standing out front.

The Watson family built a lookout from which the fish shoals could be seen and a system of bell signals to tell the waiting boat crews on the beach the position and type of fish.
During a flood tide storm in 1961 the old camp was severely damaged and the Council cleared the beach of all evidence of this historical building.
the bluestone retaining wall at Portsea is made from the bricks which were the old houses and over the last 15 years, pieces of china have been found on the foreshore which were in the houses when destroyed.
One of the crew of the work gang for the council One of the work gang in 1961 was the son of Frank Watson, the adopted son of Alexander Cosmo WATSON.

The Argus, Saturday 2 January 1915
WATSON.-On the 30th December, at Portsea, William Cosmo, youngest son of Alexander and the
late Janet Watson, of Portsea, aged 31 years.

The children of James WATSON b. in Boyndie, Banff in 1804 the son of James WATSON 1779-1843 and Margaret LOVIE. and wife Helen SMITH b. Banffshire in 1804 the daughter of James SMITH 1766-xxxx and Margaret KELMAN 1769-xxxx were:
Jane WATSON 1829
Jean Watson 1829
John Watson 1830 1906
Margaret WATSON 1833
Henry WATSON 1835 1922
Ellen WATSON 1837
William WATSON 1838 1925
Alexander Cosmo Watson 1841 1920
Helen Watson 1843



The children of Alexander Cosmo WATSON 1841-1920 and wife Janet ANDERSON 1848-1908 were:-
Helen Smith Watson 1868 1948 m. John Douglas STIRLING in 1890
Mathew Watson 1869 1955
Mary Ann Watson 1871 1901. m. Alfred Edward KEYS in 1893
Alexander WATSON 1874 1875
Cosmo Watson 1876 ?
Agnes Watson 1878 ?
James George Watson 1881 1945
William Cosmo Watson 1883 1914
Ethel Jane Watson 1885 ? m. Robert Edward BOYLE in 1905
Catherine Victoria Watson 1887 1973
Then Frank - adopted (have no idea where he came from).

The children of John WATSON 1830-1906 and wife Annie Marion SULLIVAN 1844-1928 were:-
Margaret Watson 1833 1937 m. Alexander RUSSELL
Rose Watson ? 1908 m Walter Augustus DARK 1861-1916
Margaret WATSON 1833 1925
Henry Watson 1871 1922 m. Marion Elzabeth WILLIAMS 1884-1977 in 1906
Lily Theresa Watson 1871 1953 m. Duncan McFarlane
Jessie Watson 1873 1948
Infant Watson 1875 1875
William Watson 1876 1925
John Thomas WATSON 1878 1953
Anne Watson 1880 1948
William Jones WATSON 1881 1948 m. Jean LOMBARD
Christina Ethel Watson 1884 1966 m. William Edward NEWTON 1885-1966





I'll add here, if I find anything more tonight!

The photograph below is John Watson and Ann, nee Sullivan


2 comment(s), latest 1 year, 1 month ago

Alfred Smith 1831-1917

It certainly pays to take the time to ask the old locals "What was it like?"
These are the recollections of Alfred Smith of Richmond in New South Wales, which hold a wealth of valuable family history.
Alfred was born in Hobartville, New South Wales (when old William Cox owned it), on the 13 July 1831 to John Smith 1798-1833 a convict who drowned in a river near Liverpool in 1833 and Adelaide Eliza De La Thoreza 1808-1877 she had been born in Madrid. After John Smith died, at 15 months of age, Alfred was adopted by George JAMES 1768-1862 and his wife Ann Kelly 1789-1864. They had only one girl, Eliza JAMES 1824-1862 ( the mother of Ann ONUS 1841-1927) Alfred died on 24 December 1917.
On the 11 October 1854 at St.Matthew's Catholic Church, Windsor, Alfred married Ann Amelia KINSELA 1838-1917 the daughter of Martin KINSELA 1793-1860 and Ellen, nee HENDLING 1794-1862. Alfred had many jobs throughout his lifetime, including Town Stockman, running The Punt across the river and a Drover, droving throughout New South Wales and as far down as Victoria.

Below is part of Alfred SMITH's recollections which were Chronicled by Robert FARLOW, which began when Alfred was 78, in November 1909 and published in The Windsor Richmond Gazette, under the heading,
Some Ups and Downs of an old Richmondite, Mr. Alfred Smith

