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Looking for Alexander Sutherland Allan NZ

He died in Wellington, New Zealand 27 January 1900, age 69.
married Elizabeth Rosian HUNTLEY in New Zealand in 1858
She died in Wellington, New Zealand 25 April 1919 age 79
There is no births recorded in NZ for either.

I found birth and baptism for woman of the same name but cannot find immigration.

England & Wales, FreeBMD Birth Index, 1837-1915
about Elizabeth Rosian Huntley
Name: Elizabeth Rosian Huntley
Date of Registration: Oct-Nov-Dec 1839
Registration district: Clerkenwell
Inferred County: London
Volume: 3
Page: 36

London, England, Births and Baptisms, 1813-1906
about Elizabeth Rosian Huntley
Name: Elizabeth Rosian Huntley
Record Type: Baptism
Baptism Date: 15 Jan 1840
Father's Name: Robert Henry Huntley
Mother's name: Elizabeth Huntley
Parish or Poor Law Union: Clerkenwell St James
Borough: Islington
Register Type: Parish Registers

I need Immigration records to prove the above is HER
and same for Alexander + a birth
I have decendants.
I found a R. H. Huntley as a signatory on a Memorial to Governor Fitzroy
19 April 1845. If that is her father immigration would have to be between 1839 and 45

13 comment(s), latest 4 years, 11 months ago

Volunteering can be rewarding

3 comment(s), latest 2 years, 10 months ago

Itellya's Watson's of Sorrento and Portsea.

2 comment(s), latest 4 years, 7 months ago

Alfred Smith 1831-1917

It certainly pays to take the time to ask the old locals "What was it like?"
These are the recollections of Alfred Smith of Richmond in New South Wales, which hold a wealth of valuable family history.
Alfred was born in Hobartville, New South Wales (when old William Cox owned it), on the 13 July 1831 to John Smith 1798-1833 a convict who drowned in a river near Liverpool in 1833 and Adelaide Eliza De La Thoreza 1808-1877 she had been born in Madrid. After John Smith died, at 15 months of age, Alfred was adopted by George JAMES 1768-1862 and his wife Ann Kelly 1789-1864. They had only one girl, Eliza JAMES 1824-1862 ( the mother of Ann ONUS 1841-1927) Alfred died on 24 December 1917.
On the 11 October 1854 at St.Matthew's Catholic Church, Windsor, Alfred married Ann Amelia KINSELA 1838-1917 the daughter of Martin KINSELA 1793-1860 and Ellen, nee HENDLING 1794-1862. Alfred had many jobs throughout his lifetime, including Town Stockman, running The Punt across the river and a Drover, droving throughout New South Wales and as far down as Victoria.

Below is part of Alfred SMITH's recollections which were Chronicled by Robert FARLOW, which began when Alfred was 78, in November 1909 and published in The Windsor Richmond Gazette, under the heading,
Some Ups and Downs of an old Richmondite, Mr. Alfred Smith

