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Coffs Harbour Historic Cemetery

Coffs Harbour Historic Cemetery
Address: Coff Street, Coffs Harbour
and
Coffs Harbour Lawn Cemetery
Also known as Karangi Lawn.
Address: Coramba Road, Karangi, New South Wales, Australia



Note: A spate of thefts of bronze plaques from cemeteries in this region was reported in July 2011.
Thieves, when removing the markers, have also caused damage to the stones on which they were mounted.
If you have family graves in the Coffs Harbour cemetery, and you have not already checked, it is advisable that you check on their integrity.


More information
Coffs Harbour Lawn Cemetery is administered by Coffs Harbour City Council. For further information, contact Council at Locked Bag 155, Coffs Harbour NSW 2450; phone 02 6648 4000; email: [email protected]


2 comment(s), latest 4 years, 10 months ago

Westmoreland passenger list

The 405 tons barque Westmoreland left Downs on the 8 January 1833 and arrived in Sydney Cove on the 19 May 1833 under Captain Brigstock.

Stephen John, Esq sh:163
Stephen Mrs and 2 children sh:163
Wilson Mr sh:163
Wilson Mrs sh:163
Carlysle William, Esq sh:163
Christopherson Mrs sh:163
Hamilton Miss sh:163
Beaver George, Mr sh:163
Beaver Elizabeth, Mrs and an infant born on the voyage sh:163
Beaver Francis sh:163
Beaver William sh:163
Beaver Emily sh:163
Beaver George sh:163
Trodd Able, Mr sh:163
Trodd Amy, Mrs sh:163
Trodd Mary Ann sh:163
Hillary J, Mr sh:163
Hillary Thomas, Mr sh:163
Robertson Henry, Mr sh:163
Robertson Harriett, Mrs sh:163
Robertson Henry sh:163
Robertson Harriett sh:163
Robertson Anna sh:163
Marshall James, Mr sh:163
Greenfield S, Mr sh:163
Uhr J, Mr sh:163
Longeville J H, Mr professor of languages sh:163
Nash H, Miss sh:163
Affrait L, Miss sh:163
Barnet F, Miss sh:163
Robinson T, Mr sh:163
Robinson C, Mrs sh:163
Chapman C, Mr sh:163
Chapman C, Mrs sh:163
Chapman C J sh:163
Chapman J M sh:163
Chapman J K sh:163
Grose W, Mr painter sh:163
Grose M, Mrs sh:163
Grose Alfred sh:163
Grose Henry sh:163
Phillips B A, Mr sh:163
Phillips Celeria sh:163
Phillips Charles sh:163
Phillips Alexander sh:163
Phillips Anna sh:163
Phillips Michael sh:163
Phillips Samuel sh:163
Phillips Sarah sh:163
Phillips Jacob sh:163
Phillips Rosa sh:163
Levien S, Mr sh:163
Levien H, Mrs sh:163
Levien Alfred sh:163
Levien George sh:163
Levien Annette sh:163
Levien Henrietta sh:163
Levien Matilda sh:163
Asser A, Miss

Australians as America saw us in 1942

Nothing like coming here prepared!

AUSTRALIANS AS AMERICANS SEE THEM
"An Outdoors People;Breezy, Democratic"
WASHINGTON, Sunday, 25 October 1942 AAP


["You will find Australians an outdoors people, breezy, very democratic, with no respect for stuffed shirts their own or anyone else's," says a pocket guide on Australia which is being distributed among American troops.

Issued by US War and Navy departments, the booklet states that Australians have much in common with Americans. They are a pioneer people, they believe in personal freedom, and they love sports.

"There is one thing to get straight right off the bat," the booklet says. "You are not in Australia to save a helpless people from the savage Japanese. Recently in a Sydney bar an American soldier turned to an Australian and said, 'Well, Aussie, you can go home now. We've come over to save you.' The Aussie cracked back, 'Have you? I thought you were a refugee from Pearl Harbour.'
Being simple, direct and tough, the Digger is often confused and nonplussed by the manners of Americans' in mixed company; or even in camp. To him those many 'Thank you's" Americans use are a bit too dignifled.

You might get annoyed, at the blue laws which make Australian cities pretty dull places on Sundays.
For all their breezieness Australians do not go in for drinking or woopitching in public, especially on Sunday.

