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Category: Scottish Research

Boyne - passenger list from Scotland to NSW 1839

The 619 ton ship, Boyne arrived on Wednesday 2nd January 1839 from Cromarty, Scotland, via Cape of Good Hope, having left the former Port the 1st. September 1838 and the latter the 23rd. November 1838.

Capt. Richardson, with 284 Government emigrants. Passenger - Rev. Colin Stewart (Scotland); Ewen Cameron, Esq., Surgeon Superintendent. Agent, Capt. Richardson.
Boyne was built in Calcutta in 1807.
Name of Owner: J. Somes.
Name of Broker or
Agent: Lachlan & Co.
Rate of Hire per Old Ton: 5/13/5 x 619

Of the 284 emigrants;
158 were adults
60 were children 7 to 14 years
67 were children under 7 years




A very successful voyage and one which prompted this 'Letter To The Editor' to the Sydney Gazette on the 10 January 1839.


SIR,
Although utter strangers in the colony, we shall feel much obliged to you if you will be so kind as to give the following testimony to Captain Richardson, of the ship Boyne, publicity through the medium of your useful journal. I am, sir, on behalf of all the Emigrants in the ship Boyne, your most obedient humble servant.
Charles M'Gregor.

The Emigrants just arrived from the Highlands of Scotland, by the ship Boyne, deem it a duty incumbent upon them to testify in this public manner their unfeigned gratitude and respect to Captain Richardson, for his kind, affectionate and gentlemanly conduct towards them.
He has, indeed, been as a brother to us all, and a father to the children.
His solicitude in directing all things for our comfort, and his unaffected manners, will not soon be forgotten by us.
The first officer, Mr. Daniel, and all the other Officers, and Seamen, also deserve our sincere thanks for their continued kindness to all the passengers.
The manner in which Mr. Ewen Cameron, the surgeon, has conducted the affairs committed to his charge is beyond all praise. His patience and unremitting attention to the sick could not be exceeded. His attention, also, in enforcing and directing the most salutary regulations
for the health and comfort of all has
proved eminently successful.
The Rev. Colin Stewart, who has acted as Chaplain on board, deserves our lasting gratitude, for he has spared no pains in his endeavours to improve the moral and intellectual capacities of all, particularly the young. His public and private ministrations are highly appre- ciated by all his fellow passengers :-the solemnity of public worship on the Lord's, day has been so congenial to our feelings. that we felt more at home than we other- wise could have done.
Mr. Duncan Cameron, who has acted as Schoolmaster, deserves the thanks and gratitude of all the parents on board, for his careful and unremitting endeavours to instill sound principles and communicate useful knowledge to the young.

Ship Boyne, Jan., 1838.

NOTE: Indeed the letter writer above has mistakenly dated it 1838. Also because a passenger list was never published, my source for the list below was found in the 'Index to Miscellaneous Immigrants'
within the NSW Government State Records.
Acknowledgement to Ann Smith a member of staff at State Records who indexed this series NRS 5313, Persons on Government Ships, Aug 1837-Feb 1840.
There are 107 names on this list.
Wives and Children's names have not been included.
I thought of removing the reel numbers and NRS but this way there can be no mistake when searching. janilye