"Adjoining old Mr Roberts' place, at the back, was Wiltshirehurst. Here Mr Wiltshire lived for a while when I first went to the punt. Then George Case rented it. He farmed a little, and dealt largely in sheet stringy bark.Coming along we had Peter Hornery living. He owned the place he lived on. He had been a bricklayer, but could not follow the trade on account of being a cripple for many years. William Maughan bought the land from Peter Hornery, except the little piece on which Hornery lived. Maughan lived there for some time while he was droving. Next was William John, father of Mrs Robert Pitt and Mrs John McQuade. Mrs John was a great butter maker. Next to Mr John's was Mr Kingswood. He owned the property. Richard Gow (father of the popular Frank, who was a large produce dealer in Richmond years ago) lived with the Kingswood's, was married to the only daughter. He grew a great quantity of maize. The Kingswoods and Gows left Kurrajong a good while before I left the punt, and went to live down on Griffiths' old farm. A man named Rich went to live in the place at Kurrajong. He was a shoemaker but didn't work at the trade in Kurrajong, though I remember him working at it in Richmond. He grew potatoes and vegetables and took them to Richmond and Windsor. Ad joining this property was Tom Jones' ? "Kingswood's Tom " as he was generally known. He was father to Mrs Thomas Stanford and Mrs Thomas Brown. He grew a lot of fine oaten hay. Mrs Jones would never ride in a cart, and I often wondered why. One day I asked her, and she told me Mrs Stanford, mother of Mr Tom Stanford, and herself were driving home in a cart once and capsized in the rough road and Mrs Stanford was killed. The next farm belonged to the Gilligans. James Leavers, father of Harry, rented it, and lived there. He did some farming, and with his two horses and dray took his produce and wattle bark to town. Leavers met with an accident by his horse running into a tree which stood in the road opposite Thomas John's place. Leavers was well liked. Harry was born some three weeks after his father's death. Old Mrs Leavers left there after her husband's death, and went to Richmond to live. Edward Mitchell, father of the present Robert in Kurrajong, lived on the Comleroy and owned the property he lived on He had six bullocks and a dray and drew a considerable quantity of wattle bark to town. Mrs Mitchell made a lot of butter. She was a sister to John Lord, who lived many years in Yarramundi. She was a great step-dancer, Mr Mitchell was coming home from Penrith one night, and told me he got a great fright coming down Crowley's lane. He declared he saw Andy Farrell's wife, who had been dead some time. He was perfectly sober, and whether it was imagination or a reality, he was quite upset over it. _ Close to Mitchell's, Denny McCabe lived. He married a daughter of Edward Mitchell. Denny McCabe was a king among bark. He was a jolly fellow and a great step-dancer. The last time I saw him was at Mr. A Towns station, near Boggabri, where he was fencing. It was Christmas time, and we spent a good time together. Some of his sons are still in the Kurrajong. Below Mitchell's property George Turner lived on some property belonging to Thomas John. He did a little farming and made grass-tree brooms. Then we had Mr Parker living on the Comleroy Road somewhere handy to the present Methodist Church. He did some farming, and with his one horse and cart took his maize and potatoes to town. There were some old hands scattered about the locality worthy of mention. John Williams?"Blackjack" they used to call him ? lived by himself, being a single man. He was a hard working man and took bark, etc., to town with his one horse and cart. George Turner was another great man among the bark. He married Sarah, a daughter of Edward Mitchell.
Robert Eather, father of the late Abe Eather who lived many years in Richmond, lived on the Comleroy. He owned a station on the Narran. The four sons were Thomas, Robert, James and Abe. Mr and Mrs Robert Eather died at Comleroy. After their death Jim lived there for some time. Mr and Mrs John Norris lived close by the Eather's. Norris was killed on the property. Mr Coleman lived near the Norris family. He was a fencer, but did a little farming. Cornelius McMahon can be reckoned among the old hands. He married a daughter of John Norris. I knew them both before they thought of getting married. Then we had Bill London ? ' Bill the native,' as they used to call him. Some of his children are still in the Kurra jong. Mr Murray was another old hand. Richard Skuthorp, father of our present Richard, was another I knew well. His wife was a daughter of John Ezzy. It was old Mr Skuthorp who first brought the racehorse Veno to the district, having purchased him from Mr William Clarke, who managed Bomera for years for Mr A. Town. Mr and Mrs Lamrock, parents of the late William and John, lived up Kurrajong, and I don't think they ever missed a fine Sunday going to the Presbyterian Church in Richmond. Having had a fair say about the old hands in Kurrajong we will now proceed to Colo. There wasn't a very great number of people living there in my early times, but among them were some who should not be forgotten. Colo has seen the time when it could boast of its police man. I knew two that were stationed at Colo. Curry was one. He used to visit George James. He was a tall man with sandy hair. He used to look very well in his black "bell topper". Jim Hunt was another policeman there. He was a short man and dark complexion. Mr and Mrs Cavanough kept a boarding-house down there for many years. The house was noted for its good table, and as it stood. on the Kurrajong side of the river Mr Cavanough used to help the drovers with their sheep and cattle up "the rock." Cavanough did some farming, and grew a lot of maize. They both died at Colo, the old man dying first. I knew their sons Tom, George and Jim very well. Tom was on the railway for some years in Richmond and was very popular. The last time I saw Jim was at Jerry's Plains, many years ago. William Penton, the blacksmith, who is still alive, living at North Richmond, lived for many years in Colo and I believe his family are natives of there. He lived up under the mountain on the other side of the river. He worked at his trade and did good business. There were plenty of drover's horses to be shod. He became a road contractor and carried out some big jobs on the Bulga road. His wife, was Miss Lucy Lord, but in no way related to John Lord, of Yarra mundi, There were a lot of the Gospers at Colo. Mrs Cavanough and Mrs Ivery were Gospers. I knew Robert Gosper. The late John Gosper, of Windsor, was, I believe, a native of Colo, also Henry. He kept an accommodation house at "The Gibber," It was a good place to stay at. Harry Gosper was a real friend of the drovers. If ever they lost a beast and it was to be found, Harry would get it for them. I have often heard him spoken of hundreds of miles up country, and always referred to as honest Harry Gosper. Of course there were others living up the river, but as I never went far off the road I didn't see much of them. Among them I knew Mr Caterson. I knew his son, the present Thomas, and his wife, who was Miss Grace Richardson, before they were married. Getting along from "The Gibber ' we soon get to Putty. Among the good old sorts out there were Mr Robert Ridge and his wife, He grew a lot of maize, and did droving. Mrs Ridge was post mistress, and kept an accommodation house. You could also get rations there. Mr Ridge had a mill and ground his own flour. Mrs Ridge was a sister to Mrs George Pitt and Mrs. John Crowley. Then we had Thomas Laycock and his wife. Mrs Laycock was a sister to George and Robert Pitt. I knew their sons Thomas, Andrew, Henry, George and Robert. They were always great cattle men. Andrew for many years before his death was a noted breeder of stud cattle, and was always a prominent exhibitor at the Sydney show. The eldest boy was a great pig raiser and used to drive his flocks of swine to market. Bob was killed from his horse. Thomas Laycock did a lot of droving, and bought stock for Sydney men. He was a horse fancier as well, and owned some well bred mares. At Bourawell we had Charles Sympton managing the place belonging to Mr William Farlow, senr., of Yarramundi, and also looking after Boggy swamp for the same man. I remember Mr Farlow giving me ?40 to pay Davy Hayman who was fencing out there for him. Charley was there a good while. Mr Farlow did some cultivation out there. Mr and Mrs Chapman lived at Putty on a place they bought from old Stephen Tuckerman, Their son George is still out there and seems to be doing well.
The first gaoler I remember in Windsor was a Mr Steele. He was a tall man. Mr North was the first police magistrate, and lived at old Government House, Windsor, in my early days. How I came to know a little about early Windsor, was by going with my foster father, then a policeman, on court days. What I will say about Windsor must be taken as Meaning my early recollections of that place. There was what we always knew as the watch box. This stood between the court house and the gaol wall. It was a little movable place of weatherboards. The watch box, I believe, used to be occupied by soldiers in turn, to prevent any prisoners escaping out of gaol. Then we had the flogging period in Windsor, and I knew Reuben Bullock who administered the lash. When flogging was done away with in the Haw kesbury Bullock, kept a public house. Reuben was a thin man of medium height, and although his former occu pation was not the pleasantest, he was well liked. He was of a pleasant disposition and very obliging. He was generally called "Little Bullock."

