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Hawkesbury Settlers Welcome Governor Macquarie 1810

There is no doubt, that the establishment of the township of Windsor, was, certainly, a notable event in the early history of New South Wales. The following article, refers to some of the circumstances relative to the foundation of that town.



The Hawkesbury River was discovered during the governorship of Captain Phillip, and the first settlement was made on its banks, in the year 1794. Up to the year 1810, the spot now occupied by the town of Windsor, was known as The Green Hills. From the time of the first settlement on the Hawkesbury, down to the arrival of Governor Macquarie in the colony, frequent floods had devastated the homes, farms, and crops of the colonists settled there. Shortly after Governor Macquarie entered upon his Government, he recognized the importance of the Hawkesbury district as "the granary of the colony," and decided, that some effort should be immediately made to protect, as far as possible, the homes, farms, and crops, of the settlers. Accordingly "in order to guard as far as human foresight could against such calamities," he decided to fix upon several sites where townships could be erected, which would be high and dry during flood time. He chose, among other places, the site upon which the town of Windsor now stands, and granted allotments of land in the newly-formed township to those settlers whose farms were so situated as to come within the influence of the waters of the Hawkesbury during an inundation.
These grants of land within the town were made an 'inseparable part' of those farms with out the town which were esposed to the ravages of the floods. Therefore, those town grants could not be disposed of or sold as separate properties.
The allotment of land given to each settler was proportioned to the size of his farm, and was given to him as a place of refuge for his family, his crops, and his stock; and he was expected to erect thereon a house, a corn yard, and a stockyard. It was decreed that those persons who thus obtained land under the foregoing provisions should build their houses either of brick or weatherboard ; and it was also necessary that every house so built should have a brick chimney and a shingle roof. No house was to be built lower than nine feet high, and each settler had to lodge a plan of his building with the district constable. To give the settlers in the vicinity some place of refuge during flood time, therefore, was the direct cause of the establishment of the town of Windsor
The Hawkesbury settlers from time immemorial have always been loyal subjects.
Even so far back as Governor Bligh's time, when the military deposed Bligh, the Hawkesbury settlers, almost to a man, remained loyal to him.
Bligh stated at the trial of Major Johnston, in England, that had he been able to escape from Sydney to the Hawkesbury, he would have been safe from the attacks of his enemies.
It was natural that after the appointment of a new Governor (Macquarie), the Hawkesbury settlers should exhibit the same loyalty to Bligh's successor, and this feeling was warmly continued throughout the long period of Macquarie's governorship,

The following is from the records, and whilst exhibiting loyalty, at the same time shows
the high opinion the settlers had of William Cox, the founder of the well-known family of that name, and, what is still more interesting, gives the names of the pioneer Hawkesbury settlers who helped to develop the resources, not only of this grand district, but of the then unknown interior.
Many, of their names are familiar to us, and descendents of some are still with us.
Quite an interesting chapter could be written of these old identities would time and space permit.
However, it is interesting to keep a record of the names of these pioneers who first, with axe and fire, prepared the way for agriculture, making the Hawkesbury the first granary of the colony, from which all its food supplies came.

It should. be remembered that only 16 years prior to the address being handed Macquarie,
Governor Phillip had placed the first Hawkesbury settlers - 22 in number on the banks of the Hawkesbury and at the mouth of South Creek.

Strange to say, none of the first settlers' names appear on the address.

HAWKESBURY SETTLERS' ADDRESS.

The following address from the settlers of the Hawkesbnry was presented on the
1st instant (Dec. 1810) to His Excellency the Governor Macquarie at Windsor (formerly the Green Hills),
by Thomas Arndell, Esq.

"1st December, 1810.
We, the undersigned settlers, residents of the Hawkesbuiy and its. vicinity, beg
leave respectfully to congratulate your Excellency on your arrival at this settlement,
and earnestly hope your Excellency will be pleased with the agricultural improvements and
industry that prevails here, and trust that the continuance of our exertions
Will ever merit your Excellency's approbation. We also beg leave to return our unfeigned thanks
for your Excellency's recent appointment of William Cox, Esq., as a magistrate at this
place-a gentleman who for many years has resided among us, possessing our esteem and confidence,
who, from his local knowledge of this settlement, combined with his many other good qualities,
will, we are convinced, promote your Excellency's benign intention of distributing justice and
happiness to all.

-Thomas Arndell,Thomas Hobby, Benjamin Carver, George Hall, Lawrence May, Robert Masters,
James Richards, Henry Baldwin, Paul Bushell, Robert Farlow, William Baker, John Yoel,
Thos. Matcham Pitt, James Blackman, John Merritt, John Cobcroft, John Gregory, Richard Norris,
William Heydon, Thomas Hampson, Daniel McKay, Daniel Fane, John Lyoner, Henry Murray,
John Jones, James Milaman, R. Fitzgerald, John Stevenson, Robert Wilson, Jonathan Griffiths,
Elizabeth Earl, G. Evans, John Bowman, Hugh Devlin, John Watts, William Eaton, David Bell,
James Welsh, Patrick Closhel, William Carlisle, Thomas Gordon, Caleb Wilson, Thomas Markwell,
Thomas Winston, William Baxter, Thomas Hagger, John Baylis, Donald Kennedy, Patrick Murphy,
Owen Tierney, William Shaw, John Dight, Roger Connor, Matthew Lock, Edward Pugh, William Small,
James Wall, William Faithful, William Simpson, Thomas Arkell, Charles Palmer, Thomas Weyham,
Elias Bishop, Thomas Spencer, Joseph McCoulding, Benjamin Baits, John Ryan. Robert Smith,
Paul Randall, John Wild, Benjamin South, William Etrel, Henry Lamb, Martin Mentz, Robert Guy,
John Harris, Thomas Cheshire, Stephen Smith, Thomas Lambley, Edward Field, Rowland Edwards,
George Collis, James Portsmouth, Pierce Collett, Jacob Russell, Thomas Appledore, William Dye,
R. Carr, John Leese, Thomas Cowling, John Embrey, John Benson, John Boulton, William Ezzy.


To which His Excellency, in a letter, on 5th December, 1810, was pleased to make the following answer.