"Adjoining old Mr Roberts' place, at the back, was Wiltshirehurst. Here Mr Wiltshire lived for a while when I first went to the punt. Then George Case rented it. He farmed a little, and dealt largely in sheet stringy bark.Coming along we had Peter Hornery living. He owned the place he lived on. He had been a bricklayer, but could not follow the trade on account of being a cripple for many years. William Maughan bought the land from Peter Hornery, except the little piece on which Hornery lived. Maughan lived there for some time while he was droving. Next was William John, father of Mrs Robert Pitt and Mrs John McQuade. Mrs John was a great butter maker. Next to Mr John's was Mr Kingswood. He owned the property. Richard Gow (father of the popular Frank, who was a large produce dealer in Richmond years ago) lived with the Kingswood's, was married to the only daughter. He grew a great quantity of maize. The Kingswoods and Gows left Kurrajong a good while before I left the punt, and went to live down on Griffiths' old farm. A man named Rich went to live in the place at Kurrajong. He was a shoemaker but didn't work at the trade in Kurrajong, though I remember him working at it in Richmond. He grew potatoes and vegetables and took them to Richmond and Windsor. Ad joining this property was Tom Jones' "Kingswood's Tom " as he was generally known. He was father to Mrs Thomas Stanford and Mrs Thomas Brown. He grew a lot of fine oaten hay. Mrs Jones would never ride in a cart, and I often wondered why. One day I asked her, and she told me Mrs Stanford, mother of Mr Tom Stanford, and herself were driving home in a cart once and capsized in the rough road and Mrs Stanford was killed. The next farm belonged to the Gilligans. James Leavers, father of Harry, rented it, and lived there. He did some farming, and with his two horses and dray took his produce and wattle bark to town. Leavers met with an accident by his horse running into a tree which stood in the road opposite Thomas John's place. Leavers was well liked. Harry was born some three weeks after his father's death. Old Mrs Leavers left there after her husband's death, and went to Richmond to live. Edward Mitchell, father of the present Robert in Kurrajong, lived on the Comleroy and owned the property he lived on He had six bullocks and a dray and drew a considerable quantity of wattle bark to town. Mrs Mitchell made a lot of butter. She was a sister to John Lord, who lived many years in Yarramundi. She was a great step-dancer, Mr Mitchell was coming home from Penrith one night, and told me he got a great fright coming down Crowley's lane. He declared he saw Andy Farrell's wife, who had been dead some time. He was perfectly sober, and whether it was imagination or a reality, he was quite upset over it. _ Close to Mitchell's, Denny McCabe lived. He married a daughter of Edward Mitchell. Denny McCabe was a king among bark. He was a jolly fellow and a great step-dancer. The last time I saw him was at Mr. A Towns station, near Boggabri, where he was fencing. It was Christmas time, and we spent a good time together. Some of his sons are still in the Kurrajong. Below Mitchell's property George Turner lived on some property belonging to Thomas John. He did a little farming and made grass-tree brooms. Then we had Mr Parker living on the Comleroy Road somewhere handy to the present Methodist Church. He did some farming, and with his one horse and cart took his maize and potatoes to town. There were some old hands scattered about the locality worthy of mention. John Williams"Blackjack" they used to call him lived by himself, being a single man. He was a hard working man and took bark, etc., to town with his one horse and cart. George Turner was another great man among the bark. He married Sarah, a daughter of Edward Mitchell.
Robert Eather, father of the late Abe Eather who lived many years in Richmond, lived on the Comleroy. He owned a station on the Narran. The four sons were Thomas, Robert, James and Abe. Mr and Mrs Robert Eather died at Comleroy. After their death Jim lived there for some time. Mr and Mrs John Norris lived close by the Eather's. Norris was killed on the property. Mr Coleman lived near the Norris family. He was a fencer, but did a little farming. Cornelius McMahon can be reckoned among the old hands. He married a daughter of John Norris. I knew them both before they thought of getting married. Then we had Bill London ' Bill the native,' as they used to call him. Some of his children are still in the Kurra jong. Mr Murray was another old hand. Richard Skuthorp, father of our present Richard, was another I knew well. His wife was a daughter of John Ezzy. It was old Mr Skuthorp who first brought the racehorse Veno to the district, having purchased him from Mr William Clarke, who managed Bomera for years for Mr A. Town. Mr and Mrs Lamrock, parents of the late William and John, lived up Kurrajong, and I don't think they ever missed a fine Sunday going to the Presbyterian Church in Richmond. Having had a fair say about the old hands in Kurrajong we will now proceed to Colo. There wasn't a very great number of people living there in my early times, but among them were some who should not be forgotten. Colo has seen the time when it could boast of its police man. I knew two that were stationed at Colo. Curry was one. He used to visit George James. He was a tall man with sandy hair. He used to look very well in his black "bell topper". Jim Hunt was another policeman there. He was a short man and dark complexion. Mr and Mrs Cavanough kept a boarding-house down there for many years. The house was noted for its good table, and as it stood. on the Kurrajong side of the river Mr Cavanough used to help the drovers with their sheep and cattle up "the rock." Cavanough did some farming, and grew a lot of maize. They both died at Colo, the old man dying first. I knew their sons Tom, George and Jim very well. Tom was on the railway for some years in Richmond and was very popular. The last time I saw Jim was at Jerry's Plains, many years ago. William Penton, the blacksmith, who is still alive, living at North Richmond, lived for many years in Colo and I believe his family are natives of there. He lived up under the mountain on the other side of the river. He worked at his trade and did good business. There were plenty of drover's horses to be shod. He became a road contractor and carried out some big jobs on the Bulga road. His wife, was Miss Lucy Lord, but in no way related to John Lord, of Yarra mundi, There were a lot of the Gospers at Colo. Mrs Cavanough and Mrs Ivery were Gospers. I knew Robert Gosper. The late John Gosper, of Windsor, was, I believe, a native of Colo, also Henry. He kept an accommodation house at "The Gibber," It was a good place to stay at. Harry Gosper was a real friend of the drovers. If ever they lost a beast and it was to be found, Harry would get it for them. I have often heard him spoken of hundreds of miles up country, and always referred to as honest Harry Gosper. Of course there were others living up the river, but as I never went far off the road I didn't see much of them. Among them I knew Mr Caterson. I knew his son, the present Thomas, and his wife, who was Miss Grace Richardson, before they were married. Getting along from "The Gibber ' we soon get to Putty. Among the good old sorts out there were Mr Robert Ridge and his wife, He grew a lot of maize, and did droving. Mrs Ridge was post mistress, and kept an accommodation house. You could also get rations there. Mr Ridge had a mill and ground his own flour. Mrs Ridge was a sister to Mrs George Pitt and Mrs. John Crowley. Then we had Thomas Laycock and his wife. Mrs Laycock was a sister to George and Robert Pitt. I knew their sons Thomas, Andrew, Henry, George and Robert. They were always great cattle men. Andrew for many years before his death was a noted breeder of stud cattle, and was always a prominent exhibitor at the Sydney show. The eldest boy was a great pig raiser and used to drive his flocks of swine to market. Bob was killed from his horse. Thomas Laycock did a lot of droving, and bought stock for Sydney men. He was a horse fancier as well, and owned some well bred mares. At Bourawell we had Charles Sympton managing the place belonging to Mr William Farlow, senr., of Yarramundi, and also looking after Boggy swamp for the same man. I remember Mr Farlow giving me 40 to pay Davy Hayman who was fencing out there for him. Charley was there a good while. Mr Farlow did some cultivation out there. Mr and Mrs Chapman lived at Putty on a place they bought from old Stephen Tuckerman, Their son George is still out there and seems to be doing well.
The first gaoler I remember in Windsor was a Mr Steele. He was a tall man. Mr North was the first police magistrate, and lived at old Government House, Windsor, in my early days. How I came to know a little about early Windsor, was by going with my foster father, then a policeman, on court days. What I will say about Windsor must be taken as Meaning my early recollections of that place. There was what we always knew as the watch box. This stood between the court house and the gaol wall. It was a little movable place of weatherboards. The watch box, I believe, used to be occupied by soldiers in turn, to prevent any prisoners escaping out of gaol. Then we had the flogging period in Windsor, and I knew Reuben Bullock who administered the lash. When flogging was done away with in the Haw kesbury Bullock, kept a public house. Reuben was a thin man of medium height, and although his former occu pation was not the pleasantest, he was well liked. He was of a pleasant disposition and very obliging. He was generally called "Little Bullock."