SURNAME FIRST NAME AGE DATE COPY PAGE/S ITEM REMARKS SERIES

BUCHANAN Dugald 34 02/01/1839 Reel 2654 182 [4/4780] Wife 30; ploughman NRS 5313
CAMERON Agnes 25 02/01/1839 Reel 2654 186 [4/4780] Unmarried; dairy woman NRS 5313
CAMERON Alexander 25 02/01/1839 Reel 2654 184 [4/4780] Unmarried; shepherd NRS 5313
CAMERON Alexander 28 02/01/1839 Reel 2654 184 [4/4780] Unmarried; shepherd NRS 5313
CAMERON Alexander 30 02/01/1839 Reel 2654 182 [4/4780] Wife 30; shepherd NRS 5313
CAMERON Alexander 32 02/01/1839 Reel 2654 182 [4/4780] Wife 30; farm labourer NRS 5313
CAMERON Allan 38 02/01/1839 Reel 2654 182 [4/4780] Wife 32; shepherd NRS 5313
CAMERON Allen 38 02/01/1839 Reel 2654 184 [4/4780] Unmarried; ploughman NRS 5313
CAMERON Anne 24 02/01/1839 Reel 2654 186 [4/4780] Unmarried; farm servant NRS 5313
CAMERON Archibald 28 02/01/1839 Reel 2654 184 [4/4780] Unmarried; shepherd NRS 5313
CAMERON Archibald 35 02/01/1839 Reel 2654 182 [4/4780] Wife 28; farmer NRS 5313
CAMERON Archibald 40 02/01/1839 Reel 2654 182 [4/4780] Wife 40; shepherd NRS 5313
CAMERON Cathrine 20 02/01/1839 Reel 2654 186 [4/4780] Unmarried; house servant NRS 5313
CAMERON Cathrine 27 02/01/1839 Reel 2654 186 [4/4780] Widow; house servant NRS 5313
CAMERON Christie 22 02/01/1839 Reel 2654 186 [4/4780] Unmarried; dairy woman NRS 5313
CAMERON Christina 21 02/01/1839 Reel 2654 186 [4/4780] Unmarried; house servant NRS 5313
CAMERON Christina 24 02/01/1839 Reel 2654 186 [4/4780] Unmarried; house servant NRS 5313
CAMERON Donald 23 02/01/1839 Reel 2654 184 [4/4780] Unmarried; shepherd NRS 5313
CAMERON Donald 35 02/01/1839 Reel 2654 182 [4/4780] Wife 33; shepherd NRS 5313
CAMERON Duncan 30 02/01/1839 Reel 2654 184 [4/4780] Unmarried; teacher NRS 5313
CAMERON Duncan (Mrs) 41 02/01/1839 Reel 2654 182 [4/4780] Husband 35; farm servant NRS 5313
CAMERON Ewen 25 02/01/1839 Reel 2654 182 [4/4780] Wife 21; shepherd NRS 5313
CAMERON Ewen 36 02/01/1839 Reel 2654 182 [4/4780] Wife 30; shepherd NRS 5313
CAMERON Flora 27 02/01/1839 Reel 2654 186 [4/4780] Unmarried; dairy woman NRS 5313
CAMERON George 40 02/01/1839 Reel 2654 182 [4/4780] Wife 35; shepherd NRS 5313
CAMERON Johanna 4 02/01/1839 Reel 2654 189 [4/4780] Died in the buildings 15 Jan 1839;&family NRS 5313
CAMERON John 20 02/01/1839 Reel 2654 184 [4/4780] Unmarried; farm servant NRS 5313
CAMERON John 23 02/01/1839 Reel 2654 184 [4/4780] Unmarried; ploughman NRS 5313
CAMERON John 29 02/01/1839 Reel 2654 182 [4/4780] Wife 28; shepherd NRS 5313
CAMERON John 30 02/01/1839 Reel 2654 182 [4/4780] Wife 27; shepherd NRS 5313
CAMERON John 40 02/01/1839 Reel 2654 182 [4/4780] Wife 33; shepherd and farmer NRS 5313
CAMERON Mary 17 02/01/1839 Reel 2654 186 [4/4780] Unmarried; house servant NRS 5313
CAMERON Mary 18 02/01/1839 Reel 2654 186 [4/4780] Unmarried; farm servant NRS 5313
CAMERON Mary 22 02/01/1839 Reel 2654 186 [4/4780] Unmarried; house servant NRS 5313
CAMERON Paul 21 02/01/1839 Reel 2654 184 [4/4780] Unmarried; shepherd NRS 5313
CAMPBELL Christina 23 02/01/1839 Reel 2654 186 [4/4780] Unmarried; farm servant NRS 5313
