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LABOURS AND SUFFERINGS OF THE EARLY CONVICTS

Early Australian History.
A series of Historical Sketches, bearing upon Australian Colonization and
Convict Life in New South Wales and Van Dieman's Land.

The state of things thus feebly depicted continued until the middle of May, when the Sirius returned from the Cape with a four months' supply of provisions for the settlement. Her arrival was hailed with great joy, and those convicts who had almost given themselves up to despair and the recklessness attendant upon such a condition of mind and feeling, at once became orderly, industrious, and well-behaved.
Full rations produced contentment and even hilarity, and the convicts went so far in this direction as even to indulge in dramatic entertainments, permission to do so having first been obtained from his Excellency.

The 4th of June 1789 was the King's birthday, and free and bond joined in its celebration, rendering the occasion remarkable as the data of the first performance of a play in Australia.
The play produced was George Farquhar's comedy of 'The Recruiting Officer,' and the theatre was a hut fitted up for the occasion, the actors being all convicts. Concerning the merits of this early performance no information has been handed down to us ; but Collins says, ' they (the players) professed no higher aim than 'humbly to excite a smile,' and their efforts 'to please' were not unattended with applause.'

The chief work upon which the prisoners had up to this time been employed was in procuring building materials, erecting houses and stores, building boats and wharves, and in farming operations, 250 of them being engaged, mostly at Parramatta, in clearing the ground and cultivating the soil. The discovery of the Hawkesbury River by the Governor, who spent a large portion of his time in exploring the country in this direction in search of better land for cultivation, furnished a wider scope for operations, and parties of convicts were soon sent further afield to work.
The fine deep soil on the banks of the river was admirably adapted for raising grain, and shortly after its discovery portions of it were allotted to settlers. But another season of distress being feared, in November the people were again placed on short allowance, for although the first crop had been garnered at Parramatta, amounting to upwards of 200 bushels of wheat, with small portions of maize, barley and oats, it was deemed advisable to save the whole for seed for the ensuing year ; and the rats had committed great havoc among the provisions in the public store at the settlement. The rations now served out were barely sufficient to preserve life, the weekly allowance for adults being 2lbs. flour, 2lbs. pork, 1 pint peas, and 1lb. rice, the Governor and the officers again receiving equal measure with the convicts.

And right in the midst of this trouble there came intelligence which intensified the gloom.
The Sirius frigate, which had been sent to Norfolk Island, had been wrecked there, and although two years had elapsed since the foundation of the colony, no intelligence had been received from England, and for all the people knew no fresh supplies had yet started from headquarters.
And again want bred discontent and disorder ; again were issued and enforced stringent regulations against waste; again there followed insubordination, floggings and executions.

The tender Supply was despatched to Batavia, the commander carrying instructions to charter a vessel there and load her as well as the Supply with a full cargo of provisions.
Two months of deepest misery intervened, and then one morning early in June a sail was sighted from the South Head. The vessel proved to be the Lady Juliana, from London, which had been eleven months on her passage, having started in July of the previous year.
The ship Guardian had been dispatched from England about the same time, with a large quantity of live stock and other supplies, but having struck on a rock she was compelled to put into the Cape of Good Hope, almost in a sinking state ; and the Lady Juliana, a much smaller vessel, had come on with a part of her cargo and passengers.
The provisions which thus came to hand at such an opportune time enabled the Governor to increase, but only to a small extent, the scale of provisions, it being thought that the stock would last until the return of the Supply from Batavia.

Then other surprises quickly followed. Three ships from London, transports, put in their appearance, bringing ,out a large number of convicts, and detachments of the New South Wales Corps.
More mouths to feed and very little to feed them ! the outlook was indeed dark and gruesome.

The character of the New South Wales Corps afterwards embodied in the 102nd Regiment has already been dwelt upon in Part I of this history ('The Story of the Ten Governors'), but the subject was not then exhausted, and it is necessary that something more should be said concerning a set of men whose actions proved them to have been cast in the coarsest mould of genteel viciousness.

Concerning the formation of the Corps : A Major Grose had made a proposal to the Secretary of State to enlist a force for service in the penal settlement of Botany Bay, on condition that he received certain emoluments and honours, and his offer being accepted he set his recruiting officers to work, and soon succeeded in raising the requisite number to form the first detachments. Not from the ranks of tried soldiers did he raise his force, and not from the ranks of reputable men. They were to do duty in a land of convicts ; who better for such service than convicts themselves? An Irish political prisoner named Holt, who was transported to the colony some years later than the period here referred to, and whose peculiar experiences will be narrated in a subsequent chapter, describes, the. officers-of this Corps as ' old tailors and shoemakers, stay-makers, man-milliners, tobacconists and pedlars, that were called- captains and lieutenants.' Likely men for the service were sought in the hulks of the prisons of the old land ; soldiers under punishment were taken. from the navy hulk; and those who had been condemned to service in India were reprieved on enlisting in the New South Wales Corps.
-Says Governor Hunter, who found them more, troublesome than the convicts,'Characters who have been disgraced in every other regiment in his Majesty's. service have been thought fit and proper recuits , for the New South Wales Corps. We find among these, men capable of corrupting the hearts of the best disposed, and often superior in every species of infamy to the most expert in wickedness among the convicts !'
And these are only fine lines in the picture.
Those who have read what has already been written of these men, and who read what follows and after all is said the whole truth will not have , been told will share in the astonishment of the writer of this story that every element of goodness in the young colony was not swallowed up in this sink of corruption called a Corps.

The vessels which brought to the colony the first contingent of Major Grose's army also brought about : 2,000 male and 250 female convicts. The voyage out was full of horrors to the unfortunate prisoners.
The vessels were not, regular transports, but private ships, whose owners had contracted with the Government to embark prisoners at 17/7/6 per head, without any agreement being made for sufficient accommodation or proper control ; nor were they even liable for any deduction for those who died on the voyage hence, the greater number of deaths, the more profit to the contractors. Will the reader be astonished to learn that the sharks were well fed on human flesh during the passage. Nearly 300 of the wretched creatures on board in chains perished before the vessels reached Port Jackson, in consequence of the close and improper way in which they had been confined.
Driven to desperation by the treatment they were receiving, some of the convicts made an attempt to overpower the guards and get possession of the ships. They failed, and failure brought increased suffering.
The convicts were after this attempt all heavily ironed : and the bodies of those who died under the hatches were permitted to remain there and putrefy for weeks !
Is there in all the records of the time when slave ships sailed the sea, a story more horrible and horrifying than this?
Some of those who survived the voyage died when being conveyed to the land in boats, and many of the others landed only to die.
No record has been preserved of the number that died after they were landed, but Colonel David Collins makes this grim report : All possible expedition was used in getting the sick on shore, for even while they remained on board many died. The total number of sick on the last day of June was three hundred and forty-nine.

The melancholy which closed the month of June appeared unchanged in the beginning of July. The morning generally opened with depositing in the burying ground the miserable victims of the night !'But the officers and men of the New South Wales Corps lived through it all, and on their arrival they began to shew their superiority as soldiers wearing the King of England's uniform.

Let Governor Phillip speak. He says : "They were observed to be very intimate with the convicts, living in their huts, eating, drinking and gambling with them, and perpetually enticing the women to leave the men."