Sir,-I beg you will make known to those respectable settlers of the Hawkesbury who signed the
address presented by you to me that I am much pleased with the sentiments it conveys,
and to assure them that it will always be an object of the greatest interest to me to promote
their prosperity by every means in my power. With this view I have fixed on ground for your
different townships (Windsor, Richmond, Wilberforce, Pitt Town) for the accommodation of
the settlers who have suffered so severely by the floods of the river; and by a
speedy removal to those situations of security, I hope they will enjoy the fruits
of that labor which, I am happy to observe, promises this season to be rewarded;
with one of the finest crops I ever beheld in any country.
I hope on my return to this part of the colony to find the new habitations built on an
improved and enlarged plan to those hitherto erected on the banks of the Hawkesbury.
I am very glad to find that my appointment of Mr.Cox has met with the satisfaction of
the settlers, and I have every reason to believe that he will fulfil the duties of his
office so as to gain the goodwill of all.
-I have, etc.,
LACHLAN MACQUARIE.

Macquarie foresaw shortly after his arrival in the colony, that it was immediately necessary to assist the settlers to ensure regular supplies of food; it was a fortunate thing for Australia that they were assisted and encouraged by him at that period, for as the Hawkesbury district was the ' granary of the colony,' it is morally certain, that the destruction, by floods, of homes and farms, stocks and crops, would have precipitated famines, similar in nature, to that experienced at Port Jackson in 1792. The recurrence, of these famines must have impeded the progress of the colony. If, then, the progress of the colony had, at that time, been retarded, the opening up of Australia would never have proceeded so rapidly as it did. Therefore, in referring to the first days of Windsor, it will be seen, that the circumstances surrounding its foundation, not only proves Macquarie a prudent man, but also shows us that the Hawkesbury settlers, by supplying the colony with the means of its existence food helped very materially to promote the rapid growth of English colonization in Australia.




NOTE:
William Cox was appointed Magistrate after the death of Andrew Thompson.

Sources:
Yeldap
Frank J. Brewer,1905
Windsor and Richmond Gazette
Windsor, NSW :1902-1945)
Friday 16 October 1903 Page 9
Transcription, Janilye, 2012


Florentia to Adelaide 1849

The 453 tons barque Florentia left Gravesend on 18 February 1849 then left Plymouth om the 9 March 1849 and arrived in Adelaide on the 20 June 1849 under Captain C.S.Tindale carrying 238 Emigrants.

Thomas Parr, Esq., Surgeon Superintendent, in the cabin ;
Julia,Harriet,and Emma Chisholm Sarah Leigh, Eliza Frogget,Emma Jones, Amelia Fryram, Martha. Eliza, and Esther Burnell, Sarah Wiggins, S. A. Wainright, Jane Benham, Emma Griffin, Susan Kingham, Margaret Slaughter Eliza Fawn, Jane Barnes, Grace and Barbara Foulds, Hester French, Jane Mustor, Harriet Webber, Anne Petello, Elizabeth, Mary Anne, Eliza, and Jane Bastian, Eliza Warring, Eliza Dwyre, Jane Greenlees, Sarah Weir, Amy Annison, Maria Lower, Hannah Peters, Susan Walters Biddy Plunker, R. Mortime, Caroline Parkes Mary Grace, Margaret Davis. Mary Black, Mary Oney, and Catherine White, Margaret and Biddy Hahir,Aaron Lock and wife, Robert Worn and wife, James Chislem and wife, W. Tilney, wife and four children. Wm. Howell wife and two children. George Hall, wife and five children, W. Elliott, wife and child, Charles Seaward and wife John Emonson and wife, Jame Guppy and wife Wm. Hayward, wife and three children, John Burnell and four children, James Williams, wife and three children, John Higgs, wife and three children. Robt. Shepherdson, wife and six children. W. Millhouse, wife and child, W. Tothill, wife and four children, William Pearce, wife and two children, Matthew Slaughter, wife and three children, H. Hiff and wife, W Lane, wife and two children, Samuel Mudge, wife and six children Patrick White and wife.Isaac Glenny and wife James Patterson and wife, John Miller and wife W. Wilton, wife and three children John Slee and wife, W. Kerswell, wife and child, P. A. Lehoe and wife, W. Webb, wife and five children, Thos Pollard, wife and six children, Henry Bastian wife and four children, W. Foulds, wife and two children, John Mills, wife and three children, Sam Mackey, wife and child, James Caldwell, wife and four children, Richard Mortimer, wife and four children, A. Webb, Thomas Lawton, George Burnell, John Foulds, Charles Totman, George Moss, W. Tunly, S. Davis, John Hogarth, Wm. Elson, George Hornes. David and George Pink Thomas and John White, John Hahir, J. Guerin James Kennedy, Thomas and R. Lane, B Nevill Benjamin Randell, R. Thackly, Thomas Row John Fowler, John Worn, Walter Fisher, John Foley, James Roberts, John Williams.

Eight births and three deaths during the voyage.

3 comment(s), latest 2 years, 3 months ago

Posthumous to Adelaide 1849

The 390 tons barque Posthumous left Plymouth on 13 March 1849 and arrived in Adelaide on 20 June 1849 under the guidance of Captain Davison and carrying 157 Passengers.

Passengers : Messrs. F and E. Duffield, J. Parr, W. Colman, and Mrs Colman and child, Mr Atatyar, Mr Darwent, and Mr E. R. Bower, surgeon superintendent, in the cabin ;

Messrs Nelson de Coursey, C. Schwabe, G. E. Bowley, and J. Clearson in the intermediate;

Ewart Mehruta, B. Edmondson, Mr Williams, F. Federel, J. Watkinson, Alfred Watkinson, Wm. Watkinson, Wm. Matts, Edwin Laff, Henry Laff, Wm. Edwards, wife and child, Sarah Tiffen, Josh. Betts, John Miskin, Henry James, James King, Louis Alex. Perdusal, Charlotte A. Bull Bryant, Wm. Harris, Charles Crawford, G. C. Foat, John Papple, Chas. Rooks, Josh. Wicker, Ann, Nehemiah, Josh., Alfred, and Henry Wicker, G. Wicker, infant, Jas. Fielder, Mary Fielder, Frances Hall, Eliz. Beechin, Harriet Beechin, G. Hamlin, J. Salmon, Henry Heath, S. Baird, J. Botterell, M. Baird, Walter Scott, T. Noble, J. Clarke, W. Ramsdedn, T. Evans, J. Neates, Josiah Oldfield, E. Bryant, Eliza Ann, Eliz. Jane, T. Frances, and W. C. Bryant, infant. W. Lewellen, John Edwin Smyth, W., and Mary, Emma Maslin, Eleanor, Harriet, Mary Hannah, John, Susannah, W. and Martha Cook, C. Hodson, T. Hall, wife and seven children, R. M. Wray, T. Hopkinson, R Walker Emma, Sea, Mary Ann G. Hoye, Rosina Gale, Mrs Biggs, Sarah Taylor, John, Geo., Mary Ann, Eliza, Susan, and Margaret Murray, James Jordon, wife and three children, J. Treeman Notts, wife and two children, J. J. Walker, Wm. Southgate, Henry Elborough, Sarah Elborough, J. Hammon, R. G. Dur ham, wife and six children, Susan Duncan, Susan Duncan, Walter Ransome, S. B. Pitt, C. Webb Sarah Webb, Henry, Rebecca, Eliza, and Frances Baker, Alex. Wood, Wm. Andrew, Eliz. Colts, Ulrich Spikly, Alex. Sim, John, Susan, Eliz. and Emma Harvey, Alex.J.L.F.Chanmout, Wm. Braceide and wife, Miss Morris and child, Mr Morris, wife and son Louisa Ransome, Louisa Chalmers, Wm. Akhurst wife and infant, James Coumbe, wife and six children, David Wheeler and wife, Augustus Raymond and wife, Henry, Mary Ann, Henry, Kate, Geo. and Mary Ann Gove, infant, Robt. Thompson, wife and three children, Alex. Anderson, Mr Moyle, wife and three children, Jean F. Amiet, and Louis Amiet, in the steerage.