CAMPBELL Donald 38 02/01/1839 Reel 2654 184 [4/4780] Unmarried; shepherd NRS 5313
CAMPBELL James 35 02/01/1839 Reel 2654 182 [4/4780] Wife 32; farmer and shepherd NRS 5313
CAMPBELL John 23 02/01/1839 Reel 2654 184 [4/4780] Unmarried; shepherd NRS 5313
CAMPBELL Peter 31 02/01/1839 Reel 2654 184 [4/4780] Unmarried; shepherd NRS 5313
CAMPBELL Robert 35 02/01/1839 Reel 2654 182 [4/4780] Wife 40; shepherd NRS 5313
CAMPBELL William 26 02/01/1839 Reel 2654 184 [4/4780] Unmarried; shepherd NRS 5313
GRAHAM John 24 02/01/1839 Reel 2654 184 [4/4780] Unmarried; farm servant NRS 5313
HUNTER Robina 34 02/01/1839 Reel 2654 188 [4/4780] Unmarried; seamstress NRS 5313
JEFFREY John 38 02/01/1839 Reel 2654 184 [4/4780] Unmarried; farmer NRS 5313
KENNEDY Alexander 32 02/01/1839 Reel 2654 182 [4/4780] Wife 30; shepherd NRS 5313
KENNEDY Allen 33 02/01/1839 Reel 2654 182 [4/4780] Wife 25; shepherd NRS 5313
KENNEDY Charles 47 02/01/1839 Reel 2654 182 [4/4780] Wife 40; farm servant NRS 5313
KENNEDY Hugh 22 02/01/1839 Reel 2654 184 [4/4780] Unmarried; farm servant NRS 5313
KENNEDY John 27 02/01/1839 Reel 2654 184 [4/4780] Unmarried; farm servant NRS 5313
KENNEDY Niel 26 02/01/1839 Reel 2654 184 [4/4780] Unmarried; farm servant NRS 5313
MCARTHUR Donald 28 02/01/1839 Reel 2654 182 [4/4780] Wife 21; shepherd NRS 5313
MCCOLL Sarah 65 02/01/1839 Reel 2654 188 [4/4780] Unmarried; dairy woman NRS 5313
MCDONALD Alexander 20 02/01/1839 Reel 2654 186 [4/4780] Unmarried; carpenter and wheelwright NRS 5313
MCDONALD Alexander 29 02/01/1839 Reel 2654 186 [4/4780] Unmarried; shepherd NRS 5313
MCDONALD Allan 36 02/01/1839 Reel 2654 182 [4/4780] Wife 29; shepherd NRS 5313
MCDONALD Angus 24 02/01/1839 Reel 2654 184 [4/4780] Unmarried; shepherd NRS 5313
MCDONALD Angus 44 02/01/1839 Reel 2654 182 [4/4780] Wife 22; shepherd NRS 5313
MCDONALD Anne 17 02/01/1839 Reel 2654 186 [4/4780] Unmarried; house servant NRS 5313
MCDONALD Archibald 32 02/01/1839 Reel 2654 182 [4/4780] Wife 19; shepherd NRS 5313
MCDONALD Duncan 60 02/01/1839 Reel 2654 182 [4/4780] Wife 48; shepherd NRS 5313
MCDONALD Ellen 16 02/01/1839 Reel 2654 186 [4/4780] Unmarried; house servant NRS 5313
MCDONALD Ewen 24 02/01/1839 Reel 2654 186 [4/4780] Unmarried; shepherd NRS 5313
MCDONALD Janet 16 02/01/1839 Reel 2654 186 [4/4780] Unmarried; house servant NRS 5313
MCDONALD John 26 02/01/1839 Reel 2654 184 [4/4780] Unmarried; shepherd NRS 5313
MCDONALD John 35 02/01/1839 Reel 2654 182 [4/4780] Wife 38; farmer NRS 5313
MCDONALD Margaret 25 02/01/1839 Reel 2654 188 [4/4780] Unmarried; laundry maid NRS 5313
MCDONALD Margery 20 02/01/1839 Reel 2654 186 [4/4780] Unmarried; house servant NRS 5313
MCDONALD Ronald 19 02/01/1839 Reel 2654 186 [4/4780] Unmarried; shepherd NRS 5313
MCDONALD Sally 22 02/01/1839 Reel 2654 186 [4/4780] Unmarried; house servant NRS 5313
MCEWAN John 17 02/01/1839 Reel 2654 186 [4/4780] Unmarried; shepherd NRS 5313
MCGREGOR Robert 39 02/01/1839 Reel 2654 182 [4/4780] Wife 35; gardener NRS 5313
