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The Sale of Wives In England.

Now-a-days wives are occasionally treated with barbarity. When they are, however the husbands are severely dealt with by law. But at one time wives were considered as a mercenary commodity, and the disposal of them for a certain price was a not uncommon occurrence, being recorded in newspapers as " items of everyday news." During this period of dormant sympathy, it was generally considered as lawful for a husband to sell his spouse by auction to the highest bidder, "provided he delivered her over with a halter round her neck." Strange as it may seem, the wife was frequently found to be in favour of the transaction, probably agreeing with the adage that "changes are lightsome."
In July, 1797, The Times in reference to the price of wives, said "By some mistake in our report of the Smithfield Market, we had not learned the average price of wives for the last week. The increasing value of the fair sex is esteemed by several eminent writers as a certain criterion of increasing civilisation. Smithfield has, on this ground, strong pretensions to refined improvement, as the price of wives has risen in that market from half-a-guinea to three guineas and a-half."
Even in the early years of the 19th. century, cases of the sale of wives in public are recorded.
A few instances of such sales, which appeared in a recent number of "All the Year Round," will be read with considerable interest and amusement:-
In 1750 a man and his wife falling into discourse with a grazier, at Parham, in Norfolk, the husband offered him his wife in exchange for an ox, provided he would let him choose one out of his drove. The grazier accepted the proposal, and the wife readily agreed to it. Accordingly, they met the next day, when the woman was delivered to the grazier, with a new halter round her neck, and the husband received a bullock which he subsequently sold for six guineas.
The first recorded sale after the accession of George III., occurred in the month of March, 1766 in this case a carpenter of Southwark, named Higginson, went into an ale-house for his morning draught: there he met a fellow carpenter, and their conversation turned to wives. The carpenter, whose name, history has not recorded, lamented that he had no wife. Higginson, on the other hand, lamented that he had, and expressed regret there was no way except murder by which he could rid himself of her. The carpenter assured Higginson that there was a way, the old English custom had made it quite lawful for a husband to sell his own rib. " No one would be such a fool as to buy mine," sighed Higginson. "I would do so," the other promptly replied, "and would think I had made a good bargain, too."
"Done!" shouted the delighted husband, who clinched the bargain on the spot. Mrs. Higginson was duly claimed by her new lord, and went willingly enough and lived with him as his wife.
In a few days, however, Higginson either grew tired of his mateless home or suspected that he had not done right, and went to the other carpenter's house, demanding his wife back. Mrs. Higginson strenuously refused to leave her new lord. "A sale is a sale," said she, "and not a joke."
Higginson went again and again, but to no purpose, and after a week or two he ceased calling. His wife had just begun to conclude that he had at last quietly resigned his claim, when she was cited to appear before a coroner's jury and identify her husband who had settled the question by hanging himself. (The price paid for the woman is not recorded.)
Another sale occurred in the summer of 1767. In this case, however, the man selling the "chattel" had no legal right over it, she being simply a wife by courtesy. Her reputed husband was a bricklayer's labourer, residing at Marylebone, and the price at which she was valued was five shillings and three pence and a gallon of beer. Three weeks after the sale, when the lady was duly housed with her new lord, a wealthy uncle of hers, residing in Devonshire, died, and, quite unexpectedly, acknowledged the kinship by leaving her two hundred pounds and a quantity of plate. The new protector at once decided to sanctify the union by a ceremony of the Church, and so became her husband indeed, and of course, the possessor of the legacy, there being no Married Woman's Property
Act in those days.
Edgbaston, Birmingham, was the scene of the next sale of this character which had to be reeorded. It took place in the month of August, 1773, and the facts are these :Three men and three women went into the Bell Inn. Edgbaston-street, Birmingham, and called for the toll-book, which was kept there. In this they made the following extraordinary entry: "August, thirty first, 1773. Samuel Whitehouse, of the parish of Willenhill, in the county of Stafford, this day sold his wife, Mary Whitehouse, in open market, to Thomas Griffiths, of Birmingham. Value one shilling. To take her with all faults. (Signed) Samuel Whitehouse, Mary Whitehouse. (Voucher) Thomas Buckley,
of Birmingham." The parties were said to be well pleased, and the purchase-money and the market toll, demanded for the toll, were both cheerfully paid.
This Ipswich Journal, January 28, 1737, states that : "A farmer of the parish of Stownpland sold his wife to a neighbour for five guineas, and being happy to think he had made a good bargain, presented her with a guinea to buy a new gown. He then went to Stowmarket and gave orders for the bells to he rung on the occasion."
The London Chronicle for the 1st of December, 1787, reported that : "On Monday last a person named Goward led his wife to the market place at Nuneaton, and there sold and delivered her up, with a halter about her, to one White, for the sum of three guineas. On their way Goward asked his wife if she was not ashamed of being brought to open market to be sold ; she said she was not, and was happy to think she was going to have another husband, for she knew well who was going to be her purchaser. When they came to the place Goward embraced his wife and wished her well, upon which she returned the compliment. White declared himself extremely well satisfied, and paid down the money, assuring the quondam husband it was good and full weight. The purchase being completed, White gave the ringers a handsome treat to ring a peal, and they spent the remainder of the day with the greatest joy imaginable."
A Case which occurred in 1790 is slightly different to the foregoing, for it is the record of a girl who
actually bought her husband. She was an Oxfordshire lass, and was on the eve of marriage to a young man of the same county, when the bridegroom elect would not consent to name the day unless her friends would advance fifty pounds for her dowry. Her friends being two poor to comply with this demand, the lass, who evidently thought a mercenary husband better than no husband at all, went to London and sold her hair, which was deli- cately long and light, to a chapman in the Strand for three pounds per ounce. As it weighed just twenty ounces, she returned with joy to Oxfordshire with sufficient money to buy her exacting husband, and ten pounds to boot."
It was not just in England where we have recorded the sale of wives but in New South Wales as late as 1803 we have early settler, Israel Rayner, selling his wife Catherine Carpenter. She walked out on Israel and went to live with her lover, Henry Baldwin and refused to return. When Henry Baldwin paid no heed to Israel's threats of legal action, a deal was struck and Israel sold Catherine to Henry for six bushels of wheat and a pig.


source:
The Maitland Mercury & Hunter River General Advertiser
Tuesday 26 September 1893
Victoriavane Word Press
transcription, janilye 2012


1 comment(s), latest 1 year, 2 months ago

The Fisk Jubilee Singers

This article published in The Sydney Morning Herald on the 25 September 1886 has not appeared fully transcribed online before.

Parts of the text may be offensive to non historians today. I have transcribed this article as it was written in 1886.
This article contains data which should be added to other history collected by the Fisk University.


The history of the Fisk Jubilee Singers, their work and its results, as told by Mr. J. B. T. Marsh, in a volume recently published, rivals in interest the most absorbing romance, with this notable difference, that the reader lays down the book not with the sense of gratified amusement, but with a feeling of deep sympathy, amazement, and admiration at the wonderful results, and the magic power of song.