The first chief constable I have any recollections of was a Mr Hodgins. He had son Benjamin, who used to knock about Charlie Eather's over at Enfield. 'He had a daughter Ann. She was a tall, buxom young woman, and married a man named Bill Allsop. She has been dead many years. The next chief constable was Moses Chapman, a Jew I believe. He was mostly known as "Mo the Jew." He was a short stout man and a smart little chap at his work. He was well liked. Then I mind George Jilks, another chief constable, and his wife, one son, and two daughters. He was a man who was highly respected. The daughters, Kitty and Jane, would take it in turns and come and stay a few days with the James' at Richmond. His son George was then but a lad going to school. Mr Jilks lived where Mr W. McQuade is living. George Shirley was another chief constable. He was a stout man, with a very flushed face. After him was William Hobbs, who was the last chief constable in charge of Windsor before we got our sergeants. We start our sergeants with a Mr Frewin. He was an Irishman. He wasn't in Windsor a great while. The first lockup keeper I knew there was John Horan. This was when the lockup was where the Council Chambers stand. I remember one day, in Horan's time, we had been into court, and were starting for home in the cart when I happened to look round and noticed two men with a man on the ground. I told James about it and he drove up to them. It was two police men with a prisoner who wouldn't get up and they couldn't make him move. As soon as James came up it was "Here George give us a hand.'" James had a quince stick in his hand and gave him a few smart cuts with it on a portion of his body, which made him jump up quickly enough. The first C.P.S. I knew there was a Mr Wyatt, in Mr North's time. He was a tall man. Then as a C.P.S. there we had Mr Callaway, "little Callaway" they used to call him. Then there was Mr G. A. Gordon, who was C.P.S. for many years. Mr Gordon was father of Mrs Brinsley Hall, and died recently. He was a Police Magistrate up country for a few years when he retired. Then there was old Mr J. J. Fitzpatrick, father of Mr J. C. L Fitzpatrick, M.LA., who spent many years in old Windsor. In the corner by the old Fitzroy bridge there was a large two storey place which was kept as a pub by a man named Thomas Cross. He was a very big man. I remember this same pub being kept by Mrs. Aspery, who was mother to the late Mrs M. Nowland. Her son, Thomas, who was killed at Denman by lightning, used to serve in the bar. Nearly opposite the barracks there was a pub kept by John Shearin ? "Jack the baker," as he was called. He left there and built the two storey place opposite the court house where he kept a pub for a long while. Jack died there, and his widow kept the business on for some time after his death. I remember ihe 26th, 50th, 8oth and 99th regiments being in the old Windsor barracks at different times. The present Royal Hotel used to be what we always knew as the mess house. Robert Fitzgerald lived there for a long time, and was living there at the time of the first election when he was a candidate against William Bowman Quite close to the barracks, only in Macquarie-street, there was the old "Jim Crow" inn. It was kept by Henry Hudson. He dealt a lot in horses. He had two stallions, Jim Crow, a trotter, and Clinker, a draught. He imported both of them. He died there. His widow kept the pub a while after his death, and then married James Lane. Lane kept the pub for a while. She was a native of Richmond, a sister of our Henry Silk, and I knew her before she was married to Henry Hudson, who came from Birmingham. Somewhere about where the late William Gosper lived there once lived a man named O'Dell who kept the post office, and this was the first post office I remember in Windsor. Going along Macquarie-street we come to the big house, part of which is pulled down, and the remainder occupied by Edward Day. The father of the popular mailman. Tom Thompson, kept a pub there. The hospital was built before my time. At that time it was an hospital only. The poor house, as we called it, was where the old people's quarters are at present A man named Williams, was overseer of the poor house then. He was a brother to Fred Williams, the constable who was stationed at Enfield once. I have mentioned that Reuben Bullock kept a pub. Near where the "Jim Crow " stood, and on the same side, he kept the pub. I think his sign was "The hole in the wall". John Rafter kept a pub there also. Mick Hagon kept a pub there. Mick was a big Irishman, and his wife was no small woman. Mrs Hagon kept the pub for a while. At Moses' corner I remember Mrs Moses, William's mother, having a baking business. William and Henry were only lads then. Henry used to drive his mother's bread cart. He was always a smart business chap, and to-day he is reaping the reward in wealth and honor.
The first bailiff I remember in Windsor was Richard Sheriff He was a short stout man with a very red face, and a a great horseman. The earliest mounted police I recollect were Sergeant Lane and Trooper Joseph Levy. Levy shot Armstrong, the bushranger, on a Good Friday morning. Windsor has had its bellmen, and I remember the 0ld bellman Oliver. He had a very strong voice and could be heard a long way off. He was a comical old chap and after he had finished 'crying' his business was always wound up with "God save the Queen." The attached residences of Dr. Callaghan and the late Dr. Gibson in my earliest days in Windsor was an hotel kept by Mr Coffey. He was a tall man of fair complexion. I recollect also that James Ridge kept an hotel in a two-storey house between the Royal Hotel and where Coffey kept the hotel. Where our member, Mr Brinsley Hall, lives was once occupied by Dr. Dow. He was coroner for a long while. Robert and James Dick lived up the top end of the town facing the main street. They kept the post office and a store. In the bouse where the late Ben Richards lived for years, and which is now owned by Mr Daniel Holland, I remember old Mr. Thomas Dargin living. Mr Dargin died there. In the course of time Laban White married his widow and lived there.