In Australia, the national game is cricket, but they, have another game called Australian rules football.
It is rough, tough, and exciting. There are a lot of rules, which the referee carries in a rule book the size of Webster's dictionary. The game creates the desire on the part of the crowd to tear someone apart. The referees in some parks have runways covered over so that they can escape intact after a game.

As one newspaper correspondent says, Americans and Australians are 2 of the greatest gambling people on earth. It has been said of Australians that if a couple in a bar have not anything else to bet on they will lay odds on which of 2 flies rise first from the bar.
Aussies do not fight out of textbooks. They are resourceful, inventive soldiers with plenty of intiative.
The Australian habit of pronouncing "a" as "I" is pointed out, and an example quoted: "The trine is lite to-di." The booklet includes "Waltzing Matilda" in full."]

I don't know about the too many thank-yous. It would seem that the Australian girls liked it, for 10,000 Aussie brides returned to America with these well heeled, well mannered and certainly well informed troops.


1 comment(s), latest 4 years, 11 months ago

Florentia to Adelaide 1849

The 453 tons barque Florentia left Gravesend on 18 February 1849 then left Plymouth om the 9 March 1849 and arrived in Adelaide on the 20 June 1849 under Captain C.S.Tindale carrying 238 Emigrants.

Thomas Parr, Esq., Surgeon Superintendent, in the cabin ;
Julia,Harriet,and Emma Chisholm Sarah Leigh, Eliza Frogget,Emma Jones, Amelia Fryram, Martha. Eliza, and Esther Burnell, Sarah Wiggins, S. A. Wainright, Jane Benham, Emma Griffin, Susan Kingham, Margaret Slaughter Eliza Fawn, Jane Barnes, Grace and Barbara Foulds, Hester French, Jane Mustor, Harriet Webber, Anne Petello, Elizabeth, Mary Anne, Eliza, and Jane Bastian, Eliza Warring, Eliza Dwyre, Jane Greenlees, Sarah Weir, Amy Annison, Maria Lower, Hannah Peters, Susan Walters Biddy Plunker, R. Mortime, Caroline Parkes Mary Grace, Margaret Davis. Mary Black, Mary Oney, and Catherine White, Margaret and Biddy Hahir,Aaron Lock and wife, Robert Worn and wife, James Chislem and wife, W. Tilney, wife and four children. Wm. Howell wife and two children. George Hall, wife and five children, W. Elliott, wife and child, Charles Seaward and wife John Emonson and wife, Jame Guppy and wife Wm. Hayward, wife and three children, John Burnell and four children, James Williams, wife and three children, John Higgs, wife and three children. Robt. Shepherdson, wife and six children. W. Millhouse, wife and child, W. Tothill, wife and four children, William Pearce, wife and two children, Matthew Slaughter, wife and three children, H. Hiff and wife, W Lane, wife and two children, Samuel Mudge, wife and six children Patrick White and wife.Isaac Glenny and wife James Patterson and wife, John Miller and wife W. Wilton, wife and three children John Slee and wife, W. Kerswell, wife and child, P. A. Lehoe and wife, W. Webb, wife and five children, Thos Pollard, wife and six children, Henry Bastian wife and four children, W. Foulds, wife and two children, John Mills, wife and three children, Sam Mackey, wife and child, James Caldwell, wife and four children, Richard Mortimer, wife and four children, A. Webb, Thomas Lawton, George Burnell, John Foulds, Charles Totman, George Moss, W. Tunly, S. Davis, John Hogarth, Wm. Elson, George Hornes. David and George Pink Thomas and John White, John Hahir, J. Guerin James Kennedy, Thomas and R. Lane, B Nevill Benjamin Randell, R. Thackly, Thomas Row John Fowler, John Worn, Walter Fisher, John Foley, James Roberts, John Williams.

Eight births and three deaths during the voyage.

3 comment(s), latest 4 years, 11 months ago

Posthumous to Adelaide 1849

The 390 tons barque Posthumous left Plymouth on 13 March 1849 and arrived in Adelaide on 20 June 1849 under the guidance of Captain Davison and carrying 157 Passengers.