The original band was a company of emancipated slaves, who, in 1871, set out with a determination to raise by their singing 20,000 dollars for the school of which they were students. To persons in Sydney with the fine Public schools, in which the children receive cheap education, the state of the slaves in America before emancipation is almost incomprehensible They were by law debarred from acquiring any book-learning. With greediness, and under immense privations and difficulties, men, women, and children laboured to acquire elementary knowledge, and the severest punishment in those early days, following the triumph of the Northern States, was to be suspended from school privileges. From the small start made by the American Missionary Association 17 academics and normal schools, with seven chartered institutions for collegiate and theological education, have been established. So interesting is the account of the educational work, the establishment of the Fisk University for freed people, and the progress of the institution in the 20 years it has now been established, that readers will, it is believed, be glad to know that a condensed history will be on sale during the stay of the Jubilee Singers here. There is a touching significance in the fact that at Nashville, in the former slave-pen of the city, a pile of rusty handcuffs and fetters came into possession of the school authorities, and were sold as old iron, the money being spent in Testaments and spelling books. The first teacher of the Jubilee singers was Mr. White, a native of Cadig, New York, who had a marvellous aptitude for picking out and training the best voices in vocal music. After a few months training, the Fisk choir became so successful, and their efforts in local concerts were so well appreciated, though many a scornful phrase was hurled at "the niggers," that Mr. White followed the active biddings of his earnest heart and started from Nashville with a company of 13 to provide a fund for maintaining the schools.
During their first year, indignities and insults were frequent; at some hotels they were refused admission because of their colour ; at others they were compelled to take their meals in secret ; their first concerts barely paid expenses, and many a time they had to sing with the fear that their lodging and travelling money would not be paid from the proceeds of their work.
The Rev. Henry Ward Beecher on their arrival at New York took up their cause, and thenceforth their cares were lightened.
Their first successful trip was through Connecticut ; in seven days their gross receipts exceeded 3900 dollars. In Newark one hotelkeeper, at whose house rooms had been engaged in advance, turned them literally out of their beds when he discovered that they were negroes and not niggers[sic]. This indignity bore good fruit. The City Council, to mark their sense of the wrong, passed an ordinance opening to the coloured people all the privileges of the Public schools.
Washington, Boston, many points in Massachusetts, and Rhode Island, and places in Maine, New Hampshire, and Vermont were visited.
In Boston a thousand dollar organ was presented to them for the University ; books for their library and many valuable presents were made. Their first season of three months cleared 20,000 dollars.

A second campaign began with another cruel insult, which again was turned to the advantage of the Jubilees. At Princeton a church had been tendered for their concert; the coloured people who had bought reserved-seat tickets were compelled to occupy an out-of-the-way corner. Such an indignity, offered in the House of God, provoked a hot rebuke from their manager, who was stoutly hissed for his speech. The second campaign also produced 2000 dollars profit.

The third campaign was a visit to England. Lord Shaftesbury was their friend, and the invitations to the first concert were sent in his name, The success of their singing was complete, and the singers had the best fortune throughout their trip. The Queen, the Duke and Duchoss of Argyle, Dean Stanley, Mr. Samuel Gurney, the Rev. Newman Hall, Mr. George Macdonald, and Mr. and Mrs. Gladstone, at whose house they sang to the Prince of Wales, the Grand Czareons, and many royal and noblo personages attended their concerts. Mr. Spurgeon, too, helped them much, and was himself most deeply impressed with their music. From London they went to Scotland, singing in connection with Messrs. Moody and Sankey in the North of England, and, besides large audiences, at many places they received valuable gifts. Mr. John Crossley, after hearing them at Halifax, promised
a supply of carpets, and many gave 10 to furnish a room in the Jubilee Hall. Four concerts in Manchester produced 1200. Their journey to Britain resulted in 10.000 being raised for Jubilee Hall and many gifts of apparatus, books, and money for special purposes.

In May, 1875, a second English campaign was planned. The Jubilee Hall was too small, and the Livingstone Missionary Hall was deemed necessary. The singers determined to reise beyond their ordinury earnings-which wore needed for existing demands of the school the sum of 10,000 for its erection, in their first year more than a third of the sum was raised, exclusive of the usual concert work.
Through the influence of Mr. G. P. Ittman, of Rotterdam, who heard the Jubilee Singers in London, a trip to the Continent was planned; and the grand cathedrals of the Netherlands were thronged to hear the plaintive melodies sung by those who had been slaves in America; 10,000 dollars profit from that trip. In October, 1877, they pushed on to Germany and had a warm welcome. In Berlin the Crown Prince and Princess invited them to the new palace, where their singing excited the liveliest admiration.

The company has necessarily gone through several changes; but it is asserted that the standard of the singers, who will shortly commence a season here, is quite equal to the original company. The songs are of the simplest charactor. The great charm seems to lie in the varying forms of interpretation, and the changing moods, the perfect intonation, and the light and shade with which they invest their singing. In a preface to the music, the unique origin, and some of the characteristics are pointed out. Though they are in reality the simple ecstatic utterances of un- tutored minds stirred into fervour by the meeting in church or camp, there are none of the crudities which shook the musician. The rhythm is always good, though at times complicated and often distinctly original. Three part measure, or triple time is rarely found; more than half the melodies follow the national Scottish music, in the fact that in the scale the fourth and seventh tones are omitted ; and as many maintain the Greek to have been written in a similar scale, the thoughtful student may well ask if this is not perhaps the easiest musical alphabet. Tho Jubilee Singers have secured the Y. M. C. A. hall, and will commence a season in Sydney on Monday, 4th October.


Source:
The Sydney Morning Herald
(NSW : 1842 - 1954)
Dated Saturday 25 September 1886
Page 11
Ogiginal Document Tagged
The Fisk Jubilee Singers
Transcription, janilye
7 November 2012
Photograph
State library of Victoria
Note: The Fisk Jubilee Singers found appreciative audiences in New South Wales, Victoria and South Australia throughout 1886 and 1887.j


The parents of Lord George Gordon Byron

Catharine Gordon of Gight was born in Aberdeenshire in 1765 and died on the 1 August 1811 in Newstead, Lincolnshire, England. Mrs Byron, mother of poet, Lord Byron, was descended on the paternal side from Sir William Gordon, of Gight, the third son, by Annabella Stewart, daughter of James I of Scotland, of George, second Earl of Huntley, Chancellor of Scotland 1498-1502 and Lord-lieutenant of the North from 1491 to his death in 1507.
Both her parents dying early, her father George Gordon born 1741, committed suicide at Bath on the 9 January 1779. I believe her mother Catherine Innes died a few years earlier.

Catharine Gordon was brought up at Banff by her grandmother, commonly called Lady Gight, although a penurious, illiterate woman, made sure her granddaughter was better educated than herself. Gight was worth between 23,000 and 24,000.