The first chief constable I have any recollections of was a Mr Hodgins. He had son Benjamin, who used to knock about Charlie Eather's over at Enfield. 'He had a daughter Ann. She was a tall, buxom young woman, and married a man named Bill Allsop. She has been dead many years. The next chief constable was Moses Chapman, a Jew I believe. He was mostly known as "Mo the Jew." He was a short stout man and a smart little chap at his work. He was well liked. Then I mind George Jilks, another chief constable, and his wife, one son, and two daughters. He was a man who was highly respected. The daughters, Kitty and Jane, would take it in turns and come and stay a few days with the James' at Richmond. His son George was then but a lad going to school. Mr Jilks lived where Mr W. McQuade is living. George Shirley was another chief constable. He was a stout man, with a very flushed face. After him was William Hobbs, who was the last chief constable in charge of Windsor before we got our sergeants. We start our sergeants with a Mr Frewin. He was an Irishman. He wasn't in Windsor a great while. The first lockup keeper I knew there was John Horan. This was when the lockup was where the Council Chambers stand. I remember one day, in Horan's time, we had been into court, and were starting for home in the cart when I happened to look round and noticed two men with a man on the ground. I told James about it and he drove up to them. It was two police men with a prisoner who wouldn't get up and they couldn't make him move. As soon as James came up it was "Here George give us a hand.'" James had a quince stick in his hand and gave him a few smart cuts with it on a portion of his body, which made him jump up quickly enough. The first C.P.S. I knew there was a Mr Wyatt, in Mr North's time. He was a tall man. Then as a C.P.S. there we had Mr Callaway, "little Callaway" they used to call him. Then there was Mr G. A. Gordon, who was C.P.S. for many years. Mr Gordon was father of Mrs Brinsley Hall, and died recently. He was a Police Magistrate up country for a few years when he retired. Then there was old Mr J. J. Fitzpatrick, father of Mr J. C. L Fitzpatrick, M.LA., who spent many years in old Windsor. In the corner by the old Fitzroy bridge there was a large two storey place which was kept as a pub by a man named Thomas Cross. He was a very big man. I remember this same pub being kept by Mrs. Aspery, who was mother to the late Mrs M. Nowland. Her son, Thomas, who was killed at Denman by lightning, used to serve in the bar. Nearly opposite the barracks there was a pub kept by John Shearin "Jack the baker," as he was called. He left there and built the two storey place opposite the court house where he kept a pub for a long while. Jack died there, and his widow kept the business on for some time after his death. I remember ihe 26th, 50th, 8oth and 99th regiments being in the old Windsor barracks at different times. The present Royal Hotel used to be what we always knew as the mess house. Robert Fitzgerald lived there for a long time, and was living there at the time of the first election when he was a candidate against William Bowman Quite close to the barracks, only in Macquarie-street, there was the old "Jim Crow" inn. It was kept by Henry Hudson. He dealt a lot in horses. He had two stallions, Jim Crow, a trotter, and Clinker, a draught. He imported both of them. He died there. His widow kept the pub a while after his death, and then married James Lane. Lane kept the pub for a while. She was a native of Richmond, a sister of our Henry Silk, and I knew her before she was married to Henry Hudson, who came from Birmingham. Somewhere about where the late William Gosper lived there once lived a man named O'Dell who kept the post office, and this was the first post office I remember in Windsor. Going along Macquarie-street we come to the big house, part of which is pulled down, and the remainder occupied by Edward Day. The father of the popular mailman. Tom Thompson, kept a pub there. The hospital was built before my time. At that time it was an hospital only. The poor house, as we called it, was where the old people's quarters are at present A man named Williams, was overseer of the poor house then. He was a brother to Fred Williams, the constable who was stationed at Enfield once. I have mentioned that Reuben Bullock kept a pub. Near where the "Jim Crow " stood, and on the same side, he kept the pub. I think his sign was "The hole in the wall". John Rafter kept a pub there also. Mick Hagon kept a pub there. Mick was a big Irishman, and his wife was no small woman. Mrs Hagon kept the pub for a while. At Moses' corner I remember Mrs Moses, William's mother, having a baking business. William and Henry were only lads then. Henry used to drive his mother's bread cart. He was always a smart business chap, and to-day he is reaping the reward in wealth and honor.
The first bailiff I remember in Windsor was Richard Sheriff He was a short stout man with a very red face, and a a great horseman. The earliest mounted police I recollect were Sergeant Lane and Trooper Joseph Levy. Levy shot Armstrong, the bushranger, on a Good Friday morning. Windsor has had its bellmen, and I remember the 0ld bellman Oliver. He had a very strong voice and could be heard a long way off. He was a comical old chap and after he had finished 'crying' his business was always wound up with "God save the Queen." The attached residences of Dr. Callaghan and the late Dr. Gibson in my earliest days in Windsor was an hotel kept by Mr Coffey. He was a tall man of fair complexion. I recollect also that James Ridge kept an hotel in a two-storey house between the Royal Hotel and where Coffey kept the hotel. Where our member, Mr Brinsley Hall, lives was once occupied by Dr. Dow. He was coroner for a long while. Robert and James Dick lived up the top end of the town facing the main street. They kept the post office and a store. In the bouse where the late Ben Richards lived for years, and which is now owned by Mr Daniel Holland, I remember old Mr. Thomas Dargin living. Mr Dargin died there. In the course of time Laban White married his widow and lived there.
He was auctioneer and coroner at Windsor.
Somewhere about where Mr. R. A. Pye has his business, stood a pub kept by a man named Weller. The sign was painted by Tom Masters' father, and represented a blackfellow with a big nugget of gold in his hand. Where the Bank of New South Wales is, belonged to James Hale. He lived there for a long while, and when he left he went to live at "Fairfield," which he had bought. He died there. About where Pulsford's shop is, Mr Fox kept a general store, and about where the post office is Mr Crew had a large ironmonger's shop. Adjoining Mr Crew lived the father ot Peter Beveridge. He was in business as a confectioner. Fitzgerald-street we always knew as Hangman's Row. In this street old Mr Chandler had a furniture store on the left hand side between the post office and Macquarie street. At the time of the big fire, when the Barraba Hotel was burnt down, the shop was saved. The first I remember keeping the Barraba Hotel was Charles Blanchard. I was in the Barraba the day before it was burnt down and had a glass of beer with John Grono of Pitt Town. Miss Isabella Bushell kept it at that time. Not far away, on the same side as the Barraba, lived old Mr Gallaway, a tailor. Then handy we had Mr. Watt, a shoemaker, with whom George Eather served his apprenticeship. His son, Edward, lived about Windsor for a long while, and a daughter married George Eather's eldest brother, Charles Eather.
Mrs. O'Donovan kept a draper's shop where W. H. O'Brien lives. She owned the place. She had two daughters, the last dying some little time ago, unmarried. Where W. H. O'Brien's shop is William Gaudry and his brother Charles lived, William was a great sporting man, and was clerk of the course at the old Dargin track. Old Mrs Cope lived in the house where Mrs. Brancker lives. She. owned the property and died there. Where the Commercial Bank stands old Mr Richard Ridge kept a pub. He built the Fitzroy Hotel and kept it for a good while. Ridge was a great mail contractor in conjunction with a man named Hill. Old Harry Martineer used to drive for them in the days when the train only came as far as Parramatts. I am not likely to forget those days, as I came from Sydney one day, and when I got out of the train at Parramatta Harry Martineer couldn't take me as he had too many on board. I had to put 7000 sheep over the river in the punt next day and to Richmond I had to get so I walked going by the Blacktown road. Mr Richard Ridge had the mail contract when the train came on to Black town. Paddy Doyle was the driver of the mail. After Ridge went to the "Fitzroy" old Mr Broderick had a watch maker's shop in the place Ridge left. Sometimes I brought watches down to him from up-country for repairs while I was droving. Close to Broderick's was another watchmaker named Stewart. The house where Mr William Primrose had a saddler's shop for many years, was built by Mr Mumford, the chemist. He was thrown off his horse out Magrath's Hill way, which proved fatal. He had only insured his life some nine months before for 500. Not far from where the "Fitzroy" stands and in the direction of the railway, old Mr Thomas Tebbutt kept a store. At the present day I have a pair of old fashioned brass candle sticks which George James bought off Mr Tebbutt while in was in business there. A daughter of mine in Sydney has a small, extension table which James purchased at Mr Tebbutt's shop. George Freeman kept the Cricketer's Arms on the corner where Miss Bushell conducted the Royal Exchange Hotel for so many years. In connection with this pub I had a funny experience once which I must tell. Up stairs the Oddfellows held their meetings, and I had been proposed by Mr Peebles. How I came to be proposed was, Peebles used to draw the grog to the pubs over the river, and I used to put him over in the punt. Anyhow I had been proposed, so I mounted my horse and rode in. Dr.Day was the medical officer and when he examined me he wouldn't pass me. He told me to come again next meeting night, in a fortnight, and in I went. Again he wouldn't pass me, and wanted me to come again in another fortnight, but I told him I wouldn't come any more. Dr.Day thought I had heart disease, but here I am battling well in my 80th year, while the doctor went to his rest many years ago.
A little further in the direction of the railway Thomas Freeman kept the St. Patrick's Hotel. About opposite the Salvation Army barracks Frank McDonald kept a pub in a two-storey house. He did a good business. I knew both him and his wife well. McDonald was a great man with the late Hon. William Walker in election time. Hon. William Walker's father kept a school in the cross street close by. I knew the, Hon. William's brothers, George, Robert, and John. The last time I saw George was when he was a storekeeper on a large sheep station near Coonamble. Some time after he was an auctioneer in Mudgee. The first time I saw William was on Dargin's old race course. He was pointed out to me as the young chap who was learning to be a lawyer under Mr Beddick."

Sources:
Windsor and Richmond Gazette (NSW : 1888 - 1954)
Saturday 17 September 1910
Windsor and Richmond Gazette (NSW : 1888 - 1954)
Saturday 24 September 1910
Transcription, janilye, 2012





The photograph below of Windsor,
the Royal Hotel on the right
was taken around 1880


Hawkesbury New South Wales before 1800

In these days, when we hear so much about the cost of living and the
Government have found it necessary to appoint a commission to enquire
into it. It would be as well for those now living in the Hawkesbury to
know how their forefathers fared in that respect.

Prior to the year 1800, almost all business was carried on by barter,
based chiefly on the value of the grain grown by the farming community,
and the value of that grain was fixed by the Governor and was paid
at the Government store, not in cash, but in other goods, or else on a
Government draft payable in cash in London.
The merchants gathered these drafts and sent them home in payment of goods
they imported, but the basis of all transactions depended on the price fixed
for wheat and maize at the Government store, Sydney.
The price of wheat had been fixed at 10/- per bushel and maize at 5/- per bushel,
and the home authorities in England had written Governor Hunter to say
they thought this 'too much'

He replied : '
"The immense expense of labour upon the ground will show your Grace what a
farmer's situation, with that of his family, would have been, had I persisted
in the endeavour of reducing the price under the present misfortunes of the
people, many of which are the effect of the want, of these public supplies
from Europe, which alone can ease the heavy expenses of this colony to the
Government and encourage the exertions of industry."


It is quite apparent that the merchants and dealers took all sorts of
advantages of the unfortunate farmers for it was only through the merchants
the farmer could get his draft cashed, so Governor Hunter, early in
January, 1800, did what the present Government have done.
He appointed a commission to enquire into the cost of living and sent
their report to England to show he was right in fixing the price of grain.

I attach a copy of that report so that the farmers now living on the
Hawkesbury can think the matter over.

Report.
"At a meeting held at the Hawkesbury this 14th day of January, 1800,
by the undersigned inhabitants from the different districts of the
settlement (Hawkesbury) the following average prices for labour and other
necessaries of life were considered and concluded by them in a fair and
impartial manner to have been as follows:

'To wit, for the cultivation of one acre of wheat as by average computation,
to produce twenty-five bushels.