Passengers : Messrs. F and E. Duffield, J. Parr, W. Colman, and Mrs Colman and child, Mr Atatyar, Mr Darwent, and Mr E. R. Bower, surgeon superintendent, in the cabin ;

Messrs Nelson de Coursey, C. Schwabe, G. E. Bowley, and J. Clearson in the intermediate;

Ewart Mehruta, B. Edmondson, Mr Williams, F. Federel, J. Watkinson, Alfred Watkinson, Wm. Watkinson, Wm. Matts, Edwin Laff, Henry Laff, Wm. Edwards, wife and child, Sarah Tiffen, Josh. Betts, John Miskin, Henry James, James King, Louis Alex. Perdusal, Charlotte A. Bull Bryant, Wm. Harris, Charles Crawford, G. C. Foat, John Papple, Chas. Rooks, Josh. Wicker, Ann, Nehemiah, Josh., Alfred, and Henry Wicker, G. Wicker, infant, Jas. Fielder, Mary Fielder, Frances Hall, Eliz. Beechin, Harriet Beechin, G. Hamlin, J. Salmon, Henry Heath, S. Baird, J. Botterell, M. Baird, Walter Scott, T. Noble, J. Clarke, W. Ramsdedn, T. Evans, J. Neates, Josiah Oldfield, E. Bryant, Eliza Ann, Eliz. Jane, T. Frances, and W. C. Bryant, infant. W. Lewellen, John Edwin Smyth, W., and Mary, Emma Maslin, Eleanor, Harriet, Mary Hannah, John, Susannah, W. and Martha Cook, C. Hodson, T. Hall, wife and seven children, R. M. Wray, T. Hopkinson, R Walker Emma, Sea, Mary Ann G. Hoye, Rosina Gale, Mrs Biggs, Sarah Taylor, John, Geo., Mary Ann, Eliza, Susan, and Margaret Murray, James Jordon, wife and three children, J. Treeman Notts, wife and two children, J. J. Walker, Wm. Southgate, Henry Elborough, Sarah Elborough, J. Hammon, R. G. Dur ham, wife and six children, Susan Duncan, Susan Duncan, Walter Ransome, S. B. Pitt, C. Webb Sarah Webb, Henry, Rebecca, Eliza, and Frances Baker, Alex. Wood, Wm. Andrew, Eliz. Colts, Ulrich Spikly, Alex. Sim, John, Susan, Eliz. and Emma Harvey, Alex.J.L.F.Chanmout, Wm. Braceide and wife, Miss Morris and child, Mr Morris, wife and son Louisa Ransome, Louisa Chalmers, Wm. Akhurst wife and infant, James Coumbe, wife and six children, David Wheeler and wife, Augustus Raymond and wife, Henry, Mary Ann, Henry, Kate, Geo. and Mary Ann Gove, infant, Robt. Thompson, wife and three children, Alex. Anderson, Mr Moyle, wife and three children, Jean F. Amiet, and Louis Amiet, in the steerage.

Burlington to Adelaide 1865

LIST OF PASSENGERS TO ADELAIDE PER SHIP BURLINGTON.

from London via Plymouth to Port Adelaide 2nd May 1865

The ship Burlington, Captain Ellis, which sailed from Plymouth on the 4th January, with 281 immigrants, under the charge of Dr. Gregory. Surgeon-Superintendent, arrived at a late hour on
Tuesday night, after a passage of 118 days.

Sub-joined are the names of the immigrants, together with their industrial and national classifications:?

