janilye on Family Tree Circles

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To HOOCH Looking for BURNS

For some reason I am unable to post a comment on any of your journals!

I will take you through my Rex Raymond BURNS 1928-1983 research step by step so you can go over it.

1949 - Apprentice Carpenter 128 Great East Hwy. Midland Junction.
1954 - Carpenter Midland Junction
He married Jean Mary LORIMER about 1951. daughter of G J LORIMER
1958 - Carpenter Bushmead Rd., Hazelmere
1963 ditto
1968 ditto
1972 Clerk 1 Weber Place, Dianella
He and Jean remained there till his death in 1983
CEMETERY RECORD ; BURNS REX RAYMOND 55 years 1983 DIANELLA
There are a lot of Thomas Burns' and you are going to need certificates for Rex to confirm where he was born.
The West Australian Friday 27 July 1951
LORIMER-BURNS: The engagement is announced and the marriage will take place shortly between Jean Lorimer. Kalamunda-road, South Guildford. and Rex Burns, 128 York-road. Midland Junction.

And the age tells me this isn't him but found it interesting, and besides how many Rex Burns could there be at Midland Junction and the papers arn't always right:
The West Australian Friday 26 May 1950
YOUNG PLAYERS IN LACROSSE SQUAD
The policy of most sporting bodies in fostering juniors is one that is beginning to pay dividends in almost all branches of sport and the W.A. Lacrosse Association has certainly benefited from the scheme which was started during the year.
This is borne out by the unusually large number of young players included in the State practice squad. A number of them are under 20.
One of the lads, Rex Burns, has seven years experience in lacrosse at the age of 19. He began playing in club games at the age of 12 and since that time has been a regular player for the strong Midland Junction team. He fills the important position of third home. He has moulded his game on the style of a clubmate, Arthur Horner, one of the best-known players in the State. Burns's ambition is to gain State selection and if he is chosen this year he will probably be the youngest player to compete in an interstate carnival.
apart from a speeding fine in 1947 that's about it.
I looked at the Burns people buried at Karrakatta.
and I found a death for a Rita M J BURNS in 1935
WA.bd&m DEATHS:
BURNS RITA M J Female PERTH 1283 1935
I decided to investigate and discovered her full name before marriage was Rita Madeline Julia EDMONDS born in NSW.
nsw.bd&m BIRTHS:
9250/1892 EDMONDS RITA M J JOHN T IDA M BURWOOD
This girl went to Queensland and married Thomas James BURNS in 1912;
Qld.bd&m MARRIAGES:
1912/C3004 Edmonds Rita Julia Madeline Burns Thomas James
Rita was buried at Karrakatta
CEMETERY RECORD: BURNS RITA MADELINE JULIA 43 years died 25 July 1935 PERTH

So I went back to the newspapers and have confirmed that Rita was indeed Rex's mother:-
The West Australian Friday 26 July 1935
DEATHS
BURNS. On July 25, at the Perth Hospital, Rita M. J., of 20 Adelaide-terrace, loving mother of Joyce, Audrey and Rex. Dearly loved.
BURNS. On July 25, 1985. at the Perth Hos pital, Rita Madeline Julia Burns, late of 30 Adelaide-terrace, East Perth, beloved sister of Gladys Evelyn (Mrs A. Cropper, Bayswater), and William Corcoran (Kilkenny, South Australia); aged 43 years.
FUNERAL
BURNS. The Friends of the late Mrs. Rita Madeline Julia Burns, late of 20 Adelaide terrace, East Perth, are respectfully informed that her remains will be interred in the Roman Catholic portion of the Karrakatta

Rita Madeline Julia Edmonds was the daughter of Ida Mary LOGAN b: 1870 in Ryde NSW and died in Perth WA on the 22 October 1933 Buried at Karrakatta Cemetary, Perth, before she died she was living at 15 Garret Road, Bayswater, WA Her profession was Nurse. Her parents were Ernest LOGAN and Julia Victoria SIMES.
She married 1. John Thomas EDMONDS b: 17 AUG 1870 in Beechworth, Victoria on the 2 January 1891 in Sydney.
Divorce July 14, 1897 Sydney. 2. Married William CORCORAN in 1915 in Perth WA.

Herald of the Morning

OF LIVERPOOL, built in 1855 at St. John New Brunswick. Captain G RUDOLPH, MASTER, BURTHEN 1291 TONS Surgeon onboard Dr. G.F.Hatch
Departing the PORT OF LIVERPOOL on the 10 March 1858, arriving in SYDNEY, NEW SOUTH WALES, 25TH JUNE 1858

IMMIGRANTS per ship HERALD OF THE MORNING- Notice is hereby given, that the undermentioned persons, for whom passages were provided to this colony. In pursuance of deposits made under the Remittance Regulations, have arrived in the ship Herald of the Morning, and that they will be prepared to join their friends, the single females from the Institution, Hyde Park Barracks on and after their arrival there, and the married families and single men from the ship, THIS DAY, at 4 p.m.The Sydney Morning Herald Friday 25 June 1858.