The whole detachment, we are told, with the exception of the non-commissioned officers and five or six of the privates, took an oath to stand by each other, and not to suffer a soldier to be punished for whatever crime he might commit against an inhabitant ; and so we hear Governor Hunter complaining that they had destroyed the dwelling house of one resident, for sport, no doubt, and that the greatest part of the detachment on one occasion left their barracks with their bayonets 'to attack an unarmed people,' continuing for four days in open and avowed mutiny.' The officers did not, certainly, transgress so openly after the fashion of their inferiors, but they committed outrages of another character, as fully detailed in Part I ; and they gave the sanction of silence to the 'innocent pranks' of the privates in the Regiment.

Governor John Hunter it was who wrote to one of the commanding officers (Lieut.Colonel Paterson)- in the following strain, his anger somewhat interfering with his grammar : "I must declare to you, sir, that the conduct of this part of the New South Wales Corps has been, in my opinion, the most violent and outrageous that was ever heard of by any British Regiment whatever!"
Major Grose and Captain Paterson each served as Lieutenant-Governor during the interregnum, between the departure of Governor Phillip in December, 1792, and the arrival of Governor Hunter in September, 1795 the former acting two years, and the latter for about nine months.
And here let us drop the: New South Wales Corps. I do not care to handle vice too long.

Again taking up the thread of the narrative proper, we learn that in October (just six months after leaving on her foraging mission) the Supply returned to the colony from Batavia, with a full cargo of provisions, and the captain reported that he had chartered a Dutch ship, which was following, also laden with provisions. This was joyful news, and the whole settlement was immediately put on full allowance.
The action of the Governor in limiting the ration of himself and the officers to that served out-to the soldiers and convicts, while it prevented any expression of discontent, gave the latter the clearest proof that could be offered of Phillip's desire to deal fairly with them ; and when the fresh provisions arrived there was general rejoicing. The frequent recurrence of times of scarcity, however, and the slow growth of internal production, made the convicts very unsettled, and there was a wide-spread desire to escape from a condition where starvation appeared to be a contingency not very remote at any time.

Early in 1791, several daring and successful attempts were made by prisoners to escape from the colony, by means of boats stolen from the settlers on the banks of the Parramatta and Hawkesbury Rivers, and with a view of preventing this an order was issued by the Governor limiting all boats to be built in future to a size so small that none but the most foolhardy would think of escaping in them. Nevertheless, the attempts continued to be made, but in the majority of cases the boats were so small and weak that they were swamped almost before they had cleared the Heads.

It was in August of this year that the convicts whose sentences had expired, and who desired to remain in the colony, were allowed to select small parcels of land to clear and cultivate for their own use. The first party, twelve in number, made selections of land about four miles from Parramatta, at the foot of Prospect Hill. From this time forward grants of land to emancipists continued to be made with more or less liberality, and some of the large estates in the colony at the present day, if traced back for little over
half,a century, will be found to have had their beginning under the rule which extended the system of land grants to convicts whose sentences had expired and whose conduct had been good.
And many of the prisoners had earned all that was given to them, for their services to the colony, apart altogether from the 'labour' which the Government extracted from them as a penalty attaching to crime, were really very valuable which is more than can be said of the services rendered by the crowds of non-commissioned officers to whom the public estate was served out in such large slices at this and at subsequent periods.

The real pioneers of the country were, not the retired officers or free settlers, but their assigned servants; for these were the men who braved the dangers of the bush, withstood the assaults of the justly incensed aborigines, cleared the land, cultivated it and made it habitable, and developed the resources of the country while their masters, during the greater portion of the time, took their ease in what was then the only centre of civilization in the colony.
It does not detract at all from the merit of the work in which these men engaged that their labours were not voluntary. It is to their credit that they performed their duties faithfully and well under circumstances of the most discouraging kind; and they deserved all the reward that came to them.


As this story proceeds it will be seen that, as a rule, the men who laid the foundation upon which the industrial prosperity of the colony has been raised more often received kicks than half-pence as a reward for their labours. Many of the more successful of the First Fleeters dwelt on the Hawkesbury and its tributaries, where the first agricultural settlers were planted, and from them, even to a date near the fifties could be obtained reliable reminiscences of the olden time.

One of these settlers,a Mr. S - , who was in well-to-do circumstances, and who had been freed shortly after arriving in the colony, told the following thrilling story ,in the year 1845 :
"I arrived in the colony fifty-six years since; it was Governor Phillip's time and I was fourteen years old ; there were only eight houses in the colony then. I know that myself and eighteen others laid in a hollow tree for seventeen weeks, and cooked out of a kettle with a wooden bottom; we used to stick it in a hole in the ground and make a fire round it. I was seven years in service (bond) and then started working for a living wherever I could get it. There was plenty of hardship then. I have often taken grass and pounded it, and made soup from a native dog. I would eat anything then. For seventeen weeks I had only five ounces of flour a day. We never got a full ration except when the ship was in harbour. The motto was 'kill them or work them ; their provision will be in store'.
Many a time have I been yoked like a bullock with twenty or thirty others to drag along timber. About eight hundred died in about six months at a place called Toongabbie, or Constitution Hill. I knew a man so weak he was thrown into the grave; when he said, 'Don't cover me up; I'm not dead; for God's sake don't cover me up!'The overseer answered 'D- your eyes, you'll die tonight, and we shall have the trouble to come back again!
The man recovered; his name is James and he is now alive at Richmond.
They used to have a large hole for the dead; 0nce a day men were sent down to collect the corpses of prisoners, and throw them in without any ceremony or service. The native dogs used to come down at night and fight and howl in packs, gnawing the poor dead bodies.
The Governor would order the lash at the rate of 500, 600, or 800 ; and if the men could have stood it they would have had more. I knew a man hung time and then for having stolen a few biscuits, and another for stealing a duck frock. A man was condemned no time take him to a tree, and hang him. The overseers were allowed to flog the men in the fields, Often have the men been taken from the gangs, had fifty, and been sent back to work. Any man would, have committed murder for a month's provisions ; I would have committed three (murders) for a week's provision ! I was chained seven weeks on my back for being out getting greens, wild herbs. The *Rev. used to come it tightly to force some confession. Men were obliged to tell lies to prevent their bowels being cut out with the lash!
Old - (an overseer) killed three men at the saw in a fortnight by overwork. We used to be taken in large 'parties to raise a tree; when the body of the tree was raised he (old - ) would. call some of 'the men away then more ; the men were bent double they could not bear it they fell the tree on one or two, killed on the spot. 'Take him away; put him in the ground!' There was no more about it.
After seven years I got my liberty and then started about working for a living where I could get it. I stowed myself away on board the 'Barrington, bound for Norfolk Island, with eighteen others ; it was not a penal settlement then. Governor King was there. I had food, in plenty. I was overseer of the Governor's garden. Afterwards I went to live with old D'Arcy Wentworth and a better master never lived in the world. Little Billy, the great lawyer, has often been carried in my arms. Old D'Arcy wanted, me to take charge of Homebush station, but I took to the river (Hawkesbury), worked up and down till I saved, enough money to buy old B-'s farm at Pitt Town. No man worked harder than I have done. I have by me about 1000 ready cash. I have given that farm of forty acres to my son Joseph, and three other farms and about 500 head of cattle ; and about the same to my other son. I have also got 80 acres besides my house, and some fine cattle. We are never without a chest of tea in the house ; we use two in the year. I have paid 40 for a chest of tea in this colony. Tea is a great comfort."