The Phoenix to Hobart 1825

The ship 'Phoenix', under the guidance of Captain Francis Dixon, left Downs on the 16 September 1824, touched at the Cape of Good Hope, where she remained for a week and arrived in Hobart on Wednesday the 25th.January 1825 with 76 passengers (including children) and merchandize.

The passengers were:

Cabin:

Mrs. Dixon and infant, Dudley Ferriday, Esq., Captain and Mrs. Pike, Miss Pike, Mr. and Mrs. Gough and 3 children, Mrs. and Miss Blachford, Mr. and Mrs. Bignal and 2 children, Mrs. and Miss Clark, Mrs. Johnson and 3 children, Mrs. Landsell and 2 children, Mrs. Dalrymple, Mr. Hill, Mr. G. Ives, S. R. A. Architect, Mr. Redfern and son, and Mr. Griffiths, surgeon of the ship.

Steerage:

Mrs. Scromartie and 2 children, Mr. and Mrs. Fox, Mr. and Mrs. Horsden and 4 children, Mrs. English and son, Mr. and Mrs. Mannington and 2 children, Mrs. Rawlins and child, Miss Ann Bolton, Mrs. Rowe, Mr. and Mrs. Appleton and 2 children, Mr. and Mrs.Watchorn and 4 children, Mr. and Mrs. Chapman and 3 children, Mr. Morgan, Mr. Addison, Mr. H. Addison, Mr. Henderson, Mr. J. Crouch, Bridget Dunn, Charles Radcliffe, John Medhurst, Thomas Bolton,and Samuel Cox.



Also onboard the Phoenix were a considerable number of Merino sheep of the purest breed;some of which were destined for New South Wales.
Those for Hobart Town were from the flock of C. C. WESTERN, Esq. M. P. for Essex, a Gentleman who had already much benefited the Island by previous shipments of his sheep.-Fifteen of them were consigned for W. A. BETHUNE, Esq. and nine for JAMES GRANT, Esq., four having died on the passage.


source:
Hobart Town Gazette and Van Diemens Land Advertiser
Friday 28 January 1825



Are you looking for your Tasmanian immigrant ?
Meryl Yost of Launceston is co-ordinator of this AUS-Tasmanian Genealogy Mailing List


Burlington to Adelaide 1865

LIST OF PASSENGERS TO ADELAIDE PER SHIP BURLINGTON.

from London via Plymouth to Port Adelaide 2nd May 1865

The ship Burlington, Captain Ellis, which sailed from Plymouth on the 4th January, with 281 immigrants, under the charge of Dr. Gregory. Surgeon-Superintendent, arrived at a late hour on
Tuesday night, after a passage of 118 days.

Sub-joined are the names of the immigrants, together with their industrial and national classifications:

English
Thomas, Emma, and Thomas Allen, Thomas Amos, W. James Andrews, George, Mary, George, and James Barrow, William H. Bedella, Elizabeth Bedella, Rd. and Susan Bennett, Eli Billingham, Elizabeth Blake, Amelia Blake, Mary Botting, Richard Brookes, Harriet Brown, James Coad, John, Hannah, John W., and Wm. F. Cogan, Mich. Cullings, Ellen Cooper, James Cornish, John Crothery, George and Annie Crump, Charles, Mary, John, Henry, James, Elizabeth, and Eliza Crump, John Doyle, Catherine and Thomas Driscoll, William Driscoll, June Edwards, Sarah Faulkener, Georgina Gabb, Richard and Ellen Gill, John and Augusta Groves, Fred. Hamblin, Ann Hayes, William Herring, James and Sarah Hicks, Stephen Hill, William, Ann, and Mary Hocking. John Hogan, James Holby, William Hooker., James Hulbard, Charles Hyde, John James, John Job, Edwin Juliffe, Hugh Kent, William King, Robert and Richard Kittoe, Edwin Lamming, Sarah Langley, James Letcher, Albert McDonald, Joseph and James Maddren, George Mapstone, Mary Mankelord, George and Thomas Martin. Thomas and Samuel May, Andrew Maney, James Mellen, Elizabeth Mitchell, George Morgan, Stephen, Margaret, May, Annie, William H., and Jane Moyle, Charles Mutton, William Nancarrow, Richard, John, Elizabeth, James, and Edward Nettell, Jeremiah Nicholas, May, David, Sarah. George, Ellis, Catherine, Bertha, and Ada Norman. William Parsons, Charles C., Grace. Joseph, and John Pascoe, Abel and Ellen Pattermore, Elizabeth Paull, David and Matilda Pickett, Ann, Catherine, James, and Grace Richards, Martha, James, Ellen, and Julia Rimer, Eliza Ror, John and Jane Roskilly. Elizabeth Roskrow, Emily and Nathaniel Rouse, John, Catherine, Elizabeth, Joseph, and Thomas Rule, William and Mary Simmons, Harry Smith, Elizabeth Soames, Lavinia Sparman, Thomas Spillett, William Staff. Joseph and Nathaniel Stephens, Louisa and Charlotte Stoddard, Louisa, Jane, and George Stoddard, Thomas and Jane Stom, William, Julia, Mary, and Elizabeth Symons, John Thomas. Nicholas, Mary Jane, Nicholas, and Mary Thomas, Alice Thomas, Reuben, Mary Ann, and Louisa Toms, William and Susan Touten. Richard and Thos. Trembak, Nathaniel Trescowthick. Humphry, Eliza, and Richard Trounce. Mark. Jessie. Edwin, and Laban Wake, William, Rachel, John, and Samuel Walters, John Webster, Elizabeth Weeks, Sarah Ann White, Charles Wilcoks, James, Richard, Emma, and George Williams. James Willoughby, Samuel Wills. Charles Woodward.

