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Windsor's Municipal History-THE INTERESTING EARLY STAGES

THE PROMOTERS' TROUBLES.
OPPOSITION~AND EGGS.


The Hon. William Walker.From his book entitled ''Reminiscences of a Fifty Tears' Residence at Windsor,
published in 1890, we take the following extract, which carries us still further back - back to a quarter of a century before the town's incorporation.

The hon. gentleman writes :
" There was a District Council once at Windsor (it embraced the whole district), of which the late Mr. Robert Fitzgerald was the first and last Warden. It started with a lot of Councillors, and commenced operations on a large and extravagant scale. But it had no funds to go on with. Assessors were appointed to value all the property in the district, who began work by a lengthened trip down the Hawkesbury in a boat, examining the farms on the way. A valuable suite of office furniture was ordered of a Mr. Atkinson, but after delivery he could not get paid. He sued some of the members of the Council, who denied their individual liability, and the council was without money. Atkinson was non-suited-the Council broke up-no one would consent to act on it, fearing liabilities, and it died in 1846. The furniture, which no one would own, was placed in the Court House for a considerable time ; but it was in the way there, and some of it is now, I believe, at a neighbouring house, this was tbe first experience of municipal matters at Windsor, and its failure created a bad impression. The Municipalities' Act of 1858, how ever, brought, local Councils into existence again. But there were great difficulties encountered in get ting a Municipal Council started in Windsor, and those who now partici pate in the advantages of the institu tion, little know the trouble the promoters had in getting it afloat.

The first public meeting on the, subject was called in November, 1858,at the Court House. There were
about 200 people present, numbers of whom came for the purpose of opposition and disturbance.
The lower part of the Court-room was not well lighted, so that malcontents there had every chance of keeping out of sight.
The meeting was called at 7 o'clock, but business did not commence until past eight, when I proposed that Mr. Jas. Bligh Johnson, J .P., should take the chair, but that gentleman discreetly declined.
Mr. Richard Ridge and Mr. Thomas Tebbutt were also solicited and refused.
It was apparent that no one had the courage to take the chair, and that unless I did so myself, the meeting would collapse.
Mr. Tebbutt then proposed that I should preside. I can tell you, I did not fancy the post, as I could foresee there would be some disagreeable work. However, as I was determined the meeting should not fail for want of a chairman, I consented to take the position.

I stated shortly the object of the meeting, and expressed a hope that fair play would be shown to the speakers for and against. My remarks were well received, and Mr. T. Primrose rose to move the first resolution, in favor of establishing a municipality in the borough. He was met with all kinds of interruption, and presently an egg whizzed past him, thrown from the rear part of the audience. Then followed another, and another.
I don't think they struck any one, but lodged their contents on the valuable and historical picture of Governor Macquarie and the Court House wall behind the bench. It was impossible to go on - so much noise and disorder prevailed, and the meeting broke up in sublime confusion-the advocates for a municipality receiving numerous groans and hoots.

The Court House wall remained disfigured for a long time after this discreditable scene. It was some years after this, in 1871, when the people became more reasonable, that the present Municipal
Council was established."

Source:Hawkesbury Herald (Windsor, NSW : 1902 - 1945)
Friday 16 January 1903
Transcription, janilye 2012

Mary Balderston

Do you ever wonder about places and things in time that could have changed your life.
Going through old newspapers, I often do.

This notice below made me think about Mary Balderston Mackenzie and wonder if she was ever found.

Did she or her children see it? Were they in New South Wales? Was she still alive? Did she die rich or poor?