He was auctioneer and coroner at Windsor.
Somewhere about where Mr. R. A. Pye has his business, stood a pub kept by a man named Weller. The sign was painted by Tom Masters' father, and represented a blackfellow with a big nugget of gold in his hand. Where the Bank of New South Wales is, belonged to James Hale. He lived there for a long while, and when he left he went to live at "Fairfield," which he had bought. He died there. About where Pulsford's shop is, Mr Fox kept a general store, and about where the post office is Mr Crew had a large ironmonger's shop. Adjoining Mr Crew lived the father ot Peter Beveridge. He was in business as a confectioner. Fitzgerald-street we always knew as Hangman's Row. In this street old Mr Chandler had a furniture store on the left hand side between the post office and Macquarie street. At the time of the big fire, when the Barraba Hotel was burnt down, the shop was saved. The first I remember keeping the Barraba Hotel was Charles Blanchard. I was in the Barraba the day before it was burnt down and had a glass of beer with John Grono of Pitt Town. Miss Isabella Bushell kept it at that time. Not far away, on the same side as the Barraba, lived old Mr Gallaway, a tailor. Then handy we had Mr. Watt, a shoemaker, with whom George Eather served his apprenticeship. His son, Edward, lived about Windsor for a long while, and a daughter married George Eather's eldest brother, Charles Eather.
Mrs. O'Donovan kept a draper's shop where W. H. O'Brien lives. She owned the place. She had two daughters, the last dying some little time ago, unmarried. Where W. H. O'Brien's shop is William Gaudry and his brother Charles lived, William was a great sporting man, and was clerk of the course at the old Dargin track. Old Mrs Cope lived in the house where Mrs. Brancker lives. She. owned the property and died there. Where the Commercial Bank stands old Mr Richard Ridge kept a pub. He built the Fitzroy Hotel and kept it for a good while. Ridge was a great mail contractor in conjunction with a man named Hill. Old Harry Martineer used to drive for them in the days when the train only came as far as Parramatts. I am not likely to forget those days, as I came from Sydney one day, and when I got out of the train at Parramatta Harry Martineer couldn't take me as he had too many on board. I had to put 7000 sheep over the river in the punt next day and to Richmond I had to get ? so I walked going by the Blacktown road. Mr Richard Ridge had the mail contract when the train came on to Black town. Paddy Doyle was the driver of the mail. After Ridge went to the "Fitzroy" old Mr Broderick had a watch maker's shop in the place Ridge left. Sometimes I brought watches down to him from up-country for repairs while I was droving. Close to Broderick's was another watchmaker named Stewart. The house where Mr William Primrose had a saddler's shop for many years, was built by Mr Mumford, the chemist. He was thrown off his horse out Magrath's Hill way, which proved fatal. He had only insured his life some nine months before for ?500. Not far from where the "Fitzroy" stands and in the direction of the railway, old Mr Thomas Tebbutt kept a store. At the present day I have a pair of old fashioned brass candle sticks which George James bought off Mr Tebbutt while in was in business there. A daughter of mine in Sydney has a small, extension table which James purchased at Mr Tebbutt's shop. George Freeman kept the Cricketer's Arms on the corner where Miss Bushell conducted the Royal Exchange Hotel for so many years. In connection with this pub I had a funny experience once which I must tell. Up stairs the Oddfellows held their meetings, and I had been proposed by Mr Peebles. How I came to be proposed was, Peebles used to draw the grog to the pubs over the river, and I used to put him over in the punt. Anyhow I had been proposed, so I mounted my horse and rode in. Dr.Day was the medical officer and when he examined me he wouldn't pass me. He told me to come again next meeting night, in a fortnight, and in I went. Again he wouldn't pass me, and wanted me to come again in another fortnight, but I told him I wouldn't come any more. Dr.Day thought I had heart disease, but here I am battling well in my 80th year, while the doctor went to his rest many years ago.
A little further in the direction of the railway Thomas Freeman kept the St. Patrick's Hotel. About opposite the Salvation Army barracks Frank McDonald kept a pub in a two-storey house. He did a good business. I knew both him and his wife well. McDonald was a great man with the late Hon. William Walker in election time. Hon. William Walker's father kept a school in the cross street close by. I knew the, Hon. William's brothers, George, Robert, and John. The last time I saw George was when he was a storekeeper on a large sheep station near Coonamble. Some time after he was an auctioneer in Mudgee. The first time I saw William was on Dargin's old race course. He was pointed out to me as the young chap who was learning to be a lawyer under Mr Beddick."

