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Eliza Emily Donnithorne 1821 - 1886

Eliza Emily Donnithorne born in Cape Town in 1821 and died in Newtown, Sydney in 1886 was the daughter of the former East India Company judge and Master of the Mint, James Donnithorne b: 17 April 1773, St Mary Aldermanbury, London and died 25 May 1852 in Newtown, Sydney. His father was Nicholas Donnithorne 1744-1796 fron Truro, Cornwall.

James DONNITHORNE arrived in New South Wales in 1838 and settled into the Georgian mansion 'Camperdown Lodge' at 36 King Street, Newtown New South Wales. Eliza Emily returned to England after her mother and sisters Maria and Penelope died of Cholera in Calcutta in 1832 and she did not arrive in New South Wales until the 25 June 1846 aboard the 669 ton barque 'Agincourt' with Captain Neatby.

James married Sarah Eliza BAMPTON 1790-1832, the daughter of Captain William Wright BAMPTON 1759-1813 in Mirzapore, Bengal on the 8 October 1807.

Now we all love a good urban legend and Newtown has a beauty. The thing is all legends seem to have a habit of growing and changing shape over the years.

This is the Legend of Emily Eliza Donnithorne

James Donnithorne spoilt his only surviving daughter, catering to all her demands. He arranged several marriages for her which she rejected, instead; falling in love with a shipping clerk named George Cuthbertson. Eliza's father consented to the marriage in 1846.

George Cuthbertson, jilted Eliza Emily Donnithorne he was probably driven away by her overbearing father, Cuthbertson would die in India during the Sepoy rebellion in 1858, while his fiance in Sydney waited anxiously for his return.

Suffering a nervous breakdown due to her abandonment, Eliza insisted the wedding feast be left untouched on the long dining room table in the grand mansion, Camperdown Lodge, ready for festivities and ceremonies to commence once the absent groom arrived.

Her orders were complied with by her father, retired Judge James Donnithorne, over concern for her state of mind. Those concerns were amplified by Eliza's refusal to wear anything except her wedding dress as she whiled away the days waiting for her groom. Unknown to all, Eliza was in the early stages of pregnancy.

To avoid further scandal, her newborn baby was spirited away by the Judge who arranged for its adoption while falsely telling his daughter of its death. This blow, coupled with the subsequent death of her father, sent the pretty young woman over the edge.

After her father's funeral, all but two servants were dismissed. The imposing estate would be sealed off from the world for the next 40 years. Windows and shutters were permanently closed, drapes drawn, and the house was blanketed in total darkness. Expensive European paintings and furnishings were gradually blanketed in the dust of decades, falling to ruin anonymously while weeds and overgrowth consumed the outside of the once stately house.

A generation of neighbors were born, lived and died, believing the house to be abandoned. Oblivious to the passage of time, Eliza grew old. Her wedding dress decayed and hung off her withering body as she drifted like a ghost through the dusty ruins of her world.

She refused to leave the grounds or see anyone except her lawyer and minister, who described rotting chairs collapsing under them as the mistress of the house held court, sitting solemnly in her discolored wedding dress while candles cast eerie shadows on the walls. Merciful death finally arrived in 1886 when Eliza died of heart disease, a fitting end for a woman who suffered so long from a broken heart.

A generous woman, her donations helped build the local church where she was buried, while the bulk of her considerable estate was left to charities and her trusty servants.


Eliza Emily Donnithorne, was widely considered at the time to be Charles Dickens' Miss Havisham, in Great Expectations. Although this cannot be proven, many think it true.

But that, in shutting out the light of day, she had shut out infinitely more; that, in seclusion, she had secluded herself from a thousand natural healing influences; that, her mind, brooding solitary, had grown diseased, as all minds do and must and will that reverse the appointed order of their Maker.. Great Expectations, chapter 49

There are several versions of her story, none of them all quite matching up.

Twickenham Museum version makes very interesting reading and probably as close as we are ever going to get to the truth.

Well here is my contribution:

The following appeared in what can only be described as a gossip column called 'THE DRAMA' in a paper called Bells Life in Sydney and Sporting Reviewer on Saturday 8 April 1848.
ON DIT.--The member for Durham is about to lead to the hymeneal, altar the accomplished daughter of Judge Donnithorne ; rumour adds that the "man of fashion" has eight thousand reasons for so doing.

Now I do hate to be a myth buster but the member for Durham in 1848 is of course Stuart Alexander DONALDSON 1812-1867. So that puts paid to our shipping clerk Cuthbertson ; or was she jilted twice!!
(now who was Cuthbertson)

Now I did say it was a gossip column so I searched further also reading Matt Murphy's story in The Newtown Project He gives a wedding date of 1856 that's 3 years after Eliza's father dies.(Now who would be around to spirit the baby away?

Matt Murphy asked himself the same question I've been asking;

"Why hasn't anyone gone to St.Stephens Church Newtown and checked the banns for the intended nuptials of Miss Donnithorne?"

Guess what! Matt Murphy checked and from 1845 to 1865 there are no Donnithorne's listed.

Good for you Matt Murphy. But really - Is that it?
How disappointing when urban legends lose their mystery.

James Donnithorne 1773-1852
Obituary Sydney Morning Herald, May 27 1852
THE LATE JAMES DONNITHORNE, ESQUIRE. Amongst the obituaries of the present week we regret to notice that of James Donnithorne, Esq., who for a long period of his life enjoyed some of the highest appointments in the gift of the Honorable East India Company. His father was a personal friend of George the Fourth, while Prince Regent, and held the appointment of Governor of the Stannaries for the Duchy of Cornwall, in which county his property of St. Agnes had long been possessed by his family, his uncles having held the high and honorable offices of Master of the Household, and Ambassador at the Court of Hanover, during the reigns of George the Second and Third. By the personal gift and under the especial patronage of the Prince Regent, his son, the present lamented James Donnithorne, Esq., was sent to India as the first writer in the Hon. East India Company's service. With talent and praiseworthy ability he rose to the highest distinction, and after having
acted for many years as Master of the Mint, at the receipt of 12,000 a year, he resigned to enter upon an appointment more favorable to his constitution. After a period of forty-two years he retired from the service of the company, to enjoy that repose from the fatigue of an honourable and active life which his declining age required ; and preferring the genial clime of this favoured land, adopted it as his home. He has now sunk under the weight of years, leaving behind him a name that will long be remembered by many for his unbounded hospitality, by all for his universal benevolence.- S. M. Herald, May 27.

According to Burke's Genealogical and Heraldic Dictionary, Donnithorne family tradition had it that they were descended from a Spaniard, Don Thoan, who was shipwrecked off Cornwall



1. Let every wife be persuaded that there are two ways of governing a family; the first is by the expression of that will which belongs to force; the second by the power of mildness, to which even strength will yield. One is the power of the husband; a wife should never employ any other arms than gentleness. When a woman accustoms herself to say I will, she deserves to lose her empire.

2. Avoid contradicting your husband. When we smell at a rose, it is to imbibe the sweetness of its odour: we likewise look for every thing that is amiable from women. Whoever is often contradicted feels insensibly an aversion for the person who contradicts, which gains strength by time, and, whatever be her good
qualities, is not easily destroyed.

3.Occupy yourself only with household affairs. Wait till your husband confides to you affairs of higher importance, and do not give your advice till he asks it.
4.Never take upon, yourself to be a censor of your husband's morals, and do not read lectures to him. Let your preaching be a good example, and practice virtue yourself to make him in love with it.

5.Command his attentions by being always attentive to him; never exact any thing,
and you will obtain much; appear always flattered by the little he does for you,
which will excite him to perform more.