Miss Catharine Gordon was a young lady who had her full share of feminine vanity.
At the age of 35, she was a stout, dumpy, coarse-looking woman, awkward in her movements, her accent and manner provincial, but, just like her son who was vain of his personal appearance, and especially of his hands, neck, and ears, so was she. When other charms had vanished, clung to her pride in her arms and hands.
She exhausted the patience of Thomas Stewardson 1781-1859, when he painted the portrait below in 1806. It took 40 sittings, before she was satisfied with how the particular turn in her elbow was exhibited in the most pleasing light.
Of her ancestry she was, according to her son, 'as proud as Lucifer,' and looked down upon the Byron family, and regarded the Duke of Gordon as, an inferior member of her clan.

Born and bred in the strictest Calvanism of the day, a superstitious believer in ghosts, prophecies and fortune-telling, she was subject to fits of melancholy, which her misfortunes intensified.
In later life, at any rate, her temper was ungovernable, her language, when excited, unrestrained, her love of gossip insatiable. Capricious in her moods, she flew from one extreme to the other, passing, for the slightest cause, from passionate affection to equally passionate resentment.

How far these defects were produced, as they certainly, were aggravated, by her husband's ill-treatment and her hard struggle With poverty it is impossible to say. She had many good qualities. She bore her ruin with good sense, dignity; and composure. She lived on a miserable pittance without running into debt she pinched herself in order to give her son a liberal supply of money; she was warm-hearted and generous to those in distress. She adored her scamp of a husband, and, in her own way, was a 'devoted mother.
In politics she affected 'democratic opinions', and took in a daily paper, the Morning Chronicle, which, as is shown by a bill sent in after her death, cost her at the rate of 4 17s 6d for six months no small sum to be deducted out of a narrow income.
She was fond of reading, subscribed 'to book clubs', collected all the criticisms on her son's poetry, made shrewd remarks upon them herself, and corresponded with her friends on literary subjects. It has been said that she died in a fit of rage at an upholsterer's bill. The truth is that she had been in ill-health for months, and her illness was aggravated, if not caused, by Byron's recklessness. She had raised for her son's benefit 1000, for which she made herself personally liable.

In 1809 sho had moved to Newstead in order to protect his interests in his absence abroad, and for two years, as her letters prove, kept his creditors at bay and defended his character with pathetic fidelity. When Brothers, the upholsterer, put in an execution for debts contracted by her son in furnishing Newstead, she saw herself beggared, since all her worldly possessions were liable to seizure, and the shock seems to have proved fatal.

In 1785 Miss Catharine Gordon was at Bath, buying trinkets at Deard's, dancing at Lindsay's or Hayes's, and listening to the Compliments of the fortune-hunters who fluttered round the young heiress. There she met, and there, on May 13, 1785, in the Church of St. Michael, as the register shows, she married Captain John Byron. She was fascinated by his handsome face, charmed by his dancing, piqued by his reputation.
There is no reason to suppose that he was attracted to her by anything but her fortune, and his character, debts and previous career promised her little happiness in her marriage.

Captain John "Mad Jack" Byron 1755-1791, born at Plymouth, was the eldest son of Admiral the Hon. John Byron 1723-1786, known in the Royal Navy as 'Hardy' Byron, or "Foul weather Jack," by his marriage on 8 September 1748 with Sophia Trevannion, of Caerhayes, in Cornwall. The admiral, next brother to William, 1722-1798 fifth Lord Byron, was a distinguished naval officer, whose "Narrative" of his shipwreck in the Wager was published in 1768, and whose Voyage Round the World in the Dolphin was described by "an officer in the said ship in 1767.
His eldest son, John Byron, educated at Westminster and a French military academy, entered the Guards and served in America. A gambler, a spendthrift, a profligate scamp, disowned by his father, he in 1778 ran away with and on 1 June 1779 married Amelia Osborne, Marchioness of Carmarthen, wife of Francis Osborne, afterwards fifth Duke of Leeds, nee Lady Amelia d'Arcy, only child and heiress of the last Earl of Holderness and Baroness Conyers in her own right. Captain Byron and his wife lived in Paris, where were born to them a daughter who died in infancy, and Augusta, born 1783, the poet's half-sister, who subsequently married her cousin, Colonel Leigh.
In 1784 Lady Conyers died, and Captain Byron returned to England, a widower, up to his ears in debt, and in search of an heiress.

Tradition has it that, at the marriage of Catharine Gordon with mad Jack Byron,the heronry at Gight passed over to Kelly or Haddo, the property of the Earl of Aberdeen. "The land itself will not be long in following," said his lordship, and so it proved.

For a few months Mrs Byron Gordon for her husband assumed the name and by this title her Scottish friends always addressed her lived at Gight. But the ready money, the outlying lands, the rights of fishery, the timber failed to liquidate Captain Byron's debts, and in 1786 Gight itself was sold to Lord Aberdeen for 17,850. Mrs Byron Gordon found herself at the end of 18 months stripped of her property and reduced to the income derived from 4200, subject to an annuity payable to her grandmother. She bore the reverse with a composure which shows her to have been a woman of no ordinary courage.

The wreck of their fortunes compelled Mrs Byron Gordon and her husband to retire to France. At the beginning of 1788 she had returned to London, and on the 22 January, 1788, at 16 Holles street, since numbered 24, and now destroyed, in the back drawing room of the first floor, gave birth to her only child George Gordon, afterwards sixth Lord Byron. From his birth the child suffered from what would now be described as partial infantile paralysis of the right foot and leg, especially of the inner muscles. He was born, it may be added, with a caul, then and now treasured by sailors as a preservative against drowning. In this instance, however, the charm failed. The caul was sold by the nurse to Captain James Hanson R N, who on the 26th ofJanuary 1800
was wrecked in H.M.S. Brazar off Newhaven, and with the whole of his crew, one man excepted, was drowned.

At the time when the child was born two lives only, besides that of his father, stood between him and the peerage. His great-uncle William, fifth Lord Byron, 1722-1798, commonly known as the "wicked lord," was still living, separated from his wife and shunned by his neighbours, a moody, half-crazy misanthrope. Like his younger brother the admiral, he had served in the Royal Navy. In 1747 he married Miss Elizabeth Shaw, of Besthorpe Hall, a Norfolk heiress, and by her had two daughters and two sons. The eldest, born in 1748, died in infancy the second son, William 1749-1776, married his cousin Juliana Elizabeth, the daughter of Admiral Byron. Their only son, William John 1772-1794, was the heir to the peerage, and his death on 31 July, 1794, from a, wound received at the battle of Calvi, in Corsica, made George Gordon Byron heir presrumptive to his great-uncle, then a man of 72.

The wicked Lord Byron, in the middle of the eighteenth century, lived in great state in town and at Newstead, and in 1763 was Master of the Staghounds. An eager collector of curiosities, whenever any article of special rarity was offered for sale in London he ordered out his horses, drove to the metropolis, and returned' with his purchase, bought without regard to expense. Passionate, vindictive, and headstrong, he attended as little to the cost of his revenge as to that of his pleasures.