Windsor and Richmond Gazette (NSW : 1888 - 1954)
Saturday 17 September 1910
Windsor and Richmond Gazette (NSW : 1888 - 1954)
Saturday 24 September 1910
Transcription, janilye, 2012

The photograph below of Windsor,
the Royal Hotel on the right
was taken around 1880

Licensed Publicans Hawkesbury District 1834-1837

The following is a correct list of licensed publicans,
compiled from the records of persons holding licenses
in the Hawkesbury District of New South Wales: ?

General Darling (Upper Richmond), Robert Aull 1789-1817
Union Inn, Thomas Eather 1800-1886
Plough. Thomas Mortimer xxxx-1875
Welcome Inn, Christopher Moniz 1809-1865
Packhorse, (Ferry), Thomas Parnell 1765-1853
Black Horse, Paul Randall 1752-1834
Woolpack, (North Richmond), John Town junr. 1806-1883
George the 4th, John Town, senr. 1769-1846

Bird-in-Hand, William Thomas Bayliss 1794-1849
Settlers' Hall (Windsor), Richard Lynch
Governor's Arms, (Windsor), Alfred Smith

Macquarie Arms, William Johnstone
Bird-in-Hand, Daniel Smallwood 1761-1839

Bird-in-Hand, Hugh Kelly 1770-1835
Lamb and Lark, John Pye 1809-1892
George and Dragon, John Cobcroft 1797-1881
Union Inn, James Connolly
Steam Packet, Joseph Fleming
Cottage of Content, Anne Leeson.

Australian, Henry Beasley
White Heart, John Baker
Currency Lass, Thomas Cullen
Windsor Hotel, William Cross
Red Lion, Mary Dargin 1798-1881 nee Howe
St. Patrick, Joseph Delandre 1799-1853
Cross Keys, Daniel Dickens 1792-1852
White Swan, George Freeman 1806-1867
Currency Lad, Charles Gaundry
William the 4th, Thomas Greaves
King's Arms, Andrew Johnstone.
Plough, Edward Robinson
Barley Mow, Robert Smith.

Upper Nelson
White Heart, Daniel Coulton xxx-1864

Travellers' Inn, John Eaton 1811-1904

Macquarie Arms, James Roberts 1805-1874

Lower Branch Hawkesbury
Industrious Settler, Aaron Walters

Fox under the Hill, Francis Peisler
King's Head, Adam Taylor.

Windsor and Richmond Gazette
Transcription, janilye

The Photograph below taken in 1908 is The Black Horse Hotel. The licence was first issued on 15 February 1819 to Paul Randall to keep an inn at his dwelling. For many years the sign of the black horse in full gallop announced its services.
This sign is now on exhibition in the Hawkesbury Historical Society's Museum at Windsor, New South Wales.
It closed in 1927 when the licence was transferred to the Kurrajong Heights Hotel.

2 comment(s), latest 5 years, 5 months ago

John Kilduff 1793-1854

My third great grandfather John KILDUFF was born about 1793 in County Roscommon Ireland, one of the smallest Irish counties and its name derives from the Irish - Ros Coman, meaning St Coman's Wood. Its social history is mainly based around agriculture and it was badly affected by the great famine of 1845-47. He married Mary McCARTHY 1796-1870 at Roscommon about 1816. Mary McCarthy was born about 1796, to William and Ellen McCarthy, also of Roscommon.

There were no records of John, Mary, their parents, their marriage or any children in the 2000 version of the International Genealogical Index. John and Mary may have had one or two children in Ireland, since her death certificate (1870) indicates that at the time there were four children living and one male and one female deceased. They had at least four children in the Colony but there is no surviving record of other children.

John was involved in illegal activities even after he was married. He was arrested and tried in County Roscommon Court in July 1820. He was convicted of Ribbonism and was sentenced to transportation for fourteen years. The crime is recorded on his Certificate of Freedom dated 11 October 1834. In a sense John was a political prisoner, although Ribbon societies in the first half of the nineteenth century were responsible for disruptive activities and violence against landlords and others.
Once in the colony John kept out of trouble.