Crew
RUDOLPH G CAPTAIN
BROWN W CHIEF OFFICER 32 BRITISH
BLACK A 2ND OFFICER 29 BRITISH
GONDGE T 3RD OFFICER 21 US
CARLISLE A CARPENTER 26 BRITISH
MCBRIDE W CARPENTERS MATE 25 BRITISH
ROBINSON H BOATSWAIN 22 BRITISH
STEPHENSON W SAILS 22 BRITISH
MURRAY G J STEWARD 34 BRITISH
FLEMMING P COOK 32 BRITISH
MILLER F A. B. 28 BRITISH
NEWTON J A. B. 33 BRITISH
BROWN P A. B. 22 FOREIGN
MCFARLANE J A. B. 25 BRITISH
DAVIS J A. B. 24 BRITISH
WILLIAMS J A. B. 26 BRITISH
SMITH F A. B. 23 BRITISH
MCGEE A A. B. 23 BRITISH
WILLIAMS R A. B. 22 FOREIGN
MARRIER J A. B. 23 BRITISH
LAING J A. B. 28 BRITISH
RATCLIFFE W A. B. 23 BRITISH
FLEETWOOD E A. B. 27 BRITISH
WILSON J A. B. 22 BRITISH
ORR J A. B. 40 BRITISH
FRANK J A. B. 21 BRITISH
ANGEL H A. B. 26 BRITISH
ATKINSON J A. B. 23 BRITISH
WEST T A. B. 24 BRITISH
FREWIN D A. B. 28 BRITISH
JAGHAM J ORDY 22 BRITISH
MORGAN J ORDY 19 BRITISH
MARTIN T ORDY 20 BRITISH
JOHNSTON W ORDY 18 BRITISH
BURRY B BAKER 36 BRITISH
LEWIS T BOY 18 BRITISH
WILLIAMS E BOY 15 BRITISH
GEORGE J A. B. 30 FOREIGN
SEYLAND N A. B. 28 FOREIGN
CARTER P A. B. 32 BRITISH
OLIVER G A. B. 29 GREECE
ROWORTH W A. B. 28 BRITISH
GEORGE N A. B. 29 FOREIGN
GROSS N A. B. 27 FOREIGN
NICHOLOVICK J A. B. 26 FOREIGN
D'SILVA M A. B. 27 FOREIGN
JONES J A. B. 22 FOREIGN
BROWN J A. B. 33 BRITISH
CONNEL J A. B. 25 BRITISH
CONDERRY N A. B. 28 BRITISH
TEMPLETON B A. B. 22 BRITISH
FISHER J A. B. 20 BRITISH
SARAHAN J PASS COOK 55 BRITISH
SPERE W PASS COOK 35 BRITISH
WILDIE J ? ? BRITISH


Name of Immigrant. - From what county selected.
BECKLEY, John - Surrey
Sophia
Elizabeth,
Hannah
John T.
BONE. Robert - Middlesex
Sophia
Augusta
Robert W.
CAHILL, Thomas - Tipperary
Judy
Mary
CANE, Thomas - Surrey
Catherine
Catherine E.
Ann
DALY. Thomas - Clare
Bridget
DEVETT, John - Clare
Honora
DYNAN, Thomas - Clare
Mary
FADDEN, Richard - Mayo
Mary
Ellen
FLOOD, Thomas - Tipperary
Margaret
GIBBS, Thomas - Middlesex
Sophia
HAGERTY, James - Derry
Mary
John
Susan
Robert
HASWELL, Archibald - Surrey
Mary
HEAR. John - Down
Jane
John
Sarah
Ann
HEFFERNAN, Dennis - Tipperary
Mary
HILL, John - Queen's
Ellen
KIRK, Armour - Renfrew
Mary
Ann
LUMSDEN, John - Linlithgow
Ann
Elisabeth
John
Marion
PACKHAM, Richard - Kent
Mary
Horace
John
PEARCE, James - Middlesex
Anne
James C.
Henry J.
William T.
QUEAN, Patrick - Limerick
Judith
Thomas
William
Patrick
Johanna
REEDY, Thomas - Limerick
Johanna
Mary
Johanna
REGAN, John - Galway
Ann
Patrick
STAPLETON, Alfred - Middlesex
Louisa
Harriett
STEWART, James - Donegal
Catherine
James
WILLOUGHBY, Joseph - Sussex
Elizsbeth Jane
John
WRIGHT, Ephraim - Leicester
Martha
Alfred