This old man was described as large-featured, handsome, military sort of face, of a red-brown complexion, clean shaved, and his dress a flannel shirt with black bandanna, tied sailor fashion, exposing his strong neck, and a pair of fustian trousers. A coat to him was like a prison, and he kept religiously away from that article of dress. He was as rough-mannered as he was honest, and a story is told of his meeting with Dr. -, who had the reputation among the prison population of never having spared any man in his anger or any woman in his lust. It was during the flogging days, and the Dr. met him in Sydney coming out of the bank. Holding out his hand the medico said, "Come Mr. S -, shake hands, let bygones be bygones; I am glad to see you looking so well." The old man put his hands behind him, and bawled out "I suppose because I have got a velvet waistcoat, and money in the bank, you want to shake hands; but no! Dr. - , it would take a second resurrection to save such as thee!"
The Dr.-- did not wait to hear any more.

The old man's wife was blind, but had a good memory, and she told the following story with tears :
"I have seen Dr. - take a woman who was in the family way, with a rope round her, and duck her in the water at Queen's Wharf. The laws were bad then. If a gentleman wanted a man's wife he would send the husband to Norfolk Island. I have seen a man flogged for pulling six turnips instead of five. One was overseer, the biggest villain that ever lived delighted in torment. He used to walk up and down and rub his hands when the blood ran. When he walked out the flogger walked behind him. He died a miserable death ; maggots ate him up, and not a man could be found to bury him. I have seen six men executed for stealing 21 lbs of flour. I have seen a man struck when at work with a handspike, and killed on the spot. I have seen men in tears round Governor , begging for food. He would mock them with 'Yes, yes, gentlemen; I'll make you comfortable; give you a nightcap and a pair of stockings!"

Another man in the same year gave this account ;
"I arrived in the third fleet on the 16th October, 1791; it was on a Sunday we landed. The ship's name was Barrington, Captain March. I was sent to Toongabbie. For nine months there I was on five ounces of flour when weighed out barely four; served daily. In those days we were yoked to draw timber, twenty-five in gang. The sticks were six feet long, six men abreast. We held the stick behind us, and dragged with our hands. One man came ashore in the Pitt; his name was Dixon ; he was a gentleman. He was put to the drag, but it soon done for him. He began on a Thursday and died on a Saturday, as he was dragging a load down Constitution Hill. There were thirteen hundred died there in six months. Men used to carry trees on their shoulders. How they used to die ! The men were weak dreadfully weak through want of food. A man named Gibraltar was hung for stealing a loaf out of the Governor's kitchen. He got down the chimney, stole the loaf, had a trial, and was hung the next day at sunrise. At this time a full ration was allowed to the Governor's dog. I have seen seventy men flogged at night, twenty-five lashes each. On Sunday evening they used to read the laws. If any man was found out of the camp he got 25. The women used to he punished with iron collars. In Governor King's time they used to douse them overboard. They killed one.
Dr. - was a great tyrant. Mine is a life-grant from Governor Bourke fourteen acres. I grow tobacco, wheat, and corn ; just enough to make a living."


A story was current to the following effect, shewing the arbitrary rule of 1816:
Governor Bligh having heard from his cowkeeper that the servant of an officer of the staff had made some impertinent remarks because disappointed of the customary supply of milk for his master, on the following morning sent for the disappointed delinquent. Wondering and trembling he was ushered into the presence of His Excellency, who received him with a condescending smile, and told him that as the chief constable's house was on his way home, he (the Governor,) had simply sent for him to save a dragoon the trouble of going there with a letter. The letter was handed to the somewhat bewildered servant, who straightway delivered it to 'the chief constable, and as a reward was immediately tied to the triangles and treated to 25 lashes the letter, having contained the Governor's warrant for the payment of the reward.

This chapter (5) transcribed from
Bathurst Free Press and Mining Journal (NSW : 1851 - 1904)
Published, Saturday 5 January 1889
Written by Charles White (1845-1922), editor and author,
Under his pseudonym, 'The Chatterer'
White was born at Bathurst, New South Wales,
the eldest son of John Charles White, bank clerk and Methodist lay preacher,
and his wife Myra, ne Oakey, of Demerara, West Indies.
In October 1859 his father bought the Bathurst Free Press and Mining Journal
The family owned this paper until 1904.
janilye, 2012


Notes: Production history of The Recruiting Officer.
It opened at Drury Lane in 1706. It was an immediate hit and went on to become one of the most frequently performed plays of the 18th century. The part of the foppish Brazen proved a notable role for the renowned actor-manager Colley Cibber. The Recruiting Officer was also the first play to be staged in the Colony of New South Wales, which is now Australia, by the convicts of the First Fleet in 1789 under the governance of Captain Arthur Phillip RN (also Commodore of the First Fleet) as well as the first performance of the original Dock Street Theatre in Historic downtown Charleston, SC in 1736. The most famous modern revival was staged at the National Theatre (when at the Old Vic) in 1963 its inaugural season. Directed by William Gaskill, it had an extremely strong cast which included Laurence Olivier as Brazen, Robert Stephens as Plume, Colin Blakely as Kite, Derek Jacobi as Worthy, Maggie Smith as Silvia and Mary Miller as Melinda.[citation needed] The National Theatre staged the play again in 1991 with Desmond Barrit as Brazen, Alex Jennings as Plume and Ken Stott as Kite. It was directed by Nicholas Hytner.

There have been two television adaptations of the play. The first for Australian television in 1965, the second a BBC Play of the Month in 1973. The latter, directed by David Giles, starred Ian McKellen as Plume, Prunella Ransome as his sweetheart Silvia, Jane Asher as Melinda, John Moffatt as Brazen, and Brian Blessed as Sergeant Kite.

* Rev. Samuel Marsden
The flogging Parson, He was appointed a magistrate in 1796; however, his reputation plummeted as his cruelty and harsh sentences became the stuff of legend. He was removed from the magistracy twice, by Governor Macquarie in 1818 and by Governor Brisbane in 1822-his picture below and depicted in this episode of the highly popular 1978 Australian Television series Against The Wind which may be watched here.


Windsor's Municipal History-THE INTERESTING EARLY STAGES

THE PROMOTERS' TROUBLES.
OPPOSITION~AND EGGS.


The Hon. William Walker.From his book entitled ''Reminiscences of a Fifty Tears' Residence at Windsor,
published in 1890, we take the following extract, which carries us still further back - back to a quarter of a century before the town's incorporation.

The hon. gentleman writes :
" There was a District Council once at Windsor (it embraced the whole district), of which the late Mr. Robert Fitzgerald was the first and last Warden. It started with a lot of Councillors, and commenced operations on a large and extravagant scale. But it had no funds to go on with. Assessors were appointed to value all the property in the district, who began work by a lengthened trip down the Hawkesbury in a boat, examining the farms on the way. A valuable suite of office furniture was ordered of a Mr. Atkinson, but after delivery he could not get paid. He sued some of the members of the Council, who denied their individual liability, and the council was without money. Atkinson was non-suited-the Council broke up-no one would consent to act on it, fearing liabilities, and it died in 1846. The furniture, which no one would own, was placed in the Court House for a considerable time ; but it was in the way there, and some of it is now, I believe, at a neighbouring house, this was tbe first experience of municipal matters at Windsor, and its failure created a bad impression. The Municipalities' Act of 1858, how ever, brought, local Councils into existence again. But there were great difficulties encountered in get ting a Municipal Council started in Windsor, and those who now partici pate in the advantages of the institu tion, little know the trouble the promoters had in getting it afloat.