He was embarked on the "John Barry" at Cork, Ireland which sailed on the 16 June from Cork with Captain Roger Dobson and Chief Surgeon Dan McNamara, and arriving in the Colony on 7 November 1821.

The Convict Indents papers, record that he was a labourer, that he could not read or write and was a Catholic.
A physical description indicates that John was 5 ft 5? in (about 1.67 m) tall with a fairly pale complexion, fair hair and grey eyes.

The following reconstruction of where John and later his wife Mary lived is based on various sources including parish and civil, birth, marriage and death records and Census records.

John was first assigned to John Good in the District of Bathurst and Melville, where he worked to clear the land and plant crops. About a year later another convict Thomas Killier was also assigned to Good. For some reason John was not recorded in the 1822 Muster of convicts, although Killier is, as a servant to John Good. John Kilduff is recorded in the Muster of 1824/1825 at Melville.

In 1825, John Kilduff petitioned the governor for mitigation of his sentence:

"To His Excellency Sir Thos. Brisbane KCB, Captain General and Commander in Chief of the territory of New South Wales and its Dependencies ? We hereby certify that John Kilduff, who came by the Ship John Barry, which arrived in the year 1821 has not been convicted of any crime or misdemeanours in this Colony, but is to our certain belief an honest, sober and industrious character, having served faithfully John Good residing in the District of Bathurst from the 10th November 1821 to August 1825. [Signed] J. Harris, Resident Magistrate, John Joseph Therry RCC Clergyman, John Good, Master"
Even with such eminent signatories as Doctor John Harris and the senior Catholic cleric, his petition was unsuccessful, possibly because he had served only about four of his 14 years.

His wife Mary sailed to Sydney on the Thames, which arrived in Sydney from Cork on 11 April 1826 with 37 free women and 107 children as passengers and a cargo of government stores. It's Captain was Robert Fraser and the Surgeon Superintendant Dr. Linton

John was still assigned to John Good. It is thought that he allowed them (with government permission) to live in a house at Seven Hills. In late 1827 when their daughter Mary was born they were almost certainly at Seven Hills. Some time after this John was reassigned to Daniel Kelly at Wilberforce, possibly to allow better living conditions for his wife and child. John Good comes back into the story later, as the uncle of my second great grandfather Patrick William Hall 1821-1900

The Census of October and November 1828 records John, Mary and the 1 year old child Mary at Wilberforce. John was a labourer assigned to Daniel Kelly, a former convict. Three other convicts were also assigned to Kelly. John Good was still at Seven Hills.

John's sentence expired by servitude in 1834. By the time of the 1841 Census the family was living at Pitt Town. John was the householder and was a farmer. The surviving records are only abstracts. The household consisted of John Kilduff and his wife and three sons and one daughter, all aged seven and under fourteen at the time of the Census and all born in the Colony. There were no convict servants. The house was described as of wood and unfinished but inhabited. The householder was classed in the category landed property, merchants, bankers and professionals so John must have owned or leased the land.

John remained at Pitt Town for the rest of his life. He died on 6 February 1854 aged 60 at Pitt Town. His burial is recorded in the parish record of St Matthews Catholic Church, Windsor which gave his occupation as farmer. He died before civil registration of deaths began (1856) so no other details are available.

Mary Kilduff died on 24 April 1870, age 74 at Cornwallis probably at the home of William and his family. She was laid to rest beside John at the Windsor Catholic Cemetery, Windsor New South Wales.
Her death certificate provides most of the known details of her family and children.

The children of John Kilduff 1793-1854 and Mary Kilduff nee McCarthy 1796-1870 were:-

1.Female Kilduff

2.male Kilduff

3. Mary KILDUFF b: 25 November 1827 at Pitt Town d:17 July 1911 Sydney, On 25 November 1847 married Patrick William Hall 1821-1900 The children of this marriage were:-
Mary Ann Josephine HALL 1848 - 1923
William HALL 1849 - 1910
Bridget HALL 1852 -
John Joseph HALL 1855 - 1906
Edward HALL 1859 - 1864
Sarah Mary HALL 1862 - 1938 m. Edward William MCKEE 1884-1962
Emily Johanna HALL 1867 - 1953
Ellen HALL 1869 - 1869
Patrick Henry HALL 1869 - 1871
Agnes HALL 1872 - 1874

4. John Kilduff b: 21 July 1831, Pitt Town, NSW d: 25 April 1911 at Windsor, NSW. On the 1 December 1858 at Windsor, NSW married Sarah BUCKRIDGE 1840-1930.
The children of this marriage were:-
Eleanor Kilduff 1859 - 1949
John Robert Kilduff 1860 - 1906
Ada Sarah Kilduff 1863 - 1928
Amy Adeline Kilduff 1865 -
Minnie Elizabeth Kilduff 1868 - 1937
George Norbert Kilduff 1870 - 1954
Alfred Rowland Kilduff 1873 - 1889
Ida Mary Kilduff 1875 - 1907
Cecily Mary Kilduff 1878 - 1951
William Martin Kilduff 1881 - 1902
Mary Isabella Kilduff 1883 - 1904