MCKENZIE Allen 44 02/01/1839 Reel 2654 182 [4/4780] Wife 34; agriculturalist NRS 5313
MCKENZIE Janet 24 02/01/1839 Reel 2654 188 [4/4780] Unmarried; dairy woman NRS 5313
MCKILLOP Donald 34 02/01/1839 Reel 2654 184 [4/4780] Unmarried; shepherd NRS 5313
MCKINNON Donald 28 02/01/1839 Reel 2654 184 [4/4780] Unmarried; shepherd NRS 5313
MCKINNON Dugald 19 02/01/1839 Reel 2654 186 [4/4780] Unmarried; shepherd NRS 5313
MCKINNON Duncan 17 02/01/1839 Reel 2654 184 [4/4780] Unmarried; shepherd NRS 5313
MCKINNON Ewen 22 02/01/1839 Reel 2654 184 [4/4780] Unmarried; shepherd NRS 5313
MCKINNON Ewen 62 02/01/1839 Reel 2654 182 [4/4780] Wife 51; shepherd NRS 5313
MCKINNON Mary 19 02/01/1839 Reel 2654 188 [4/4780] Unmarried; house servant NRS 5313
MCKINNON Peter 30 02/01/1839 Reel 2654 184 [4/4780] Unmarried; shepherd NRS 5313
MCLEAN Alexander 25 02/01/1839 Reel 2654 186 [4/4780] Unmarried; farm servant NRS 5313
MCLELLAN Mary 32 02/01/1839 Reel 2654 186 [4/4780] Unmarried; house keeper NRS 5313
MCMASTER Allen 40 02/01/1839 Reel 2654 182 [4/4780] Wife 44; farmer NRS 5313
MCMASTER Anne 18 02/01/1839 Reel 2654 188 [4/4780] Unmarried; house servant NRS 5313
MCMASTER Ellen 17 02/01/1839 Reel 2654 188 [4/4780] Unmarried; house servant NRS 5313
MCMASTER Margaret 17 02/01/1839 Reel 2654 188 [4/4780] Unmarried; house servant NRS 5313
MCMASTER Mary 20 02/01/1839 Reel 2654 188 [4/4780] Unmarried; house servant NRS 5313
MCMILLAN William 30 02/01/1839 Reel 2654 182 [4/4780] Wife 28; shepherd NRS 5313
MCMILLEN Cathrine 21 02/01/1839 Reel 2654 188 [4/4780] Unmarried; house servant NRS 5313
MCMULLEN Jessie 18 02/01/1839 Reel 2654 188 [4/4780] Unmarried; house servant NRS 5313
MCNAUGHTEN John 21 02/01/1839 Reel 2654 186 [4/4780] Unmarried; shepherd NRS 5313
MCNAUGHTON Donald 27 02/01/1839 Reel 2654 184 [4/4780] Wife 24; shepherd NRS 5313
MCNAUGHTON James 25 02/01/1839 Reel 2654 184 [4/4780] Unmarried; shepherd NRS 5313
MCPHAIL Donald 25 02/01/1839 Reel 2654 184 [4/4780] Wife 28; shepherd NRS 5313
MCPHEE Alexander 26 02/01/1839 Reel 2654 184 [4/4780] Wife 23; ploughman NRS 5313
MCPHEE Ewen 25 02/01/1839 Reel 2654 186 [4/4780] Unmarried; sawyer NRS 5313
MCPHEE John 21 02/01/1839 Reel 2654 186 [4/4780] Unmarried; shepherd NRS 5313
MCPHEE Mary 23 02/01/1839 Reel 2654 188 [4/4780] Unmarried; house maid NRS 5313
MCPHEE Peter 37 02/01/1839 Reel 2654 182 [4/4780] Wife 27; farmer NRS 5313
MCPHERSON Jean 21 02/01/1839 Reel 2654 186 [4/4780] Unmarried; house servant NRS 5313
MCVICAR Archibald 30 02/01/1839 Reel 2654 182 [4/4780] Wife 34; shepherd and servant NRS 5313
MCVICAR Norman 36 02/01/1839 Reel 2654 182 [4/4780] Wife 38; labourer NRS 5313
ROBERTSON Walter 35 02/01/1839 Reel 2654 184 [4/4780] Wife 38; joiner NRS 5313
SINCLAIR Isabella 34 02/01/1839 Reel 2654 188 [4/4780] Unmarried; house maid NRS 5313
STEWART Alexander 30 02/01/1839 Reel 2654 184 [4/4780] Wife 28; shepherd and farmer NRS 5313
STEWART Donald 14 02/01/1839 Reel 2654 186 [4/4780] Unmarried; shepherd NRS 5313
TROTTER William 21 02/01/1839 Reel 2654 186 [4/4780] Unmarried; farm overseer NRS 5313