His London life closed with his fatal duel with William CHAWORTH 1726-1765 on Saturday, January 26, 1765. On that evening a club of Nottinghamshire gentlemen, were holding their monthly meeting at the Star and Garter tavern in Pall Mall. They usually dined at 7 o'clock the bill and a bottle were brought, and the company separated. On that particular evening a dispute had arisen between Lord Byron and Mr Chaworth, presumably about whether the former, who did not preserve, or the latter, who was a strict preserver, had most game on his manor. The discussion grew warm, and Mr Chaworth said, "Your lordship knows where to find me in Berkeley Row," or words to that effect.
Nothing further passed at the time the subject was dropped and no serious consequences seem to have been feared. The company, who had dined on the second floor, had paid the bill and were dispersing.
On descending to the first floor Lord Byron came up to William Chaworth and referred to the conversation which had passed between them at dinner. Both seem then to have called a waiter to bring a candle and show them an empty room. The waiter opened a door on the first floor, showed the gentlemen into a room, set down a tallow candle which he was holding in his hand, and left them. In a few seconds the affair was ended. According to Mr Chaworth's account of what passed, he saw Lord Byron's sword half drawn, and, knowing the man, immediately, or as quick as he could, whipped out his sword and had the first thrust, running Lord Byron through some part of his waistcoat. Then Lord Byron, shortened his sword and ran his Chaworth through the body. The bell was rung the landlord entered the room to find Lord Byron supporting Chaworth. Mr Hawkins, the surgeon was immediately summoned; but the wound proved mortal. Chaworth lived long enough to make a will leaving everything to his lady friend, in who's house he lived, in Berkerley Row, Piccadilly.
One of the members of the Nottinghamshire Club, Mr Sherwin took the rapiers away and are both now preserved at Annersley Hall, in Nottinghamshire.

Lord Byron was tried for murder on 16 April, 1765, in Westminster Hall. The peers almost unanimously dismissed the charge of murder, and found him guilty of manslaughter only.
The fatal termination of the duel, and its circumstances --the absence of seconds, the dark room dimly lighted by one miserable tallow candle-- attracted so much attention for the case that, it is said, tickets for the trial were, sold for six guineas apiece.
There seems, however, nothing which, judged by the code of the day, could reflect any special blame on Lord Byron, or discredit him in the county. Thenceforward he absented himself from London.

After the birth of her son Mrs Byron Gordon settled at Aberdeen. There for a time she was joined by her husband, though they soon found it necessary to live at opposite ends of Queen street.
Captain Byron's daughter, Augusta, had been placed under the care of her grandmother, Lady Holderness; his wife could give him no more money she had run into debt to supply him with 300, and on her remaining income she could barely maintain herself and her son. He was free from incumbrances, and had drained the milch cow dry.
Returning in 1790 to France, he died in the summer of the following year at Valenciennes, In his will, dictated by him from his sick bed to two notaries of that city, on 21 June, 1791, he is described as, "John Byron, a native of London, and ordinarily resident there". You'll notice he makes no mention, of his wife or of his daughter.

The operative part, as translated from the French into the English of Doctors' Commons, 17 August, 1791, runs as follows

I give and bequeath to Mrs Leigh, my sister, the sum of 400 sterling, to be paid out of the effects of my deceased father and mother. I appoint my son, Mr George Byron, heir of my real and personal estate, and charge him to pay my debts, legacies, and funeral expenses. I appoint the said Mrs Leigh, my sister, executrix of this my will.

The death of Captain Byron was passionately lamented by his wife, who, in spite of his vices, adored her handsome larrikan of a husband. Already an orphan and almost beggared, she was now a widow of 26, with an income of 122 a year, out of which to lodge, clothe, and feed her son and herself, and to provide for his education.


Volunteering can be rewarding

TROVE

The National Library of Australia, in collaboration with Australian State and
Territory libraries, began a program in March 2007 to digitise Australian newspapers
for access and preservation purposes.

The Australian newspapers hold an enormous amount of information from around the world.
As of 12 October 2012 there are 7,543,642 pages consisting of 74,500,869 articles.
Over the past 4 years the National Library of Australia, with a modest budget and
small team of staff, has digitised more than 6.8 million pages of Australian newspapers.
This equates to just over 260 titles out of approximately 7,700 newspaper
titles published in Australia
This is a FREE online Service.

Our concern, at the moment is the transcription of news from America
received by ship and by telegram and appearing in our national
newspapers since the early 1800's.

Not being familiar with names and place names 'American', Australian
transcribers are finding the task of transcribing American articles sometimes difficult.

We need American volunteers to 'Fix The Text'.
Even just one article would be a big help.

The bonus for you is, you get to read a lot of interesting news
which may not be preserved in your own country.
For example;

Launceston Examiner Tas. Tuesday 14 November 1871

AMERICAN.


General Washburne has defeated General Butler for the command-in-chief of the United States army.


The Russian fleet has arrived in New York harbor.

The Tammany Ring has confessed to the municipal frauds with which it was charged, and has repaid 750,000 dollars.

The United States are taking active steps to suppress Mormonism. They have arrested Brigbam Young and a number of other Mor mon celebrities on charges of adultery. Wool is in fair demand at New York. At the recent sales there Australian scarcely covered importations.

Kerosene is steady. Dovoe's, 31 cents.

Many lives were lost during the progress of the great fire at Chicago. It broke out on Sunday, 8th October, while a strong wind was blowing. Everything was in a very dry and combustible state, owing to a long spell of dry weather. The fire brigades were powerless to arrest the progress of the flames. The water and gas works, the newspaper offices, banks, principal hotels, and all the public buildings of the city were destroyed. A second fire raged on Monday, 10th October. On the second occasion the fire was traced to incen diaries, whose intention was to destroy the remainder of the city left untouched by the former fire, and occupied principally by the wealthy classes. Their object was plunder. Two men were caught firing buildings, and were immediately shot by the infuriated populace. Others who were implicated were led off with ropes round their necks. Nine. tenths of the city have been destroyed.
Another telegram says:over 100,000 persons have been rendered homeless by the great fire at Chicago. Seventy vessels were burned at the wharves. A number of prisoners in the gaol were burned to death.
The fire extended over an area of three miles in length, by one in breadth.
Large contributions of food, clothing, and money have arrived from all parts of America.

The Mercury Hobart, Tas. Tuesday 30 March 1897
LATEST CABLEGRAMS
THE MAYFLOWER LOG

It is proposed to make a facsimile of the Log of the Mayflower, which
Mr. T. Bayard has obtained the loan of in England, for the purpose of
sending it to the United States for exhibition.