Scotch Robert Aitchison, Jane Aitchison, Joseph Barton, David Bell. William H. Ford, Alexander Fulton, Jane Gardiner, David Harrison, Jane Harrison. John, Ann, Mary, Jessie, and Mary Henderson, Ann Henry, James lnglis, Ann Jolly. Alexander Johnson. Barbara Linklater, Charles Linklater, Andrew, Jessie, Jessie, Andrew, Isabella, Jane, James, and Elizabeth Lindsay, Isabel Lyndsay. Margaret Lynch, Robert McConnell Alexander and Margaret McGregor, Catherine and Jessie McKenzie, Ann McKeown, Robert Taylor, Ellen Wallace, James Young.

Irish Charles Barrett, James, Mary, and Winifred Carry, James Chant. Ann Collins. Mary and Bridget Connell. William Coughlin, James Coy, Thomas and Margaret Cunningham, Catherine and Pat Doyle, David Gunn, Mary Higgins, Michael,John, and Monty Hogan. Thady Hynes, David, Mary, Michael, Pat, and Mary Kelly, Michael Keneally, William, John, Mary, and Margaret Kenedy, Celia King, James Lyman, Ellen McAuliffe, Eliza McCahey. Mary McCarthy, Ann McLoughlin, Pat and Margaret Mouby, Thomas Neeman, Abigail O'Callaghan, Thomas Rochford, Stephen, John, and Robert Ryan. Thomas and Ellen Stafford, Ann Stunchon, John Walsh, Pat Whelan.

Summary of Nationalities.
English Adults, 155: children between 1 and 12, 19: infants, 8; total 192.
Scotch Adults 30: children between 1 and 12. 9 ; total, 39.
Irish Adults. 45; children between 1 and 12, 3 : infants, 1 ; total, 49.
Totals Adults, 240; children between 1 and 12, 31; infants, 9; grand total, 288 equal to 210
statute adults; children between 1 and 12, 15; total, 255. Industrial Classification. Miners 33, labourers 59, servants 43, schoolmasters 2, matron 1,cooks 4, shepherds 2, blacksmiths 5, carpenters or cabinet-makers 3, masons 3, farmers 2, farm labourers and servants 6, laundress 1, sawyer 1, railway labourer 1, housekeeeper 1, coachpainter 1, printer 1, carter 1, ploughman 2, dairymaid 1, sempstress 1, shoe makers 2.

Source:
The South Australian Advertiser (Adelaide, SA : 1858 - 1889)
Wednesday 3 May 1865
Taken from the Agents' embarkation list


Cometville State School Queensland 1878-1930

Cometville renamed Comet on the 19 March 1931 is 859 kilometres or 534 miles north west of Brisbane, Australia, on the Comet River which was named by explorer Ludwig Leichhardt in December 1844 after Wilmot's Comet which was visible in the Southern Hemisphere at that time.
Comet is where Leichhardt's famous "dig tree" was established to indicate to others where he had buried food and journals.

It was a very important day for the outback settlement of Cometville when the State school opened on the 23 October 1878.

Below is a list of the Head School Teachers and the years in which they served up until 1930

Samuel Clark........................ 23 October 1877 to 19 September 1879
Alexander Blyth..................... 01 January 1879 to 30 September 1879
John Boland (acting) ............... 01 October 1879 to 30 September 1881
John Hassell........................ 01 October 1881 to 02 September 1883
William Henry Allen Jeffreys........ 20 August 1883 to 31 December 1884
William Henry Smith ................ 19 January 1885 to 25 April 1889
John Mills ......................... 06 May 1889 to 25 April 1891
Phillp Henry Robinson............... 26 May 1891 to 31 December 1896
Louis Charles Francis .............. 01 January 1897 to 06 February 1898
George Henry Osmond ................ 28 February 1898 to 31 December 1900
Denis sheahan....................... 01 January 1901 to 13 March 1902
Hubert George Ladbrook ............. 07 April 1902 to 31 March 1905
Clement Bleakley ................... 01 April 1905 to 30 June 1910
Patrick Kehoe....................... 01 July 1910 to 28 February 1911
Albert Boettcher ................... 27 February 1911 to 30 March 1914
James Thiele........................ 01 May 1914 to 15 September 1918
John Henry Langford ................ 18 September 1918 to 30 September 1921
Gladys Fannv Kidd .................. 01 October 1921 to 24 January 1926
William Leslie Kemp ................ 25 January 1926 to 31 December 1929
William Charles Thomas Jordan....... 01 January 1930

The photograph below which is not all that well preserved, but I've not ever been able to find another.
Taken in the 1930s it shows the original Cometville State School in the foreground and the new Comet State School behind. after this photograph was taken the old school was removed.
The new school behind was bought in 1936 by the Country Women's Association (Gindie branch) and turned into a rest home.


Peter Hough 1776-1833

My 3rd Great Grandfather was Peter HOUGH, born in Paris, France 1776 and died in Richmond, New South Wales on the 17 March 1833. He was buried at St Peter's Church of England Cemetery Richmond, on the 19 March 1833.

Peter Hough was indicted for burglary, 16th September 1795 and tried at the Old Bailey For steeling money and silver from St.Paul's Coffee Shop in London. For this charge he was found Not Guilty

On the 17 February 1797 Peter Hough was again before the courts. This time in Middlesex and charged with Petty Larceny. He was charged with "that on 8 February 1797 with force and arms that he did steal one Red Morocco Pocket Book of the value of 10 pence from James Daniell. Found guilty and committed to Newgate Prison until the sentence of 7 years Transportation could be carried out. Between 12 October 1797 and 31 December 1797 at Woolwich; England, Peter Hough was imprisoned on board the hulk Prudentia. On 2 January 1798 at Woolwich it was noted he had been ill but was recovering from venereal disease.

Peter HOUGH was named on the Hillsborough ships list as Peter HUFF sailed to New South Wales on the Hillsborough taking 218 days. The captain was William Hingston. She left England on 23 November 1798 and arrived in Sydney Cove on 26 July 1799. As well as convicts, free settlers were also also onboard. 95 died on the voyage.

The convicts were ironed two together and were accommodated on the lowest deck where conditions were extremely grim, there being no direct access to outside light or air. Each man was given a wooden plank two feet wide as a bunk and a blanket and a pillow. The weight of the irons was 11 lbs.