Below is a photograph of the Ship Boyne's Passenger Record Book


1 comment(s), latest 2 years, 8 months ago

William Glas MCALPIN 1810-1902

William Glas McALPIN, the son of Peter MCALPIN 1768-1850 and Elizabeth, nee ELTON 1778-1817 was born on 6 October 1810 in Stirling, Perthshire, Scotland, died on 2 Feb 1902 in Bulga, NSW, Australia. He died on the 2 February 1902 at the age of 91. He was buried on 5 February 1902 in St Mark's, Church of England cemetery, Bulga, NSW, Australia.

William Glas McALPIN arrived age 18 months with his parents and 2 siblings, Peter and Sarah, arrived from London as free settlers on the ship "General Graham" 29 January 1812.

William was known generally in life as 'Billy Mack' and When Archibald BELL and his party discovered the alternate route over the Blue Mountains (Bells Line of Road) William Glas McALPIN was a member of his party.

William married Susannah ONUS, daughter of Joseph ONUS 1781-1835 and Ann EATHER 1793-1865, on 1 February 1833 in Christ Church, Church of England, Castlereagh, New South Wales.

Susannah was born on 28 October 1815 in Cornwallis, NSW. died on 10 August 1882 in Bulga, NSW. at age 66, and was buried on 12 August 1882 in St Mark's, Church of England cemetery, Bulga, NSW.
William McALPIN built a brick home in 1834 in the main street of Richmond, NSW with financial help from Joseph ONUS (the father of his wife) and set up a blacksmiths shop at the rear.

Their first 3 children all died within 3 years

The children of William Glas MCALPIN and Susannah, nee ONUS were:-


1.Elizabeth McALPIN was born on 25 October 1833 in Richmond, NSW. died on 11 March 1835 in Richmond, NSW, at age 1, and was buried on 1 April 1835 in St Peter's, Church of England cemetery, Richmond, NSW.

2.Ann McALPIN was born on 21 January 1836 in Richmond, NSW, and died on 6 February 1838 in Richmond, NSW, at age 2, and was buried on 8 February 1838 in St Peter's, Church of England cemetery, Richmond, NSW.

3.Peter McALPIN was born on 16 November 1838 in Richmond, NSW, died on 25 November 1838 in Richmond, NSW and was buried on 26 November 1838 in St Peter's, Church of England cemetery, Richmond, NSW.


4.William McALPIN was born on 19 February 1840 in Richmond, NSW. died on 12 August 1923 in Bulga, NSW, at age 83, and was buried in 1923 in St Mark's, Church of England cemetery, Bulga, NSW.

William married (1)Eva Mary PEBERDY b: 1846, d: 15 October 1868.
on 10 September 1867 in St Matthew's Church, Mount Dangar, NSW.

William next married (2)Elizabeth CHAPMAN b: 4 December 1850, d:29 July 1933 on 29 April 1874 in Burrowell, Howes Valley, NSW.


5.Susannah McALPIN was born on 13 May 1842 in Richmond, NSW, Australia, died on 18 January 1882 in "Oreel" Station, Narrabri, NSW, at age 39, and was buried on 19 January 1882 in "Oreel" Station, Narrabri, NSW.
Susannah married MacDonald CLARK b: 20 September 1836, d: 10 February 1918. on 2 Apr 1863 in St Mark's, Church of England, Bulga, NSW.