5.William Kilduff b:1832 Riverstone, NSW d: 23 April 1911 Windsor, NSW. On the 3 May 1855 at St. Matthews Catholic Church, Windsor, married Mary Sophia SEYMOUR 1837-1916.
The Children of this marriage were:-
Mary Ann Kilduff 1855 - 1855
Lucy Kilduff 1856 - 1928
Mary Anne Kilduff 1858 - 1938
Elizabeth Margaret Kilduff 1862 - 1945
William Joseph Kilduff 1864 - 1865
Therese Lydia Kilduff 1865 - 1945
William Charles Kilduff 1868 - 1911
George Martin Kilduff 1870 - 1914
John Joseph Kilduff 1872 - 1926
Edwin Leonard Kilduff 1875 - 1943
Frederick Leo Kilduff 1878 - 1908
Francis Kilduff 1883 ? 1954 m. Mary Ivy Williams 1890-1929

6.Unknown Kilduff 1834 - after 1870, according to Mother's death certificate still living when she died

1828 New South Wales, Australia Census (TNA Copy)
New South Wales, Australia Convict Ship Muster Rolls
and Related Records, 1790-1849
1841 New South Wales, Australia, Census
NEW South Wales Registry of Births Deaths Marriages
New South Wales, Australia Historical Electoral Rolls, 1842-1864
New South Wales State Records
Australian National Archives
A huge thanks to
Colin Kilduff,another tireless researcher


Below is a photograph of John Kilduff's Certificate of Freedom,
granted on 11 October 1834

Some Ups and Downs of an old Richmondite, Mr Alfred Smith.