6.All men are vain ; never wound his vanity, not even in the most trifling instances.
A wife may have more sense than her husband, but she' should never seem to know it.

7.When a man gives wrong counsel, never make him feel that, he has done so, but lead him on by degrees to what is rational, with mildness and gentleness; when he is convinced,
leave him all the merit of having found out what was just and reasonable.

8.When a husband is out of temper, behave obligingly to him; if he is abusive, never retort;
and never prevail over him to humble him.

9.Choose well your female friends: have but few, and be careful of following their advice in all matters.

10. Cherish neatness without luxury, and pleasure without excess; dress with taste,
and particularly with modesty; vary the fashions of your dress, especially in regard to colours.
It gives a change to the ideas, and recalls pleasing recollections. Such things may appear trifling, but they are of more importance than is imagined.

11.Never be, - curious to pry into your husband's concerns, but obtain his confidence
by that which, at all times, you repose in him. Always preserve order and economy;
avoid being out of temper, and be careful never to scold.
By these means he will find his own house more pleasant than any other.

12. Seem always to obtain information from him, especially before company,
though you may pass yourself for a simpleton. Never forget that a wife owes all her importance
to that of her husband; Leave him entirely master of his actions, to go or come whenever he thinks fit.
A wife ought to make her company so amiable to her husband that he could not exist without it;
then he will not seek for any pleasure abroad if she does not partake of it with him.

transcribed from The Australian (Sydney, NSW : 1824 - 1848) issue Friday 1 August 1828, by janilye on the 29 January 2012

Still happily living by the code in 1900 in Dungog, New South Wales just as her mother and grandmother did.

9 comment(s), latest 3 years, 10 months ago

Newtown Sydney NSW from settlement to 1912

This article, which I have transcribed below was written on the 12 December 1912 and appeared as part of a feature in The Sydney Morning Herald, for Newtown's Municipal Jubilee. The links I added myself. janilye



Newtown is an old town-a very old town, in fact, as towns go in Australia.
It may almost be said to have begun with the arrival of Phillip. Certain it is that the man to whom the two grants of land, totalling 210 acres, on which to-day the greater part of Newtown stands, came out to Australia with Governor Phillip in 1788.
This man was one Nicholas Devine, son of a farmer in Burrin, county Cavan, Ireland. For 25 years Nicholas Devine filled the position of principal superintendent of convicts, and he seems to have given satisfaction to his superiors, for we find his services recognised by two grants of the public land the first grant of 120 acres was given to him on January 8, 1734, by "Richard Grose, Esquire, Lieutenant-Governor of the Colony," and the second, a grant of 50 acres, was given by "John Hunter Esquire, Lieutenant-Governor of the Colony," on October 3, 1799.
And Devine settled there, and, after his native town, he called the place Burrin Farm.
The Grose grant reads, In part:-"In pursuance of the power and authority vested in me is aforesaid, I do by these presents give and grant unto Nicholas Devine, his heirs and assigns, to have and to hold for ever one hundred and twenty acres of land, to be known by the name of Burrin Farm, laying: and situated in the
district of Bulanamlng, and separated on the north side by a road of 200ft in width from the land allotted for the maintenance of a schoolmaster, without the town of Sydney. Such timber as may be growing and to grow hereafter upon the said land, "which may be deemed fit for naval purposes, to be reserved for the use of the
Crown "

The land granted to Devine by Governor Hunter was bounded on the south-west side by Page, Candells, Jenkins, and Field farm, from which it is separated by a road of 60 feet, and on the south side by an allotment granted unto Samuel Burt, the said 90 acres
of land to be known by the name of Burrin"
On these 210 acres Devine lived for many years and there he died. The land was heavily timbered, but whether any of the timber was ever requisitioned for naval purposes we do not know. We know this, however, that the heirs and assigns of Nicholas Devine who were to have and to hold it for ever, have long since ceased to have any interest in the land. Burrin Farm has ceased to be.
All the farms that once were there about have gone, and on the land are thousands of houses closely packed together, and, where once a few men bade each other the time of day, and inquired how the crops were getting on, many thousands of people-in Newtown and Erskinevllle and Camperdown, in Enmore, St Peters, and the places contiguous thereto-are living and moving in these busy times with never a thought of the old farm lands.
But at a time like this, when Newtown Is celebrating its municipal Jubilee, we may with advantage look back on some of the past history of the place, and recall some of the early life of Australia and some of the men of old. History and romance are here blended in a way that should interest all Australians.


Old hands still speak of the great Devine case- or the Newtown ejectment case as the records have it as a 'cause celebre' which lasted for many days and which was crowded with sensational incident.
In it were engaged most of the leading counsel of the day and many prominent families were concerned in it as defendants.
The date was 1857-27 years after Nicholas Devine had died. Devine went to England, it Is said, as a witness for Bligh, after the latter's deposition and there he married. He however left no issue and on his death his property passed to one Bernard Rochfort, yeoman who had become his assigned servant in 1825.
To Rochfort it is alleged he conveyed the whole of the land comprised in the two grants, and from Rochfort it was purchased in parcels of various sizes by citizens of Sydney who built fine country homes there, spending thousands of pounds. Then suddenly relatives of the deceased Nicholas Devine appeared upon the scene and laid claim to all the land. Rochfort was charged with forcing the old man's signature to the will. Moreover it was claimed that being an assigned servant he was not entitled to possess any land whatever.
The families who were now living on the estate combined to defend the case - to defend their own estates.
It was one of the longest if not the longest list of defendants in a case that this country has any record of.
We have not space to follow it further than to state that in the end proceedings were stopped by the defendants paying a certain sum to the claimant as a solatium. But the evildence given in the case-it was published afterwards in pamphlet form and may be seen in the Public Library.

It is interesting because many of the men who were witnesses lived as boys in Sydney at the beginning of the nineteenth century and told of things that happened in the old convict days. And partlcularly interesting, is it to one who wishes to preserve the old history of Newtown.
There were bushrangers at Newtown once, for in 1822 we read Nicholas Devine and his wife were beaten by bushrangers till they were almost senseless". One witness John Lucas said, "I am a native of the colony and have great recollection. I know Nicholas Devine 54 or 55 years ago. I lived on Church Hill then, and Devine lived in Bridge street and afterwards we lived near each other at Newtown. I knew him in 1800, and I recollect his being beaten by the bushrangers in 1822. He had a sap ling fence around his farm, and I used to go there to get firewood". Another witness Michael Willlam Henry said that he came to the colony in 1800 and was formerly in the Marines "The last commander that I sailed under" he said " was Lord Nelson"
There is much interesting history in these Pages but it must be passed over.