ARDLAM, William - King's County
BALLINGER, Michael - Clare
BARNES, Elephteria - Surrey
BARRETT, William - Cork
BRENNAND, James - Mayo
BR?DY, John - Down
BR?DY, James - Down
BURKE. James - Tipperary
BURKE, Thomas - Mouth
BURKE, Ralph - Mouth
BUTLER. Richard - Tipperary
CARR, Edward - Tipperary
Clugston, Samuel - Armagh
CONNOLLY, Bartholomew - Galway
CONNOLLY, John - Galway
CORLEY, Patrick - Louth
CORBY, Francis - Louth
DALY, Michael - Clare
DOHERTY, Robert - Londonderry
DONAGHUE, Michael - Limerick
DUFFY, John - Clare
DUNN, John Tipperary
EGAN, John - Clare
ENRIGHT, John - Limerick
FADDEW, Edward - Lancaster
FENELY, James - Tipperary
FLANNERY. Patrick - Clare
FLOOD, Thomas - Tipperary
FLOOD, Patrick - Tipperary
FLYNN, John - Mayo
GLEESON, John - Tipperary
GRAHAM, Robert - Fermanagh
GRALTON, Cornelius - Mayo
GRALTON, Ann - Mayo
GROVER, George - Sussex
HAGARTY, Charles - Derry
HAGARTY, Richard - Derry
HANLIHAN, John - Kerry
HARTIGAN, James - Monaghan
HEAR, Hugh - Down
HICKEY, John - Clare
HIND, John - Clare
HUDSON, Michael - Kilkenny
HUDSON, James - Kilkenny
KEDDLE, William - Linlithgow
KENNA, Patrick - Queen's County
KENNA, Thomas - Queen's County
KEOGH, John - Clare
Knox, John - Wigton
LIMPHIER, Joseph - Tipperary
LINGARD, William - Tipperary
LITTLE, James - Dublin
LUMSDEN, Alexander - Linlithgow
Mc MULLEN, Charles - Antrim
MADDEN, Thomas - Mayo
MURPHY, Thomas - Cork
MURRAY, Stephen - Clare
MURRAY, James - Clare
NAY, Benjamin - Middlesex
NOONAN, John - Limerick
NOONEN, David - Limerick
O'BYRNE, Garrett - Wicklow
PACKHAM, William - Kent
QUIGLEY, John - Clare
REARDY, Patrick - Clare
REEDY, John - Limerick
REEDY, Thomas - Limerick
REEDY, James - Limerick
REYNOLDS. Martin - Clare
SMITH, Michael - Cavan
TAYLOR, John - Kilkenny
WALSH, Edmund - Clare
WOODLAND, John - Sligo
Ardlam Mary - Kings County

BALLINGER, Bridget - Clare
BALLINGER, Elisabeth - Clare
BARNES, Susannah - Surrey
BARNES, Julia - Surrey
BECKLEY, Laura - Surrey
BENTLEY, Eliza - Stafford
BENTLEY, Eliza Christian - Stafford
BRADY, Elizabeth - Down
BRYAN, Catherine - Tipperary
BURKE, Judy - Kilkenny
BUTLER, Mary - Tipperary
BUTLER, Margaret - Tipperary
BUTLER, Judith - Tipperary
CORLEY, Eliza - Louth
CORLEY, Margaret - Louth
CORLEY, Ellen - Louth
CUPPLES, Ann Eliza - Armagh
CUPPLES, John - Armagh
DALY, Ellen - Clare
DENAN, Bridget - Clare
FLANNERY, Susan - Clare
GEARY, Mary - Cork
GEARY, Bridget - Cork
GOULD, Ellen - Cork
SAUNDERS Marianne - Cork
HAGARTY, Susan - Derry
HARRIS, Harriet - Somerset
HARRIS, Anne - Somerset
HARRIS, Emma - Somerset
HARRIS, Henry - Somerset
HEAR, Jane - Down
HEAR, Elizabeth - Down
HEFFERNAN, Catherine - Tipperary
HEFFERNAN, Bridget - Tipperary
SHANNAHAN Patrick - Tipperary
HOGAN, Ann - Galway
HOGAN, Honorah - Tipperary
HUDSON, Mary - Kilkenny
HUGHES, Margaret - Monaghan
KEATING, Johanna - Tipperary
KIRK, Catherine - Renfrew
LELLIS, Mary - Galway
LOADER, Hannah - Surrey
LUMSDEN, Ann - Linlithgow
LUMSDEN, Agnes , j . -Linlithgow
M'CABE, Margaret - Monaghan
MADDEN, Honora - Lancaster
MOSS, Sarah - Tyrone
MOSS, Mary - Tyrone
MURPHY, Catherine - Cork
MURRAY, Honora - Tipperary
MURRAY, Bridget - Clare
MUSGRAVE, Catherine - Lancaster
MUSGRAVE, George K. - Lancaster
MUSGRAVE, John - Lancaster
MUSGRAVE, Agnes - Westmoreland
O'MARA, Bridget - Kilkenny
QUEAN, Mary - Limerick
QUEAN, Bridget - Limerick
QUEAN, Sarah - Limerick
QUIN, Johanna - Cork
REAVES, Elizabeth - Somerset
REAVES, Janet - Somerset
REDDY, Bridget - Limerick
REYNOLDS, Mary - Clare
ROYCE, Eliza - Lincolnshire
ROYCE, Martha - Lincolnshire
SHINE, Catherine - Athlone
SMITH, Elisabeth - Northampton
STEWART, Martha - Tyrone
SYMONS, Dorcas - Wilts
TAYLOR. Elisabeth - Kilkenny
WALPOLE, Ann - Kilkenny
WOODLAND, Ellen - Sligo.