English?
Thomas, Emma, and Thomas Allen, Thomas Amos, W. James Andrews, George, Mary, George, and James Barrow, William H. Bedella, Elizabeth Bedella, Rd. and Susan Bennett, Eli Billingham, Elizabeth Blake, Amelia Blake, Mary Botting, Richard Brookes, Harriet Brown, James Coad, John, Hannah, John W., and Wm. F. Cogan, Mich. Cullings, Ellen Cooper, James Cornish, John Crothery, George and Annie Crump, Charles, Mary, John, Henry, James, Elizabeth, and Eliza Crump, John Doyle, Catherine and Thomas Driscoll, William Driscoll, June Edwards, Sarah Faulkener, Georgina Gabb, Richard and Ellen Gill, John and Augusta Groves, Fred. Hamblin, Ann Hayes, William Herring, James and Sarah Hicks, Stephen Hill, William, Ann, and Mary Hocking. John Hogan, James Holby, William Hooker., James Hulbard, Charles Hyde, John James, John Job, Edwin Juliffe, Hugh Kent, William King, Robert and Richard Kittoe, Edwin Lamming, Sarah Langley, James Letcher, Albert McDonald, Joseph and James Maddren, George Mapstone, Mary Mankelord, George and Thomas Martin. Thomas and Samuel May, Andrew Maney, James Mellen, Elizabeth Mitchell, George Morgan, Stephen, Margaret, May, Annie, William H., and Jane Moyle, Charles Mutton, William Nancarrow, Richard, John, Elizabeth, James, and Edward Nettell, Jeremiah Nicholas, May, David, Sarah. George, Ellis, Catherine, Bertha, and Ada Norman. William Parsons, Charles C., Grace. Joseph, and John Pascoe, Abel and Ellen Pattermore, Elizabeth Paull, David and Matilda Pickett, Ann, Catherine, James, and Grace Richards, Martha, James, Ellen, and Julia Rimer, Eliza Ror, John and Jane Roskilly. Elizabeth Roskrow, Emily and Nathaniel Rouse, John, Catherine, Elizabeth, Joseph, and Thomas Rule, William and Mary Simmons, Harry Smith, Elizabeth Soames, Lavinia Sparman, Thomas Spillett, William Staff. Joseph and Nathaniel Stephens, Louisa and Charlotte Stoddard, Louisa, Jane, and George Stoddard, Thomas and Jane Stom, William, Julia, Mary, and Elizabeth Symons, John Thomas. Nicholas, Mary Jane, Nicholas, and Mary Thomas, Alice Thomas, Reuben, Mary Ann, and Louisa Toms, William and Susan Touten. Richard and Thos. Trembak, Nathaniel Trescowthick. Humphry, Eliza, and Richard Trounce. Mark. Jessie. Edwin, and Laban Wake, William, Rachel, John, and Samuel Walters, John Webster, Elizabeth Weeks, Sarah Ann White, Charles Wilcoks, James, Richard, Emma, and George Williams. James Willoughby, Samuel Wills. Charles Woodward.

Scotch ? Robert Aitchison, Jane Aitchison, Joseph Barton, David Bell. William H. Ford, Alexander Fulton, Jane Gardiner, David Harrison, Jane Harrison. John, Ann, Mary, Jessie, and Mary Henderson, Ann Henry, James lnglis, Ann Jolly. Alexander Johnson. Barbara Linklater, Charles Linklater, Andrew, Jessie, Jessie, Andrew, Isabella, Jane, James, and Elizabeth Lindsay, Isabel Lyndsay. Margaret Lynch, Robert McConnell Alexander and Margaret McGregor, Catherine and Jessie McKenzie, Ann McKeown, Robert Taylor, Ellen Wallace, James Young.

Irish? Charles Barrett, James, Mary, and Winifred Carry, James Chant. Ann Collins. Mary and Bridget Connell. William Coughlin, James Coy, Thomas and Margaret Cunningham, Catherine and Pat Doyle, David Gunn, Mary Higgins, Michael,John, and Monty Hogan. Thady Hynes, David, Mary, Michael, Pat, and Mary Kelly, Michael Keneally, William, John, Mary, and Margaret Kenedy, Celia King, James Lyman, Ellen McAuliffe, Eliza McCahey. Mary McCarthy, Ann McLoughlin, Pat and Margaret Mouby, Thomas Neeman, Abigail O'Callaghan, Thomas Rochford, Stephen, John, and Robert Ryan. Thomas and Ellen Stafford, Ann Stunchon, John Walsh, Pat Whelan.

Summary of Nationalities.?
English? Adults, 155: children between 1 and 12, 19: infants, 8; total 192.
Scotch? Adults 30: children between 1 and 12. 9 ; total, 39.
Irish? Adults. 45; children between 1 and 12, 3 : infants, 1 ; total, 49.
Totals ?Adults, 240; children between 1 and 12, 31; infants, 9; grand total, 288? equal to 210
statute adults; children between 1 and 12, 15?; total, 255?. Industrial Classification.? Miners 33, labourers 59, servants 43, schoolmasters 2, matron 1,cooks 4, shepherds 2, blacksmiths 5, carpenters or cabinet-makers 3, masons 3, farmers 2, farm labourers and servants 6, laundress 1, sawyer 1, railway labourer 1, housekeeeper 1, coachpainter 1, printer 1, carter 1, ploughman 2, dairymaid 1, sempstress 1, shoe makers 2.