The Sydney Morning Herald, Friday 5 December 1873
N O T I C E.
The late DAVID BALDERSTON, of 49, Regent street, Greenock, having, by his trust, disposition, and settlement, left a LEGACY to Mrs. MARY BALDERSTON, or MACKENZIE, his Sister. Widow of WILLIAM MACKENZIE, sometime Blacksmith in Glasgow, who left Scotland many years ago, and failing her, to her children. Notice is hereby given, that the said Mrs. Mary Balderston, or Mackenzie, if alive or if dead, her children : are required to claim the said bequest, and to establish their right thereto within two years from the 24th day of February, 1873, the date of the said David Balderston's death, and that if she or they fail to do so, Mr. Balderaton's trustees will proceed to pay over the said legacy to the other residuary legatees, as directed by the said trust, disposition, and settlement, and codicils thereto.
Communications on the subject to be addressed to JOHN MACDONALD, Solicitor, Mansion House, Greenock, Scotland.

With all the clues above and with what's available online today we could probably find this family in two shakes of a lamb's tail.. unless

1 comment(s), latest 5 years, 2 months ago

Coffs Harbour Historic Cemetery

Coffs Harbour Historic Cemetery
Address: Coff Street, Coffs Harbour
and
Coffs Harbour Lawn Cemetery
Also known as Karangi Lawn.
Address: Coramba Road, Karangi, New South Wales, Australia



Note: A spate of thefts of bronze plaques from cemeteries in this region was reported in July 2011.
Thieves, when removing the markers, have also caused damage to the stones on which they were mounted.
If you have family graves in the Coffs Harbour cemetery, and you have not already checked, it is advisable that you check on their integrity.


More information
Coffs Harbour Lawn Cemetery is administered by Coffs Harbour City Council. For further information, contact Council at Locked Bag 155, Coffs Harbour NSW 2450; phone 02 6648 4000; email: [email protected]


2 comment(s), latest 5 years, 2 months ago

Westmoreland passenger list

The 405 tons barque Westmoreland left Downs on the 8 January 1833 and arrived in Sydney Cove on the 19 May 1833 under Captain Brigstock.

Stephen John, Esq sh:163
Stephen Mrs and 2 children sh:163
Wilson Mr sh:163
Wilson Mrs sh:163
Carlysle William, Esq sh:163
Christopherson Mrs sh:163
Hamilton Miss sh:163
Beaver George, Mr sh:163
Beaver Elizabeth, Mrs and an infant born on the voyage sh:163
Beaver Francis sh:163
Beaver William sh:163
Beaver Emily sh:163
Beaver George sh:163
Trodd Able, Mr sh:163
Trodd Amy, Mrs sh:163
Trodd Mary Ann sh:163
Hillary J, Mr sh:163
Hillary Thomas, Mr sh:163
Robertson Henry, Mr sh:163
Robertson Harriett, Mrs sh:163
Robertson Henry sh:163
Robertson Harriett sh:163
Robertson Anna sh:163
Marshall James, Mr sh:163
Greenfield S, Mr sh:163
Uhr J, Mr sh:163
Longeville J H, Mr professor of languages sh:163
Nash H, Miss sh:163
Affrait L, Miss sh:163
Barnet F, Miss sh:163
Robinson T, Mr sh:163
Robinson C, Mrs sh:163
Chapman C, Mr sh:163
Chapman C, Mrs sh:163
Chapman C J sh:163
Chapman J M sh:163
Chapman J K sh:163
Grose W, Mr painter sh:163
Grose M, Mrs sh:163
Grose Alfred sh:163
Grose Henry sh:163
Phillips B A, Mr sh:163
Phillips Celeria sh:163
Phillips Charles sh:163
Phillips Alexander sh:163
Phillips Anna sh:163
Phillips Michael sh:163
Phillips Samuel sh:163
Phillips Sarah sh:163
Phillips Jacob sh:163
Phillips Rosa sh:163
Levien S, Mr sh:163
Levien H, Mrs sh:163
Levien Alfred sh:163
Levien George sh:163
Levien Annette sh:163
Levien Henrietta sh:163
Levien Matilda sh:163
Asser A, Miss

Australians as America saw us in 1942

Nothing like coming here prepared!

AUSTRALIANS AS AMERICANS SEE THEM
"An Outdoors People;Breezy, Democratic"
WASHINGTON, Sunday, 25 October 1942 AAP


["You will find Australians an outdoors people, breezy, very democratic, with no respect for stuffed shirts their own or anyone else's," says a pocket guide on Australia which is being distributed among American troops.