6.Sarah McALPIN was born on 28 July 1845 in Richmond, NSW. and died on 3 July 1922 in Singleton, NSW. at age 76.
Sarah married William WOODS b: 4 March 1844, d: 7 May 1933.
on 16 Sep 1868 in St Mark's, Church of England, Bulga, NSW, Australia.


7.Joseph McALPIN was born on 31 January 1849 in Bulga, NSW, Australia, died on 12 February 1913 in Bulga, NSW, Australia at age 64, and was buried in 1913 in St Mark's, Church of England cemetery, Bulga, NSW.
Joseph married (1)Elizabeth Jane DAWES b: 1849, d: 19 April 1884.
on 25 June 1873 in All Saint's, Church of England, Patricks Plains, NSW. Joseph next married (2)Amelia Therese ROGERS b:20 September 1861, d:8 September 1945.
on 15 July 1886 in Roman Catholic Church, Patricks Plains, NSW.

8. Mary McALPIN was born on 12 January 1852 in Bulga, NSW. died on 3 January 1915 in Bulga, NSW at age 62, and was buried in 1915 in St Mark's, Church of England cemetery, Bulga, NSW.
Mary married Edward ROSER b: 13 March 1848, d: 9 November 1930 on 14 December 1870 in All Saint's, Church of England, Singleton, NSW.


At the end of 1841 the family moved to Bulga - they settled close to their relatives on Wollombi Brook.
William's life long hobby and interest was the breeding and showing of Clydesdale horses - showing horses at many shows including Maitland, Mudgee and Sydney - and acting as a judge at many country shows.

In 1871 William Glas McALPIN, purchased 465 acres of land at Bulga. It was land that had been Thomas TAILBY's and George EATON's grants, along with land that Joseph ONUS had owned and willed to his sons. William had purchased the land from Thomas Alexander ONUS 1849-1934, the son of his sister Elizabeth 1825-1884., which had been left to him by his father.

From then on William and his family resided on this land, which he named "Glen Alpin", and were next-door neighbours to Thomas Eather 1824-1909 and his wife Eliza, nee CROWLEY at 'Meerea'


William Glas McALPIN and His wife Susannah are both buried in the Anglican Cemetery at Bulga their epitaph reads;

"Kind Hearts are More than Coronets".
-----

*Extracts from "Among the Pastoralists and Producers," an account from the roving reporter, Harold M MacKENZIE.

1895.
"On leaving Mr THORLEY's property intending to shape a course for Warkworth, I was persuaded to alter it, upon learning from that gentleman that one of the oldest and best men for recounting events of the past lived at Bulga, in the person of Mr. William Glass [sic] McALPIN, so hither I hied myself without delay".

At the time, 1895/1896, the road between Singleton and Bulga was in good condition and the weather was hot. Bulga, an Aboriginal name for "Mountain," had a Public School, Church of England, a Wesleyan Chapel and a School of Arts. The "Band of Hope" numbered from 300 to 400 people, with William Glas McALPIN taking a leading role. Bulga was a sober place and publicans and sly groggers got short shift: "Young man, we wouldn't have 'em near us" said William Glas, who MacKENZIE found enjoyed fishing and was a fit 85-year-old. Getting produce to market was a problem and William sent his wheat to Maitland over a bad road. However cattle were no problem -they were driven over the Putty to the Hawkesbury, thence to the stock markets at Homebush.

William Glas McALPIN related that he arrived in Sydney on the ship "General Graham" in January 1812, which carried stores for the colony and a small number of passengers, who were all free settlers with a trade. His father he said was a blacksmith and he had been a smithy at Windsor. William Glas learnt the trade there. He bought a piece of land from George BOWMAN and moved to Richmond where he lived to 1841. He made his first droving trip to Bulga on Mr ONUS's account, the first in 1826 and he finally settled there in 1841. He said droving wasn't a bad life, people were very honest and he never had any problem getting paid.

William related that his sister, Sarah McALPIN, was the first white woman at Bulga and that he and his brother-in-law Mr ONUS had 1,200 acres between them at Bulga.