H. H. BROWNE. Agent for Immigration. Government Immigration Office,
Sydney, 25th Jane, 1858.


This list is not a complete list of all who sailed on the Herald Of The Morning. This is the Agent's List which was published in the Sydney Morning Herald on arrival.

Below is the number onboard according to the official immigration list:-

Married Males 65
Married Females 65
Single Males 14 and upwards 113
Single Females 14 and upwards 118
Males 7-14 16
Females 7-14 10
Males 4-7 10
Females 4-7 11
Males 1-4 12
Females 1-4 22
Males under 1 year 1
Females under 1 year 4
Births on voyage 1 male 2 Female
Deaths on voyage 3 Male 3 Female

Source for Crew List Source: State Records Authority of New South Wales: Shipping Master's Office; Passengers Arriving 1855 - 1922; NRS13278, [X98-100] reel 406. Transcribed by Gloria Sheehan, 2005.
Source Citation: State Records Authority of New South Wales; Kingswood New South Wales, Australia; Persons on bounty ships to Sydney, Newcastle, and Moreton Bay (Board's Immigrant Lists); Series: 5317; Reel: 2477; New South Wales Government. Passengers arriving at Sydney 1846 (Agent's Immigrant Lists). Series 5326, Reel 2457. State Records Authority of New South Wales, Kingswood, New South Wales.
Source for Agents List The Sydney Morning Herald Friday 25 June 1858.
Transcribed by janilye, 2012




NOTE: The Herald of the Morning made a second voyage to Australia arriving in Hobson's Bay from Liverpool on 5 November 1859 with 419 government immigrants.
Ten days later, around midnight, whilst tied up at the dock she caught fire. Attempts to scuttle her by cutting holes in her bow were unsuccessful, so she was towed to Sandridge ( Port Melbourne) and left to burn. janilye


Mary Balderston

Do you ever wonder about places and things in time that could have changed your life.
Going through old newspapers, I often do.

This notice below made me think about Mary Balderston Mackenzie and wonder if she was ever found.

Did she or her children see it? Were they in New South Wales? Was she still alive? Did she die rich or poor?

The Sydney Morning Herald, Friday 5 December 1873
N O T I C E.
The late DAVID BALDERSTON, of 49, Regent street, Greenock, having, by his trust, disposition, and settlement, left a LEGACY to Mrs. MARY BALDERSTON, or MACKENZIE, his Sister. Widow of WILLIAM MACKENZIE, sometime Blacksmith in Glasgow, who left Scotland many years ago, and failing her, to her children. Notice is hereby given, that the said Mrs. Mary Balderston, or Mackenzie, if alive or if dead, her children : are required to claim the said bequest, and to establish their right thereto within two years from the 24th day of February, 1873, the date of the said David Balderston's death, and that if she or they fail to do so, Mr. Balderaton's trustees will proceed to pay over the said legacy to the other residuary legatees, as directed by the said trust, disposition, and settlement, and codicils thereto.
Communications on the subject to be addressed to JOHN MACDONALD, Solicitor, Mansion House, Greenock, Scotland.

With all the clues above and with what's available online today we could probably find this family in two shakes of a lamb's tail.. unless

1 comment(s), latest 2 years, 5 months ago

Coffs Harbour Historic Cemetery

Coffs Harbour Historic Cemetery
Address: Coff Street, Coffs Harbour
and
Coffs Harbour Lawn Cemetery
Also known as Karangi Lawn.
Address: Coramba Road, Karangi, New South Wales, Australia



Note: A spate of thefts of bronze plaques from cemeteries in this region was reported in July 2011.
Thieves, when removing the markers, have also caused damage to the stones on which they were mounted.
If you have family graves in the Coffs Harbour cemetery, and you have not already checked, it is advisable that you check on their integrity.


More information
Coffs Harbour Lawn Cemetery is administered by Coffs Harbour City Council. For further information, contact Council at Locked Bag 155, Coffs Harbour NSW 2450; phone 02 6648 4000; email: coffs.council@chcc.nsw.gov.au


2 comment(s), latest 2 years, 5 months ago

Westmoreland passenger list

The 405 tons barque Westmoreland left Downs on the 8 January 1833 and arrived in Sydney Cove on the 19 May 1833 under Captain Brigstock.