Northern Standard, Tuesday 5 September 1939
WRIGLEY DIVORCE


Chicago, August 31.
Byron E. Wrigley, jun., an executive of the chewing gum manufacturing firm,
was granted an uncontested divorce from Mrs. Dorothy T. Wrigley, of Sydney,
on the grounds of desertion. Their child, Michael, aged 5, was given into the custody of
the mother.
Wrigley said that he was married in Sydney on May 26, 1932.
He was transferred from Sydney to Chicago last April, but his wife refused
to accompany him.

Morning Bulletin Rockhampton, Qld. Friday 30 August 1946
American Was Already Married

An American serviceman, who was stated to be residing with his legal wife in
Los Angeles, was named as the defendant in the Supreme Court yesterday in an action
by a Rockhampton girl for an order to annul her marriage with him.
Murial Jane Ricks, otherwise known as Forman, sought from Mr. Justice Brennan
annulment of her marriage with Homer Forman.
The action was undefended. Mr. T. J. Hally appeared for the plaintiff.
The plaintiff gave evidence of going through a form of marriage on September 19, 1942,
with Forman, who was with the American forces in Rockhampton at the time.
There was one child of the marriage.
Witness, now aged 21, said she then believed Forman to be a single man. There was
then no check by the authorities and she had to rely upon assurances by his friends
that he was single. Since then she had found out through the British consulate in
America, that he was married in San Francisco in November, 1941, and at present
was living with his wife in Los Angeles.
His Honour: Such girls deserve all they get. They are looking for trouble.
They play around with Yanks without knowing anything about them.


A judgement nisi declaring the marriage null and void, returnable after
three months, was granted.


2 comment(s), latest 1 year, 9 months ago

Itellya's Watson's of Sorrento and Portsea.

Here are a few things I've collected today and for some obscure reason I was not able to private message you.
You may not already have what's here.
Rather than me putting useless comments on your page, add what you want.
I shall remove this after you have whatever you think is relevant. Let me know 'when'

This letter to the editor came without any dates or sources, perhaps you can work out a date;

Sir,-In the issue of yesterday and under News of the Day column, you publish the following:-
"The Lands Department recently prosecuted one J. Watson who jumped a public reserve in the vicinity of the baths at Sorrento. Mr. Watson, although warned that he was a trespasser, commenced to erect a wooden building on the land.Legal proceedings were thereupon taken against him and the local magistrates ordered him to quit the land within thirty days.
Great inconvenience was experienced by the occupation of this land, as it overlooks the baths, but Mr. Watson showed no inclination to move off without compensation. Further legal proceedings were thereupon initiated against him but he has now informed the lands department of his intention to retire from the fight and give up posession. Mr Watson some months ago obtained 1500 pounds compensation from the government for giving up a piece of land as a site for a fort in the Bay."

Now, as these statements are not in accordance with the facts of the case, I trust you will grant me a small space in order to show the whole matter in its true colours:-For five and twenty years I have resided at Portsea,where I got my living and maintained my family by fishing; my property consisted of a six-roomed stone house and three quarters of an acre of land at Point Franklin. This was my own property. I had also a hut on the beach, in which was stored my nets and gear for fishing. Some months ago the Government purchased my land for defence purposes for 1400 pounds not 1500. This included the house and improvements, and was not merely for the land as your paragraph would lead one to suppose. I was compelled to sell, and the price paid was the Government valuation. The land had a special value for me on account of its elevated oposition and its closeness to bold water, the fishing lookout being the best around the Bay.
Having now to make another home, I selected Sorrento, and purchased two acres of ground from Mr. Duffy, upon which I built a six-roomed weatherboard cottage.The land and house are away back, the Bay not being visible from there. After my house was finished and my family settled, I commenced building a hut in the foreshore in which to store my nets and gear,and also to enable us to be at hand in some sort of shelter, in case rough weather set in, to save our boats and nets. I may mention that my old hut at Portsea situated on the beach is still being used by some fishermen for a similar purpose.After my hut was finished I was quite astonished at being requested by the lands Department to remove same. I had no idea in what I was doing wrong in putting it up as all round the Bay the fishermen have similar huts on the foreshore and this is the first time a fisherman has been compelled to remove. I naturally refused to shift,and allowed myself to be summoned in order to test the question. I was summoned and ordered to remove my hut within thirty days.The hut has since been removed. Your paragraph states that " great inconvenience" was experienced by the occupation of this land as it "overlooks the baths" This is really distorting the facts with a vengeance.
The hut was three quarters of a mile from the baths and being built on the beach was on the same level, consequently could not overlook anything. The true reason why I was compelled to pull down my hut was because it was situated about 40yards from Dr. Blair's Bathing Box, which is built on the beach also, and the fact of my building a hut was looked upon as an intrusion by him.
Now I should like to know why Dr. Blair and others are allowed to have bathing boxes on the beach, while I am debarred from having a hut there. Unless I can have a place to secure my fishing gear, and that close to the water,I shall be compelled to give up fishing, as the damage to my nets,boats etc. in rough weather would be ruinous. As your paragraph states, I have given up the fight.
I am only a poor fisherman, and cannot afford to lose the few pounds I have left, and ruin my family in endeavouring to get justice. I intend, however, applying for permission to build a bathing box for my family, the same as the Doctor, as I have a house and ground at the back. I don't think the department can with justice refuse this. If, however, I fail, I shall then be convinced that it is imposssible for a poor man to get justice. Yours, &c. J. Watson.
-------------------------------------------------------

don't know if this below is one of your WATSONs, but here it is;

The Argus, Friday 10 April 1896
A FISHERMAN LOST.FLINDERS, THURSDAY.
A fisherman named George Watson left Flinders in his boat, 'the Fugitive', yesterday morning to attend to his crayfish pots within a few miles of Cape Schanck and intended returning to his family for dinner, but nothing has since been heard of him or his boat. Very rough weather prevailed in the straits last night, and it is feared that a serious mishap has occurred. All the coast stations have been communicated with, and a boat manned by experienced local fishermen started this forenoon to cruise in search to the southward of Phillip Island. Constable Jones,from Dromana, also searched the beaches and rocks between Flinders and Cape Schank. Information from Phillip Island states that Constable Thornton, of Cowes, picked up a rudder and gear answering the description of the rudder belonging to the missing boat. No hope is now enter- tained that Watson is alive.
Mornington Standard, Thursday 16 April 1896
George Watson, the fisherman who has been missing from Flinders since yesterday week has not yet been heard of, although portions of his clothing and fragments of his boat were picked up on the back beach on Sunday, and on Monday his boat was discovered beached at East Creek, near Shoreham. A rudder and other gear have also been found at Cowes, and have been identified as belonging to his boat. Diligent but unsuccessful search for the body has been made along the cost, He leaves a widow and children.