The first public meeting on the, subject was called in November, 1858,at the Court House. There were
about 200 people present, numbers of whom came for the purpose of opposition and disturbance.
The lower part of the Court-room was not well lighted, so that malcontents there had every chance of keeping out of sight.
The meeting was called at 7 o'clock, but business did not commence until past eight, when I proposed that Mr. Jas. Bligh Johnson, J .P., should take the chair, but that gentleman discreetly declined.
Mr. Richard Ridge and Mr. Thomas Tebbutt were also solicited and refused.
It was apparent that no one had the courage to take the chair, and that unless I did so myself, the meeting would collapse.
Mr. Tebbutt then proposed that I should preside. I can tell you, I did not fancy the post, as I could foresee there would be some disagreeable work. However, as I was determined the meeting should not fail for want of a chairman, I consented to take the position.

I stated shortly the object of the meeting, and expressed a hope that fair play would be shown to the speakers for and against. My remarks were well received, and Mr. T. Primrose rose to move the first resolution, in favor of establishing a municipality in the borough. He was met with all kinds of interruption, and presently an egg whizzed past him, thrown from the rear part of the audience. Then followed another, and another.
I don't think they struck any one, but lodged their contents on the valuable and historical picture of Governor Macquarie and the Court House wall behind the bench. It was impossible to go on - so much noise and disorder prevailed, and the meeting broke up in sublime confusion-the advocates for a municipality receiving numerous groans and hoots.

The Court House wall remained disfigured for a long time after this discreditable scene. It was some years after this, in 1871, when the people became more reasonable, that the present Municipal
Council was established."

Source:Hawkesbury Herald (Windsor, NSW : 1902 - 1945)
Friday 16 January 1903
Transcription, janilye 2012

To HOOCH Looking for BURNS

For some reason I am unable to post a comment on any of your journals!

I will take you through my Rex Raymond BURNS 1928-1983 research step by step so you can go over it.

1949 - Apprentice Carpenter 128 Great East Hwy. Midland Junction.
1954 - Carpenter Midland Junction
He married Jean Mary LORIMER about 1951. daughter of G J LORIMER
1958 - Carpenter Bushmead Rd., Hazelmere
1963 ditto
1968 ditto
1972 Clerk 1 Weber Place, Dianella
He and Jean remained there till his death in 1983
CEMETERY RECORD ; BURNS REX RAYMOND 55 years 1983 DIANELLA
There are a lot of Thomas Burns' and you are going to need certificates for Rex to confirm where he was born.
The West Australian Friday 27 July 1951
LORIMER-BURNS: The engagement is announced and the marriage will take place shortly between Jean Lorimer. Kalamunda-road, South Guildford. and Rex Burns, 128 York-road. Midland Junction.

And the age tells me this isn't him but found it interesting, and besides how many Rex Burns could there be at Midland Junction and the papers arn't always right:
The West Australian Friday 26 May 1950
YOUNG PLAYERS IN LACROSSE SQUAD
The policy of most sporting bodies in fostering juniors is one that is beginning to pay dividends in almost all branches of sport and the W.A. Lacrosse Association has certainly benefited from the scheme which was started during the year.
This is borne out by the unusually large number of young players included in the State practice squad. A number of them are under 20.
One of the lads, Rex Burns, has seven years experience in lacrosse at the age of 19. He began playing in club games at the age of 12 and since that time has been a regular player for the strong Midland Junction team. He fills the important position of third home. He has moulded his game on the style of a clubmate, Arthur Horner, one of the best-known players in the State. Burns's ambition is to gain State selection and if he is chosen this year he will probably be the youngest player to compete in an interstate carnival.
apart from a speeding fine in 1947 that's about it.
I looked at the Burns people buried at Karrakatta.
and I found a death for a Rita M J BURNS in 1935
WA.bd&m DEATHS:
BURNS RITA M J Female PERTH 1283 1935
I decided to investigate and discovered her full name before marriage was Rita Madeline Julia EDMONDS born in NSW.
nsw.bd&m BIRTHS:
9250/1892 EDMONDS RITA M J JOHN T IDA M BURWOOD
This girl went to Queensland and married Thomas James BURNS in 1912;
Qld.bd&m MARRIAGES:
1912/C3004 Edmonds Rita Julia Madeline Burns Thomas James
Rita was buried at Karrakatta
CEMETERY RECORD: BURNS RITA MADELINE JULIA 43 years died 25 July 1935 PERTH

So I went back to the newspapers and have confirmed that Rita was indeed Rex's mother:-
The West Australian Friday 26 July 1935
DEATHS
BURNS. On July 25, at the Perth Hospital, Rita M. J., of 20 Adelaide-terrace, loving mother of Joyce, Audrey and Rex. Dearly loved.
BURNS. On July 25, 1985. at the Perth Hos pital, Rita Madeline Julia Burns, late of 30 Adelaide-terrace, East Perth, beloved sister of Gladys Evelyn (Mrs A. Cropper, Bayswater), and William Corcoran (Kilkenny, South Australia); aged 43 years.
FUNERAL
BURNS. The Friends of the late Mrs. Rita Madeline Julia Burns, late of 20 Adelaide terrace, East Perth, are respectfully informed that her remains will be interred in the Roman Catholic portion of the Karrakatta

Rita Madeline Julia Edmonds was the daughter of Ida Mary LOGAN b: 1870 in Ryde NSW and died in Perth WA on the 22 October 1933 Buried at Karrakatta Cemetary, Perth, before she died she was living at 15 Garret Road, Bayswater, WA Her profession was Nurse. Her parents were Ernest LOGAN and Julia Victoria SIMES.
She married 1. John Thomas EDMONDS b: 17 AUG 1870 in Beechworth, Victoria on the 2 January 1891 in Sydney.
Divorce July 14, 1897 Sydney. 2. Married William CORCORAN in 1915 in Perth WA.

Herald of the Morning

OF LIVERPOOL, built in 1855 at St. John New Brunswick. Captain G RUDOLPH, MASTER, BURTHEN 1291 TONS Surgeon onboard Dr. G.F.Hatch
Departing the PORT OF LIVERPOOL on the 10 March 1858, arriving in SYDNEY, NEW SOUTH WALES, 25TH JUNE 1858

IMMIGRANTS per ship HERALD OF THE MORNING- Notice is hereby given, that the undermentioned persons, for whom passages were provided to this colony. In pursuance of deposits made under the Remittance Regulations, have arrived in the ship Herald of the Morning, and that they will be prepared to join their friends, the single females from the Institution, Hyde Park Barracks on and after their arrival there, and the married families and single men from the ship, THIS DAY, at 4 p.m.The Sydney Morning Herald Friday 25 June 1858.