Issued by US War and Navy departments, the booklet states that Australians have much in common with Americans. They are a pioneer people, they believe in personal freedom, and they love sports.

"There is one thing to get straight right off the bat," the booklet says. "You are not in Australia to save a helpless people from the savage Japanese. Recently in a Sydney bar an American soldier turned to an Australian and said, 'Well, Aussie, you can go home now. We've come over to save you.' The Aussie cracked back, 'Have you? I thought you were a refugee from Pearl Harbour.'
Being simple, direct and tough, the Digger is often confused and nonplussed by the manners of Americans' in mixed company; or even in camp. To him those many 'Thank you's" Americans use are a bit too dignifled.

You might get annoyed, at the blue laws which make Australian cities pretty dull places on Sundays.
For all their breezieness Australians do not go in for drinking or woopitching in public, especially on Sunday.

In Australia, the national game is cricket, but they, have another game called Australian rules football.
It is rough, tough, and exciting. There are a lot of rules, which the referee carries in a rule book the size of Webster's dictionary. The game creates the desire on the part of the crowd to tear someone apart. The referees in some parks have runways covered over so that they can escape intact after a game.

As one newspaper correspondent says, Americans and Australians are 2 of the greatest gambling people on earth. It has been said of Australians that if a couple in a bar have not anything else to bet on they will lay odds on which of 2 flies rise first from the bar.
Aussies do not fight out of textbooks. They are resourceful, inventive soldiers with plenty of intiative.
The Australian habit of pronouncing "a" as "I" is pointed out, and an example quoted: "The trine is lite to-di." The booklet includes "Waltzing Matilda" in full."]

I don't know about the too many thank-yous. It would seem that the Australian girls liked it, for 10,000 Aussie brides returned to America with these well heeled, well mannered and certainly well informed troops.


1 comment(s), latest 5 years, 2 months ago

Florentia to Adelaide 1849

The 453 tons barque Florentia left Gravesend on 18 February 1849 then left Plymouth om the 9 March 1849 and arrived in Adelaide on the 20 June 1849 under Captain C.S.Tindale carrying 238 Emigrants.

Thomas Parr, Esq., Surgeon Superintendent, in the cabin ;
Julia,Harriet,and Emma Chisholm Sarah Leigh, Eliza Frogget,Emma Jones, Amelia Fryram, Martha. Eliza, and Esther Burnell, Sarah Wiggins, S. A. Wainright, Jane Benham, Emma Griffin, Susan Kingham, Margaret Slaughter Eliza Fawn, Jane Barnes, Grace and Barbara Foulds, Hester French, Jane Mustor, Harriet Webber, Anne Petello, Elizabeth, Mary Anne, Eliza, and Jane Bastian, Eliza Warring, Eliza Dwyre, Jane Greenlees, Sarah Weir, Amy Annison, Maria Lower, Hannah Peters, Susan Walters Biddy Plunker, R. Mortime, Caroline Parkes Mary Grace, Margaret Davis. Mary Black, Mary Oney, and Catherine White, Margaret and Biddy Hahir,Aaron Lock and wife, Robert Worn and wife, James Chislem and wife, W. Tilney, wife and four children. Wm. Howell wife and two children. George Hall, wife and five children, W. Elliott, wife and child, Charles Seaward and wife John Emonson and wife, Jame Guppy and wife Wm. Hayward, wife and three children, John Burnell and four children, James Williams, wife and three children, John Higgs, wife and three children. Robt. Shepherdson, wife and six children. W. Millhouse, wife and child, W. Tothill, wife and four children, William Pearce, wife and two children, Matthew Slaughter, wife and three children, H. Hiff and wife, W Lane, wife and two children, Samuel Mudge, wife and six children Patrick White and wife.Isaac Glenny and wife James Patterson and wife, John Miller and wife W. Wilton, wife and three children John Slee and wife, W. Kerswell, wife and child, P. A. Lehoe and wife, W. Webb, wife and five children, Thos Pollard, wife and six children, Henry Bastian wife and four children, W. Foulds, wife and two children, John Mills, wife and three children, Sam Mackey, wife and child, James Caldwell, wife and four children, Richard Mortimer, wife and four children, A. Webb, Thomas Lawton, George Burnell, John Foulds, Charles Totman, George Moss, W. Tunly, S. Davis, John Hogarth, Wm. Elson, George Hornes. David and George Pink Thomas and John White, John Hahir, J. Guerin James Kennedy, Thomas and R. Lane, B Nevill Benjamin Randell, R. Thackly, Thomas Row John Fowler, John Worn, Walter Fisher, John Foley, James Roberts, John Williams.