The Hillsborough was one of a convoy of about 15 ships and there was some delay in their sailing because of storms. During the trip typhoid struck and 100 convicts died. The typhoid began on 12 November. The disease was carried by lice and, due to the lack of hygiene, it spread rapidly through the ship.

The convicts were given only 13 pints of water each to last them for a week. This was to be their ration throughout the journey despite the fact that their provisions were salt meat and they had to sail through the tropics in appalling heat. The journey began with a gale and one can only imagine the conditions as the convicts were locked below and many were seasick.

The convicts were deeply rebellious and the Captain and crew responded with dreadful cruelty. A number of the convicts had found ways to remove their irons, but this was reported to the captain by an informer amongst the convicts. They were thereupon all ordered on deck, had their irons examined and, if these had been interfered with, the convicts were punished by between 12 and 72 lashes. The Captain further threatened to hang any more convicts found interfering with their chains.

By March the ship arrived in Table Bay, now the site of Capetown in South Africa, where they stayed for some considerable time as a number of convicts were dying from typhoid and the ship had to be cleaned and provisioned. Conditions on the shore were also very poor, the convicts being forced to dig graves for their dead comrades whilst shackled together.

The Captain finally realised that the treatment he was meting out would interfere with the payment he was to receive for the delivery of live convicts, and conditions began to improve toward the end of May with liberty to go on deck at will if one was sick, as much water as was wanted, but by now the death toll had risen to 63 of the original 300.

The ship sailed down the "roaring forties" going through a number of terrible storms and arrived off Van Diemans Land (now re-named Tasmania) on 4 July. Fighting their way up the east coast of Australia, they arrived off Sydney Heads at 4 am on 26 July. At daylight the ship sailed up the Harbour and the convicts were finally unloaded on 29 July.

Only 205 of the 300 original convicts were landed in Australia, and of these 6 more died in the first few days. The Hillsborough had been one of the worst convict ships ever to bring a load to Australia, and Governor Hunter wrote to the Secretary of the Colonies, the Duke of Portland, acquainting him with the situation and describing the convicts on the Hillsborough as \"a cargo of the most miserable and wretched convicts I ever beheld". The reason for this was a difference in the payment method. Whereas previously the Government had paid 23 per head for every convict transported to Botany Bay, James Duncan owner and contractor of the Hillsborough was to receive only 18 per head with an extra 4/10/6 for every live convict arriving in Australia.

Source; William Noah 1754-1827


In July 1801 Peter appears on the census at Parramatta with Susannah Tillet 1780-1846 convict arrived on the 'Speedy' in 1800
No marriage. They had 2 Children
Peter 1801-xxxx
Henry 1803-1880 m Cordelia TOOTH 1828-1885 in 1848

Spouse Catherine Rigby 1782-xxxx died in Windsor. Convict arrived on the 'Nile' 1801, Catherine Rigby, sailed back to England after gaining her freedom, leaving Louisa in the care of her father.
No marriage
Children Louisa 1805-1881 m. John CUPITT 1799-1937 in 1819

Spouse Mary WOOD 1793-1880 The daughter of John WOOD 1768-1845 and Ann MATTHEWS 1762-1819. Peter married Mary at St.Phillips C of E Sydney, New South Wales on the 19 September 1809.

The children of this marriage were:-
1.Sophia 1810-1885m. Timothy LACY 1806-1887 in 1827
2.John 1812-1896 m. Margaret MAGUIRE 1812-1904 in 1837
3.George 1813-1878 m. Mary BANNISTER 1820-1875 in 1838
4.Peter Joseph 1817-1888 m. Jane Sharp LOVELL 1823-1894 in 1840
5.Mary 1821-1904 m.William CORNWELL 1827-1906 in 1850
6.Ann 1822-1889 m. William ONUS 1822-1855 in 1842 and William REID 1833-xxxx in 1857
7.Eliza 1825-1870 m. Charles EATHER 1827-1891 in 1848
8.Elizabeth 1830-1909 m. James Edward MARSDEN 1830-1887 in 1850
9.Sarah 1833-1878 m. William BENSON 1830-1923 in 1855

He was Publican of a hotel opposite the Toll Gate on the Sydney Road in Parramatta from 1825 till the end of 1828.

On 4 November 1826 at Parramatta, Peter Hough and Timothy KELLY were committed for trial at the Quarter Sessions, for assault and battery of John Hall of Evan forcibly taking his horse and cart from him on the high road, but the trial did not proceed.

janilye

Below is the Toll Gate on Sydney Road. On the Sydney side of Parramatta.


John Wood 1768-1845

My 4th great grandfather was John WOOD, he was born in 1768 at Ealing, Middlesex, England.
John had been a coachman in England to the commissary General - John Palmer.
John was convicted at Somerset Assizes and sentenced to seven years transportation.
John WOOD arrived in Australia on board the Albemarle on the 13 October 1791.
In the 1828 census, John was working for his son in law, Peter Hough 1776-1833.
John's headstone at St Peter's Cemetery Richmond, stated he was 94 years old when he died. He was actually 77, indeed someone made a blue. His headstone is beside his daughter Mary and her husband Peter Hough.

John partnered Ann Matthews around 1792-3. No marriage has been found. Ann had been born at Enfield in London on the 11 April 1762. The third of seven children born to of Matthew MATTHEWS 1730 and Ann SMITH 1735.

[ANN MATTHEWS was indicted for burglariously and feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling house of John Lewis Andre, about the hour of two in the night of the 7th of October, and burglariously stealing therein, eight silver table spoons, value 40s. four silver desert spoons, value 16s. four tea spoons, value 8s. five cruet tops, value 20s. two silver salt spoons, value 2s. a diaper table cloth, value 2s. and a linen towel, value 8d. his property.]

Ann was tried at Middlesex and found guilty on the 17 October 1791, then sent to the hulks to await transportation
She departed on the Kitty on 31 March 1792 and arrived in New South Wales on 18th November, 1792.
Ann died on the 21 December 1819 at age 57 and was buried 3 days later from St Phillips's Church Sydney. Her grave is most likley to be under the Sydney Town Hall.