Sydney has grown greatly in the last hundred years the city has expanded, large suburbs have grown up and where once the blacks had corroborees and bushrangers held men up, we have a metropolis with a population of nearlv three quarters of a million. Newtown like so many of our other suburbs has grown from small things to big things It is in fact, the busiest of all our suburbs today.
But before Newtown was O'Connelltown, (called after Sir Maurlce O'Connell, who lies burled In the old Camperdown Cemetery near St. Stephen's Church) was flourishing and though, the name has now gone, some of the old inhabitants still say they live in O'Connelltown.
Exactly how Newtown got its name is not quite clear. But years ago - many years ago- there were half a dozen small cottages situated between Beehag's block (where Hatters' Arcade now stands) and Eliza street and the records of the Wesleyan Church show that services were held in one of these old cottages in 1838.
Probably they were built about 1830. There was a big break from St. John's Tavern (now the Shakespeare Hotel, at the corner of King and Hordern streets) to Beehag's property Then, in addition to the cottages referred
to, there were brickworks, surrounded by a number of old huts, on what is now known as the Gowrie Estate, at the rear of Newtown Markets. In all probability this group of buildings came to be called "the new town," and so the place got its name. There are some who tell us, however, that a small vlllage sprang up at St. Peters, and that it used to be referred to as "New Town."
Many of the streets in Newtown are named after the men of the early days. O'Connell street, for instance, is named after Sir Maurice Charles O'Connell, a cousin of the celebrated Daniel O'Connoll. He landed in Sydney in 1809, In command of the 73rd Regiment, and bearing a commission as Lieutenant-Governor of New South Wales and its dependencies and immediately after his arrlval he married Mrs. Putland, the brave and dutiful daughter of Governor Bligh. He died in Sydney on May 25, 1818, and his remains were the first to be interred in the Church of England cemetery at Newtown-known as the old Camperdown Cemotery. It was in Sydney that his no less distinguished son, Sir Maurlce Charles O'Connoll (President of legislatlve Council of Queensland, and four times Actlng-Governor of Queensland), was born. Bligh-street, Newtown, reminds us that the land on the west side of King-street, from Forbes street down to Missenden-road, comprised the grant to Bligh, and in the forties and fifties it was all practically vacant land.


There have been great changes since then, and there is scarce a vacant piece of land there now. The old tollbars have gone, and the railway and tramway run through the land where the old farms were. There were three gates on what was then known as Cook's River-road-one at Forbes-street (tho entrance from the city), one on what is now the Newtown railway bridge, and one at the dam, Cook's River. By paying at one of them the traveller was given a pass to clear the others for the same day only. The road, being one of the main roads, was vested in the Cook's River-road trust. Before it was taken over by the trust it was one of the worst out of the city, but a couple of years afterwards it was acknowledged to be the best in the colony. The gates were leased or sold for three-year periods, and the first to take charge was G A. Davis, an old resident of the district. The trust could only raise money by the sale of the tollbars; It had no power to tax anyone save those who went through the gates.
It was near the old toll-bar, and between King-Street and Bligh-street, that Dr. Samson's acadamy for boys and young men stood, and many of his scholars became prominent business men in the city.
Close by, in Bligh street, was the residence of "Parson" Kemp, who was the first minister of St Stephen's. The old house is still standing. At the bottom of Nelson-street, now called Little Queen street, was Gough's College Hotel, afterwards known as "Gough's Folly," because It was built off the main road, with no population near at the time. It certainly did seem an out-of-the-way place for an hotel but probably Gough was a far-seelng man. "I do not think he was mad," said an old resident to a "Herald reporter, "because there was a lot or building going on about there, and he opened his house to catch the trade. More over, the University was being built, St. Paul's College, St. John's College, and several smaller places. " From which It would appear that Mr. Gough expected to do a big trade with the University!
It is not without Interest to note. In those skyscraper days, that the first three-story building in Newtown was put up in King street by a Mr, Peden, who was connected with one of the city banks, and used as a private residence. To-day it is a pastrycook's shop.


When Newtown was incorporated there were only about 15 buildings on the east side of King-street, extending from Forbes-street to the railway bridge. Mr. Hordern, who laid the foundations of the firm of Hordern Brothers, is said to have lived on the corner of Fitzroy-street. Lower down, on the Cook's River-road, was Dent's large block. It ran from Short-street to Holt-street
The Hon. Thomas Holt, M.L.C., built a very large mansion there, and it was afterward.
used as the Camden College, with the Rev. S. C. Kent as the principal. Many prominent men of the city were educated there, among them the late Mr. Samuel Hordern and his brother Anthony, Dr. A. Watson, and Dr. Knaggs. Mr. Holt also built Camden-terrace, end portion of this terrace is still standing. He is also remembered for having built what was then the largest mansion in the colony. This was at Marrickville, and it was known as "The Warren." He imported a thousand rabbits, and stocked the land, and made it a rabbit run, and is now blamed for the rabbit pest in this country. This property was later occupied by the Carmelite nuns, but it is now unoccupied, and its castle-like character makes it an object of much interest.
The principal business places of Enmore are situated on what was once the "Josephson block."
Joshua Frey Josephson owned a great area of the land thereabouts, and lived in a mansion on the spot where the Enmore tram terminus now is. He was one of our early Judges, and In 1848 was Mayor of Sydney. Another of our Judges who lived out here, in "Stanmore House." was Sir George Long Innes. Still another famous place in this locality was 'Reiby House' once belonging to Mary Reiby


The Old White Horse, built about 1838 on Cook's River-road, and standing opposite Pat tinson's grocer shop, is the oldest house in Newtown to-day. It Is built of laths and plaster, and so dates back to very early times. The hotel was one of the old-time wayside places that stood back some distance from the road.
It had one of the old colonial water troughs-the trunk of a tree hollowed out in the front. It was kept in the early days by a man named Isaac Titterton and afterwards by James Richards who was one of the first bus propietors plying between Newtown and Sydney. This man drove in one morning to town and reported that gold had been found in Newtown and there was a rush at once, all sorts of fancy prices being paid to the busmen to take people out. The gold was alleged to have been found out in Garsod's brickyards, now known as the Gowrie Estate.
Gold, it is true, was found there, but only a few grains of it, and the old hands state that "Jimmy Richards found it to make business for his hotel and his 'buses." Hundreds of people joined in the "rush."

There was a well at the hotel, and the top of it was left off one night, with the result that a woman with a child in her arms fell in. It was in the days of the crinoline, and so the woman kept afloat until she was taken out, but the child was drowned.
The City Bank building was originally erected by John Donohoe as an hotel, but an iron monger named Matthew Harrison, who had his place a little lower down, offered a big rent, with a long lease, and it was accepted, and the place was never opened as a hotel.
On the same site, before this place was built, there was an old slab hut built with a bark roof, occupied by an old man, known as "Billy the Bull," so called because he used to work an old bull in the shafts of a dray as others worked a horse. He was a hawker and wood carter.

The Bank of Australasia once stood on the site of Ralph Mason's old smithy shop. Then the bank bought it.
Up to that time the price paid was the highest given for land in Newtown. The Bank of Australasia first started opposite where the Bank Hotel is now.


One by one those old houses - the owners of many of which figured as defendants in the Devine case - have disappeared, and the large grounds in which they stood have been sub divided and sold to meet the demands of our modern life. The last to go was "Thurnby." It was the home of T. C. Brellatt, leading flour-miller in the colony at that time, and the first returning officer in Newtown. After living there for many years he sold the property to Mr. Foster, who afterwards became Judge Foster, and represented Newtown in Parliament for some years.
The old place was recently pulled down, and the ground is now nearly all built on. But a few of the old houses that figured in the Devine case are still standing-Reiby House, in Statlon street; Donohoe's old cottage, in Ersklnevllle road (now part of a cordial factory); two shops on Cook's River-road, now occupied by a pawnbroker; and "The Retreat," at the corner of Burrin and Wilson Streets.

There has, indeed, been a transformation since the days when Nicholas Devine lived upon his farm. Life is far swifter now than in the days when the mailman drove leisurely through the place, blowing the old-fashioned horn. Time is far more precious than it was when a large boiler (now in the possession of Mr. Macquarie Walker, of Wells-street) burst, and went rolling with a thunderous noise along King-street, Newtown, and the driver and fireman of a train that had pulled up at the station left their train to go and see what all the commotion was about.

A suggestion has been made to the committee in charge of the celebrations that steps be taken to make the oldest residents guests
of honour at some of the functions. It is a suggestion that will probably be acted upon.

The Newtown Project for the Sydney Archives

4 comment(s), latest 3 years, 9 months ago

All the kings and Queens since William 1st

Horrible Histories has found an easy way to remember all the Kings and Queens of England, just click on This song it's so much more fun!