Eight births and three deaths during the voyage.

3 comment(s), latest 5 years, 3 months ago

Posthumous to Adelaide 1849

The 390 tons barque Posthumous left Plymouth on 13 March 1849 and arrived in Adelaide on 20 June 1849 under the guidance of Captain Davison and carrying 157 Passengers.

Passengers : Messrs. F and E. Duffield, J. Parr, W. Colman, and Mrs Colman and child, Mr Atatyar, Mr Darwent, and Mr E. R. Bower, surgeon superintendent, in the cabin ;

Messrs Nelson de Coursey, C. Schwabe, G. E. Bowley, and J. Clearson in the intermediate;

Ewart Mehruta, B. Edmondson, Mr Williams, F. Federel, J. Watkinson, Alfred Watkinson, Wm. Watkinson, Wm. Matts, Edwin Laff, Henry Laff, Wm. Edwards, wife and child, Sarah Tiffen, Josh. Betts, John Miskin, Henry James, James King, Louis Alex. Perdusal, Charlotte A. Bull Bryant, Wm. Harris, Charles Crawford, G. C. Foat, John Papple, Chas. Rooks, Josh. Wicker, Ann, Nehemiah, Josh., Alfred, and Henry Wicker, G. Wicker, infant, Jas. Fielder, Mary Fielder, Frances Hall, Eliz. Beechin, Harriet Beechin, G. Hamlin, J. Salmon, Henry Heath, S. Baird, J. Botterell, M. Baird, Walter Scott, T. Noble, J. Clarke, W. Ramsdedn, T. Evans, J. Neates, Josiah Oldfield, E. Bryant, Eliza Ann, Eliz. Jane, T. Frances, and W. C. Bryant, infant. W. Lewellen, John Edwin Smyth, W., and Mary, Emma Maslin, Eleanor, Harriet, Mary Hannah, John, Susannah, W. and Martha Cook, C. Hodson, T. Hall, wife and seven children, R. M. Wray, T. Hopkinson, R Walker Emma, Sea, Mary Ann G. Hoye, Rosina Gale, Mrs Biggs, Sarah Taylor, John, Geo., Mary Ann, Eliza, Susan, and Margaret Murray, James Jordon, wife and three children, J. Treeman Notts, wife and two children, J. J. Walker, Wm. Southgate, Henry Elborough, Sarah Elborough, J. Hammon, R. G. Dur ham, wife and six children, Susan Duncan, Susan Duncan, Walter Ransome, S. B. Pitt, C. Webb Sarah Webb, Henry, Rebecca, Eliza, and Frances Baker, Alex. Wood, Wm. Andrew, Eliz. Colts, Ulrich Spikly, Alex. Sim, John, Susan, Eliz. and Emma Harvey, Alex.J.L.F.Chanmout, Wm. Braceide and wife, Miss Morris and child, Mr Morris, wife and son Louisa Ransome, Louisa Chalmers, Wm. Akhurst wife and infant, James Coumbe, wife and six children, David Wheeler and wife, Augustus Raymond and wife, Henry, Mary Ann, Henry, Kate, Geo. and Mary Ann Gove, infant, Robt. Thompson, wife and three children, Alex. Anderson, Mr Moyle, wife and three children, Jean F. Amiet, and Louis Amiet, in the steerage.