Source:
The South Australian Advertiser (Adelaide, SA : 1858 - 1889)
Wednesday 3 May 1865
Taken from the Agents' embarkation list


Cometville State School Queensland 1878-1930

Cometville renamed Comet on the 19 March 1931 is 859 kilometres or 534 miles north west of Brisbane, Australia, on the Comet River which was named by explorer Ludwig Leichhardt in December 1844 after Wilmot's Comet which was visible in the Southern Hemisphere at that time.
Comet is where Leichhardt's famous "dig tree" was established to indicate to others where he had buried food and journals.

It was a very important day for the outback settlement of Cometville when the State school opened on the 23 October 1878.

Below is a list of the Head School Teachers and the years in which they served up until 1930

Samuel Clark........................ 23 October 1877 to 19 September 1879
Alexander Blyth..................... 01 January 1879 to 30 September 1879
John Boland (acting) ............... 01 October 1879 to 30 September 1881
John Hassell........................ 01 October 1881 to 02 September 1883
William Henry Allen Jeffreys........ 20 August 1883 to 31 December 1884
William Henry Smith ................ 19 January 1885 to 25 April 1889
John Mills ......................... 06 May 1889 to 25 April 1891
Phillp Henry Robinson............... 26 May 1891 to 31 December 1896
Louis Charles Francis .............. 01 January 1897 to 06 February 1898
George Henry Osmond ................ 28 February 1898 to 31 December 1900
Denis sheahan....................... 01 January 1901 to 13 March 1902
Hubert George Ladbrook ............. 07 April 1902 to 31 March 1905
Clement Bleakley ................... 01 April 1905 to 30 June 1910
Patrick Kehoe....................... 01 July 1910 to 28 February 1911
Albert Boettcher ................... 27 February 1911 to 30 March 1914
James Thiele........................ 01 May 1914 to 15 September 1918
John Henry Langford ................ 18 September 1918 to 30 September 1921
Gladys Fannv Kidd .................. 01 October 1921 to 24 January 1926
William Leslie Kemp ................ 25 January 1926 to 31 December 1929
William Charles Thomas Jordan....... 01 January 1930

The photograph below which is not all that well preserved, but I've not ever been able to find another.
Taken in the 1930s it shows the original Cometville State School in the foreground and the new Comet State School behind. after this photograph was taken the old school was removed.
The new school behind was bought in 1936 by the Country Women's Association (Gindie branch) and turned into a rest home.


Peter Hough 1776-1833

My 3rd Great Grandfather was Peter HOUGH, born in Paris, France 1776 and died in Richmond, New South Wales on the 17 March 1833. He was buried at St Peter's Church of England Cemetery Richmond, on the 19 March 1833.

Peter Hough was indicted for burglary, 16th September 1795 and tried at the Old Bailey For steeling money and silver from St.Paul's Coffee Shop in London. For this charge he was found Not Guilty

On the 17 February 1797 Peter Hough was again before the courts. This time in Middlesex and charged with Petty Larceny. He was charged with "that on 8 February 1797 with force and arms that he did steal one Red Morocco Pocket Book of the value of 10 pence from James Daniell. Found guilty and committed to Newgate Prison until the sentence of 7 years Transportation could be carried out. Between 12 October 1797 and 31 December 1797 at Woolwich; England, Peter Hough was imprisoned on board the hulk Prudentia. On 2 January 1798 at Woolwich it was noted he had been ill but was recovering from venereal disease.

Peter HOUGH was named on the Hillsborough ships list as Peter HUFF sailed to New South Wales on the Hillsborough taking 218 days. The captain was William Hingston. She left England on 23 November 1798 and arrived in Sydney Cove on 26 July 1799. As well as convicts, free settlers were also also onboard. 95 died on the voyage.

The convicts were ironed two together and were accommodated on the lowest deck where conditions were extremely grim, there being no direct access to outside light or air. Each man was given a wooden plank two feet wide as a bunk and a blanket and a pillow. The weight of the irons was 11 lbs.

The Hillsborough was one of a convoy of about 15 ships and there was some delay in their sailing because of storms. During the trip typhoid struck and 100 convicts died. The typhoid began on 12 November. The disease was carried by lice and, due to the lack of hygiene, it spread rapidly through the ship.