Crew
RUDOLPH G CAPTAIN
BROWN W CHIEF OFFICER 32 BRITISH
BLACK A 2ND OFFICER 29 BRITISH
GONDGE T 3RD OFFICER 21 US
CARLISLE A CARPENTER 26 BRITISH
MCBRIDE W CARPENTERS MATE 25 BRITISH
ROBINSON H BOATSWAIN 22 BRITISH
STEPHENSON W SAILS 22 BRITISH
MURRAY G J STEWARD 34 BRITISH
FLEMMING P COOK 32 BRITISH
MILLER F A. B. 28 BRITISH
NEWTON J A. B. 33 BRITISH
BROWN P A. B. 22 FOREIGN
MCFARLANE J A. B. 25 BRITISH
DAVIS J A. B. 24 BRITISH
WILLIAMS J A. B. 26 BRITISH
SMITH F A. B. 23 BRITISH
MCGEE A A. B. 23 BRITISH
WILLIAMS R A. B. 22 FOREIGN
MARRIER J A. B. 23 BRITISH
LAING J A. B. 28 BRITISH
RATCLIFFE W A. B. 23 BRITISH
FLEETWOOD E A. B. 27 BRITISH
WILSON J A. B. 22 BRITISH
ORR J A. B. 40 BRITISH
FRANK J A. B. 21 BRITISH
ANGEL H A. B. 26 BRITISH
ATKINSON J A. B. 23 BRITISH
WEST T A. B. 24 BRITISH
FREWIN D A. B. 28 BRITISH
JAGHAM J ORDY 22 BRITISH
MORGAN J ORDY 19 BRITISH
MARTIN T ORDY 20 BRITISH
JOHNSTON W ORDY 18 BRITISH
BURRY B BAKER 36 BRITISH
LEWIS T BOY 18 BRITISH
WILLIAMS E BOY 15 BRITISH
GEORGE J A. B. 30 FOREIGN
SEYLAND N A. B. 28 FOREIGN
CARTER P A. B. 32 BRITISH
OLIVER G A. B. 29 GREECE
ROWORTH W A. B. 28 BRITISH
GEORGE N A. B. 29 FOREIGN
GROSS N A. B. 27 FOREIGN
NICHOLOVICK J A. B. 26 FOREIGN
D'SILVA M A. B. 27 FOREIGN
JONES J A. B. 22 FOREIGN
BROWN J A. B. 33 BRITISH
CONNEL J A. B. 25 BRITISH
CONDERRY N A. B. 28 BRITISH
TEMPLETON B A. B. 22 BRITISH
FISHER J A. B. 20 BRITISH
SARAHAN J PASS COOK 55 BRITISH
SPERE W PASS COOK 35 BRITISH
WILDIE J ? ? BRITISH


Name of Immigrant. - From what county selected.
BECKLEY, John - Surrey
Sophia
Elizabeth,
Hannah
John T.
BONE. Robert - Middlesex
Sophia
Augusta
Robert W.
CAHILL, Thomas - Tipperary
Judy
Mary
CANE, Thomas - Surrey
Catherine
Catherine E.
Ann
DALY. Thomas - Clare
Bridget
DEVETT, John - Clare
Honora
DYNAN, Thomas - Clare
Mary
FADDEN, Richard - Mayo
Mary
Ellen
FLOOD, Thomas - Tipperary
Margaret
GIBBS, Thomas - Middlesex
Sophia
HAGERTY, James - Derry
Mary
John
Susan
Robert
HASWELL, Archibald - Surrey
Mary
HEAR. John - Down
Jane
John
Sarah
Ann
HEFFERNAN, Dennis - Tipperary
Mary
HILL, John - Queen's
Ellen
KIRK, Armour - Renfrew
Mary
Ann
LUMSDEN, John - Linlithgow
Ann
Elisabeth
John
Marion
PACKHAM, Richard - Kent
Mary
Horace
John
PEARCE, James - Middlesex
Anne
James C.
Henry J.
William T.
QUEAN, Patrick - Limerick
Judith
Thomas
William
Patrick
Johanna
REEDY, Thomas - Limerick
Johanna
Mary
Johanna
REGAN, John - Galway
Ann
Patrick
STAPLETON, Alfred - Middlesex
Louisa
Harriett
STEWART, James - Donegal
Catherine
James
WILLOUGHBY, Joseph - Sussex
Elizsbeth Jane
John
WRIGHT, Ephraim - Leicester
Martha
Alfred

ARDLAM, William - King's County
BALLINGER, Michael - Clare
BARNES, Elephteria - Surrey
BARRETT, William - Cork
BRENNAND, James - Mayo
BR?DY, John - Down
BR?DY, James - Down
BURKE. James - Tipperary
BURKE, Thomas - Mouth
BURKE, Ralph - Mouth
BUTLER. Richard - Tipperary
CARR, Edward - Tipperary
Clugston, Samuel - Armagh
CONNOLLY, Bartholomew - Galway
CONNOLLY, John - Galway
CORLEY, Patrick - Louth
CORBY, Francis - Louth
DALY, Michael - Clare
DOHERTY, Robert - Londonderry
DONAGHUE, Michael - Limerick
DUFFY, John - Clare
DUNN, John Tipperary
EGAN, John - Clare
ENRIGHT, John - Limerick
FADDEW, Edward - Lancaster
FENELY, James - Tipperary
FLANNERY. Patrick - Clare
FLOOD, Thomas - Tipperary
FLOOD, Patrick - Tipperary
FLYNN, John - Mayo
GLEESON, John - Tipperary
GRAHAM, Robert - Fermanagh
GRALTON, Cornelius - Mayo
GRALTON, Ann - Mayo
GROVER, George - Sussex
HAGARTY, Charles - Derry
HAGARTY, Richard - Derry
HANLIHAN, John - Kerry
HARTIGAN, James - Monaghan
HEAR, Hugh - Down
HICKEY, John - Clare
HIND, John - Clare
HUDSON, Michael - Kilkenny
HUDSON, James - Kilkenny
KEDDLE, William - Linlithgow
KENNA, Patrick - Queen's County
KENNA, Thomas - Queen's County
KEOGH, John - Clare
Knox, John - Wigton
LIMPHIER, Joseph - Tipperary
LINGARD, William - Tipperary
LITTLE, James - Dublin
LUMSDEN, Alexander - Linlithgow
Mc MULLEN, Charles - Antrim
MADDEN, Thomas - Mayo
MURPHY, Thomas - Cork
MURRAY, Stephen - Clare
MURRAY, James - Clare
NAY, Benjamin - Middlesex
NOONAN, John - Limerick
NOONEN, David - Limerick
O'BYRNE, Garrett - Wicklow
PACKHAM, William - Kent
QUIGLEY, John - Clare
REARDY, Patrick - Clare
REEDY, John - Limerick
REEDY, Thomas - Limerick
REEDY, James - Limerick
REYNOLDS. Martin - Clare
SMITH, Michael - Cavan
TAYLOR, John - Kilkenny
WALSH, Edmund - Clare
WOODLAND, John - Sligo
Ardlam Mary - Kings County