Stephen John, Esq sh:163
Stephen Mrs and 2 children sh:163
Wilson Mr sh:163
Wilson Mrs sh:163
Carlysle William, Esq sh:163
Christopherson Mrs sh:163
Hamilton Miss sh:163
Beaver George, Mr sh:163
Beaver Elizabeth, Mrs and an infant born on the voyage sh:163
Beaver Francis sh:163
Beaver William sh:163
Beaver Emily sh:163
Beaver George sh:163
Trodd Able, Mr sh:163
Trodd Amy, Mrs sh:163
Trodd Mary Ann sh:163
Hillary J, Mr sh:163
Hillary Thomas, Mr sh:163
Robertson Henry, Mr sh:163
Robertson Harriett, Mrs sh:163
Robertson Henry sh:163
Robertson Harriett sh:163
Robertson Anna sh:163
Marshall James, Mr sh:163
Greenfield S, Mr sh:163
Uhr J, Mr sh:163
Longeville J H, Mr professor of languages sh:163
Nash H, Miss sh:163
Affrait L, Miss sh:163
Barnet F, Miss sh:163
Robinson T, Mr sh:163
Robinson C, Mrs sh:163
Chapman C, Mr sh:163
Chapman C, Mrs sh:163
Chapman C J sh:163
Chapman J M sh:163
Chapman J K sh:163
Grose W, Mr painter sh:163
Grose M, Mrs sh:163
Grose Alfred sh:163
Grose Henry sh:163
Phillips B A, Mr sh:163
Phillips Celeria sh:163
Phillips Charles sh:163
Phillips Alexander sh:163
Phillips Anna sh:163
Phillips Michael sh:163
Phillips Samuel sh:163
Phillips Sarah sh:163
Phillips Jacob sh:163
Phillips Rosa sh:163
Levien S, Mr sh:163
Levien H, Mrs sh:163
Levien Alfred sh:163
Levien George sh:163
Levien Annette sh:163
Levien Henrietta sh:163
Levien Matilda sh:163
Asser A, Miss

Australians as America saw us in 1942

Nothing like coming here prepared!

AUSTRALIANS AS AMERICANS SEE THEM
"An Outdoors People;Breezy, Democratic"
WASHINGTON, Sunday, 25 October 1942 AAP


["You will find Australians an outdoors people, breezy, very democratic, with no respect for stuffed shirts their own or anyone else's," says a pocket guide on Australia which is being distributed among American troops.

Issued by US War and Navy departments, the booklet states that Australians have much in common with Americans. They are a pioneer people, they believe in personal freedom, and they love sports.

"There is one thing to get straight right off the bat," the booklet says. "You are not in Australia to save a helpless people from the savage Japanese. Recently in a Sydney bar an American soldier turned to an Australian and said, 'Well, Aussie, you can go home now. We've come over to save you.' The Aussie cracked back, 'Have you? I thought you were a refugee from Pearl Harbour.'
Being simple, direct and tough, the Digger is often confused and nonplussed by the manners of Americans' in mixed company; or even in camp. To him those many 'Thank you's" Americans use are a bit too dignifled.

You might get annoyed, at the blue laws which make Australian cities pretty dull places on Sundays.
For all their breezieness Australians do not go in for drinking or woopitching in public, especially on Sunday.

In Australia, the national game is cricket, but they, have another game called Australian rules football.
It is rough, tough, and exciting. There are a lot of rules, which the referee carries in a rule book the size of Webster's dictionary. The game creates the desire on the part of the crowd to tear someone apart. The referees in some parks have runways covered over so that they can escape intact after a game.

As one newspaper correspondent says, Americans and Australians are 2 of the greatest gambling people on earth. It has been said of Australians that if a couple in a bar have not anything else to bet on they will lay odds on which of 2 flies rise first from the bar.
Aussies do not fight out of textbooks. They are resourceful, inventive soldiers with plenty of intiative.
The Australian habit of pronouncing "a" as "I" is pointed out, and an example quoted: "The trine is lite to-di." The booklet includes "Waltzing Matilda" in full."]

I don't know about the too many thank-yous. It would seem that the Australian girls liked it, for 10,000 Aussie brides returned to America with these well heeled, well mannered and certainly well informed troops.


1 comment(s), latest 2 years, 5 months ago

Hawkesbury Settlers Welcome Governor Macquarie 1810

There is no doubt, that the establishment of the township of Windsor, was, certainly, a notable event in the early history of New South Wales. The following article, refers to some of the circumstances relative to the foundation of that town.



The Hawkesbury River was discovered during the governorship of Captain Phillip, and the first settlement was made on its banks, in the year 1794. Up to the year 1810, the spot now occupied by the town of Windsor, was known as The Green Hills. From the time of the first settlement on the Hawkesbury, down to the arrival of Governor Macquarie in the colony, frequent floods had devastated the homes, farms, and crops of the colonists settled there. Shortly after Governor Macquarie entered upon his Government, he recognized the importance of the Hawkesbury district as "the granary of the colony," and decided, that some effort should be immediately made to protect, as far as possible, the homes, farms, and crops, of the settlers. Accordingly "in order to guard as far as human foresight could against such calamities," he decided to fix upon several sites where townships could be erected, which would be high and dry during flood time. He chose, among other places, the site upon which the town of Windsor now stands, and granted allotments of land in the newly-formed township to those settlers whose farms were so situated as to come within the influence of the waters of the Hawkesbury during an inundation.
These grants of land within the town were made an 'inseparable part' of those farms with out the town which were esposed to the ravages of the floods. Therefore, those town grants could not be disposed of or sold as separate properties.
The allotment of land given to each settler was proportioned to the size of his farm, and was given to him as a place of refuge for his family, his crops, and his stock; and he was expected to erect thereon a house, a corn yard, and a stockyard. It was decreed that those persons who thus obtained land under the foregoing provisions should build their houses either of brick or weatherboard ; and it was also necessary that every house so built should have a brick chimney and a shingle roof. No house was to be built lower than nine feet high, and each settler had to lodge a plan of his building with the district constable. To give the settlers in the vicinity some place of refuge during flood time, therefore, was the direct cause of the establishment of the town of Windsor
The Hawkesbury settlers from time immemorial have always been loyal subjects.
Even so far back as Governor Bligh's time, when the military deposed Bligh, the Hawkesbury settlers, almost to a man, remained loyal to him.
Bligh stated at the trial of Major Johnston, in England, that had he been able to escape from Sydney to the Hawkesbury, he would have been safe from the attacks of his enemies.
It was natural that after the appointment of a new Governor (Macquarie), the Hawkesbury settlers should exhibit the same loyalty to Bligh's successor, and this feeling was warmly continued throughout the long period of Macquarie's governorship,