Here are the lyrics:-
I'm William the Conqueror
My enemies stood no chance
They call me the first English king
Although I come from France

1066, the Domesday book
I gave to history
So fat, on death my body burst
But enough about me

To help remember all your kings
I've come up with this song
A simple rhyme and ditty
For you all to sing along!

Oh! William!
(Bit short, init? We need more kings. Who came next?)

William second, cheeks were red
Killed out hunting, so it's said
I took over, Henry one
That's my next eldest son

Then King Stephen, it's true, check it!
Hi, Henry two, killed Thomas Beckett
Richard Lionheart? That's right!
Always spoiling for a fight

Oh, King John! What a disaster!
Rule restrained by Magna Carta!

William, William, Henry, Stephen
Henry, Richard, John, oi!
Time for my mate, King Henry eight
To take up this song

Henry three built the abbey
Ed one hated Scots
A red hot poker killed Ed two
That must have hurt him lots!

Edward third was a chivalry nerd
Began the hundred years war
Then Richard two was king, aged ten
Then Henry, yes one more!

King Henry four, plots galore
Not least from Henry five, moi
I killed ten score at Agincourt
Then Henry six arrived!

Edward four, Edward five
Richard the third, he's bad
'Cause he fought wars with Henry seventh
First Tudor and my dad

So Henry eight, I was great
Six wives, two were beheaded
Edward the sixth came next, but he died young
And so my dreaded
Daughter Mary ruled, so scary
Then along came... me!
I'm Liz the first, I had no kids
So Tudors RIP!

William, William, Henry, Stephen
Henry, Richard, John, oi!
Henry, Ed, Ed, Ed, Rich two
Then three more Henrys join our song!
Edward, Edward, Rich the third
Henry, Henry, Ed again
Mary one, good Queen Liz
That's me! Time for more men!

James six of Scotland next
Is English James the first, he led
Then Stuarts ruled, so Charles the first
The one who lost his head

No monarchy until came me,
Charles two, I liked to party
King Jimmy two was scary, oooh!
Then Mary was a smarty

She ruled with Will, their shoes were filled
By sourpuss Queen Anne Gloria
And so from then, you were ruled by men
Till along came Queen Victoria!

William, William, Henry, Stephen
Henry, Richard, John, oi!
Henry, Ed, Ed, Ed, Rich two
Then three more Henrys join our song!
Edward, Edward, Rich the third
Henry, Henry, Ed again
Mary one, good Queen liz
Jimmy, Charles and Charles and then
Jim, Will, Mary, Anne Gloria
Still to come, it's Queen Victoria!

And so began the Hanover gang
George one and George two... grim!
Then George the third was quite absurd
Till I replaced old him

King George the fourth and known henceforth
As angry, fat and cross... hang on!
It's true you beat Napoleon
But were mostly a dead loss... bang on!

Old William four was a sailor... ahoy!
That's nearly the end of the storya
As onto the scene comes the best loved queen
Hail to Queen Victoria!

William, William, Henry, Stephen
Henry, Richard, John, oi!
Henry, Ed, Ed, Ed, Rich two
Then three more Henrys join our song!
Edward, Edward, Rich the third
Henry, Henry, Ed again
Mary one, good Queen Liz
Jimmy, Charles and Charles and then
Jim, Will, Mary, Anne Gloria
George, George, George, George
Will, Victoria!

(I ruled for sixty four years, you know!)

Ed seven, George five
Then Ed, George sixth
Liz two then reigned and how!
And so our famous monarch song
Is brought right up to now! Oh!

William, William, Henry, Stephen
Henry, Richard, John, oi!
Henry, Ed, Ed, Ed, Rich two
Then three more Henrys join our song!
Edward, Edward, Rich the third
Henry, Henry, Ed again
Mary one, good Queen Liz
Jimmy, Charles and Charles and then
Jim, Will, Mary, Anne Gloria
George, George, George, George
Will, Victoria!
Edward, George, Edward, George six
And Queen Liz two completes the mix!

That's all the English kings and queens
Since William first that there have been!

1066 King William the Conqueror 1066-1087

1087 King William Rufus (son of William) 1087-1100

1100 King Henry I (William Rufus brother) 1100-1135

1135 King Stephen (nephew of Henry I) 1135-1154

1154 King Henry II (grandson of Henry I) 1154-1189

1189 King Richard I (third son of Henry II) 1189-1199

1199 King John (fifth son of Henry II) 1199-1216

1216 King Henry III (son of John) 1216-1272

1272 King Edward I (son of Henry III) 1272-1307

1307 King Edward II (son of Edward I) 1307-1327

1327 King Edward III (son of Edward II) 1327-1377

1377 King Richard II (grandson of Edward III, son of the Black Prince) 1377-1399

1399 King Henry IV (grandson of Edward III, son of John of Gaunt) 1399-1413

1413 King Henry V (son of Henry IV) 1413-1422

1422 King Henry VI (son of Henry V) 1422-1461

1461 King Edward IV ( youngest son of Edward III ) 1461-1483

1483 King Richard III (uncle of Edward V) 1483-1485

1485 Henry VII (grandson of Henry V) 1485-1509

1509 Henry VIII ( son of Henry VII)

1547 Edward V (Henry's son by Jane Seymour) 1547-1553

1553 Mary (Henry's daughter by Queen Katherine of Aragon) 1553-1558

1558 Elizabeth I (Henry's daughter by Anne Boleyn) 1558-1603

1603 James I (great-great-grandson of Henry VII) 1603-1625

1625 Charles I (second son of James) 1625-1649

1649 The Commonwealth under the Cromwell rule 1649 - 1659

1660 Charles II (oldest son of Charles I) 1660-1685

1685 James II (brother of Charles II) 1685-1688

1689 William of Orange (grandson of Charles I) and Mary (daughter of James II) 1689-1694

1694 William III - Ruled alone after death of Mary 1694 - 1702

1702 Anne (sister of Mary)

1714 George I (great-grandson of James I) 1714-1727

1727 George II (son of George I) 1727-1760

1760 George III (grandson of George II) 1760-1820

1820 George IV (son of George III)

1830 William IV (brother of George IV)

1837 Victoria (niece of William IV) 1837-1901

1901 Edward VII (son of Victoria and Albert) 1901-1910

1910 George V (second son of Edward VII) 1910-1936

1936 Edward VIII (son of George V)

1936 George VI (second son of George V) 1936-1952

1952 Elizabeth II (daughter of George VI)

I love Horrible Histories

CENSUS 1841-1911

The census was held on a Sunday either that last weekend in March or the beginning of April. Sunday night when most people would be at home.
You'll notice the first census in 1841 was held in June and not successful at all, because the bright sparks in the city who organised it, didn't realise, it was during the agricultural season and most people were away for the harvest. The 1841 census in England and Wales was the first census where the names of all the occupants of the household were taken.
They were administered in census districts which were based on the registration districts used in the civil registration of births, deaths and marriages. These districts were made into divisions of about 200 households called enumeration districts and enumerators were employed ( yes! they were paid)to visit the households and explain the forms, much the same as they do today.
The districts did not always match the existing parish boundaries.

The date of the census were:

Sunday 6 June 1841
Sunday 30 March 1851
Sunday 7 April 1861
Sunday 2 April 1871
Sunday 3 April 1881
Sunday 5 April 1891
Sunday 31 March 1901
Sunday 2 April 1911

Census returns are subject to a 100 years' privacy rule

I couldn't resist adding this History of the British Empire from Horrible Histories.