Cutting down and clearing weeds ... ... 1 0 0
Breaking up and tilling the ground ... 1 6 8
Chipping and covering the wheat and sowing ... ... 1 2 0
Reaping ... ... 3 0 0
Carrying home, stacking and thatching ... ... 2 0 0
Thrashing and carrying in the barn ... ... ... 2 2 6
Carriage to His Majesty's store, porterage, etc. ... 1 19 7
One bushel and a half of seed ... ... 15/-
TOTAL. 13 5 9

'There. is no allowance for first clearing the land in the above estimation,
which is per acre, 6.'

Average price of the necessary articles of life bought at;
Sydney by us :
Tea, per pound ... ... 4 0 0
Sugar, per pound ... ... 2/6
Spirits per gallon, from 1/10/ to 4/0/0
Soap, per pound... ... ... 6/-
Tobacco, per pound ... ... 10/-
Butter, per pound ... ... 4/-
Cheese, per pound ... ... 3/-
Duck cloth, per yard ..... 5/-
Woollen cloth, per yard... 2 0 0
Irish linen, per yard ... . 5/-
Calico, per yard ... ... .. 4/-
Silk handkerchiefs, each ... 10/-
Linen and cotton checks, per yard. ... 6/-
Hats, each ... ... ... 2 0 0
Flannels, blankets, and all sorts of bedding much wanted, and none for sale.
"N.B. All other European goods equally dear, though not mentioned in the
above list."

SIGNATORIES:

Giles William Mower
Edward Robinson
John Fraser Molloy
Thomas Aker
Thomas Tyler
Matthew Lock
Andrew Thompson
William Roberts
Daniel Smallwood
Roger Foyfield
James Malee
Joseph Wright
Jonas Archer
William Aspinall

I would remind readers, that at that time there was
no plough, horse or bullock in the district, and all farming work of
every description had to be done by hand, and I shall have something
to say on this subject in a future issue, showing the great industry
of those pioneers of the Hawkesbury.

Pictured below;
The bronze, 3.5 metre (about 11 feet) monument commemorating our
women pioneers of New South Wales.
Living a life of tremendous hardship. They were certanly expert
in making the pennies go further.
situated in the Jessie Street Gardens, Loftus St, Sydney


Licensed Publicans Hawkesbury District 1834-1837

The following is a correct list of licensed publicans,
compiled from the records of persons holding licenses
in the Hawkesbury District of New South Wales:

RICHMOND
General Darling (Upper Richmond), Robert Aull 1789-1817
Union Inn, Thomas Eather 1800-1886
Plough. Thomas Mortimer xxxx-1875
Welcome Inn, Christopher Moniz 1809-1865
Packhorse, (Ferry), Thomas Parnell 1765-1853
Black Horse, Paul Randall 1752-1834
Woolpack, (North Richmond), John Town junr. 1806-1883
George the 4th, John Town, senr. 1769-1846

RICHMOND ROAD
Bird-in-Hand, William Thomas Bayliss 1794-1849
Settlers' Hall (Windsor), Richard Lynch
Governor's Arms, (Windsor), Alfred Smith

PITT TOWN
Macquarie Arms, William Johnstone
Bird-in-Hand, Daniel Smallwood 1761-1839

WINDSOR-ROAD
Bird-in-Hand, Hugh Kelly 1770-1835
Lamb and Lark, John Pye 1809-1892
George and Dragon, John Cobcroft 1797-1881
Union Inn, James Connolly
Steam Packet, Joseph Fleming
Cottage of Content, Anne Leeson.

WINDSOR
Australian, Henry Beasley
White Heart, John Baker
Currency Lass, Thomas Cullen
Windsor Hotel, William Cross
Red Lion, Mary Dargin 1798-1881 nee Howe
St. Patrick, Joseph Delandre 1799-1853
Cross Keys, Daniel Dickens 1792-1852
White Swan, George Freeman 1806-1867
Currency Lad, Charles Gaundry
William the 4th, Thomas Greaves
King's Arms, Andrew Johnstone.
Plough, Edward Robinson
Barley Mow, Robert Smith.

Upper Nelson
White Heart, Daniel Coulton xxx-1864

Wollombi
Travellers' Inn, John Eaton 1811-1904

Blacktown
Macquarie Arms, James Roberts 1805-1874

Lower Branch Hawkesbury
Industrious Settler, Aaron Walters

Prospect
Fox under the Hill, Francis Peisler
King's Head, Adam Taylor.

Source:
Windsor and Richmond Gazette
Transcription, janilye


The Photograph below taken in 1908 is The Black Horse Hotel. The licence was first issued on 15 February 1819 to Paul Randall to keep an inn at his dwelling. For many years the sign of the black horse in full gallop announced its services.
This sign is now on exhibition in the Hawkesbury Historical Society's Museum at Windsor, New South Wales.
It closed in 1927 when the licence was transferred to the Kurrajong Heights Hotel.


2 comment(s), latest 1 year, 11 months ago

John Kilduff 1793-1854

My third great grandfather John KILDUFF was born about 1793 in County Roscommon Ireland, one of the smallest Irish counties and its name derives from the Irish - Ros Coman, meaning St Coman's Wood. Its social history is mainly based around agriculture and it was badly affected by the great famine of 1845-47. He married Mary McCARTHY 1796-1870 at Roscommon about 1816. Mary McCarthy was born about 1796, to William and Ellen McCarthy, also of Roscommon.

There were no records of John, Mary, their parents, their marriage or any children in the 2000 version of the International Genealogical Index. John and Mary may have had one or two children in Ireland, since her death certificate (1870) indicates that at the time there were four children living and one male and one female deceased. They had at least four children in the Colony but there is no surviving record of other children.


John was involved in illegal activities even after he was married. He was arrested and tried in County Roscommon Court in July 1820. He was convicted of Ribbonism and was sentenced to transportation for fourteen years. The crime is recorded on his Certificate of Freedom dated 11 October 1834. In a sense John was a political prisoner, although Ribbon societies in the first half of the nineteenth century were responsible for disruptive activities and violence against landlords and others.
Once in the colony John kept out of trouble.


He was embarked on the "John Barry" at Cork, Ireland which sailed on the 16 June from Cork with Captain Roger Dobson and Chief Surgeon Dan McNamara, and arriving in the Colony on 7 November 1821.

The Convict Indents papers, record that he was a labourer, that he could not read or write and was a Catholic.
A physical description indicates that John was 5 ft 5 in (about 1.67 m) tall with a fairly pale complexion, fair hair and grey eyes.


The following reconstruction of where John and later his wife Mary lived is based on various sources including parish and civil, birth, marriage and death records and Census records.


John was first assigned to John Good in the District of Bathurst and Melville, where he worked to clear the land and plant crops. About a year later another convict Thomas Killier was also assigned to Good. For some reason John was not recorded in the 1822 Muster of convicts, although Killier is, as a servant to John Good. John Kilduff is recorded in the Muster of 1824/1825 at Melville.


In 1825, John Kilduff petitioned the governor for mitigation of his sentence:

"To His Excellency Sir Thos. Brisbane KCB, Captain General and Commander in Chief of the territory of New South Wales and its Dependencies We hereby certify that John Kilduff, who came by the Ship John Barry, which arrived in the year 1821 has not been convicted of any crime or misdemeanours in this Colony, but is to our certain belief an honest, sober and industrious character, having served faithfully John Good residing in the District of Bathurst from the 10th November 1821 to August 1825. [Signed] J. Harris, Resident Magistrate, John Joseph Therry RCC Clergyman, John Good, Master"
Even with such eminent signatories as Doctor John Harris and the senior Catholic cleric, his petition was unsuccessful, possibly because he had served only about four of his 14 years.