BALLINGER, Bridget - Clare
BALLINGER, Elisabeth - Clare
BARNES, Susannah - Surrey
BARNES, Julia - Surrey
BECKLEY, Laura - Surrey
BENTLEY, Eliza - Stafford
BENTLEY, Eliza Christian - Stafford
BRADY, Elizabeth - Down
BRYAN, Catherine - Tipperary
BURKE, Judy - Kilkenny
BUTLER, Mary - Tipperary
BUTLER, Margaret - Tipperary
BUTLER, Judith - Tipperary
CORLEY, Eliza - Louth
CORLEY, Margaret - Louth
CORLEY, Ellen - Louth
CUPPLES, Ann Eliza - Armagh
CUPPLES, John - Armagh
DALY, Ellen - Clare
DENAN, Bridget - Clare
FLANNERY, Susan - Clare
GEARY, Mary - Cork
GEARY, Bridget - Cork
GOULD, Ellen - Cork
SAUNDERS Marianne - Cork
HAGARTY, Susan - Derry
HARRIS, Harriet - Somerset
HARRIS, Anne - Somerset
HARRIS, Emma - Somerset
HARRIS, Henry - Somerset
HEAR, Jane - Down
HEAR, Elizabeth - Down
HEFFERNAN, Catherine - Tipperary
HEFFERNAN, Bridget - Tipperary
SHANNAHAN Patrick - Tipperary
HOGAN, Ann - Galway
HOGAN, Honorah - Tipperary
HUDSON, Mary - Kilkenny
HUGHES, Margaret - Monaghan
KEATING, Johanna - Tipperary
KIRK, Catherine - Renfrew
LELLIS, Mary - Galway
LOADER, Hannah - Surrey
LUMSDEN, Ann - Linlithgow
LUMSDEN, Agnes , j . -Linlithgow
M'CABE, Margaret - Monaghan
MADDEN, Honora - Lancaster
MOSS, Sarah - Tyrone
MOSS, Mary - Tyrone
MURPHY, Catherine - Cork
MURRAY, Honora - Tipperary
MURRAY, Bridget - Clare
MUSGRAVE, Catherine - Lancaster
MUSGRAVE, George K. - Lancaster
MUSGRAVE, John - Lancaster
MUSGRAVE, Agnes - Westmoreland
O'MARA, Bridget - Kilkenny
QUEAN, Mary - Limerick
QUEAN, Bridget - Limerick
QUEAN, Sarah - Limerick
QUIN, Johanna - Cork
REAVES, Elizabeth - Somerset
REAVES, Janet - Somerset
REDDY, Bridget - Limerick
REYNOLDS, Mary - Clare
ROYCE, Eliza - Lincolnshire
ROYCE, Martha - Lincolnshire
SHINE, Catherine - Athlone
SMITH, Elisabeth - Northampton
STEWART, Martha - Tyrone
SYMONS, Dorcas - Wilts
TAYLOR. Elisabeth - Kilkenny
WALPOLE, Ann - Kilkenny
WOODLAND, Ellen - Sligo.

H. H. BROWNE. Agent for Immigration. Government Immigration Office,
Sydney, 25th Jane, 1858.


This list is not a complete list of all who sailed on the Herald Of The Morning. This is the Agent's List which was published in the Sydney Morning Herald on arrival.

Below is the number onboard according to the official immigration list:-

Married Males 65
Married Females 65
Single Males 14 and upwards 113
Single Females 14 and upwards 118
Males 7-14 16
Females 7-14 10
Males 4-7 10
Females 4-7 11
Males 1-4 12
Females 1-4 22
Males under 1 year 1
Females under 1 year 4
Births on voyage 1 male 2 Female
Deaths on voyage 3 Male 3 Female

Source for Crew List Source: State Records Authority of New South Wales: Shipping Master's Office; Passengers Arriving 1855 - 1922; NRS13278, [X98-100] reel 406. Transcribed by Gloria Sheehan, 2005.
Source Citation: State Records Authority of New South Wales; Kingswood New South Wales, Australia; Persons on bounty ships to Sydney, Newcastle, and Moreton Bay (Board's Immigrant Lists); Series: 5317; Reel: 2477; New South Wales Government. Passengers arriving at Sydney 1846 (Agent's Immigrant Lists). Series 5326, Reel 2457. State Records Authority of New South Wales, Kingswood, New South Wales.
Source for Agents List The Sydney Morning Herald Friday 25 June 1858.
Transcribed by janilye, 2012




NOTE: The Herald of the Morning made a second voyage to Australia arriving in Hobson's Bay from Liverpool on 5 November 1859 with 419 government immigrants.
Ten days later, around midnight, whilst tied up at the dock she caught fire. Attempts to scuttle her by cutting holes in her bow were unsuccessful, so she was towed to Sandridge ( Port Melbourne) and left to burn. janilye


Mary Balderston

Do you ever wonder about places and things in time that could have changed your life.
Going through old newspapers, I often do.

This notice below made me think about Mary Balderston Mackenzie and wonder if she was ever found.

Did she or her children see it? Were they in New South Wales? Was she still alive? Did she die rich or poor?

The Sydney Morning Herald, Friday 5 December 1873
N O T I C E.
The late DAVID BALDERSTON, of 49, Regent street, Greenock, having, by his trust, disposition, and settlement, left a LEGACY to Mrs. MARY BALDERSTON, or MACKENZIE, his Sister. Widow of WILLIAM MACKENZIE, sometime Blacksmith in Glasgow, who left Scotland many years ago, and failing her, to her children. Notice is hereby given, that the said Mrs. Mary Balderston, or Mackenzie, if alive or if dead, her children : are required to claim the said bequest, and to establish their right thereto within two years from the 24th day of February, 1873, the date of the said David Balderston's death, and that if she or they fail to do so, Mr. Balderaton's trustees will proceed to pay over the said legacy to the other residuary legatees, as directed by the said trust, disposition, and settlement, and codicils thereto.
Communications on the subject to be addressed to JOHN MACDONALD, Solicitor, Mansion House, Greenock, Scotland.

With all the clues above and with what's available online today we could probably find this family in two shakes of a lamb's tail.. unless

1 comment(s), latest 2 years, 5 months ago

Coffs Harbour Historic Cemetery

Coffs Harbour Historic Cemetery
Address: Coff Street, Coffs Harbour
and
Coffs Harbour Lawn Cemetery
Also known as Karangi Lawn.
Address: Coramba Road, Karangi, New South Wales, Australia



Note: A spate of thefts of bronze plaques from cemeteries in this region was reported in July 2011.
Thieves, when removing the markers, have also caused damage to the stones on which they were mounted.
If you have family graves in the Coffs Harbour cemetery, and you have not already checked, it is advisable that you check on their integrity.


More information
Coffs Harbour Lawn Cemetery is administered by Coffs Harbour City Council. For further information, contact Council at Locked Bag 155, Coffs Harbour NSW 2450; phone 02 6648 4000; email: coffs.council@chcc.nsw.gov.au


2 comment(s), latest 2 years, 5 months ago

Westmoreland passenger list

The 405 tons barque Westmoreland left Downs on the 8 January 1833 and arrived in Sydney Cove on the 19 May 1833 under Captain Brigstock.