Special forms were supplied for asylums, hospitals, schools and similar institutions
with over 100 occupants.
The form below is the 1911 Census

1 comment(s), latest 3 years, 10 months ago

Death Roll 1902 Mt.Kembla New South Wales

Many lists exist of this kind but with this one I have added the ages and marital status or the victims.

M t K e m b l a C o l l i e r y G a s E x p l o s i o n - 1 9 0 2 which killed 96 people.

TOM BEST, 46, married, leaves seven children.
TOM HOWELL, 38, single
FRANK DUNGEY, 46, married, leaves seven
JAMES M'LISTER, 22, single
M. EGAN, 29, single
N. EGAN, 20, single
ALF. HEWLETT, 25, single
JOE WILKINSON, 26, single
STEVE GLEESON, 27, married, leaves five
W. DOHERTY, 24, single
GEORGE YOUNGMAN, 45, married, leaves five
children (married Delia Griffith who later married Kenneth Hilton Guest)
DICK THOMAS, 23, single
BOB JONES, 19, single
GEORGE RUSSELL, 21, single
G. M'DILL, 40, married
T. KENDRICK, 25, single
DAVID SCOTT, 40, married, leaves seven chil
JAMES PURCELL, 65, married
EDWARD GILL, 22, single.
BRYSON, 5O, single
JAMES RICH, sen., 60, married
JAMES RICH, jun., leaves six children
W. BRASHIER, 40, married
PATRICK M'CANN. 40, married, leaves three
children ,
JACK MURPHY, 40, widower, four children.
TOM EGAN, 28, single.
DICK THOMAS, 30, single
WALTER MORRIS. 60, married
HENRY AIKEN (25), single.
PROSPER ANNESLEY (35), single;
W. BRAY (40), married; leaves eight chlldren.
ROBERT BLACKETT (28), single.
P. BLACKETT (24), single.
W. BRACHIER, married.
ARTHUR CARTER (28), single.
G. DIXON (23), married.
D. EGAN (22), single.
W. FILBY (50), married.
E. GALLAGHER (45), married; leaves three children.
D. GALLAGHER (50), single.
J. HEAD (28), single. ' ?
JOHN HITCHIN, married.
J. JEFFRIES (38), married.
JOHN JAMES (40) married; leaves three children.
P. HUGHES, married.
J. MUIR (18), single.
PETER MUIR, married.
G. MORRIS (30), single
H. MEURANT (20), single.
W. MEURANT (25), married.
W. M'MURRAY (45), single (relief party).
H. O. MACCABE (45), married, leaves two children (relief party).
HENRY MORRISON (18), single.
J. M'LISTER (22), married.
William NELSON (45), married, leaves five. ohildren
(underground manager).
JACOB NELSON (16). Nephew of William Nelson.
W. NIXON, single.
M. PEACE (40), married, leaves one child.
THOMAS PURCELL (40), married, leaves six chlldron.
JOHN PURCELL (26), married, leaves three children.
JAMES PURCELL (30), married, leaves three children.
J. RYAN (38), married, leaves two children.
STEWART (40), single.
FREDERICK SMITH (17), single
WILLIAM SILCOCK (17), single,
THOMAS TOST (30), single.
G. STAFFORD, single.

1 comment(s), latest 3 years, 6 months ago

Peter McAlpin 1809-1898

It is said, The Singleton Argus, on 25th September 1835, when writing about Peter McAlpin 1809-1898, described him as a man with "a roaming disposition, a giant and in every sense of the term, physically and morally with high principles, lofty ideals". I have been unable to find this article. Never-the-less, he was, all of that.

Peter McALPIN Senior 1758-1850 had taken his family out to the Hawkesbury district and set himself up as a blacksmith at Windsor after arriving with the family as free settlers on the 'General Graham' on the 29 January 1812.

Here the family lived until the end of 1815, when Peter Snr. sold his shop and two houses by auction, the family moved to Richmond early in 1816, again setting up a blacksmith shop, when young Peter was only 7.

In 1822 Peter together with his brother William Glas and Catherine (nicknamed, Kite) attended the school in Richmond for only about a year, just long enough to learn to read and write and do their sums.

In the 1825 census Peter was recorded as living at Richmond, however it was not long after the census that Peter showed his wanderlust by making a trek up north to Muswellbrook, or perhaps he was a little bit envious of his brother's wanderings.

Two years earlier in 1823, Peter's brother William known as Billy Mack at thirteen, had been one of Archibald Bell's party who, with the help of aboriginal guides marked the Bells Line of Road which was an alternative route to Blaxland, Lawson and Wentworths road across the Blue Mountains.

In the 1828 census Peter was living in Bathurst and working as a labourer for John Neville 1780-1854 and his wife Elizabeth nee Vincent, whom Peter had met in Richmond, when they were living there. They had offered him work and Peter was keen to take it.

I'm not sure how long Peter remained with John Neville and his family but John Neville moved from Bathurst to Rylstone in 1830 and Peter didn't like to stay in one place for long.

In 1831 Peter set himself up as the Blacksmith in Patrick's Plains. It's thought that Peter visited Richmond around Christmas 1831 when his little sister Catherine 'Kite' announced she was going to marry William Clark on the 16 January 1832. Of all the family Peter was closest to Kite and I don't see him missing her wedding day.

Another big wedding took place on the 1 February 1833 when brother Billy Mack married Susannah Onus 1815-1882 at Christ Church in Castlereagh. William built a brick home in 1834 in the main street of Richmond, NSW with financial help from Joseph ONUS (the father of his wife, Susannah) and set up a blacksmiths shop at the rear.

On the 9 January 1935 at a chapel in Maitland where his sister and her husband William Clark were now living Peter married Elizabeth Cole alias Harrison, a convict woman whose real name was Phebe Cole, nee Stirrup
1807-1885. Phoebe was a widow with two children.

This marriage was seen as a convenience for both parties and did not last very long. It seems Peter sold the shop bought Phoebe a house, gave her some money and then took off for Victoria. Neither one looking back or having any regrets.

It was on the 30 August 1835 that the first settlers arrived in Melbourne and commenced building along the Yarra River. This pioneering group led by Captain John Lacey with his builder from Launceston George Evans, his servant Evan Evans, carpenters William Jackson and Robert Hay Marr, the Blacksmith James Gilbert and his wife and a ploughman called Charlie Wise. In 1840 Peter McAlpin made his way there not to seek his fortune ( he could have made that in New South Wales), but for the adventure of it all.

From this point on it's not easy to track Peter. He did have a blacksmith shop in Little Bourke Street Melbourne, in 1847. In March 1851 he was shot in his left arm in the city of Melbourne at 1am by George May Smith after Peter called he and his companions some names. George May Smith was charged with assault and fined twenty shillings. Another shot in the arm in 1851 was because Peter was out of the state of nsw for so many years phoebe, had him declared dead. She married Frederick WINGRAVE 1797-1876, at Windeyer on the 31 March 1852.
Then in 1853 we see Peter at the McIvor diggings. I doubt he was digging more likely running the blacksmiths shop.

All told Peter spent thirty five years in Victoria not returning to New South Wales until 1875.