Mornington Standard,Thursday 14 May 1896
A concert was held in the Flinders Mechanics' Institute on the 1st inst.,
in aid of the widow of the late George Watson.
The hall was fairly filled, and the chair was taken by the Rev. Mr. Edwards.
The following programme was gone through:-
Overture, Miss Robertson; song, Will He not Come Back Again,
Mr. J. L. Banks; recitation, The Life Boat, Mr. E. Jones ; song, Mrs. Noyess; recitation, The Holly and Ivy Girl, Miss Katie Tuck; song,-The Cows are in the Corn, Miss N. Bryne, sung with great taste and expression, and the young per former was loudly applauded; song, Mr. Flanigan; song, Golden Love, Miss Veida.Violin solo, Mr. and Master Hopcraft; song, Soon We'll be in London Town, Mr. Edwards; song,'I Couldn't, Could I,
Miss Smith, very nicely rendered; song, The Old Log Cabin in the Dell, Mr. Brunk.
This brought the first part of the programme to a close.
" The second part opened with a violin solo, Messrs Hopcraft; song, The Bellringers, Mr. J. L. Banks;
song. The Toilers, Mr. Edwards: recitation, Mr. Jones; song, The Old Folks at Home, Miss N. Byrne;
song, A Soldiers and a Man Mr. Parkinson ; song, The Postal, Mrs. Noyes ;
recitation, The Razor Seller, Mr. Flanigan , song. Where There's a Will There's a Way, Miss Smith ; re citation, I Want to Fly. Mr. Parkinson; song, Daddy, Miss Veido; song. It. Always Comes Round to Me, Mr. Brunt.
The singing, of the National Anthem brought the concert to a close.
Miss Robertson made a very efficient pianist.
After the concert a dance was held, which was also a great success

Mornington Standard,Thursday 4 June 1896
FROM OUR OWN CORRESPONDENTS
HASTINGS
George Watson Relief Fund the sum of 2 1s, contributed by the teachers
and scholars of Holy Trinity Church, Sunday-school, Hastings (1),
and by David Mairs, Esq. (1 1s).
-----------------------------------------------------------------
Alexander bought a 1 acre beach front block where he built and operated the
Portsea Hotel from 9th December 1876 until he sold in 1890.The present hotel was built in 1927 on the same site and has since been extended. A photograph in the public bar of this hotel is of Alexander Cosmo standing out front.

The Watson family built a lookout from which the fish shoals could be seen and a system of bell signals to tell the waiting boat crews on the beach the position and type of fish.
During a flood tide storm in 1961 the old camp was severely damaged and the Council cleared the beach of all evidence of this historical building.
the bluestone retaining wall at Portsea is made from the bricks which were the old houses and over the last 15 years, pieces of china have been found on the foreshore which were in the houses when destroyed.
One of the crew of the work gang for the council One of the work gang in 1961 was the son of Frank Watson, the adopted son of Alexander Cosmo WATSON.

The Argus, Saturday 2 January 1915
WATSON.-On the 30th December, at Portsea, William Cosmo, youngest son of Alexander and the
late Janet Watson, of Portsea, aged 31 years.

The children of James WATSON b. in Boyndie, Banff in 1804 the son of James WATSON 1779-1843 and Margaret LOVIE. and wife Helen SMITH b. Banffshire in 1804 the daughter of James SMITH 1766-xxxx and Margaret KELMAN 1769-xxxx were:
Jane WATSON 1829
Jean Watson 1829
John Watson 1830 1906
Margaret WATSON 1833
Henry WATSON 1835 1922
Ellen WATSON 1837
William WATSON 1838 1925
Alexander Cosmo Watson 1841 1920
Helen Watson 1843



The children of Alexander Cosmo WATSON 1841-1920 and wife Janet ANDERSON 1848-1908 were:-
Helen Smith Watson 1868 1948 m. John Douglas STIRLING in 1890
Mathew Watson 1869 1955
Mary Ann Watson 1871 1901. m. Alfred Edward KEYS in 1893
Alexander WATSON 1874 1875
Cosmo Watson 1876 ?
Agnes Watson 1878 ?
James George Watson 1881 1945
William Cosmo Watson 1883 1914
Ethel Jane Watson 1885 ? m. Robert Edward BOYLE in 1905
Catherine Victoria Watson 1887 1973
Then Frank - adopted (have no idea where he came from).

The children of John WATSON 1830-1906 and wife Annie Marion SULLIVAN 1844-1928 were:-
Margaret Watson 1833 1937 m. Alexander RUSSELL
Rose Watson ? 1908 m Walter Augustus DARK 1861-1916
Margaret WATSON 1833 1925
Henry Watson 1871 1922 m. Marion Elzabeth WILLIAMS 1884-1977 in 1906
Lily Theresa Watson 1871 1953 m. Duncan McFarlane
Jessie Watson 1873 1948
Infant Watson 1875 1875
William Watson 1876 1925
John Thomas WATSON 1878 1953
Anne Watson 1880 1948
William Jones WATSON 1881 1948 m. Jean LOMBARD
Christina Ethel Watson 1884 1966 m. William Edward NEWTON 1885-1966





I'll add here, if I find anything more tonight!

The photograph below is John Watson and Ann, nee Sullivan


2 comment(s), latest 11 months, 3 weeks ago

Australians as America saw us in 1942

Nothing like coming here prepared!

AUSTRALIANS AS AMERICANS SEE THEM
"An Outdoors People;Breezy, Democratic"
WASHINGTON, Sunday, 25 October 1942 AAP


["You will find Australians an outdoors people, breezy, very democratic, with no respect for stuffed shirts their own or anyone else's," says a pocket guide on Australia which is being distributed among American troops.

Issued by US War and Navy departments, the booklet states that Australians have much in common with Americans. They are a pioneer people, they believe in personal freedom, and they love sports.

"There is one thing to get straight right off the bat," the booklet says. "You are not in Australia to save a helpless people from the savage Japanese. Recently in a Sydney bar an American soldier turned to an Australian and said, 'Well, Aussie, you can go home now. We've come over to save you.' The Aussie cracked back, 'Have you? I thought you were a refugee from Pearl Harbour.'
Being simple, direct and tough, the Digger is often confused and nonplussed by the manners of Americans' in mixed company; or even in camp. To him those many 'Thank you's" Americans use are a bit too dignifled.

You might get annoyed, at the blue laws which make Australian cities pretty dull places on Sundays.
For all their breezieness Australians do not go in for drinking or woopitching in public, especially on Sunday.

In Australia, the national game is cricket, but they, have another game called Australian rules football.
It is rough, tough, and exciting. There are a lot of rules, which the referee carries in a rule book the size of Webster's dictionary. The game creates the desire on the part of the crowd to tear someone apart. The referees in some parks have runways covered over so that they can escape intact after a game.

As one newspaper correspondent says, Americans and Australians are 2 of the greatest gambling people on earth. It has been said of Australians that if a couple in a bar have not anything else to bet on they will lay odds on which of 2 flies rise first from the bar.
Aussies do not fight out of textbooks. They are resourceful, inventive soldiers with plenty of intiative.
The Australian habit of pronouncing "a" as "I" is pointed out, and an example quoted: "The trine is lite to-di." The booklet includes "Waltzing Matilda" in full."]