Stephen John, Esq sh:163
Stephen Mrs and 2 children sh:163
Wilson Mr sh:163
Wilson Mrs sh:163
Carlysle William, Esq sh:163
Christopherson Mrs sh:163
Hamilton Miss sh:163
Beaver George, Mr sh:163
Beaver Elizabeth, Mrs and an infant born on the voyage sh:163
Beaver Francis sh:163
Beaver William sh:163
Beaver Emily sh:163
Beaver George sh:163
Trodd Able, Mr sh:163
Trodd Amy, Mrs sh:163
Trodd Mary Ann sh:163
Hillary J, Mr sh:163
Hillary Thomas, Mr sh:163
Robertson Henry, Mr sh:163
Robertson Harriett, Mrs sh:163
Robertson Henry sh:163
Robertson Harriett sh:163
Robertson Anna sh:163
Marshall James, Mr sh:163
Greenfield S, Mr sh:163
Uhr J, Mr sh:163
Longeville J H, Mr professor of languages sh:163
Nash H, Miss sh:163
Affrait L, Miss sh:163
Barnet F, Miss sh:163
Robinson T, Mr sh:163
Robinson C, Mrs sh:163
Chapman C, Mr sh:163
Chapman C, Mrs sh:163
Chapman C J sh:163
Chapman J M sh:163
Chapman J K sh:163
Grose W, Mr painter sh:163
Grose M, Mrs sh:163
Grose Alfred sh:163
Grose Henry sh:163
Phillips B A, Mr sh:163
Phillips Celeria sh:163
Phillips Charles sh:163
Phillips Alexander sh:163
Phillips Anna sh:163
Phillips Michael sh:163
Phillips Samuel sh:163
Phillips Sarah sh:163
Phillips Jacob sh:163
Phillips Rosa sh:163
Levien S, Mr sh:163
Levien H, Mrs sh:163
Levien Alfred sh:163
Levien George sh:163
Levien Annette sh:163
Levien Henrietta sh:163
Levien Matilda sh:163
Asser A, Miss

Australians as America saw us in 1942

Nothing like coming here prepared!

AUSTRALIANS AS AMERICANS SEE THEM
"An Outdoors People;Breezy, Democratic"
WASHINGTON, Sunday, 25 October 1942 AAP


["You will find Australians an outdoors people, breezy, very democratic, with no respect for stuffed shirts their own or anyone else's," says a pocket guide on Australia which is being distributed among American troops.

Issued by US War and Navy departments, the booklet states that Australians have much in common with Americans. They are a pioneer people, they believe in personal freedom, and they love sports.

"There is one thing to get straight right off the bat," the booklet says. "You are not in Australia to save a helpless people from the savage Japanese. Recently in a Sydney bar an American soldier turned to an Australian and said, 'Well, Aussie, you can go home now. We've come over to save you.' The Aussie cracked back, 'Have you? I thought you were a refugee from Pearl Harbour.'
Being simple, direct and tough, the Digger is often confused and nonplussed by the manners of Americans' in mixed company; or even in camp. To him those many 'Thank you's" Americans use are a bit too dignifled.

You might get annoyed, at the blue laws which make Australian cities pretty dull places on Sundays.
For all their breezieness Australians do not go in for drinking or woopitching in public, especially on Sunday.

In Australia, the national game is cricket, but they, have another game called Australian rules football.
It is rough, tough, and exciting. There are a lot of rules, which the referee carries in a rule book the size of Webster's dictionary. The game creates the desire on the part of the crowd to tear someone apart. The referees in some parks have runways covered over so that they can escape intact after a game.

As one newspaper correspondent says, Americans and Australians are 2 of the greatest gambling people on earth. It has been said of Australians that if a couple in a bar have not anything else to bet on they will lay odds on which of 2 flies rise first from the bar.
Aussies do not fight out of textbooks. They are resourceful, inventive soldiers with plenty of intiative.
The Australian habit of pronouncing "a" as "I" is pointed out, and an example quoted: "The trine is lite to-di." The booklet includes "Waltzing Matilda" in full."]

I don't know about the too many thank-yous. It would seem that the Australian girls liked it, for 10,000 Aussie brides returned to America with these well heeled, well mannered and certainly well informed troops.


1 comment(s), latest 2 years, 6 months ago

Hawkesbury Settlers Welcome Governor Macquarie 1810

There is no doubt, that the establishment of the township of Windsor, was, certainly, a notable event in the early history of New South Wales. The following article, refers to some of the circumstances relative to the foundation of that town.



The Hawkesbury River was discovered during the governorship of Captain Phillip, and the first settlement was made on its banks, in the year 1794. Up to the year 1810, the spot now occupied by the town of Windsor, was known as The Green Hills. From the time of the first settlement on the Hawkesbury, down to the arrival of Governor Macquarie in the colony, frequent floods had devastated the homes, farms, and crops of the colonists settled there. Shortly after Governor Macquarie entered upon his Government, he recognized the importance of the Hawkesbury district as "the granary of the colony," and decided, that some effort should be immediately made to protect, as far as possible, the homes, farms, and crops, of the settlers. Accordingly "in order to guard as far as human foresight could against such calamities," he decided to fix upon several sites where townships could be erected, which would be high and dry during flood time. He chose, among other places, the site upon which the town of Windsor now stands, and granted allotments of land in the newly-formed township to those settlers whose farms were so situated as to come within the influence of the waters of the Hawkesbury during an inundation.
These grants of land within the town were made an 'inseparable part' of those farms with out the town which were esposed to the ravages of the floods. Therefore, those town grants could not be disposed of or sold as separate properties.
The allotment of land given to each settler was proportioned to the size of his farm, and was given to him as a place of refuge for his family, his crops, and his stock; and he was expected to erect thereon a house, a corn yard, and a stockyard. It was decreed that those persons who thus obtained land under the foregoing provisions should build their houses either of brick or weatherboard ; and it was also necessary that every house so built should have a brick chimney and a shingle roof. No house was to be built lower than nine feet high, and each settler had to lodge a plan of his building with the district constable. To give the settlers in the vicinity some place of refuge during flood time, therefore, was the direct cause of the establishment of the town of Windsor
The Hawkesbury settlers from time immemorial have always been loyal subjects.
Even so far back as Governor Bligh's time, when the military deposed Bligh, the Hawkesbury settlers, almost to a man, remained loyal to him.
Bligh stated at the trial of Major Johnston, in England, that had he been able to escape from Sydney to the Hawkesbury, he would have been safe from the attacks of his enemies.
It was natural that after the appointment of a new Governor (Macquarie), the Hawkesbury settlers should exhibit the same loyalty to Bligh's successor, and this feeling was warmly continued throughout the long period of Macquarie's governorship,

The following is from the records, and whilst exhibiting loyalty, at the same time shows
the high opinion the settlers had of William Cox, the founder of the well-known family of that name, and, what is still more interesting, gives the names of the pioneer Hawkesbury settlers who helped to develop the resources, not only of this grand district, but of the then unknown interior.
Many, of their names are familiar to us, and descendents of some are still with us.
Quite an interesting chapter could be written of these old identities would time and space permit.
However, it is interesting to keep a record of the names of these pioneers who first, with axe and fire, prepared the way for agriculture, making the Hawkesbury the first granary of the colony, from which all its food supplies came.

It should. be remembered that only 16 years prior to the address being handed Macquarie,
Governor Phillip had placed the first Hawkesbury settlers - 22 in number on the banks of the Hawkesbury and at the mouth of South Creek.

Strange to say, none of the first settlers' names appear on the address.

HAWKESBURY SETTLERS' ADDRESS.

The following address from the settlers of the Hawkesbnry was presented on the
1st instant (Dec. 1810) to His Excellency the Governor Macquarie at Windsor (formerly the Green Hills),
by Thomas Arndell, Esq.