His wife Mary sailed to Sydney on the Thames, which arrived in Sydney from Cork on 11 April 1826 with 37 free women and 107 children as passengers and a cargo of government stores. It's Captain was Robert Fraser and the Surgeon Superintendant Dr. Linton


John was still assigned to John Good. It is thought that he allowed them (with government permission) to live in a house at Seven Hills. In late 1827 when their daughter Mary was born they were almost certainly at Seven Hills. Some time after this John was reassigned to Daniel Kelly at Wilberforce, possibly to allow better living conditions for his wife and child. John Good comes back into the story later, as the uncle of my second great grandfather Patrick William Hall 1821-1900

The Census of October and November 1828 records John, Mary and the 1 year old child Mary at Wilberforce. John was a labourer assigned to Daniel Kelly, a former convict. Three other convicts were also assigned to Kelly. John Good was still at Seven Hills.


Johns sentence expired by servitude in 1834. By the time of the 1841 Census the family was living at Pitt Town. John was the householder and was a farmer. The surviving records are only abstracts. The household consisted of John Kilduff and his wife and three sons and one daughter, all aged seven and under fourteen at the time of the Census and all born in the Colony. There were no convict servants. The house was described as of wood and unfinished but inhabited. The householder was classed in the category landed property, merchants, bankers and professionals so John must have owned or leased the land.


John remained at Pitt Town for the rest of his life. He died on 6 February 1854 aged 60 at Pitt Town. His burial is recorded in the parish record of St Matthews Catholic Church, Windsor which gave his occupation as farmer. He died before civil registration of deaths began (1856) so no other details are available.


Mary Kilduff died on 24 April 1870, age 74 at Cornwallis probably at the home of William and his family. She was laid to rest beside John at the Windsor Catholic Cemetery, Windsor New South Wales.
Her death certificate provides most of the known details of her family and children.

The children of John Kilduff 1793-1854 and Mary Kilduff nee McCarthy 1796-1870 were:-

1.Female Kilduff

2.male Kilduff

3. Mary KILDUFF b: 25 November 1827 at Pitt Town d:17 July 1911 Sydney, On 25 November 1847 married Patrick William Hall 1821-1900 The children of this marriage were:-
Mary Ann Josephine HALL 1848 1923
William HALL 1849 1910
Bridget HALL 1852
John Joseph HALL 1855 1906
Edward HALL 1859 1864
Sarah Mary HALL 1862 1938 m. Edward William MCKEE 1884-1962
Emily Johanna HALL 1867 1953
Ellen HALL 1869 1869
Patrick Henry HALL 1869 1871
Agnes HALL 1872 1874

4. John Kilduff b: 21 July 1831, Pitt Town, NSW d: 25 April 1911 at Windsor, NSW. On the 1 December 1858 at Windsor, NSW married Sarah BUCKRIDGE 1840-1930.
The children of this marriage were:-
Eleanor Kilduff 1859 1949
John Robert Kilduff 1860 1906
Ada Sarah Kilduff 1863 1928
Amy Adeline Kilduff 1865
Minnie Elizabeth Kilduff 1868 1937
George Norbert Kilduff 1870 1954
Alfred Rowland Kilduff 1873 1889
Ida Mary Kilduff 1875 1907
Cecily Mary Kilduff 1878 1951
William Martin Kilduff 1881 1902
Mary Isabella Kilduff 1883 1904

5.William Kilduff b:1832 Riverstone, NSW d: 23 April 1911 Windsor, NSW. On the 3 May 1855 at St. Matthews Catholic Church, Windsor, married Mary Sophia SEYMOUR 1837-1916.
The Children of this marriage were:-
Mary Ann Kilduff 1855 1855
Lucy Kilduff 1856 1928
Mary Anne Kilduff 1858 1938
Elizabeth Margaret Kilduff 1862 1945
William Joseph Kilduff 1864 1865
Therese Lydia Kilduff 1865 1945
William Charles Kilduff 1868 1911
George Martin Kilduff 1870 1914
John Joseph Kilduff 1872 1926
Edwin Leonard Kilduff 1875 1943
Frederick Leo Kilduff 1878 1908
Francis Kilduff 1883 1954 m. Mary Ivy Williams 1890-1929

6.Unknown Kilduff 1834 after 1870, according to Mother's death certificate still living when she died

Sources:
1828 New South Wales, Australia Census (TNA Copy)
New South Wales, Australia Convict Ship Muster Rolls
and Related Records, 1790-1849
1841 New South Wales, Australia, Census
NEW South Wales Registry of Births Deaths Marriages
New South Wales, Australia Historical Electoral Rolls, 1842-1864
New South Wales State Records
Australian National Archives
Wikipedia
A huge thanks to
Colin Kilduff,another tireless researcher

janilye

Below is a photograph of John Kilduff's Certificate of Freedom,
granted on 11 October 1834


St Matthew's Catholic Burial Register 1845 - 1854

S/name. F/names. Abode. deathdate. burialdate. Age. Ship. Occupation. Clergyman.