The convicts were given only 13 pints of water each to last them for a week. This was to be their ration throughout the journey despite the fact that their provisions were salt meat and they had to sail through the tropics in appalling heat. The journey began with a gale and one can only imagine the conditions as the convicts were locked below and many were seasick.

The convicts were deeply rebellious and the Captain and crew responded with dreadful cruelty. A number of the convicts had found ways to remove their irons, but this was reported to the captain by an informer amongst the convicts. They were thereupon all ordered on deck, had their irons examined and, if these had been interfered with, the convicts were punished by between 12 and 72 lashes. The Captain further threatened to hang any more convicts found interfering with their chains.

By March the ship arrived in Table Bay, now the site of Capetown in South Africa, where they stayed for some considerable time as a number of convicts were dying from typhoid and the ship had to be cleaned and provisioned. Conditions on the shore were also very poor, the convicts being forced to dig graves for their dead comrades whilst shackled together.

The Captain finally realised that the treatment he was meting out would interfere with the payment he was to receive for the delivery of live convicts, and conditions began to improve toward the end of May with liberty to go on deck at will if one was sick, as much water as was wanted, but by now the death toll had risen to 63 of the original 300.

The ship sailed down the "roaring forties" going through a number of terrible storms and arrived off Van Dieman?s Land (now re-named Tasmania) on 4 July. Fighting their way up the east coast of Australia, they arrived off Sydney Heads at 4 am on 26 July. At daylight the ship sailed up the Harbour and the convicts were finally unloaded on 29 July.

Only 205 of the 300 original convicts were landed in Australia, and of these 6 more died in the first few days. The Hillsborough had been one of the worst convict ships ever to bring a load to Australia, and Governor Hunter wrote to the Secretary of the Colonies, the Duke of Portland, acquainting him with the situation and describing the convicts on the Hillsborough as \"a cargo of the most miserable and wretched convicts I ever beheld". The reason for this was a difference in the payment method. Whereas previously the Government had paid ?23 per head for every convict transported to Botany Bay, James Duncan owner and contractor of the Hillsborough was to receive only ?18 per head with an extra ?4/10/6 for every live convict arriving in Australia.

Source; William Noah 1754-1827


In July 1801 Peter appears on the census at Parramatta with Susannah Tillet 1780-1846 convict arrived on the 'Speedy' in 1800
No marriage. They had 2 Children
Peter 1801-xxxx
Henry 1803-1880 m Cordelia TOOTH 1828-1885 in 1848

Spouse Catherine Rigby 1782-xxxx died in Windsor. Convict arrived on the 'Nile' 1801, Catherine Rigby, sailed back to England after gaining her freedom, leaving Louisa in the care of her father.
No marriage
Children Louisa 1805-1881 m. John CUPITT 1799-1937 in 1819

Spouse Mary WOOD 1793-1880 The daughter of John WOOD 1768-1845 and Ann MATTHEWS 1762-1819. Peter married Mary at St.Phillips C of E Sydney, New South Wales on the 19 September 1809.

The children of this marriage were:-
1.Sophia 1810-1885m. Timothy LACY 1806-1887 in 1827
2.John 1812-1896 m. Margaret MAGUIRE 1812-1904 in 1837
3.George 1813-1878 m. Mary BANNISTER 1820-1875 in 1838
4.Peter Joseph 1817-1888 m. Jane Sharp LOVELL 1823-1894 in 1840
5.Mary 1821-1904 m.William CORNWELL 1827-1906 in 1850
6.Ann 1822-1889 m. William ONUS 1822-1855 in 1842 and William REID 1833-xxxx in 1857
7.Eliza 1825-1870 m. Charles EATHER 1827-1891 in 1848
8.Elizabeth 1830-1909 m. James Edward MARSDEN 1830-1887 in 1850
9.Sarah 1833-1878 m. William BENSON 1830-1923 in 1855

He was Publican of a hotel opposite the Toll Gate on the Sydney Road in Parramatta from 1825 till the end of 1828.

On 4 November 1826 at Parramatta, Peter Hough and Timothy KELLY were committed for trial at the Quarter Sessions, for assault and battery of John Hall of Evan forcibly taking his horse and cart from him on the high road, but the trial did not proceed.

janilye?

Below is the Toll Gate on Sydney Road. On the Sydney side of Parramatta.