Between Bulga and Warkworth.
The first week of January 1896.
"The first week in January will be remembered as one of the hottest, if not the hottest, I have ever experienced." After leaving John HAYES' "Rock View," MacKENZIE journeyed to fellow orchardist George PARTRIDGE. George's 80-acre property was considered to be better than HAYES for it had two good creeks on both sides. While at PARTRIDGE's place MacKENZIE was shown a huge apricot tree which bore 1,700 dozen apricots in 1895 - plus many that fell to the ground in wind storms. He had very little problem with disease and pests but the 12 acres planted with oranges of Mr ETHER [sic] who lived thereabout was almost entirely destroyed by caterpillars. His pumpkin crop went the same way "even though a very determined Mr EATHER re-planted the crop three times, the thirty acres were ravaged on each occasion."

In The Bulga District. Among the Pastoralists and Producers.
By Harold M MacKENZIE.
15th February 1896
"In {one of my past articles} it will be remembered, I dealt chiefly with reminiscences of Bulga when Mr William McALPIN came to the place as far back as 1826 - a man of whom it may be said landed with the proverbial half-crown in his pocket, apprenticed himself to a trade, bought land, and so with thrift and perseverance gradually worked himself to the front-and stayed there. Now, in his declining years, he has the pleasure of seeing his grandchildren around him with peace and comfort reigning in the household. Can a man be expected to do more in a general way?
Amongst the various stock which this old gentleman has concerned himself through life his "hobby" seems to have been breeding draughts. Without any undue flattery, it may be stated that Mr McALPIN has taken more prizes at populous centres, such as Mudgee, Maitland, Sydney etc, than any one else in the same line. Conversing in reference to the different breeds, Mr McALPIN's experience has been solely with the Clydesdale, and as compared with the Suffolk Punch, from what he has seen, he would not be inclined to make a change. To give one instance of his success as a prize taker, it may be stated that a Clydesdale filly, now a two year old, obtained when a yearling no less than three prizes in succession. Talking of horses, concerning which the old gentleman made more pertinent remarks, he said nothing more to the point than when he exclaimed, "I don't believe in breeding mules, my friend." Latterly, of course, Mr McALPIN has not concerned himself much with horse breeding, being content to take a rod and wander forth to enjoy the pursuit that old Isaak (sic) loved.


[Research Notes: The Discovery of (St) Patrick's Plains.
(Editor).
John HOWE, with his party, discovered a route from Windsor to the Hunter River in March 1820 which varies little to the present day Putty Road. During 1887 several letters were published in the Maitland Mercury pertaining to the discovery.

The correspondents were "Jus Sanguinis" (anonymous) William Glas McALPIN, George Thomas LODER, Elizabeth YEOMANS (Mrs.) and William COLLINS. William Glas McALPIN's first letter of July 5, 1887, "trusting that "Jus Sanguinis" would not feel aggrieved at {his} correction "brought forth a response on July 16, to both prior letters from George Thomas LODER. Four days later, July 20, Benjamin SINGLETON's daughter, Elizabeth YEOMANS entered the dispute then she was followed by William COLLINS. The following letter, written by William G McALPIN, was his reply to two articles published in the Maitland Mercury that originated from George T LODER and Elizabeth YEOMANS.