247 Bourke John Windsor 9 Jan 1845 40 Labourer Thos Slattery
248 Fitzgerald Michl Windsor 23 Jan 1845 67 Pauper Thos Slattery
249 Pendergast Mary Cornwallis 16 Feb 1845 10 weeks Native of the Colony Thos Slattery
250 Breach George Windsor 20 Feb 1845 12 months Native of the Colony John Kenny
251 White James Richmond 21 Mar 1845 50 Farmer Thos Slattery
252 Turner Ann Wilberforce 26 Mar 1845 42 John Kenny
253 Cullen Edward Vinegar Hill 4 Apr 1845 Farmer Thos Slattery
254 Norris James Cornwallis 10 May 1845 5 Native of the Colony Thos Slattery
255 Dempsey John Richmond 11 May 1845 69 Farmer Thos Slattery
256 Slater or Donohoe Mary Clarendon 11 May 1845 22 Margaret 2 Servant Thos Slattery
257 Fogerty Michl Currajong 24 May 1845 37 Labourer Thos Slattery
258 Kenna Patk Currajong 30 May 1845 80 Tilly Sherry Labourer Thos Slattery
259 Kough William Windsor 8 Jun 1845 Labourer Thos Slattery
260 Tighe Anne Windsor 4 Jul 1845 58 Elizabeth Servant Thos Slattery
261 Holt William Currajong 15 Jul 1845 14 weeks Native of the Colony Thos Slattery
262 Collins Patrick Wollombi 31 Jul 1845 5 Native of the Colony John Kenny
263 Pendergast John Windsor 30 Nov 1845 37 Native of the Colony Mr McGrath
264 Brady Thomas Windsor 17 Jan 1846 58 Native of Ireland Mr McGrath
265 Fitzpatrick James Penrith 4 Apr 1846 7 Mr McGrath
266 Fitzpatrick Mary Windsor 14 Apr 1846 15 weeks Mr McGrath
267 McGoven Peter Wilberforce ? 15 Apr 1846 26 Captain Cook Mr McGrath
268 Gaham or Graham Hugh Freemans Reach 13 May 1846 51 Mr McGrath
269 Darey or Doney Thomas Freemans Reach 14 Jul 1846 41 Mr McGrath
270 Davies Mathew Poor House 28 Jul 1846 70 Mr McGrath
271 Keating G Poor House 14 Aug 1846 67 Mr McGrath
272 Foley Catherine Poor House 19 Aug 1846 35 Mr McGrath
273 O'Donnell Patk Poor House 23 Aug 1846 80 Mr McGrath
274 Perkins ? Windsor 18 Oct 1846 43 Mr McGrath
275 Byrne Patk Windsor 15 Nov 1846 32 Mr McGrath
276 Humphreys Ann Wilberforce 18 Nov 1846 6 Mr McGrath
277 Walsh Ann Windsor 28 Jan 1847 58 Mr McGrath
278 Connor Charles Asylum 10 Feb 1847 50 Mr McGrath
279 Cassidy James Windsor 30 Apr 1847 54 Schoolmaster Mr McGrath
280 Curran Mrs Rebecca Richmond 19 May 1847 19
281 Cusack Patrick Windsor 23 Aug 1847 32 Labourer John Joseph Therry
282 Dormer John Windsor 11 Sep 1847 His body was found in the Hawkesbury River How he came by his death the Coroners Jury could not obtain evidence John Joseph Therry
283 Kennedy Patrick Asylum 17 Sep 1847 63 John Joseph Therry
284 Smith Ann Asylum 13 Oct 1847 48 John Joseph Therry
285 Daley Patrick Richmond 25 Oct 1847 28 John Joseph Therry
286 Riley Mary Ann Richmond 12 Nov 1847 20 months John Joseph Therry
287 O'Brien Michael Windsor 12 Nov 1847 one day John Joseph Therry
288 Power or Poore Mary Ann Clarendon 23 Nov 1847 eleven days John Joseph Therry
289 Collins Thomas Windsor late of Wiseman's establishment at Windsor Hospital 24 Nov 1847 about 46 Herdsman John Joseph Therry
290 Maguire Edward McDonald River, died in Windsor Hospital 21 Dec 1847 66 Labourer John Joseph Therry
291 Riley John Cornwallis 24 Dec 1847 78 Labourer John Joseph Therry
292 Cuffe Farrell Richmond 5 Jan 1848 73 Schoolmaster John Joseph Therry
293 McKeon Hugh Windsor 6 Jan 1848 86 Labourer John Joseph Therry
294 Duffy James Kurrajong 13 Jan 1848 75 Farmer John Joseph Therry
295 Connor Bridget Vinegar Hill 15 Jan 1848 45 John Joseph Therry
296 Donelly Thomas Asylum Windsor 7 Feb 1848 72 Labourer John Joseph Therry
297 McDonogh Patrick North Rocks near Windsor 7 Feb 1848 62 Labourer John Joseph Therry
298 O'Grady Thomas Richmond 8 Mar 1848 22 months John Joseph Therry
299 Peible George Windsor 5 Apr 1848 4 1/2 John Joseph Therry
300 McCormick John Windsor 18 Apr 1848 40 Pauper Asylum John Joseph Therry
301 Murphy Samuel Windsor 19 Apr 1848 41 Pauper Asylum John Joseph Therry
302 Elliott Catherine Windsor 24 Apr 1848 63 Pauper Asylum John Joseph Therry
303 Holmes William Windsor May 1848 46 Pauper Asylum John Joseph Therry
304 Cullen Ellen Caddie Creek 28 May 1848 7 John Joseph Therry
305 Carthy Denis Windsor 29 May 1848 84 Pauper Asylum John Joseph Therry
306 Byrnes Patrick Cornwallis 6 Jun 1848 77 Farmer John Joseph Therry
307 Connelly James Windsor 8 Jun 1848 69 Atlas Shepherd John Joseph Therry
308 Carney Rebecca Eastern Creek 7 Jul 1848 84 Atlas Farmer Rev M Stephens
309 Kean Charles Windsor 22 Jul 1848 82 Pauper Asylum Rev E Luckie
310 Kelly James Lakeville 23 Jul 1848 75 Farmer Rev E Luckie
311 Landres James Richmond Aug 1848 88 Haldo 2nd Farmer Rev E Luckie
312 Gribbon Hugh Windsor 15 Aug 1848 78 Pauper Asylum Rev E Luckie
313 Good Arthur Windsor 2 Sep 1848 57 Pauper Asylum Rev M Stephens
314 Mahan John Windsor Sep 1848 36 Shop Keeper Rev M Stephens
315 Keane Peter Kurrajong Sep 1848 30
316 Spinks John Windsor 12 Oct 1848 42 Lady Melville Bricklayer John Grant
317 Barry Thos 26 Nov 1848 61 Dafiesta 1st Pauper Asylum John Grant
318 Haleroft Mary 5 Dec 1848 35 Pyramus Pauper Asylum John Grant
319 Huston Catherine 10 Dec 1848 43 Hooghley Pauper Asylum John Grant
320 Byrnes Walter 12 Dec 1848 38 Lady Harwood John Grant
321 Lynch ? 26 Dec 1848 48 Charles Forbes John Grant
322 unreadable 10 months John Grant
323 Braywood Henry Windsor 31 Dec 1848 14 months Native child John Grant
324 Turner Anne 14 Jan 1849 51 John Grant
325 Cullen James 4 Feb 1849 40 John Grant
326 C? Maria 12 Feb 1849 40 John Grant
327 Hayward Jane 16 Feb 1849 4 days John Grant
328 Spinks Mary 4 Mar 1849 46 Asylum John Grant
329 Harper ? 22 Mar 1849 53 Unreadable John Grant
330 McKeene Mary Richmond 24 Mar 1849 60 unreadable John Grant
331 Foley John Windsor 14 Apr 1849 54 Elizabeth [3] Asylum John Grant
332 McKibbett Bridget 14 Apr 1849 61 John Grant
333 Trodden Henry 24 Apr 1849 12 days John Grant
334 Costigan William 29 Apr 1849 45 Labourer John Grant
335 Doyle George 3 Jun 1849 70 Asylum John Grant
336 Herring Thos 11 Jun 1849 50 John Grant
337 Brennan John 22 Jun 1849 66 unreadable John Grant
338 Connor Timothy Windsor 24 Jun 1849 76 Unreadable Pauper John Grant
339 Riley Patrick Windsor 1 Jul 1849 59 Unreadable John Grant
340 Clifford Fredk ? Windsor 5 Jul 1849 70 Patra John Grant
341 Coffey Isabel Windsor 10 Jul 1849 38 John Grant
342 Davis Margt Colo 10 Aug 1849 44 Fourth John Grant
343 Donohue Patrick Windsor 19 Aug 1849 49 Andromeda Pauper John Grant
344 McDonald Richd Windsor 21 Aug 1849 10 months John Grant
345 Sullivan Mary Windsor 14 Sep 1849 44 John Grant
346 Baker Margaret Richmond 15 Sep 1849 31 Isabella John Grant
347 Woods James Richmond 6 Oct 1849 8 months John Grant
348 Savage Patrick Richmond 16 Oct 1849 57 Labourer John Grant
349 Pendergast Thos Richard Pitt Town 4 Nov 1849 4 months Native of the Colony John Grant
350 Byrne Maryanne Windsor 11 Nov 1849 5 Native John Grant
351 Maguire Joseph Windsor 12 Nov 1849 2 months Native John Grant
352 *bridge or Petherbridge unreadable Windsor 18 Nov 1849 4 months Native John Grant
353 Carney Edwd Prospect 11 Dec 1849 75 Farmer John Grant
354 Connors Charlotte 14 Dec 1849 60 Maria 2nd Pauper Asylum John Grant
355 Murray Mary Kurrajong 20 Dec 1849 12 months Native of the Colony John Grant
356 Henright Jane Windsor 7 Mar 1850 6 months Native of the Colony John Grant
357 Davis William Tumbledon Barn District of Windsor 7 Mar 1850 14 days Native of the Colony John Grant
358 Colrenny Bridget Windsor 20 Mar 1850 15 Anglia John Grant
359 Rafter Catherine Windsor 7 May 1850 14 months Native of the Colony John Grant
360 Mills Mathew Richmond 17 May 1850 16 months Native of the Colony John Grant
361 Heany Mary Windsor 1 Jun 1850 40 Elizabeth House Servant John Grant
362 Keenan William Windsor 12 Jun 1850 85 Martha Pauper Asylum John Grant
363 Hefferan Patrick Wilberforce 21 Jun 1850 60 Labourer John Grant
364 McAlpin Ellen Richmond 1 Aug 1850 69 Farmer John Grant
365 Timmins Michael Yellowmanday 20 Sep 1850 42 Native of the Colony John Grant
366 Mullens James Windsor 6 Oct 1850 40 Labourer John Grant
367 Ives Mary Richmond 28 Oct 1850 50 Henry Walsh John Grant
368 Reily Francis Richmond 2 Nov 1850 63 Edward Farmer John Grant
369 Smith Henry North Rocks 16 Dec 1850 25 John Grant
370 Gardoll Anton Richmond 21 Dec 1850 12 Weeks John Grant