The following is from the records, and whilst exhibiting loyalty, at the same time shows
the high opinion the settlers had of William Cox, the founder of the well-known family of that name, and, what is still more interesting, gives the names of the pioneer Hawkesbury settlers who helped to develop the resources, not only of this grand district, but of the then unknown interior.
Many, of their names are familiar to us, and descendents of some are still with us.
Quite an interesting chapter could be written of these old identities would time and space permit.
However, it is interesting to keep a record of the names of these pioneers who first, with axe and fire, prepared the way for agriculture, making the Hawkesbury the first granary of the colony, from which all its food supplies came.

It should. be remembered that only 16 years prior to the address being handed Macquarie,
Governor Phillip had placed the first Hawkesbury settlers - 22 in number on the banks of the Hawkesbury and at the mouth of South Creek.

Strange to say, none of the first settlers' names appear on the address.

HAWKESBURY SETTLERS' ADDRESS.

The following address from the settlers of the Hawkesbnry was presented on the
1st instant (Dec. 1810) to His Excellency the Governor Macquarie at Windsor (formerly the Green Hills),
by Thomas Arndell, Esq.

"1st December, 1810.
We, the undersigned settlers, residents of the Hawkesbuiy and its. vicinity, beg
leave respectfully to congratulate your Excellency on your arrival at this settlement,
and earnestly hope your Excellency will be pleased with the agricultural improvements and
industry that prevails here, and trust that the continuance of our exertions
Will ever merit your Excellency's approbation. We also beg leave to return our unfeigned thanks
for your Excellency's recent appointment of William Cox, Esq., as a magistrate at this
place-a gentleman who for many years has resided among us, possessing our esteem and confidence,
who, from his local knowledge of this settlement, combined with his many other good qualities,
will, we are convinced, promote your Excellency's benign intention of distributing justice and
happiness to all.

-Thomas Arndell,Thomas Hobby, Benjamin Carver, George Hall, Lawrence May, Robert Masters,
James Richards, Henry Baldwin, Paul Bushell, Robert Farlow, William Baker, John Yoel,
Thos. Matcham Pitt, James Blackman, John Merritt, John Cobcroft, John Gregory, Richard Norris,
William Heydon, Thomas Hampson, Daniel McKay, Daniel Fane, John Lyoner, Henry Murray,
John Jones, James Milaman, R. Fitzgerald, John Stevenson, Robert Wilson, Jonathan Griffiths,
Elizabeth Earl, G. Evans, John Bowman, Hugh Devlin, John Watts, William Eaton, David Bell,
James Welsh, Patrick Closhel, William Carlisle, Thomas Gordon, Caleb Wilson, Thomas Markwell,
Thomas Winston, William Baxter, Thomas Hagger, John Baylis, Donald Kennedy, Patrick Murphy,
Owen Tierney, William Shaw, John Dight, Roger Connor, Matthew Lock, Edward Pugh, William Small,
James Wall, William Faithful, William Simpson, Thomas Arkell, Charles Palmer, Thomas Weyham,
Elias Bishop, Thomas Spencer, Joseph McCoulding, Benjamin Baits, John Ryan. Robert Smith,
Paul Randall, John Wild, Benjamin South, William Etrel, Henry Lamb, Martin Mentz, Robert Guy,
John Harris, Thomas Cheshire, Stephen Smith, Thomas Lambley, Edward Field, Rowland Edwards,
George Collis, James Portsmouth, Pierce Collett, Jacob Russell, Thomas Appledore, William Dye,
R. Carr, John Leese, Thomas Cowling, John Embrey, John Benson, John Boulton, William Ezzy.


To which His Excellency, in a letter, on 5th December, 1810, was pleased to make the following answer.