Peter died on the 23 September 1898 in Singleton, New South Wales.
His death certificate states he died without issue

His grave is at the Glenridding Uniting Church Cemetery, formerly known as
the Glenridding Presbyterian Cemetery, on the Putty Road, Singleton, NSW.
The headstone reads-
23 Sep 1898
Age: 89y

Singleton Argus (NSW : 1880 - 1954), Saturday 24 September 1898

Death of an Old Colonist.
"In his 90th year, Mr Peter M'Alpin, of Bulga, died in the local Hospital yesterday,
after a short illness, his death being due to senile decay.
The deceased was a native of Sterling, Scotland, but was only three years of age
when he arrived with his parents in Victoria he lived there for 35 years, when he removed
to N. S. Wales, and has since lived in this part of the colonya term of 51 years.
Mr M'Alpin was married in Maitland, but there was no issue to the union.
The old gentleman was well respected, and those who knew him intimately
in his earlier days retain many pleasant memories of the acquaintanceship "

Note: He arrived with parents in NSW on 29 Jan 1812.
He Lived in Victoria for 35 Years and
in NSW for a total of 51 years.

written by janilye, 2004.
Thank you to Rob Fountain for information re- Phoebe Stirrup

Boyne - passenger list from Scotland to NSW 1839

The 619 ton ship, Boyne arrived on Wednesday 2nd January 1839 from Cromarty, Scotland, via Cape of Good Hope, having left the former Port the 1st. September 1838 and the latter the 23rd. November 1838.

Capt. Richardson, with 284 Government emigrants. Passenger - Rev. Colin Stewart (Scotland); Ewen Cameron, Esq., Surgeon Superintendent. Agent, Capt. Richardson.
Boyne was built in Calcutta in 1807.
Name of Owner: J. Somes.
Name of Broker or
Agent: Lachlan & Co.
Rate of Hire per Old Ton: £5/13/5 x 619

Of the 284 emigrants;
158 were adults
60 were children 7 to 14 years
67 were children under 7 years

A very successful voyage and one which prompted this 'Letter To The Editor' to the Sydney Gazette on the 10 January 1839.

Although utter strangers in the colony, we shall feel much obliged to you if you will be so kind as to give the following testimony to Captain Richardson, of the ship Boyne, publicity through the medium of your useful journal. I am, sir, on behalf of all the Emigrants in the ship Boyne, your most obedient humble servant.
Charles M'Gregor.

The Emigrants just arrived from the Highlands of Scotland, by the ship Boyne, deem it a duty incumbent upon them to testify in this public manner their unfeigned gratitude and respect to Captain Richardson, for his kind, affectionate and gentlemanly conduct towards them.
He has, indeed, been as a brother to us all, and a father to the children.
His solicitude in directing all things for our comfort, and his unaffected manners, will not soon be forgotten by us.
The first officer, Mr. Daniel, and all the other Officers, and Seamen, also deserve our sincere thanks for their continued kindness to all the passengers.
The manner in which Mr. Ewen Cameron, the surgeon, has conducted the affairs committed to his charge is beyond all praise. His patience and unremitting attention to the sick could not be exceeded. His attention, also, in enforcing and directing the most salutary regulations
for the health and comfort of all has
proved eminently successful.
The Rev. Colin Stewart, who has acted as Chaplain on board, deserves our lasting gratitude, for he has spared no pains in his endeavours to improve the moral and intellectual capacities of all, particularly the young. His public and private ministrations are highly appre- ciated by all his fellow passengers :-the solemnity of public worship on the Lord's, day has been so congenial to our feelings. that we felt more at home than we other- wise could have done.
Mr. Duncan Cameron, who has acted as Schoolmaster, deserves the thanks and gratitude of all the parents on board, for his careful and unremitting endeavours to instill sound principles and communicate useful knowledge to the young.

Ship Boyne, Jan., 1838.

NOTE: Indeed the letter writer above has mistakenly dated it 1838. Also because a passenger list was never published, my source for the list below was found in the 'Index to Miscellaneous Immigrants'
within the NSW Government State Records.
Acknowledgement to Ann Smith a member of staff at State Records who indexed this series NRS 5313, Persons on Government Ships, Aug 1837-Feb 1840.
There are 107 names on this list.
Wives and Children's names have not been included.
I thought of removing the reel numbers and NRS but this way there can be no mistake when searching. janilye