I don't know about the too many thank-yous. It would seem that the Australian girls liked it, for 10,000 Aussie brides returned to America with these well heeled, well mannered and certainly well informed troops.


1 comment(s), latest 2 years, 4 months ago

The things you should have asked

After hearing the old story about not asking the 'right questions' or 'not paying attention', when you were younger and the grannies were still around.
I went in search of an answer and I found these questions below on a blog posted by Ancestry Australia and New Zealand on January 9, 2012 in Australia. I have added a couple of things, as you can too.

I have printed out some copies and intend to pass them around to the oldies (the other oldies) in the family at our next get-together. Of course they'll all roll their eyes and think, 'ohhhh nooooooooo here she goes again'. But hopefully they will humour me and maybe your family will too.


Family Questions
Do you have a family legend or story that has been passed down for generations?
What traditions do you look forward to at family get-togethers?
What is unique about your family background or ethnicity?
How did your ancestors change your life?
Do you have any advice for future generations?
What is the most important thing you learned from your parents?
When was the best time in your life and why was it great?
What are you most proud of about your family?
How do you want to be remembered?
What is your favorite thing about being part of your family?

My Family
What quirky personality traits run in your family?
What physical characteristics run in your family?
What is/was your favorite activity to do with your mother or father?
How would your family spend a typical day together?
How would your mother or father punish or reward you as a child?
What things did you do with your brothers and sisters when you were growing up?
How have your brothers and sisters influenced your life?

Fun Family Questions
Who is the biggest troublemaker in your family?
Who in your family would you want to be stranded on a desert island with?
Which family member do you think could be famous?
Who is the best cook?
What is your favourite food?
What is your favourite song?
Who do you most want to be like in your family?
Who has the best sense of humour in your family?

World Questions
What do you think was the biggest problem facing the world when you were growing up?
What do you think is the biggest problem facing the world today?
What do you think are the discoveries and inventions that changed your life?
What do you think the world will be like for your familys future generations in 100 years?
What is your wish for the future generations of your family?

INSTRUCTIVE CODE ...

FOR MARRIED LADIES.


1. Let every wife be persuaded that there are two ways of governing a family; the first is by the expression of that will which belongs to force; the second by the power of mildness, to which even strength will yield. One is the power of the husband; a wife should never employ any other arms than gentleness. When a woman accustoms herself to say I will, she deserves to lose her empire.

2. Avoid contradicting your husband. When we smell at a rose, it is to imbibe the sweetness of its odour: we likewise look for every thing that is amiable from women. Whoever is often contradicted feels insensibly an aversion for the person who contradicts, which gains strength by time, and, whatever be her good
qualities, is not easily destroyed.

3.Occupy yourself only with household affairs. Wait till your husband confides to you affairs of higher importance, and do not give your advice till he asks it.
'
4.Never take upon, yourself to be a censor of your husband's morals, and do not read lectures to him. Let your preaching be a good example, and practice virtue yourself to make him in love with it.

5.Command his attentions by being always attentive to him; never exact any thing,
and you will obtain much; appear always flattered by the little he does for you,
which will excite him to perform more.

6.All men are vain ; never wound his vanity, not even in the most trifling instances.
A wife may have more sense than her husband, but she' should never seem to know it.

7.When a man gives wrong counsel, never make him feel that, he has done so, but lead him on by degrees to what is rational, with mildness and gentleness; when he is convinced,
leave him all the merit of having found out what was just and reasonable.

8.When a husband is out of temper, behave obligingly to him; if he is abusive, never retort;
and never prevail over him to humble him.

9.Choose well your female friends: have but few, and be careful of following their advice in all matters.

10. Cherish neatness without luxury, and pleasure without excess; dress with taste,
and particularly with modesty; vary the fashions of your dress, especially in regard to colours.
It gives a change to the ideas, and recalls pleasing recollections. Such things may appear trifling, but they are of more importance than is imagined.

11.Never be, - curious to pry into your husband's concerns, but obtain his confidence
by that which, at all times, you repose in him. Always preserve order and economy;
avoid being out of temper, and be careful never to scold.
By these means he will find his own house more pleasant than any other.

12. Seem always to obtain information from him, especially before company,
though you may pass yourself for a simpleton. Never forget that a wife owes all her importance
to that of her husband; Leave him entirely master of his actions, to go or come whenever he thinks fit.
A wife ought to make her company so amiable to her husband that he could not exist without it;
then he will not seek for any pleasure abroad if she does not partake of it with him.


transcribed from The Australian (Sydney, NSW : 1824 - 1848) issue Friday 1 August 1828, by janilye on the 29 January 2012

Below;
Still happily living by the code in 1900 in Dungog, New South Wales just as her mother and grandmother did.


9 comment(s), latest 2 years, 6 months ago

All the kings and Queens since William 1st

Horrible Histories has found an easy way to remember all the Kings and Queens of England, just click on This song it's so much more fun!

Here are the lyrics:-
I'm William the Conqueror
My enemies stood no chance
They call me the first English king
Although I come from France

1066, the Domesday book
I gave to history
So fat, on death my body burst
But enough about me

To help remember all your kings
I've come up with this song
A simple rhyme and ditty
For you all to sing along!

Oh! William!
(Bit short, init? We need more kings. Who came next?)

William second, cheeks were red
Killed out hunting, so it's said
I took over, Henry one
That's my next eldest son

Then King Stephen, it's true, check it!
Hi, Henry two, killed Thomas Beckett
Richard Lionheart? That's right!
Always spoiling for a fight

Oh, King John! What a disaster!
Rule restrained by Magna Carta!

William, William, Henry, Stephen
Henry, Richard, John, oi!
Time for my mate, King Henry eight
To take up this song

Henry three built the abbey
Ed one hated Scots
A red hot poker killed Ed two
That must have hurt him lots!

Edward third was a chivalry nerd
Began the hundred years war
Then Richard two was king, aged ten
Then Henry, yes one more!

King Henry four, plots galore
Not least from Henry five, moi
I killed ten score at Agincourt
Then Henry six arrived!

Edward four, Edward five
Richard the third, he's bad
'Cause he fought wars with Henry seventh
First Tudor and my dad

So Henry eight, I was great
Six wives, two were beheaded
Edward the sixth came next, but he died young
And so my dreaded
Daughter Mary ruled, so scary
Then along came... me!
I'm Liz the first, I had no kids
So Tudors RIP!

William, William, Henry, Stephen
Henry, Richard, John, oi!
Henry, Ed, Ed, Ed, Rich two
Then three more Henrys join our song!
Edward, Edward, Rich the third
Henry, Henry, Ed again
Mary one, good Queen Liz
That's me! Time for more men!

James six of Scotland next
Is English James the first, he led
Then Stuarts ruled, so Charles the first
The one who lost his head

No monarchy until came me,
Charles two, I liked to party
King Jimmy two was scary, oooh!
Then Mary was a smarty

She ruled with Will, their shoes were filled
By sourpuss Queen Anne Gloria
And so from then, you were ruled by men
Till along came Queen Victoria!