371 Ahearn James Windsor 25 Dec 1850 8 ? John Grant
372 Brants Mary Windsor 19 Jan 1851 7 days John Grant
373 Wright Johanna Richmond 6 Mar 1851 33 Farmer John Grant
374 Clynes John Windsor 19 Mar 1851 28 Labourer John Grant
375 Pigeon Bridget South Creek 12 Apr 1851 8
376 Mason Mary Buried at Kurrajong 4 May 1851 68
377 Ray David Richmond 10 May 1851 1
378 Redman Martin Windsor 11 May 1851 30 Ogley Pauper Rev N J Coffey
379 Neil Patrick Richmond 1 Jun 1851 37 Farmer Rev N J Coffey
380 Cormack Patrick Cornwallis 10 Jun 1851 47 Labourer Rev N J Coffey
381 Doyle William Windsor 25 Jun 1851 55 Henry Porcher Pauper Rev N J Coffey
382 Egan Michl Windsor 30 Aug 1851 34 Inn Keeper Rev N J Coffey
383 Guthrie John Wilberforce 7 Sep 1851 70 Labourer Rev N J Coffey
384 Kelly Michael Richmond 11 Sep 1851 3 Rev N J Coffey
385 Connor Roger Nepean 1 Oct 1851 77 Neptune Farmer ?
386 Lynch Thomas Windsor 8 Oct 1851 91 Farmer Rev N J Coffey
387 Doyle Bridget Windsor 9 Oct 1851 55 Elizabeth 4th Pauper Rev N J Coffey
388 Collins Thomas Windsor 18 Oct 1851 88 Ann Pauper Rev N J Coffey
389 Ray Alexander Windsor 20 Oct 1851 50 Isabella Pauper Rev N J Coffey
390 Moloney Sarah Buried at Kurrajong 13 Nov 1851 52 Rev N J Coffey
391 Callum James Pitt Town 1 Dec 1851 5 months Rev N J Coffey
392 Smith Patrick Pitt Town 8 Dec 1851 2 months Rev N J Coffey
393 Glasgow Henry Pitt Town 8 Jan 1852 9 Rev N J Coffey
394 Molloy Mary Pitt Town 21 Jan 1852 7 months Rev N J Coffey
394 Mangin Martin Windsor 30 Jan 1852 40 Labourer Rev N J Coffey
395 Fair Richard Calai Creek 1 Feb 1852 2 Rev N J Coffey
396 Heaney Thomas Windsor 4 Feb 1852 61 Pauper Rev N J Coffey
397 McCabe Catherine Buried at Kurrajong 10 Feb 1852 64 Rev N J Coffey
398 Costello Jeremiah Windsor 8 Feb 1852 67 Black Smith Rev N J Coffey
399 Harper Patrick South Creek 16 Feb 1852 72 Farmer Rev N J Coffey
400 Bullok Catherine Windsor 19 Feb 1852 32 Inn Keeper Rev N J Coffey
401 Pendergast Thomas Pitt Town 25 Feb 1852 6 months Rev N J Coffey
402 Higgens Michael Sydney 3 Mar 1852 35 Rev N J Coffey Buried at Kurrajong
403 Dunn Ellen Windsor 4 Mar 1852 72 Labourer's wife Rev N J Coffey
404 Hadden John Kurrajong 11 Mar1852 86 Labourer Rev N J Coffey
405 Sullivan Ellen Windsor 4 Apr 1852 14 months Rev N J Coffey
406 Harris Mary unreadable 22 Apr 1852
407 Maguire Thomas Cornwallis 19 May 1852 62 Farmer Rev P Hallinan
408 Ring John Windsor 20 May 1852 70 Meadicant Rev P Hallinan
409 Broderick Daniel Windsor 31 May 1852 55 Pauper Rev P Hallinan
410 Connely Patrick Cliften 21 Jun 1852 60 Labourer Rev P Hallinan
411 unreadable unreadable Vinegar Hill 13 Jul 1852 58 Labourer Rev P Hallinan
412 unreadable John Michael Windsor 16 Jul 1852 1 day Rev P Hallinan
413 O'Brien Agnes Josephine Windsor 22 Jul 1852 3 weeks Rev P Hallinan
414 Mulhern William McGraths Hill 6 Sep 1852 78 Labourer Rev P Hallinan
415 Davis Margaret South Creek Windsor 15 Sep 1852 70 Rev P Hallinan
416 Kempster James Nepean District 19 Sep 1852 2 yrs 8 mths Rev P Hallinan
417 Day Bridget Cornwallis 29 Sep 1852 55 Widow Rev P Hallinan
418 Leary Mary Windsor 6 Oct 1852 44 Pauper Rev P Hallinan
419 Davies Richd Richmond 14 Oct 1852 34 Labourer Rev P Hallinan
420 Bourke Ellen Windsor 26 Oct 1852 29 Labourer's wife Rev P Hallinan
421 Keogh Walter Windsor 28 Oct 1852 56 John Bayer? Pauper Rev P Hallinan
422 Hamilton John Windsor 12 Nov 1852 75 Rev P Hallinan
423 Sullivan Cornelius Windsor 19 Nov 1852 - Atlas Pauper Rev P Hallinan
424 Cunningham Mary Windsor 20 Nov 1852 Farmer Rev P Hallinan
425 Woods Robert Richmond 21 Nov 1852 18 months Rev P Hallinan
426 Reedy Bridget Windsor 21 Nov 1852 2 Rev P Hallinan
427 Beans Mary unreadable 26 Nov 1852 74 unreadable Rev P Hallinan
428 Hynds Charles Box Hill 1 Dec 1852 18 Farmer Rev P Hallinan
429 McCarthy Thomas Windsor 4 Dec 1852 58 Rev P Hallinan
430 Whelan John Windsor 15 Dec 1852 73 Portland Rev P Hallinan
431 Doyle Patrick Windsor 17 Dec 1852 81 Hodbro? Rev P Hallinan
432 Carthy Mary Windsor 12 Dec 1852 60 Rev P Hallinan
433 Gabon Patrick Windsor 19 Dec 1852 72 Earl of St Vincent Rev P Hallinan
434 Brennan John Windsor 1 Jan 1853 60 Atlas [3] Pauper Rev P Hallinan
435 Cunningham Robert Windsor 6 Jan 1853 30 Royal Saxon Rev P Hallinan
436 King Patrick Windsor 3 Feb 1853 74 Rev P Hallinan
437 Egan Edward Windsor 18 Feb 1853 55 Rev P Hallinan
438 Gaunt Michael Kurrajong 1 Jan 1853 2 months Rev P Hallinan
439 Finley John Windsor 14 Apr 1853 64 Pauper Rev P Hallinan
440 Moffitt Mary Windsor 16 Apr 1853 30 Rev P Hallinan
441 Murray Anne Sally's Bottoms 13 May 1853 33 Rev P Hallinan
442 Goodwin Mary Freemans Reach 15 May 1853 75 Rev P Hallinan
443 McCabe Owen Kurrajong 22 May 1853 27 Rev P Hallinan
444 Norris Mary Ann Cornwallis 27 May 1853 40 Rev P Hallinan
445 Connors Michael Windsor 22 May 1853 80 Rev P Hallinan
446 Harrison Catherine Windsor 24 May 1853 67 Rev P Hallinan
447 Hayes Mary Jane Freemans Reach 2 Jun 1853 37 Rev P Hallinan
448 Barton Stephen Cliften 2 Jun 1853 5 Rev P Hallinan
449 Byrns Peter Windsor 9 Jun 1853 10 Rev P Hallinan
450 Eather Mrs Mary Kurrajong 11 Jun 1853 50 Rev P Hallinan
451 Hanly Jane Richmond 14 Jun 1853 4 months Rev P Hallinan
452 Wayburn Bridget Pitt Town 19 Jun 1853 52 Rev P Hallinan
453 Moore William Pitt Town 21 Jun 1853 50 Rev P Hallinan
454 Read Laurence Windsor 15 Jul 1853 60 Rev P Hallinan
455 Mahon Patrick Windsor 15 Jul 1853 77 Rev P Hallinan
456 Murphy John Hospital Windsor 17 Jul 1853 60 Rev P Hallinan
457 unreadable Mrs Richmond 5 Aug 1853 26 Rev P Hallinan
458 Parkland Mary Windsor 3 Aug 1853 61 Rev P Hallinan
459 Moran Michael Pitt Town 13 Aug 1853 62 Rev P Hallinan
460 Norris Elizabeth Richmond Bottoms 21 Aug 1853 23 Rev P Hallinan
461 Kelly Daniel Pitt Town 3 Sep 1853 79 Rev P Hallinan
462 Gunan Michael Richmond 13 Sep 1853 55 Rev P Hallinan
463 Mellish Maria Sydney 13 Sep 1853 36 Rev P Hallinan
464 Hill Elizabeth Windsor 18 Sep 1853 60 Rev P Hallinan
465 Clarke Thomas Pitt Town 22 Sep 1853 3 Rev P Hallinan
466 Gatton Thomas Windsor 2 Oct 1853 77 Rev P Hallinan
467 Riely John Penrith District 8 Oct 1853 45 Rev P Hallinan
468 Murray Thomas Sally's Bottoms 31 Oct 1853 7 Rev P Hallinan
469 Waddle Thomas Richmond 16 Nov 1853 60 Rev P Hallinan
470 Jones unreadable Windsor 17 Nov 1853 63 Rev P Hallinan
471 Slater unreadable Fairfield 22 Nov 1853 54 Rev P Hallinan
472 Sharry Mary Windsor 23 Nov 1853 19 Rev P Hallinan
473 Dockin John Richmond Bottoms 26 Nov 1853 7 Rev P Hallinan
474 Crawley John Windsor 1 Dec 1853 67 Rev P Hallinan
475 Connors Charles Box Hill 11 Dec 1853 74 Rev P Hallinan
476 Sharry Mary Ann Windsor 12 Dec 1853 1 month Rev P Hallinan
477 nil Rev P Hallinan
478 Buttersworth Bridget Pitt Town Bottoms 2 Jan 1854 26 Rev P Hallinan
479 Buttersworth Bridget Pitt Town Bottoms 12 Jan 1854 17 days Rev P Hallinan
480 Mellish Mary Sydney 26 Jan 1854 6 months Rev P Hallinan Age crossed out
481 Kilduf John Pitt Town 8 Feb 1854 60 Rev P Hallinan
482 Walsh John Windsor 7 Feb 1854 48 Rev P Hallinan
483 Brennan John Windsor 8 Feb 1854 70 Rev P Hallinan
484 Whitford Mary Windsor 18 Feb 1854 60 Rev P Hallinan
485 Power Michael Wilberforce 24 Mar 1854 63 Rev P Hallinan
486 Davies Henry Wilberforce 27 Mar 1854 53 Rev P Hallinan
487 Cavanagh Michael Windsor 10 Apr 1854 78 Rev P Hallinan
488 Pender [gast] Thomas Pitt Town 29 Apr 1854 14 months Rev P Hallinan
489 McQuade Charles Hale Windsor 29 Jun 1854 1 month Rev H Johnson
490 Kenny Anne Richmond 9 Jul 1854 77 Rev P Hallinan
491 Dempsey Denis Richmond 7 Aug 1854 62 Rev P Hallinan
492 Doyle Peter Wilberforce 12 Aug 1854 70 Rev P Hallinan
493 Riley Elizabeth Windsor 17 Sep 1854 63 Rev P Hallinan
494 Norris Michael Cornwallis 28 Sep 1854 30 Rev P Hallinan
495 Doyle Timothy Windsor 17 Oct 1854 80 Rev P Hallinan
496 Hewson Henry North Richmond 24 Oct 1854 11 Rev P Hallinan
497 Tierney Mary Windsor 5 Nov 1854 4 Rev P Hallinan
498 O'Keefe Mary Jane Windsor 13 Nov 1854 7 weeks Rev P Hallinan
499 Tait John Pitt Town 26 Nov 1854 3 Rev P Hallinan
500 Kelly John Richmond Bottoms 28 Dec 1854 2 Rev P Hallinan
501 Gahan Hugh Freemans Reach 31 Dec 1854 1yr 9 months Rev P Hallinan
502 unreadable Thomas Windsor 27 Dec 1854 80 Rev P Hallinan