BUCHANAN Dugald 34 02/01/1839 Reel 2654 182 [4/4780] Wife 30; ploughman NRS 5313
CAMERON Agnes 25 02/01/1839 Reel 2654 186 [4/4780] Unmarried; dairy woman NRS 5313
CAMERON Alexander 25 02/01/1839 Reel 2654 184 [4/4780] Unmarried; shepherd NRS 5313
CAMERON Alexander 28 02/01/1839 Reel 2654 184 [4/4780] Unmarried; shepherd NRS 5313
CAMERON Alexander 30 02/01/1839 Reel 2654 182 [4/4780] Wife 30; shepherd NRS 5313
CAMERON Alexander 32 02/01/1839 Reel 2654 182 [4/4780] Wife 30; farm labourer NRS 5313
CAMERON Allan 38 02/01/1839 Reel 2654 182 [4/4780] Wife 32; shepherd NRS 5313
CAMERON Allen 38 02/01/1839 Reel 2654 184 [4/4780] Unmarried; ploughman NRS 5313
CAMERON Anne 24 02/01/1839 Reel 2654 186 [4/4780] Unmarried; farm servant NRS 5313
CAMERON Archibald 28 02/01/1839 Reel 2654 184 [4/4780] Unmarried; shepherd NRS 5313
CAMERON Archibald 35 02/01/1839 Reel 2654 182 [4/4780] Wife 28; farmer NRS 5313
CAMERON Archibald 40 02/01/1839 Reel 2654 182 [4/4780] Wife 40; shepherd NRS 5313
CAMERON Cathrine 20 02/01/1839 Reel 2654 186 [4/4780] Unmarried; house servant NRS 5313
CAMERON Cathrine 27 02/01/1839 Reel 2654 186 [4/4780] Widow; house servant NRS 5313
CAMERON Christie 22 02/01/1839 Reel 2654 186 [4/4780] Unmarried; dairy woman NRS 5313
CAMERON Christina 21 02/01/1839 Reel 2654 186 [4/4780] Unmarried; house servant NRS 5313
CAMERON Christina 24 02/01/1839 Reel 2654 186 [4/4780] Unmarried; house servant NRS 5313
CAMERON Donald 23 02/01/1839 Reel 2654 184 [4/4780] Unmarried; shepherd NRS 5313
CAMERON Donald 35 02/01/1839 Reel 2654 182 [4/4780] Wife 33; shepherd NRS 5313
CAMERON Duncan 30 02/01/1839 Reel 2654 184 [4/4780] Unmarried; teacher NRS 5313
CAMERON Duncan (Mrs) 41 02/01/1839 Reel 2654 182 [4/4780] Husband 35; farm servant NRS 5313
CAMERON Ewen 25 02/01/1839 Reel 2654 182 [4/4780] Wife 21; shepherd NRS 5313
CAMERON Ewen 36 02/01/1839 Reel 2654 182 [4/4780] Wife 30; shepherd NRS 5313
CAMERON Flora 27 02/01/1839 Reel 2654 186 [4/4780] Unmarried; dairy woman NRS 5313
CAMERON George 40 02/01/1839 Reel 2654 182 [4/4780] Wife 35; shepherd NRS 5313
CAMERON Johanna 4½ 02/01/1839 Reel 2654 189 [4/4780] Died in the buildings 15 Jan 1839;&family NRS 5313
CAMERON John 20 02/01/1839 Reel 2654 184 [4/4780] Unmarried; farm servant NRS 5313
CAMERON John 23 02/01/1839 Reel 2654 184 [4/4780] Unmarried; ploughman NRS 5313
CAMERON John 29 02/01/1839 Reel 2654 182 [4/4780] Wife 28; shepherd NRS 5313
CAMERON John 30 02/01/1839 Reel 2654 182 [4/4780] Wife 27; shepherd NRS 5313
CAMERON John 40 02/01/1839 Reel 2654 182 [4/4780] Wife 33; shepherd and farmer NRS 5313
CAMERON Mary 17 02/01/1839 Reel 2654 186 [4/4780] Unmarried; house servant NRS 5313
CAMERON Mary 18 02/01/1839 Reel 2654 186 [4/4780] Unmarried; farm servant NRS 5313
CAMERON Mary 22 02/01/1839 Reel 2654 186 [4/4780] Unmarried; house servant NRS 5313
CAMERON Paul 21 02/01/1839 Reel 2654 184 [4/4780] Unmarried; shepherd NRS 5313
CAMPBELL Christina 23 02/01/1839 Reel 2654 186 [4/4780] Unmarried; farm servant NRS 5313
CAMPBELL Donald 38 02/01/1839 Reel 2654 184 [4/4780] Unmarried; shepherd NRS 5313
CAMPBELL James 35 02/01/1839 Reel 2654 182 [4/4780] Wife 32; farmer and shepherd NRS 5313
CAMPBELL John 23 02/01/1839 Reel 2654 184 [4/4780] Unmarried; shepherd NRS 5313
CAMPBELL Peter 31 02/01/1839 Reel 2654 184 [4/4780] Unmarried; shepherd NRS 5313
CAMPBELL Robert 35 02/01/1839 Reel 2654 182 [4/4780] Wife 40; shepherd NRS 5313
CAMPBELL William 26 02/01/1839 Reel 2654 184 [4/4780] Unmarried; shepherd NRS 5313
GRAHAM John 24 02/01/1839 Reel 2654 184 [4/4780] Unmarried; farm servant NRS 5313
HUNTER Robina 34 02/01/1839 Reel 2654 188 [4/4780] Unmarried; seamstress NRS 5313
JEFFREY John 38 02/01/1839 Reel 2654 184 [4/4780] Unmarried; farmer NRS 5313
KENNEDY Alexander 32 02/01/1839 Reel 2654 182 [4/4780] Wife 30; shepherd NRS 5313
KENNEDY Allen 33 02/01/1839 Reel 2654 182 [4/4780] Wife 25; shepherd NRS 5313
KENNEDY Charles 47 02/01/1839 Reel 2654 182 [4/4780] Wife 40; farm servant NRS 5313
KENNEDY Hugh 22 02/01/1839 Reel 2654 184 [4/4780] Unmarried; farm servant NRS 5313
KENNEDY John 27 02/01/1839 Reel 2654 184 [4/4780] Unmarried; farm servant NRS 5313
KENNEDY Niel 26 02/01/1839 Reel 2654 184 [4/4780] Unmarried; farm servant NRS 5313
MCARTHUR Donald 28 02/01/1839 Reel 2654 182 [4/4780] Wife 21; shepherd NRS 5313
MCCOLL Sarah 65 02/01/1839 Reel 2654 188 [4/4780] Unmarried; dairy woman NRS 5313
MCDONALD Alexander 20 02/01/1839 Reel 2654 186 [4/4780] Unmarried; carpenter and wheelwright NRS 5313
MCDONALD Alexander 29 02/01/1839 Reel 2654 186 [4/4780] Unmarried; shepherd NRS 5313
MCDONALD Allan 36 02/01/1839 Reel 2654 182 [4/4780] Wife 29; shepherd NRS 5313
MCDONALD Angus 24 02/01/1839 Reel 2654 184 [4/4780] Unmarried; shepherd NRS 5313
MCDONALD Angus 44 02/01/1839 Reel 2654 182 [4/4780] Wife 22; shepherd NRS 5313
MCDONALD Anne 17 02/01/1839 Reel 2654 186 [4/4780] Unmarried; house servant NRS 5313
MCDONALD Archibald 32 02/01/1839 Reel 2654 182 [4/4780] Wife 19; shepherd NRS 5313
MCDONALD Duncan 60 02/01/1839 Reel 2654 182 [4/4780] Wife 48; shepherd NRS 5313
MCDONALD Ellen 16 02/01/1839 Reel 2654 186 [4/4780] Unmarried; house servant NRS 5313
MCDONALD Ewen 24 02/01/1839 Reel 2654 186 [4/4780] Unmarried; shepherd NRS 5313
MCDONALD Janet 16 02/01/1839 Reel 2654 186 [4/4780] Unmarried; house servant NRS 5313
MCDONALD John 26 02/01/1839 Reel 2654 184 [4/4780] Unmarried; shepherd NRS 5313
MCDONALD John 35 02/01/1839 Reel 2654 182 [4/4780] Wife 38; farmer NRS 5313
MCDONALD Margaret 25 02/01/1839 Reel 2654 188 [4/4780] Unmarried; laundry maid NRS 5313
MCDONALD Margery 20 02/01/1839 Reel 2654 186 [4/4780] Unmarried; house servant NRS 5313
MCDONALD Ronald 19 02/01/1839 Reel 2654 186 [4/4780] Unmarried; shepherd NRS 5313
MCDONALD Sally 22 02/01/1839 Reel 2654 186 [4/4780] Unmarried; house servant NRS 5313
MCEWAN John 17 02/01/1839 Reel 2654 186 [4/4780] Unmarried; shepherd NRS 5313
MCGREGOR Robert 39 02/01/1839 Reel 2654 182 [4/4780] Wife 35; gardener NRS 5313
MCKENZIE Allen 44 02/01/1839 Reel 2654 182 [4/4780] Wife 34; agriculturalist NRS 5313
MCKENZIE Janet 24 02/01/1839 Reel 2654 188 [4/4780] Unmarried; dairy woman NRS 5313
MCKILLOP Donald 34 02/01/1839 Reel 2654 184 [4/4780] Unmarried; shepherd NRS 5313
MCKINNON Donald 28 02/01/1839 Reel 2654 184 [4/4780] Unmarried; shepherd NRS 5313
MCKINNON Dugald 19 02/01/1839 Reel 2654 186 [4/4780] Unmarried; shepherd NRS 5313
MCKINNON Duncan 17 02/01/1839 Reel 2654 184 [4/4780] Unmarried; shepherd NRS 5313
MCKINNON Ewen 22 02/01/1839 Reel 2654 184 [4/4780] Unmarried; shepherd NRS 5313
MCKINNON Ewen 62 02/01/1839 Reel 2654 182 [4/4780] Wife 51; shepherd NRS 5313
MCKINNON Mary 19 02/01/1839 Reel 2654 188 [4/4780] Unmarried; house servant NRS 5313
MCKINNON Peter 30 02/01/1839 Reel 2654 184 [4/4780] Unmarried; shepherd NRS 5313
MCLEAN Alexander 25 02/01/1839 Reel 2654 186 [4/4780] Unmarried; farm servant NRS 5313
MCLELLAN Mary 32 02/01/1839 Reel 2654 186 [4/4780] Unmarried; house keeper NRS 5313
MCMASTER Allen 40 02/01/1839 Reel 2654 182 [4/4780] Wife 44; farmer NRS 5313
MCMASTER Anne 18 02/01/1839 Reel 2654 188 [4/4780] Unmarried; house servant NRS 5313
MCMASTER Ellen 17 02/01/1839 Reel 2654 188 [4/4780] Unmarried; house servant NRS 5313
MCMASTER Margaret 17 02/01/1839 Reel 2654 188 [4/4780] Unmarried; house servant NRS 5313
MCMASTER Mary 20 02/01/1839 Reel 2654 188 [4/4780] Unmarried; house servant NRS 5313
MCMILLAN William 30 02/01/1839 Reel 2654 182 [4/4780] Wife 28; shepherd NRS 5313
MCMILLEN Cathrine 21 02/01/1839 Reel 2654 188 [4/4780] Unmarried; house servant NRS 5313
MCMULLEN Jessie 18 02/01/1839 Reel 2654 188 [4/4780] Unmarried; house servant NRS 5313
MCNAUGHTEN John 21 02/01/1839 Reel 2654 186 [4/4780] Unmarried; shepherd NRS 5313
MCNAUGHTON Donald 27 02/01/1839 Reel 2654 184 [4/4780] Wife 24; shepherd NRS 5313
MCNAUGHTON James 25 02/01/1839 Reel 2654 184 [4/4780] Unmarried; shepherd NRS 5313
MCPHAIL Donald 25 02/01/1839 Reel 2654 184 [4/4780] Wife 28; shepherd NRS 5313
MCPHEE Alexander 26 02/01/1839 Reel 2654 184 [4/4780] Wife 23; ploughman NRS 5313
MCPHEE Ewen 25 02/01/1839 Reel 2654 186 [4/4780] Unmarried; sawyer NRS 5313
MCPHEE John 21 02/01/1839 Reel 2654 186 [4/4780] Unmarried; shepherd NRS 5313
MCPHEE Mary 23 02/01/1839 Reel 2654 188 [4/4780] Unmarried; house maid NRS 5313
MCPHEE Peter 37 02/01/1839 Reel 2654 182 [4/4780] Wife 27; farmer NRS 5313
MCPHERSON Jean 21 02/01/1839 Reel 2654 186 [4/4780] Unmarried; house servant NRS 5313
MCVICAR Archibald 30 02/01/1839 Reel 2654 182 [4/4780] Wife 34; shepherd and servant NRS 5313
MCVICAR Norman 36 02/01/1839 Reel 2654 182 [4/4780] Wife 38; labourer NRS 5313
ROBERTSON Walter 35 02/01/1839 Reel 2654 184 [4/4780] Wife 38; joiner NRS 5313
SINCLAIR Isabella 34 02/01/1839 Reel 2654 188 [4/4780] Unmarried; house maid NRS 5313
STEWART Alexander 30 02/01/1839 Reel 2654 184 [4/4780] Wife 28; shepherd and farmer NRS 5313
STEWART Donald 14 02/01/1839 Reel 2654 186 [4/4780] Unmarried; shepherd NRS 5313
TROTTER William 21 02/01/1839 Reel 2654 186 [4/4780] Unmarried; farm overseer NRS 5313