"1st December, 1810.
We, the undersigned settlers, residents of the Hawkesbuiy and its. vicinity, beg
leave respectfully to congratulate your Excellency on your arrival at this settlement,
and earnestly hope your Excellency will be pleased with the agricultural improvements and
industry that prevails here, and trust that the continuance of our exertions
Will ever merit your Excellency's approbation. We also beg leave to return our unfeigned thanks
for your Excellency's recent appointment of William Cox, Esq., as a magistrate at this
place-a gentleman who for many years has resided among us, possessing our esteem and confidence,
who, from his local knowledge of this settlement, combined with his many other good qualities,
will, we are convinced, promote your Excellency's benign intention of distributing justice and
happiness to all.

-Thomas Arndell,Thomas Hobby, Benjamin Carver, George Hall, Lawrence May, Robert Masters,
James Richards, Henry Baldwin, Paul Bushell, Robert Farlow, William Baker, John Yoel,
Thos. Matcham Pitt, James Blackman, John Merritt, John Cobcroft, John Gregory, Richard Norris,
William Heydon, Thomas Hampson, Daniel McKay, Daniel Fane, John Lyoner, Henry Murray,
John Jones, James Milaman, R. Fitzgerald, John Stevenson, Robert Wilson, Jonathan Griffiths,
Elizabeth Earl, G. Evans, John Bowman, Hugh Devlin, John Watts, William Eaton, David Bell,
James Welsh, Patrick Closhel, William Carlisle, Thomas Gordon, Caleb Wilson, Thomas Markwell,
Thomas Winston, William Baxter, Thomas Hagger, John Baylis, Donald Kennedy, Patrick Murphy,
Owen Tierney, William Shaw, John Dight, Roger Connor, Matthew Lock, Edward Pugh, William Small,
James Wall, William Faithful, William Simpson, Thomas Arkell, Charles Palmer, Thomas Weyham,
Elias Bishop, Thomas Spencer, Joseph McCoulding, Benjamin Baits, John Ryan. Robert Smith,
Paul Randall, John Wild, Benjamin South, William Etrel, Henry Lamb, Martin Mentz, Robert Guy,
John Harris, Thomas Cheshire, Stephen Smith, Thomas Lambley, Edward Field, Rowland Edwards,
George Collis, James Portsmouth, Pierce Collett, Jacob Russell, Thomas Appledore, William Dye,
R. Carr, John Leese, Thomas Cowling, John Embrey, John Benson, John Boulton, William Ezzy.


To which His Excellency, in a letter, on 5th December, 1810, was pleased to make the following answer.

Sir,-I beg you will make known to those respectable settlers of the Hawkesbury who signed the
address presented by you to me that I am much pleased with the sentiments it conveys,
and to assure them that it will always be an object of the greatest interest to me to promote
their prosperity by every means in my power. With this view I have fixed on ground for your
different townships (Windsor, Richmond, Wilberforce, Pitt Town) for the accommodation of
the settlers who have suffered so severely by the floods of the river; and by a
speedy removal to those situations of security, I hope they will enjoy the fruits
of that labor which, I am happy to observe, promises this season to be rewarded;
with one of the finest crops I ever beheld in any country.
I hope on my return to this part of the colony to find the new habitations built on an
improved and enlarged plan to those hitherto erected on the banks of the Hawkesbury.
I am very glad to find that my appointment of Mr.Cox has met with the satisfaction of
the settlers, and I have every reason to believe that he will fulfil the duties of his
office so as to gain the goodwill of all.
-I have, etc.,
LACHLAN MACQUARIE.

Macquarie foresaw shortly after his arrival in the colony, that it was immediately necessary to assist the settlers to ensure regular supplies of food; it was a fortunate thing for Australia that they were assisted and encouraged by him at that period, for as the Hawkesbury district was the ' granary of the colony,' it is morally certain, that the destruction, by floods, of homes and farms, stocks and crops, would have precipitated famines, similar in nature, to that experienced at Port Jackson in 1792. The recurrence, of these famines must have impeded the progress of the colony. If, then, the progress of the colony had, at that time, been retarded, the opening up of Australia would never have proceeded so rapidly as it did. Therefore, in referring to the first days of Windsor, it will be seen, that the circumstances surrounding its foundation, not only proves Macquarie a prudent man, but also shows us that the Hawkesbury settlers, by supplying the colony with the means of its existence food helped very materially to promote the rapid growth of English colonization in Australia.




NOTE:
William Cox was appointed Magistrate after the death of Andrew Thompson.

Sources:
Yeldap
Frank J. Brewer,1905
Windsor and Richmond Gazette
Windsor, NSW :1902-1945)
Friday 16 October 1903 Page 9
Transcription, Janilye, 2012


Florentia to Adelaide 1849

The 453 tons barque Florentia left Gravesend on 18 February 1849 then left Plymouth om the 9 March 1849 and arrived in Adelaide on the 20 June 1849 under Captain C.S.Tindale carrying 238 Emigrants.

Thomas Parr, Esq., Surgeon Superintendent, in the cabin ;
Julia,Harriet,and Emma Chisholm Sarah Leigh, Eliza Frogget,Emma Jones, Amelia Fryram, Martha. Eliza, and Esther Burnell, Sarah Wiggins, S. A. Wainright, Jane Benham, Emma Griffin, Susan Kingham, Margaret Slaughter Eliza Fawn, Jane Barnes, Grace and Barbara Foulds, Hester French, Jane Mustor, Harriet Webber, Anne Petello, Elizabeth, Mary Anne, Eliza, and Jane Bastian, Eliza Warring, Eliza Dwyre, Jane Greenlees, Sarah Weir, Amy Annison, Maria Lower, Hannah Peters, Susan Walters Biddy Plunker, R. Mortime, Caroline Parkes Mary Grace, Margaret Davis. Mary Black, Mary Oney, and Catherine White, Margaret and Biddy Hahir,Aaron Lock and wife, Robert Worn and wife, James Chislem and wife, W. Tilney, wife and four children. Wm. Howell wife and two children. George Hall, wife and five children, W. Elliott, wife and child, Charles Seaward and wife John Emonson and wife, Jame Guppy and wife Wm. Hayward, wife and three children, John Burnell and four children, James Williams, wife and three children, John Higgs, wife and three children. Robt. Shepherdson, wife and six children. W. Millhouse, wife and child, W. Tothill, wife and four children, William Pearce, wife and two children, Matthew Slaughter, wife and three children, H. Hiff and wife, W Lane, wife and two children, Samuel Mudge, wife and six children Patrick White and wife.Isaac Glenny and wife James Patterson and wife, John Miller and wife W. Wilton, wife and three children John Slee and wife, W. Kerswell, wife and child, P. A. Lehoe and wife, W. Webb, wife and five children, Thos Pollard, wife and six children, Henry Bastian wife and four children, W. Foulds, wife and two children, John Mills, wife and three children, Sam Mackey, wife and child, James Caldwell, wife and four children, Richard Mortimer, wife and four children, A. Webb, Thomas Lawton, George Burnell, John Foulds, Charles Totman, George Moss, W. Tunly, S. Davis, John Hogarth, Wm. Elson, George Hornes. David and George Pink Thomas and John White, John Hahir, J. Guerin James Kennedy, Thomas and R. Lane, B Nevill Benjamin Randell, R. Thackly, Thomas Row John Fowler, John Worn, Walter Fisher, John Foley, James Roberts, John Williams.

Eight births and three deaths during the voyage.

3 comment(s), latest 2 years, 6 months ago