Sir,-I beg you will make known to those respectable settlers of the Hawkesbury who signed the
address presented by you to me that I am much pleased with the sentiments it conveys,
and to assure them that it will always be an object of the greatest interest to me to promote
their prosperity by every means in my power. With this view I have fixed on ground for your
different townships (Windsor, Richmond, Wilberforce, Pitt Town) for the accommodation of
the settlers who have suffered so severely by the floods of the river; and by a
speedy removal to those situations of security, I hope they will enjoy the fruits
of that labor which, I am happy to observe, promises this season to be rewarded;
with one of the finest crops I ever beheld in any country.
I hope on my return to this part of the colony to find the new habitations built on an
improved and enlarged plan to those hitherto erected on the banks of the Hawkesbury.
I am very glad to find that my appointment of Mr.Cox has met with the satisfaction of
the settlers, and I have every reason to believe that he will fulfil the duties of his
office so as to gain the goodwill of all.
-I have, etc.,
LACHLAN MACQUARIE.

Macquarie foresaw shortly after his arrival in the colony, that it was immediately necessary to assist the settlers to ensure regular supplies of food; it was a fortunate thing for Australia that they were assisted and encouraged by him at that period, for as the Hawkesbury district was the ' granary of the colony,' it is morally certain, that the destruction, by floods, of homes and farms, stocks and crops, would have precipitated famines, similar in nature, to that experienced at Port Jackson in 1792. The recurrence, of these famines must have impeded the progress of the colony. If, then, the progress of the colony had, at that time, been retarded, the opening up of Australia would never have proceeded so rapidly as it did. Therefore, in referring to the first days of Windsor, it will be seen, that the circumstances surrounding its foundation, not only proves Macquarie a prudent man, but also shows us that the Hawkesbury settlers, by supplying the colony with the means of its existence food helped very materially to promote the rapid growth of English colonization in Australia.




NOTE:
William Cox was appointed Magistrate after the death of Andrew Thompson.

Sources:
Yeldap
Frank J. Brewer,1905
Windsor and Richmond Gazette
Windsor, NSW :1902-1945)
Friday 16 October 1903 Page 9
Transcription, Janilye, 2012


Florentia to Adelaide 1849

The 453 tons barque Florentia left Gravesend on 18 February 1849 then left Plymouth om the 9 March 1849 and arrived in Adelaide on the 20 June 1849 under Captain C.S.Tindale carrying 238 Emigrants.

Thomas Parr, Esq., Surgeon Superintendent, in the cabin ;
Julia,Harriet,and Emma Chisholm Sarah Leigh, Eliza Frogget,Emma Jones, Amelia Fryram, Martha. Eliza, and Esther Burnell, Sarah Wiggins, S. A. Wainright, Jane Benham, Emma Griffin, Susan Kingham, Margaret Slaughter Eliza Fawn, Jane Barnes, Grace and Barbara Foulds, Hester French, Jane Mustor, Harriet Webber, Anne Petello, Elizabeth, Mary Anne, Eliza, and Jane Bastian, Eliza Warring, Eliza Dwyre, Jane Greenlees, Sarah Weir, Amy Annison, Maria Lower, Hannah Peters, Susan Walters Biddy Plunker, R. Mortime, Caroline Parkes Mary Grace, Margaret Davis. Mary Black, Mary Oney, and Catherine White, Margaret and Biddy Hahir,Aaron Lock and wife, Robert Worn and wife, James Chislem and wife, W. Tilney, wife and four children. Wm. Howell wife and two children. George Hall, wife and five children, W. Elliott, wife and child, Charles Seaward and wife John Emonson and wife, Jame Guppy and wife Wm. Hayward, wife and three children, John Burnell and four children, James Williams, wife and three children, John Higgs, wife and three children. Robt. Shepherdson, wife and six children. W. Millhouse, wife and child, W. Tothill, wife and four children, William Pearce, wife and two children, Matthew Slaughter, wife and three children, H. Hiff and wife, W Lane, wife and two children, Samuel Mudge, wife and six children Patrick White and wife.Isaac Glenny and wife James Patterson and wife, John Miller and wife W. Wilton, wife and three children John Slee and wife, W. Kerswell, wife and child, P. A. Lehoe and wife, W. Webb, wife and five children, Thos Pollard, wife and six children, Henry Bastian wife and four children, W. Foulds, wife and two children, John Mills, wife and three children, Sam Mackey, wife and child, James Caldwell, wife and four children, Richard Mortimer, wife and four children, A. Webb, Thomas Lawton, George Burnell, John Foulds, Charles Totman, George Moss, W. Tunly, S. Davis, John Hogarth, Wm. Elson, George Hornes. David and George Pink Thomas and John White, John Hahir, J. Guerin James Kennedy, Thomas and R. Lane, B Nevill Benjamin Randell, R. Thackly, Thomas Row John Fowler, John Worn, Walter Fisher, John Foley, James Roberts, John Williams.

Eight births and three deaths during the voyage.

3 comment(s), latest 2 years, 5 months ago

Posthumous to Adelaide 1849

The 390 tons barque Posthumous left Plymouth on 13 March 1849 and arrived in Adelaide on 20 June 1849 under the guidance of Captain Davison and carrying 157 Passengers.