Below is a photograph of the Ship Boyne's Passenger Record Book

1 comment(s), latest 3 years, 8 months ago

Mine injuries and deaths Victoria

Another site for your favourites is the Victorian Mining Accident Index compiled by Dave Evans and presented by the Ballarat & District Genealogical Society. This is my way of introducing you to a most informative site. It isn't only these few John Smiths injured or killed in mining accidents, but 5,600 miners from the 1850s to the 1940s.

Smith, Jno
Married, 33 Y. O.

Smith, John
30 Y. O.
Accident drowned
(Dig. Evans)

Smith, John
Single, 21 Y. O.

Smith, John
Married, 28 Y. O.

Smith, John
Wilkinson & Co Mine

Smith, John F.

Smith, Jonathon
Married, 41 Y. O.
Injury in claim
(C.I.R.)(Dig. Evans)

This photograph below I took at a little town called Yapeen, Victoria last month December 2011.

I'm always filled with a mixture of excitement and suspicion when I see a John Smith.
I wasn't disappointed this time.

After I took the photo, (I swear there was not another living soul to be seen in this town) I went around to the Guildford Hotel.

As I was showing the photograph to a couple of the locals, this old man pipes up " He was me grand father!"

This is the excitement part.

"I'll have another beer and a beer for this man here too please". I order, as I fossick in my bag for pen and notepad.

"Tell me about him." I coax all smiles and pen poised.

" Well, it wasn't his real name," says my new found drinking partner.

"Oh! I'm not surprised. Most John Smith's were hiding", says pedantic know-it-all me. " What was his real name?" I ask excitement mounting.

"William", says my new friend as I order another two drinks.

"William what," I ask impatiently.

"William Smith!"

Suspicion finally kicks in but not before the laughter from my drinking partner and his friends.

Elijah Branford 1827-1905

Emigrant on the barque Indian, Elijah Branford was just 22 when he arrived in Port Adelaide.
Born in Lakenham, Norfolk, England on the 3 March 1827, the son of Samuel BRANFORD b:abt.1805 and died 14 March 1833 at Swainsthorpe, Norfolk, England. Elijah's mother was Hannah Elizabeth Baxter born 25 December 1807 in Barford, Norfolk, England. Hannah also migrated to Adelaide, South Australia and died on the 7 June 1852 under the name Hannah PALLENT from her second marriage.
Elijah had two syblings also emigrants;
James BRANFORD b:1828 Norfolk. d: 8 December 1888, Little Adelaide, South Australia
Elizabeth BRANFORD b:1831 Norwich, Norfolk, England d:12 March 1915, Mount Gambier, South Australia

Elijah BRANFORD married Susanna LEWIS in Adelaide on the 20 April 1852. Susanna was born in Breconshire, Wales on the 5 February 1834 one of five children on Edward LEWIS and Harriet.

The children of Elija BRANFORD and Susannah, nee LEWIS all born in Kangarilla, South Australia 41 km (25 miles) from Adelaide, were:-


2. EZRA BRANFORD b:24 March 1854 d: xxxx m. Lucy Rose WOODS 1866-xxxx I've found three children born to this couple; DORIS (-) Veda Laurel (1889-1923) OLIVER LESTER (1891-1918

3. JOHN BRANFORD b: 16 March 1856 ?

4. SAMUEL BRANFORD b: 11 March 1859 Kangarilla. d:15 March 1939 at Brighton, South Australia. m. Jane SHEARING 1862-1902 at the Congregational Church, Glenelg on the 24 September 1884. their four children were:-
GRACE EVA (1885-1944) HENRY ERNEST (1887-1954) BERTHA ALICE (1891-1974) ADELINE MAY (1896-1985).
In 1910 Samuel next married Ellen Florence Elliott 1871-1956.

5. JAMES LEWIS BRANFORD b: 14 July 1861 Kangarilla.

6. RUTH ELIZABETH BRANFORD b: 12 July 1863 Kangarilla

7. ELIZA JANE BRANFORD b: 30 August 1865 Kangarilla. m. William TOOP on the 22 October 1884 at the home of the bride's parents, 'Glengrove' Kangarilla

8. SUSAN BRANFORD b: 24 March 1875 died 7 October 1879 Kangarilla, South Australia

9. ELIJAH DAVID BAXTER BRANFORD b: 1 June 1876 Kangarilla. d: 10 September 1946 Tumby Bay,South Australia m. Louisa Jane ?
Elijah David was Licensee of the Mintaro Hotel in 1902 which is now known as The Magpie and Stump hotel. He Joined the A.I.F at age 40, a motor mechanic by trade he joined as a driver on 16 September 1916. ANZAC

Susannah Branford nee Lewis died at 'Glengrove' Kangarilla on the 6 February 1885 of Heart disease.
The South Australian Advertiser. Friday 13 February 1885
BRANFORD.On the 6th February at Glengrove. Kangarilla, after three weeks of extreme pain, caused by heart disease, Susannah, the beloved wife of Elijah Branford, aged 51, leaving a large family to mourn their loss.

Elijah BRANFORD died on the 10 July 1905 at the Adelaide hospital. He was a colonist for over 56 years.
He was buried the next day in the old section of the Clarendon-Kangarilla Cemetery, Plot 244

The image below is Mrs. Bennett in her bonnet, with her two daughters and grandchildren in front of the Post Office, in Kangarilla, South Australia, which was formerly Eyre's Flat Post Office
DATE ca.1870

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