July 26, 1887.
To the Editor of the Maitland Mercury.
"Sir - I observe that my letter to you on the subject of the discovery of Patrick's Plains has called forth, - first, a reply from Mr G T LODER, and secondly, from Mrs E YEOMANS. Both of whom seem to think I have been misinformed on the subject, and as I have good reason to believe that the information which I conveyed was perfectly correct, I beg that you will again allow me space in your valuable columns to make reply. Now, as Mr LODER was the first to take exception to what I had written, I purpose to deal with him first. In confirmation of his information he has sent you various extracts on the subject from the journal of the late Mr John HOWE, but strange to say, he has not given one date; and not a word is said about the journey from the point at which the party crossed the branch at TURNBULL's farm, till they reached a point some forty miles further on, namely, "Puttee". The extract then states that they were unable to proceed further, on account of the numerous lagoons and creeks in the way. Now although I have travelled the road many times, (and my first trip dates back as far as 1826), I have never seen anything in the shape of creeks or lagoons to impede my progress. I have travelled the road in company with two of the party who first found it, namely, the late Messrs G LODER and T DARGAN (sic), and although we often conversed on the subject, I have never heard of either of them state that they met with any such difficulties, or that they went by any other but that known as the Bulga. I am not therefore much inclined to place much confidence in what is supposed to be Mr HOWE's journal. The information I afforded you in my last was collected from the late Mr Phillip THORLEY just about a year before his decease, and as that gentleman was noted for his sterling truth and integrity, I do not see why I should doubt that which he told me with his own lips. So much for Mr LODER: now for Mrs YEOMANS".
"The lady states that her father was the first white man who ever set foot upon Patrick Plains, and discovered the grand country that it comprises, but I can tell Mrs YEOMANS that the Government were well aware already of the fertility of the Hunter River valley, and were only endeavouring to find an overland route to it. Regarding any desire on my part to cast a slur upon the memory of the late Mr B SINGLETON on account of his determination to return when his blackfellow told him how close he was to the river, I must state that far from any such thought entering my head, I rather, on the other hand, commend him for his common sense. For undoubtedly, had he gone on with PARR he would never have received any compensation for his discovery (having no appointment in the expedition) and that the honour of the discovery should have been his, had he gone on, has been proved by the fact that PARR failed in finding a road. As to Mrs YEOMANS ignorance of PARR, I must inform her that she has not studied Australian history very closely, or she would know that PARR was a mineralogist in the service of the Government, and that previous to the expedition which I mentioned in my last (of which he was the head), he had been with OXLEY in his exploring excursions in the east. With reference to the Randel PARR of whom Mrs YEOMANS speaks, I may say that I probably knew him as well, if not better than she did. This lady also says that her mother, the wife of the late Mr B SINGLETON, and Mrs Phillip THORLEY were the first white women who set foot on Patrick's Plains. But though her memory is so green, I must yet refresh it by asking her if another white woman by the name of * HOYLE did not accompany them? Mrs YEOMANS also states that her father was the leader of the expedition, who found the track over the Bulga; but if such was the case it is singular that the Government in granting members of the party compensation awarded Mr SINGLETON only 200 acres, and Mr HOWE 700 acres. Another significant fact regarding this matter is that not one place along the route bears the name SINGLETON, while no less than three were named after Mr HOWE - namely Howe's Waterhole, Howe's Valley, and Howe's Mountain - all of which names have been retained to the present day. In my opinion, it is evident that Mr HOWE was the leader of the party, though Mr SINGLETON, no doubt, rendered valuable assistance as a guide".

"In conclusion, I may state that I have no wish to enter a controversy on the subject, but I am fully convinced that neither * Mr HOWE nor Mr SINGLETON ever stood on Patrick's Plains till they did so together when they crossed the Bulga in the expedition mentioned in my last". (* The date given by William in his prior letter was 1818. Ed.).

"Apologising for again trespassing upon your space - I am, etc.,"

W G M'ALPIN.
Glen Alpin, Bulga, 26th July, 1887.

* In a published answer (Maitland Mercury) to William G McALPIN's question about the woman named HOYLE, Elizabeth YEOMANS replied:-
"She was the wife of the man who brought Mr H BALDWIN's sheep over. She was a nurse, and came to attend my mother at the birth of a ** son in January 1823 and she returned with her husband shortly after.

** This son would have been John SINGLETON who married in 1844 Jane Ann ROTTON and died of dysentery in 1849 whence returning to NSW from the Californian Gold Fields. (according to our other records John SINGLETON died at sea during the voyage to the Californian Gold Fields !!!). The later would be correct as John SINGLETON & Jane Ann ROTTON had 3 daughters born between 1845 and 1850.


PIONEERS.
Now, at this time their shadows fall
Across the intervening years,
Bringing remembrance that stirs
The blood; let memory call
Back, back from out the shadowy past These men who tilled the virgin soil,
Blazoned new trails; by dint of toil
Gave us our heritage, so that at last
We who follow on may reap
The harvest sown by those who gave
E'en of life's blood; yet, o'er their graves
Do monumental stones that mark their sleep
Give greater tribute than this land,
Primeval yet-but for their hands.
-Thomas Wentworth.
janilye