The children of John WOOD and Ann, nee MATTHEWS were:-
1.Mary Matthews WOOD 1793 1880 m. Peter HOUGH 1776-1833 at St.Phillips C of E Sydney, New South Wales on the 18 September 1809.
This couple had 9 children;
Sophia Hough 1810 1885 m. Timothy LACY 1806-1887
John Hough 1812 1896 m. Margaret MAGUIRE 1812-1904
George Hough 1813 1878 m. Mary BANNISTER 1820-1875
Peter Joseph Hough 1817 1888 m. Jane Sharp LOVELL 1823-1894
Mary Hough 1821 1904 m. William CORNWELL 1827-1906
Ann Hough 1822 1889 m. 1.William ONUS 1822-1855 2. William REID 1833-xxxx
Eliza HOUGH 1825 1870 m. Charles HOUGH 1827-1891
Elizabeth Hough 1830 1909 m. James Edward MARSDEN 1830-1887
Sarah Hough 1833 1878 m. William BENSON 1830-1923

2.Ann Wood 1796 1831 m. Daniel PEGG 1791-1860 at St.Phillips C of E Sydney, New South Wales on the 4 April 1820. Daniel was the son of Samuel PEGG 1750-xxxx and Mary TAYLOR 1753-xxxx Daniel died in Victoria and Ann in Tasmania.
This couple had 7 children:-
Eliza Pegg 1817 1875 m. William WHITEHOUSE 1813-1891
Mary Ann Pegg 1821 xxxx m. Thomas GORDON 1810-1887
William Pegg 1822
George Pegg 1824 1870 m.1. Winifred EGAN 1820-1857 2. Ann HEFFERNAN 1825-xxxx
John Pegg 1826 1827
Jane Pegg 1828 1829
James Pegg 1829 1896 committed suicide on 15 September 1896 at Heidelburg, Victoria

3.John Wood 1798 1883 m. Mary Ann DALEY 1811-1894 the daughter of Charles Daley 1775-1831 and Susannah Alderson 1780-1854at St.Matthews C of E Windsor, New South Waleson the 28 December 1829. Both John and Mary Ann died in Windsor.
The children of this marriage were:-
Elizabeth Wood 1830 1901 m. William Thomas GOSPER 1740-1908
Sophia Wood 1832 1837
John Wood 1834 1915 m. Lucina Ann DORSET 1857-1885
George Wood 1836 1889
James Wood 1839 1913 m. Emma SIMMS 1840-1916
William Wood 1841 1920 m. Amelia NORRIS 1840-1927
Mary S Wood 1843
Emma Wood 1845 1916
Henry Charles Wood 1847 1893
Sarah Ann Wood 1849 1850
Thomas Wood 1852 1892

4.George Wood 1807 1881 m. Jane CROSS 1818-1888 the daughter of Thomas CROSS 1775-1843 and Martha Eaton Bryant 1798-1839 at St.Peters C of E Richmond, New South Wales on the 29 April 1834. Both died in Windsor.
The children of this marriage were:-
Thomas Wood 18351881 m. Elizabeth HOSKISSON 1836-1925 in 1855
William Wood 18361924 m. Sarah CUPITT 1837-1923 in 1859
John Wood 18381913 m. Mary RICHARDSON 1841-1912 in 1862
George Wood 1840 1840
Robert Wood 1841 1844
Edward Wood 18431910 m. Margaret LYONS 1841-1902 in 1864
Ann Wood 18451938 m. 1.John Frederick COBCROFT 1838-1875 2.Richard Matthew REYNOLDS 1856-1928 see photo
James Wood 18471931 m. Elizabeth Grace SHAPTON 1845-1908 in 1872
Martha Wood 18491921 m. William Ephraim WILLIAMS 1846-1919 in 1868
George Wood 1851 1851
Henry Wood 1853 1853
Albert Wood 1855
Jane Sophia Wood 18571941 m. Frederick Allan Liddell 1861-1935 in 1889
Andrew Wood 1859 1948
Charles Alfred Wood 1861 - 1902


5.Sophia Wood 1809 1832 Sophia became the mistress of Charles CONNOLLY 1784-1825 in 1821. Charles sailed to England in 1825 where he died. On the 3 September 1825 Sophia gave birth to a daughter Elizabeth. Next Sophia married Benjamin HYRONS 1795-1873 in New Norfolk, Tasmania on the 23 March 1829.
One son was born at New Norfolk, Tasmania in July 1828 John Hyrons he died on the 25 October 1901 whilst visiting his daughter at South Melbourne, Victoria.

janilye

The photograph is Ann Wood 1845-1938 submitted by Kylie G Carter


Windsor, Richmond, Kurrajong, NSW.

A LIST OF SUBSCRIPTIONS for the purpose of erecting a Presbyterian Church in
Windsor, and School House in Richmond and Kurryjong.

WINDSOR ......................................... s. d.