Credits: Transcriptions by Kristine Wood - October 2003.

Jane Charlotte Eather 1851-1897

Jane Charlotte, the second child to survive infancy in the family of Thomas EATHER 1824-1909
and Eliza, nee CROWLEY 1822-1897, was born at Bulga on Wollombi Brook on 14 January 1851 and grew up there on her parents' farm. As a child she attended school in the local St Mark's Church, which was used as a school house on week days. At the age of 24 Jane was married on 8 October 1875 to Samuel PARTRIDGE, the 3rd. son of nine children to William PARTRIDGE 1818-1906 and Elizabeth nee RUSSELL 1822-1899 both from Kent, England, who were farming in the Bulga district. Samuel PARTRIDGE was known as Sam. He was very short in stature, being scarcely five feet (152 cm) in height. As a fourteen year-old boy he had been present during the hold-up on Warlands Range, when Peter CLARK 1837-1863 had been killed. It was Sam who had ridden off to Murrurundi to alert the police.
The young couple settled on a farm in the Bulga district and over the years had a family of four sons and one daughter.

1.Edgar Clarihew PARTRIDGE 1875-1960, their eldest son, married Susan Jane METTAM on 2 October 1905. The daughter of James METTAM 1838-1930 and Elizabeth, nee MERCER 1842-1880. They had two sons and five daughters. Both the sons died in childhood. All the five daughters married and four had issue numbering fifteen altogether.
Edgar and Susan both enjoyed long lives. They had been married for 55 years when Edgar died at the age of 85 on 28 November 1960. Susan survived him by over eight years and was 92 when she passed away on 6 July 1969.

2.Vera Caroline PARTRIDGE 1879-1941, the eldest daughter of Jane and Samuel, married Alfred CLARK 1864-1951 on 19 April 1911 when she was 32. He was generally known as Andrew and was about fifteen years older than her. They had two sons and a daughter.

3.Guy Russell PARTRIDGE 1881-1954, the second son and third child of Jane and Samuel, married Elizabeth Hazel SQUIRE on 2 November 1940 at Singleton. She was the daughter of Victor William SQUIRE 1878-1930 and Annie Felicia, nee CLARK 1891-1970. Annie was a daughter of Jane's sister Sarah Eather 1861-1923 who had married Ashton CLARK. Therefore Guy and Elizabeth were first cousins once removed. He turned 60 in the month that he married. His bride had been born at Quirindi on 29 March 1918 and was 22. They had three sons all born at Singleton.

4.The fourth child of Jane and Samuel Partridge, Oscar EATHER PARTRIDGE 1884-1963, he married Ethel Florence Isolda May MORGAN 1885-1962 in 1911 at Armidale, NSW. She had been born at Armidale 17 September 1885, the daughter of Hananiah MORGAN 1846-1904 and his wife, Jemima Agnes, nee McMICHAEL 1852-1928. They had four sons. Oscar died at Traralgin in Victoria in 1963 at the age of 88.

5.The fourth son and fifth child Darrell PARTRIDGE 1891-1953 married Ada Teresa CALLAGHAN 1893-1979 the daughter of Patrick and Margaret CALLAGHAN from Dungog, New South Wales.

Jane PARTRIDGE who suffered from heart disease, died suddenly whilst doing her housework on 3 June 1897 at the early age of 46, so she did not live to see any of her children married or any of her grandchildren. Samuel survived her by 31 years. Beulah SQUIRE, a sister of Guy PARTRIDGE's wife, lived at her parents' home "Gerale" at Bulga when she was young. In later years she remembered Samuel PARTRIDGE - 'Uncle Sam'. He used to go to "Gerale" every Saturday. He rode a pretty cream horse and tied it up behind the cow bails. When the school van was running, Beulah and her siblings caught it at Bill COOKE's gate. Uncle Sam used to time his arrival from town to be at the gate so that the young ones could open it for him. He then used to give them a lift down to his gate, thereby saving himself from having to open and close three gates. Sam was a small man, as were his two brothers. Sam's brother Peter PARTRIDGE 1859-1918 married Amy Hilton CLARK daughter of Macdonald CLARK 1836-1918 and Susannah, nee MCALPIN 1842-1882 at Patrick's Plain in 1887. Sam was age 72 years when he died on 11 June 1928 - his death was registered at Singleton, New South Wales
Sam and Jane are buried together at St.Mark's Church of England Cemetery, Bulga, New South Wales.

The photo below was taken in 1888, at the side of Thomas EATHER's house 'Meerea' at Bulga, NSW
Standing from left Peter McAlpin, William Glas McAlpin, William Partridge
Sitting Thomas Eather, Eliza Eather, nee Crowley, Elizabeth Eather, nee Russell
Sitting in front is Elizabeth McDonald relict of James Swales Clark