Passengers : Messrs. F and E. Duffield, J. Parr, W. Colman, and Mrs Colman and child, Mr Atatyar, Mr Darwent, and Mr E. R. Bower, surgeon superintendent, in the cabin ;

Messrs Nelson de Coursey, C. Schwabe, G. E. Bowley, and J. Clearson in the intermediate;

Ewart Mehruta, B. Edmondson, Mr Williams, F. Federel, J. Watkinson, Alfred Watkinson, Wm. Watkinson, Wm. Matts, Edwin Laff, Henry Laff, Wm. Edwards, wife and child, Sarah Tiffen, Josh. Betts, John Miskin, Henry James, James King, Louis Alex. Perdusal, Charlotte A. Bull Bryant, Wm. Harris, Charles Crawford, G. C. Foat, John Papple, Chas. Rooks, Josh. Wicker, Ann, Nehemiah, Josh., Alfred, and Henry Wicker, G. Wicker, infant, Jas. Fielder, Mary Fielder, Frances Hall, Eliz. Beechin, Harriet Beechin, G. Hamlin, J. Salmon, Henry Heath, S. Baird, J. Botterell, M. Baird, Walter Scott, T. Noble, J. Clarke, W. Ramsdedn, T. Evans, J. Neates, Josiah Oldfield, E. Bryant, Eliza Ann, Eliz. Jane, T. Frances, and W. C. Bryant, infant. W. Lewellen, John Edwin Smyth, W., and Mary, Emma Maslin, Eleanor, Harriet, Mary Hannah, John, Susannah, W. and Martha Cook, C. Hodson, T. Hall, wife and seven children, R. M. Wray, T. Hopkinson, R Walker Emma, Sea, Mary Ann G. Hoye, Rosina Gale, Mrs Biggs, Sarah Taylor, John, Geo., Mary Ann, Eliza, Susan, and Margaret Murray, James Jordon, wife and three children, J. Treeman Notts, wife and two children, J. J. Walker, Wm. Southgate, Henry Elborough, Sarah Elborough, J. Hammon, R. G. Dur ham, wife and six children, Susan Duncan, Susan Duncan, Walter Ransome, S. B. Pitt, C. Webb Sarah Webb, Henry, Rebecca, Eliza, and Frances Baker, Alex. Wood, Wm. Andrew, Eliz. Colts, Ulrich Spikly, Alex. Sim, John, Susan, Eliz. and Emma Harvey, Alex.J.L.F.Chanmout, Wm. Braceide and wife, Miss Morris and child, Mr Morris, wife and son Louisa Ransome, Louisa Chalmers, Wm. Akhurst wife and infant, James Coumbe, wife and six children, David Wheeler and wife, Augustus Raymond and wife, Henry, Mary Ann, Henry, Kate, Geo. and Mary Ann Gove, infant, Robt. Thompson, wife and three children, Alex. Anderson, Mr Moyle, wife and three children, Jean F. Amiet, and Louis Amiet, in the steerage.

The Phoenix to Hobart 1825

The ship 'Phoenix', under the guidance of Captain Francis Dixon, left Downs on the 16 September 1824, touched at the Cape of Good Hope, where she remained for a week and arrived in Hobart on Wednesday the 25th.January 1825 with 76 passengers (including children) and merchandize.

The passengers were:

Cabin:

Mrs. Dixon and infant, Dudley Ferriday, Esq., Captain and Mrs. Pike, Miss Pike, Mr. and Mrs. Gough and 3 children, Mrs. and Miss Blachford, Mr. and Mrs. Bignal and 2 children, Mrs. and Miss Clark, Mrs. Johnson and 3 children, Mrs. Landsell and 2 children, Mrs. Dalrymple, Mr. Hill, Mr. G. Ives, S. R. A. Architect, Mr. Redfern and son, and Mr. Griffiths, surgeon of the ship.

Steerage:

Mrs. Scromartie and 2 children, Mr. and Mrs. Fox, Mr. and Mrs. Horsden and 4 children, Mrs. English and son, Mr. and Mrs. Mannington and 2 children, Mrs. Rawlins and child, Miss Ann Bolton, Mrs. Rowe, Mr. and Mrs. Appleton and 2 children, Mr. and Mrs.Watchorn and 4 children, Mr. and Mrs. Chapman and 3 children, Mr. Morgan, Mr. Addison, Mr. H. Addison, Mr. Henderson, Mr. J. Crouch, Bridget Dunn, Charles Radcliffe, John Medhurst, Thomas Bolton,and Samuel Cox.



Also onboard the Phoenix were a considerable number of Merino sheep of the purest breed;some of which were destined for New South Wales.
Those for Hobart Town were from the flock of C. C. WESTERN, Esq. M. P. for Essex, a Gentleman who had already much benefited the Island by previous shipments of his sheep.-Fifteen of them were consigned for W. A. BETHUNE, Esq. and nine for JAMES GRANT, Esq., four having died on the passage.


source:
Hobart Town Gazette and Van Diemens Land Advertiser
Friday 28 January 1825



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