John Harris, Esq., J P., Shanes Park ........50 0 0

John Harris, Jun., Esq., Shanes Park ........50 0 0

Sir John Jamison, M. C. Regentville .........15 0 0

Mrs. Panton, Windsor.............................10 0 0

John Panton, Esq., Windsor .....................10 0 0

John Betts, Esq., Sydney.........................10 0 0

Richard Fitzgerald, Esq. Windsor .............10 0 0

Mr. Robert Smith, Windsor ........................18 18 0

Thomas Cadell, Esq., Windsor..................10 0 0

H. Graham, Esq., Surgeon, Windsor...............5 0 0

Mr. Patrick Anderson, Windsor........ ..........5 0 0

Mr. Peter Adamson, Windsor .....................5 0 0

Mr. William White, Windsor......................5 0 0

Mr. George Knight, Windsor......................6 0 0

Mr. George Walker, Windsor .....................5 0 0

Mr. Peter Alexander, Windsor ...................5 0 0

Captain Moffatt, Parramatta ..................3 3 0

Mr. Richard Bell, Wilberforce ................3 3 0

Samuel North, Esq., P. M .....................1 1 0

Mr. J. Teale, Windsor ........................2 2 0

Mr. John Barker, Windsor......................1 0 0

Mrs. M'Keller, Windsor .......................1 1 0

Messrs. J and J. Tebbutt, Windsor ............2 2 0

Mr. A. M'lntosh, Windsor......................2 2 0

Mr. Robert Stewart, Windsor...................2 2 0

Mr. James Cazalet, Windsor ...................0 10 0

Mr. William Heath, Windsor ....................1 0 0

Mr. Joseph Clegg, Windsor ....................0 5 0

Mr. George Watson, Windsor ...................1 1 0

Dr. White, Windsor ............................2 2 0

A Friend .....................................0 5 0

Mr. A. Baldwin, Freeman's Reach...............0 10 0

A Friend .....................................1 1 0

Mr. George Hall, Junior.......................1 1 0

Mr. P. Byrnes.................................1 0 0

Mr. Charles Gaudry ...........................1 0 0

Mr. John Bullivant............................1 0 0

Mr. G. Seymore ...............................0 10 0

Mr. C. Summer ................................1 0 0

Mr. John Suffolk .............................1 1 0

Mr. John Walden, Wilberforce..................1 0 0

Mr. Reuben Green, Wilberforce.................0 5 0

Mr. John Hogan................................0 10 0

Mr. Israel Lett, Wilberforce .................0 10 0

Mr. Charles Martin ...........................0 5 0

Mr. Thomas Lynn ..............................0 10 0

Mr. J. Scarf .................................0 5 0

Mr. John Masking . ...........................0 10 0

Mr. Isaac Gorrick, Junior ....................1 0 0

Mr. John Yoeman ...............................1 0 0

Mr. Thomas Graham..............................1 0 0

Mr. M. Power...................................0 10 0

Mr. Joshua Rose................................0 5 0

Mrs. Ann Season................................0 10 0

Mr. P. Bushell ................................1 0 0

Mrs. Mary Cunningham.. ........................0 10 0

Mr. W. Nowland ................................1 0 0

John Odell, Esq................................2 2 0

Mr. J. Malony .................................0 10 0

Mr. John Wood ..................................1 0 0

A Friend.......................................0 5 0

Captain Maughan .......... ....................1 0 0

Mr. Williim Cross ............ ................2 2 0

Mr. John Primrose .............................1 1 0

Mr. William Walker ............................1 0 0

Miss Ellen Ferguson ...........................1 0 0

Mr. Joseph Flemming............................1 1 0

Mr. Walter Howell, Penrith ....................0 10 0

Mr. John Gardener..............................1 0 0

Mr. William Walker, Cornwallis ................0 10 0

Mr. J. Frazier.................................0 5 0

Mr. Jessie Upton...............................1 0 0

Mr. Andrew Frazer..............................0 5 0

F. Beddeck, Esq. ..............................1 1 0

Mr. William Salone ............................2 2 0

Rev. J. Fullerton ............................50 0 0

IN RICHMOND AND KURRYJONG

George Bowman, Esq ...... ... ................25 0 0

William Bowman, Esq...........................20 0 0

Mr. John Burns ...............................20 0 0

Thomas Cadell, Junior, Esq.....................1 0 0

Mr. Faithful ..................................5 0 0

Mr. Robert Aull................................2 0 0

Mr. William Farlow ............................1 0 0

Mr. Howell ............. ......................2 0 0

Mr. G. Crosse....... ..........................2 0 0

Mr. Edward Powell..............................1 0 0

Mr. Thomas Markwell............................2 0 0

Mr. John Stevenson ............................5 0 0

Mrs. Hough.....................................1 0 0

Mr. Joseph Stubbs .............................1 0 0

Mr. Robert Wilson .............................3 0 0

Mr. P. M'Alpin .....,..........................5 0 0

Mrs. S. Eather.................................2 0 0

Mr. Samuel Pane ...............................1 0 0

Mr. Wm. M'Alpin................................5 0 0

Mrs. Wm. M'Alpin ..............................2 10 0

Mr. Wm.Sharpe..................................5 0 0

Mr. Thomas Onus ...............................5 0 0

Mr. Joseph Onus ...............................5 0 0

Mr. Daniel Hearskin ...........................1 0 0

Mr. Paul Develin ..............................1 0 0

Dr. Seymour ...................................1 0 0

Mr. W. E. Brew.................................1 0 0

Mr. A. Cornwall....................... ........1 0 0

John Robinson .................................0 10 0

Mrs. Harrington................................0 2 6

Mr. Robert Martin, Senior. ............. ......2 0 0

Mr. R, Martin, Junior..........................2 10 0

Mrs. M.Martin .................................2 10 0

Mr. John Town ...................................1 0 0

Mrs. Town....................... ..............1 0 0

Mr. W. Price ......... ........................1 0 0

Mr. John Henderson ............................5 0 0

Mrs. Mortimer..................................1 0 0

Mrs. J, Wilshire ............................. 2 2 0

Mr. Douglass .............................. ...3 0 0

Mr. Rollinston.................................0 10 0

Mr. John.......................................1 0 0

Mr. John, Junior...............................1 0 0

Mr. Malpass ...................................1 0 0

Mr. Walsh .....................................1 10 0

A Friend ......................................1 10 0

481 2 6

More than two hundred pounds of the above subscriptions have been already received, and the Trustees respectfully inform the Subscribers that John Panton, Esq, is Treasurer for the district of Windsor; and George Bowman, Esq., is the Treasurer for that of Richmond, Subscriptions will be thankfully received and acknowledged by these gentlemen.

Source; The Colonist (Sydney, NSW : 1835 - 1840)
Saturday 14 July 1838


Work was started on the building situated in Drummond St, South Windsor in 1839 and completed some time in 1842. The church was officially opened in 1843.
The first minister was Rev. Mathew Adam 1811-1863, who had emigrated from Scotland in 1837 on the Portland and conducted a school. He remained there till his death in 1863.

The last service was on March 12, 1966. The church was then demolished due to termites and damp.
Since then regular services have been held in the hall in the church grounds.

Source: Source: W & R Gazette (from 1888 to December 1982)
Reference: 23 October 1968, p 1

Police Incidents - Sydney 1832

The Sydney Herald (NSW : 1831 - 1842)--Thursday 7 June 1832

POLICE INCIDENTS


Monday.-Mary Madden was charged by her mistress with taking herself off on Sunday morning, for the purpose, as she boldly declared, of spending the day on the water, with a party of choice spirits like herself.
Mary denied the charge; the mistress vociferating it at the top of her lungs, and a very pretty botheration and blarney immediately ensued, which bothered the cause most mightily.
After order was restored, the Bench decided that Mary should sojourn under Mrs. Gordon's wing for fourteen days.

Sarah Dawson, possessing a considerable portion of cambric handkerchief-sensibility, was placed at the bar, charged with being found snoring a charming bass in the Shambles of the Market-place, the previous evening; during her placid slumbers she was heard ejaculating, " give me another drain, and then." -
On hearing the charge, the tears chased each other down her lilly cheeks, "like Orient Pearls at random strung." The exchequer having been previously exchequered, and not one of the bye standers having sufficient gallantry to offer to become her banker, she was fain to put up with three hours reclination in the stocks.

John M'Carthy, picked up, humming to himself, " I've been roaming, I've been roaming," - "I dare say you have" said the constable, and the burden of his song turning out true, to the letter, the Bench sent him to a cell for three days.