Some Ups and Downs of an old
Richmondite, Alfred Smith.1831-1917
Chronicled by Robert Farlow.
[For the Gazette.]
Mr Joseph Douglas (grandfather of William), lived on the Heights and kept
an accommodation house. Many of the Sydney aristocrats came up and spent
their holidays at the old man's place. I remember them coming up to stay before
trains ran in the colony. Richard Ridge many a time brought them as far as the
river while I was there. Mr Douglas used to meet them there with a one horse
conveyance and take them up to his house. I remember one in particular
coming up for the good of his health, a Lieut. Lethbridge. The change in that
man's appearance after he had been up there about a month was something
wonderful. Mr Douglas kept a good house, and it was always looked upon as
a grand place to stop at. I remember a lawyer named Want driving two splendid
horses up to the Heights in his own carriage from Sydney and staying at Mr
Douglas' house, He told me they were the pair of horses which ran away and
killed Lady Mary Fitzroy at Parramatta. Mr Douglas' house sheltered another
distinguished personage, Sir John Young.
He stayed a night at Douglas', and next day he and his officials rode out on horse
back as far as Mount Tomah for a look round the mountains. Old Mr Douglas'
daughter, Sarah, married Cuthbert Cowling. Cowling owned the property where
Arthur Powell lives. He kept a boarding house there, and it was a fine, place to
stay at. He had many other city aristocrats staying with him on different occasions.
Among Mr Douglas' boys I knew John (William's father) who was droving for
many years. He drove for Mr Cope for a long time. John married a Miss Keenan,
from the Mudgee district, and kept a boarding house where his father kept it.
His wife was a great business woman and managed the boarding house while he
would be away on the roads. When John started the boarding house he made
large additions to his father's old home, and he was well repaid. He sold the
property to Mr George Bowman, and it was up there the medical Doctor Cameron
died. The last time I saw John Douglas was at Riverstone, where he was staying
with his daughter, Mrs Charles Kenny, and where he died. Many a time I have
been travelling on the roads in the company of John Douglas in my droving days.
There was another boy named Joe, but I didn't know much about him.
Then there was Mrs Sherwood, "Granny" Sherwood as she was often
called, who lived up there. I knew her very well. It was nothing unusual for her to
walk from the Heights to Richmond.
From Richmond she generally went to Mrs Faithful's and stayed the night. Mrs
Faithful thought a lot of the old lady. I knew Mrs Sherwood's two sons, Tom and
Jim, both good sawyers, and I often punted their loads of timber. Jim married a Miss
Gosper, of Colo. He has been dead many years, and the widow married a man named
Brown and is still alive. Tom married and went to Mount Tomah and kept a
boarding house for many years out there.
He had two sons, and he and the boys used to meet the drovers and help them
over Bell's Line. This was convenient for drovers, and Tom and the boys made
good money at it. A pound a day was the charge. Jim died up on the Heights,
and I have seen his grave in the garden close to the house.
Mick Hennessy, an old Irishman, lived on the Heights and owned a lot of land
about there. He had some sons, and I remember one of them used to drive a
bullock team, and among them they did sawing.
Then there is "Northfield,' which the late Mr Comrie owned, and where he
lived for so many years. I put him over the river when he went up to have a look
at the property with the view of buying.
I put him and his wife and her brother, Mr Jennings, over many times afterwards.
Mr Comrie was a good fare, for no matter what silver coin he happened to pull out
it was always 'keep the change.'
Any reference to Kurrajong would not be complete without a mention of
the Wilson family, truly a large one. A great many of the younger
generations I am not so well acquainted with. I knew the old Mr Wilson and his
wife very well, and many a time I have put them over in the punt, Mrs Wilson
was a sister to Mrs Barwick. Among the old couple's family I remember the
boys Simmie, Ned, Job, Tim, Jack, and Tom, the youngest. They were great
men with the pit saw, though I don't think Simmie did as much as the others.
The Christian names of the girls I didn't know, but I remember one was married to
George Davis, another to Joe Hawkins and a third to Dan Neil. Simmie married
Betsy Horan, who was a daughter of John Horan, at one time lockup keeper at
Windsor — in the early days of course — and afterwards kept a pub, the Donny-
brook, Wheeney Creek. Old Donnybrook then belonged to 'Grandfather' Town,
who died in Richmond. I knew Simmie's wife before she was married. Ned married
a Miss Riley, and I knew her father and mother. Tim married a sister of Ned's
wife, and I knew her also before she was married. Jack married a Miss Barwick,
who I knew very well. I put Jack and his wife over the river when they were
going away to get married. Tom married a daughter of Mr James Douglas (another
son I had forgotten of Mr Joseph Douglas'). I knew her also before she married.
Close to old Mr Wilson's place lived George Davis, who was a great sawyer,
and I have put a deal of his sawn timber over the river.
Close to George Davis, his brother John lived for some time. He farmed a little
and grew a lot of potatoes. He also took wattle bark occasionally to Richmond.
When he left Kurrajong he went to live on Griffiths' old farm (now Mr John Cupitt's)
and farmed. While there he had a son drowned in the river. Close to the Davis brothers
Mr John Barwick lived, and on his property grew a great lot of potatoes. He
had an old grey horse and old-fashioned cart with which he took his potatoes to
town. I used to put him and his loads over the river. He died at Kurrajong
many years ago.
Close to Barwick's. old Mr Moston lived and he too was a great
potato grower. He died over there. His two girls married Mr M. Riley and
Mr. Charles Pittman. His son John married Susan Dean, a niece of my wife. Both
this couple are dead. Jim, another son, had a bullock team and carted sawn
timber, a few sheets of stringy bark occasionally, and potatoes. He married a
daughter of Thomas Case, of the ' Donnybrook.' I put Jim and his intended wife
over the river the day they were married at the Richmond Church of England,
The Rev. Mr Elder married them. The last time I saw them they had a selection
at Apple Tree Flat, ten miles this side of Mudgee. John Lane was a sawyer, and
lived near the Mostons. His wife was a hard working woman, and I have often
put her over the river very early in the morning with a load of potatoes for
Windsor. Jack could sing well and sang at my wedding. He told me that when he
was a lad he used to sing in the choir at Parramatta in Parson Marsden's time.
He went to the diggings, and his wife died on the Turon. He came back while I
was droving, and had a hut at Norwood, and was sawing as I came through with,
sheep. He was great company, and after I gave up droving he stayed a few days
with us. Another man lived close to these people, called Josh Bushell. He did a
little farming and sawing. When the diggings broke out he started carrying
with his bullock team. Alfred Brown was another old man about there and
a carpenter by trade. It was he who built the house where Mr John Pitt lives,
for old Mr John Town. He built another large, place with stables and
kitchen three miles this side of Mount Tomah for Thomas Sherwood, I put
him over the river occasionally. I knew his son Ned, who lived on the Heights
for a long while. While living there he used to meet cattle drovers and help them
over Bell's Line. One of Mr Brown's daughters married Sam Dean, of Orange, a
nephew of my wife. Another married William Irvine, a wheelwright, and a
third married a Mr Hand. John Pittman, Charley's father, lived near Brown's. He
lived for years with the Mr Cox, of Clarendon. He owned a lot of land up
there and years ago had some cattle. I knew his sons Henry, John, George, and
Charles. The latter is still among us. He had two daughters. Hannah died
many years ago. Mary married William Peck, and she, too, has been dead a long
On many a Sunday I put the late Rev. Elder over the river as he went up to the
old church at the foot of the Big Hill to preach. This side of the old Anglican
church Mr McMahon lived for a long time. He was father of the late Michael
and Cornelius, and Mr Thomas McMahon, who is still hale and hearty and much
respected at Comleroy. There were three girls. One had the sad misfortune
to be burned to death. One married William Eather who was drowned with
her five children in the 1867 flood. Another married the late Mr Philip
Maguire and lived many years out Pitt Town way. She is still living and resides
in Windsor.
There was an old man we knew as Bell the gardener who lived about there and
had a farm of his own. He had an old horse and cart and took his fruit to
Windsor. Paddy Riley lived adjoining Bell the gardener. His son Mick had eight
bullocks in his team with which he used to bring sawn timber to Richmond. Mrs
Riley made a deal of butter and took it in to Richmond. I only knew their son
Mick, and the daughter, Mrs Michael McMahon.
(To be continued.)
SOURCE: Windsor and Richmond Gazette
Saturday 20 August 1910
Transcription, janilye 2012

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