William, William, Henry, Stephen
Henry, Richard, John, oi!
Henry, Ed, Ed, Ed, Rich two
Then three more Henrys join our song!
Edward, Edward, Rich the third
Henry, Henry, Ed again
Mary one, good Queen liz
Jimmy, Charles and Charles and then
Jim, Will, Mary, Anne Gloria
Still to come, it's Queen Victoria!

And so began the Hanover gang
George one and George two... grim!
Then George the third was quite absurd
Till I replaced old him

King George the fourth and known henceforth
As angry, fat and cross... hang on!
It's true you beat Napoleon
But were mostly a dead loss... bang on!

Old William four was a sailor... ahoy!
That's nearly the end of the storya
As onto the scene comes the best loved queen
Hail to Queen Victoria!

William, William, Henry, Stephen
Henry, Richard, John, oi!
Henry, Ed, Ed, Ed, Rich two
Then three more Henrys join our song!
Edward, Edward, Rich the third
Henry, Henry, Ed again
Mary one, good Queen Liz
Jimmy, Charles and Charles and then
Jim, Will, Mary, Anne Gloria
George, George, George, George
Will, Victoria!
Victoria!

(I ruled for sixty four years, you know!)

Ed seven, George five
Then Ed, George sixth
Liz two then reigned and how!
And so our famous monarch song
Is brought right up to now! Oh!

William, William, Henry, Stephen
Henry, Richard, John, oi!
Henry, Ed, Ed, Ed, Rich two
Then three more Henrys join our song!
Edward, Edward, Rich the third
Henry, Henry, Ed again
Mary one, good Queen Liz
Jimmy, Charles and Charles and then
Jim, Will, Mary, Anne Gloria
George, George, George, George
Will, Victoria!
Edward, George, Edward, George six
And Queen Liz two completes the mix!

That's all the English kings and queens
Since William first that there have been!




1066 King William the Conqueror 1066-1087

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1087 King William Rufus (son of William) 1087-1100

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1100 King Henry I (William Rufus brother) 1100-1135

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1135 King Stephen (nephew of Henry I) 1135-1154

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
1154 King Henry II (grandson of Henry I) 1154-1189

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
1189 King Richard I (third son of Henry II) 1189-1199

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
1199 King John (fifth son of Henry II) 1199-1216

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
1216 King Henry III (son of John) 1216-1272

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
1272 King Edward I (son of Henry III) 1272-1307

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
1307 King Edward II (son of Edward I) 1307-1327

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
1327 King Edward III (son of Edward II) 1327-1377

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
1377 King Richard II (grandson of Edward III, son of the Black Prince) 1377-1399

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
1399 King Henry IV (grandson of Edward III, son of John of Gaunt) 1399-1413

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1413 King Henry V (son of Henry IV) 1413-1422

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1422 King Henry VI (son of Henry V) 1422-1461

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1461 King Edward IV ( youngest son of Edward III ) 1461-1483

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1483 King Richard III (uncle of Edward V) 1483-1485

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1485 Henry VII (grandson of Henry V) 1485-1509

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1509 Henry VIII ( son of Henry VII)
1509-1547

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1547 Edward V (Henry's son by Jane Seymour) 1547-1553

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1553 Mary (Henry's daughter by Queen Katherine of Aragon) 1553-1558

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1558 Elizabeth I (Henry's daughter by Anne Boleyn) 1558-1603

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1603 James I (great-great-grandson of Henry VII) 1603-1625

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1625 Charles I (second son of James) 1625-1649

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1649 The Commonwealth under the Cromwell rule 1649 - 1659

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1660 Charles II (oldest son of Charles I) 1660-1685

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1685 James II (brother of Charles II) 1685-1688

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1689 William of Orange (grandson of Charles I) and Mary (daughter of James II) 1689-1694

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1694 William III - Ruled alone after death of Mary 1694 - 1702

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1702 Anne (sister of Mary)
1702-1714

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1714 George I (great-grandson of James I) 1714-1727

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1727 George II (son of George I) 1727-1760

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1760 George III (grandson of George II) 1760-1820

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
1820 George IV (son of George III)
1820-1830

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
1830 William IV (brother of George IV)
1830-1837

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1837 Victoria (niece of William IV) 1837-1901

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1901 Edward VII (son of Victoria and Albert) 1901-1910

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1910 George V (second son of Edward VII) 1910-1936

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1936 Edward VIII (son of George V)

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1936 George VI (second son of George V) 1936-1952

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1952 Elizabeth II (daughter of George VI)




I love Horrible Histories


Mine injuries and deaths Victoria

Another site for your favourites is the Victorian Mining Accident Index compiled by Dave Evans and presented by the Ballarat & District Genealogical Society. This is my way of introducing you to a most informative site. It isn't only these few John Smiths injured or killed in mining accidents, but 5,600 miners from the 1850s to the 1940s.

Smith, Jno
1888/09/13
Injured
Married, 33 Y. O.
Ballarat
Buninyong
(A.R.Sec.Mines)

Smith, John
1862/00/00
Killed
30 Y. O.
Accident drowned
Castlemaine
(Dig. Evans)

Smith, John
1885/09/12
Injured
Single, 21 Y. O.
Castlemaine
Tarrangower
(A.R.Sec.Mines)

Smith, John
1886/08/03
Killed
Married, 28 Y. O.
Sandhurst
Eaglehawk
(A.R.Sec.Mines)

Smith, John
1913/00/00
Injured
Ballarat
Wilkinson & Co Mine
(A.R.Sec.Mines)

Smith, John F.
1892/08/10
Killed
Compo
Sandhurst
Eaglehawk
(A.R.Sec.Mines)

Smith, Jonathon
1875/03/31
Killed
Married, 41 Y. O.
4
Injury in claim
Sandhurst
Sandhurst
(C.I.R.)(Dig. Evans)


This photograph below I took at a little town called Yapeen, Victoria last month December 2011.

I'm always filled with a mixture of excitement and suspicion when I see a John Smith.
I wasn't disappointed this time.

After I took the photo, (I swear there was not another living soul to be seen in this town) I went around to the Guildford Hotel.

As I was showing the photograph to a couple of the locals, this old man pipes up " He was me grand father!"

This is the excitement part.

"I'll have another beer and a beer for this man here too please". I order, as I fossick in my bag for pen and notepad.

"Tell me about him." I coax all smiles and pen poised.

" Well, it wasn't his real name," says my new found drinking partner.

"Oh! I'm not surprised. Most John Smith's were hiding", says pedantic know-it-all me. " What was his real name?" I ask excitement mounting.

"William", says my new friend as I order another two drinks.

"William what," I ask impatiently.

"William Smith!"

Suspicion finally kicks in but not before the laughter from my drinking partner and his friends.