Thomas Hewitt, a sort of a lackadaisical visaged youth, was charged with not only getting drunk himself, but making the servants of his master also drunk; entering the parlour where his master was sitting, breaking nine squares of glass, and threatening to set fire to the house, and consign his master and all his household goods to the flames.
On the favourable representation of the master, he was only fined 5s. and discharged.

Tuesday.-William Whaling was charged with being found all the worse for wear, endeavouring to win the affections of a pretty girl, who was just beginning to feel an interest in his small talk, when malheureusement , a baton bearer stepped in and desired Whaling to accept of a lodging at the King's expense, which he wished to avoid, but without success - three days on the Mill were recommended to prevent similar exhibitions of gallantry.

Jacob Porter, a quizzical looking old codger, who, from appearances, carried his name visibly marked on his countenance, was charged with banging a poker and frying pan together through the streets the previous night, at the same time harmoniously chanting, "Hark the bonny Christ Church Bells." - To balance this small adair he enriched the poor fund with five shillings.

Mary Thompson was charged with being picked up the previous afternoon, on the Parramatta road, waving her hand, and exclaiming to a young man, who was getting through the pannel of the fence into the bush, "false, perjured, fleeting Charley." As it appeared that she was a bolter, and was frequently in the habit of making herself scarce, the Bench sent her to the 3 C. for a month.

Mary Macmanus, a regular touch and go lady, with the temper of a Volcano, that was constantly in eruption whenever any thing crossed her, was charged with solacing John the footman the night before, with some comfortable liquors, and a good feed. -1 month Gordon seminary. On hearing the sentence she looked unutterable things and threatened a violent explosion, but the guardians of the peace muzzled her instanter.

Wednesday.-Eliza Ross was charged with absconding with her Mistress's child, and at ten o'clock at night both were brought home drunk. 6 weeks, 3rd class.

Mary Ann Clany, mugging herself with hot punch, as she described it, to rectify the disorganized state of her internals, and when wound up, with flying off at a tangent, refusing work, and all that sort of thing - 1 month, 3rd class.

Ann Carr, for giving her mistress due notice that she intended to quit, as her grub was not of that quality she had been in the habit of feeding upon, was sent to try Mrs. Gordon's fare for 1 month.

William Hervey was charged with being picked up in the streets, rolling over and over, Hervey declared that it was a touch of the Cholera that possessed him, the Bench considering that it might be the gin-cholera, sent him to the stocks for three hours.

John Kerwen was charged with being found on the Race Course, on one knee to a lady of the pave, whom he was thus pathetically addressing
" Oh me, can thus thy forehead lour,
And know'st thou not who loves thee best ;
Oh Sally dear, oh more than dearest.
Say is it me thou hat'st, or fear'st,
Come lay thy head upon my breast,
And I will kiss thee into rest."
The devil, exclaimed the irreverent constable, what's all this palaver about, come with me, my lad, and he was conveyed to the lock-up.
The Bench, to curb these sort of pranks, sent him to take three days exercise on the mill.

Ann Armstrong, who was admonished and discharged only the previous day, was charged, that when she arrived at home, she clapped her arms a-kimbo, and swearing she would nolens volens on the part of her mistress, be Lady of the ascendant.


The Sydney Herald (NSW : 1831 - 1842)--Thursday 19 July 1832

MONDAY.Maria Carney was placed at the bar to answer for bolting, amalgamating, and sundry
other amusements.
BenchWhat have you to say Maria for such
tricks.
MariaOh, nothing, my mistress is one of the best in the Colony, and I hope I may serve my lagging with her.
BenchI fear not; how long have you to serve?
MariaOnly a streaky bit, say three years.
BenchThen, you will have to serve one month more by taking the air at Mrs. Gordon's for a month.
Maria wished now to say something about bad feedqueer wittles, &c, but the constabulary, very politely, handed her from the bar.

Adam Bond, for threatening to make his mistress smell h-ll, by setting fire to the house, was ordered 14 days on the mill.

Winefred Doyle, a lushington, was placed at the bar on that charge.
BenchPrisoner, will you promise to reform.
WinefredI must have my morning, my leavener and my night cups.
BenchSix weeks 3 C.

William Gorman, was charged with being drunk and skylarking.
Bench Were you drunk
Gorman IndubitablyYes
Bench Five shillings to the poor.
GormanThat's meI'm poor.
BenchThree hours stocks.
GormanI wish you were alongside of me just now, see how I'd sarve you-
The Charley's were obliged to remove him vi et-armis, as Gorman, who is a bit of a sledge hammer hitter, wished to show fight.

John Eaton, Thomas Green, and John Tierney were charged with being musically lushey, and while in that state, with singing through the streets, the Glee of "Gently tolls the evening Chimes."
The Bench sent them to chime on the mill for seven days.

Henry Willis, for making free with a pair of fie- for-shames, belonging to the Governor of the gaol, was ordered into his custody, until delivered by due course of law.

Patrick Ryan, with a phiz resembling the back of a lobster when parboiled; a jest leering in his eyecurling on his lipand mantling and diffusing itself over his whole visage, was charged for not having the fear of the mill before his eyes, but being moved and seduced by the rum bottle, which he swigged at so heartily, that he was picked up as stiff as a poker, but the application of an oak sapling, well applied, made him quite supple. Seven days Devil's barrel organ.

TUESDAY.Mary Perkins, when allowed to stroll for an hour, was charged with taking six, which she declared was what she understood by compound interest.
The Bench ordered her for this, to obtain a more correct knowledge of arithmetic at Mrs. Gordon's academy.
" Carry me out, bury me decently" said Mary, as she bounced from the bar.

Mary Carr, with a taste for the sublime and beautiful, was charged with returning home the previous day in a queer state, seizing a knife, and having flourished it over her mistress' head, for a few minutes, exclaimed, "here's into your bread basket," and attempted to put her threat into execution, when she was fortunately prevented. 2 mos. 3 C.

Charles Phillips, an impertinent young dog, was charged with phoo-phooing whenever ordered to do any work. Master would say, "Charles do this," "phoo, phoo," master Charles would reply, "don't you wish you may get it." Seven days mill to teach him manners.

Thomas Darby, rolling through the streets at 12 o'clock at night, singing out,
" Talk of the cordial that sparkled for Helen, Her cup was a fiction, but this is reality."
At the same time flourishing a bottle of grog round his head, and he gave the Charleys the choice of a broken head or the contents of the bottle, they preferred the chance of the former, and after demolishing his bottle, secured him. Darby refused to come down with the ready, and consequently was handed to the stocks.


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