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Martin KINSELA 1793 - 1860 Wexford to Windsor

Martin KINSELA was born in Wexford, Ireland in 1793 and that's about all I know about his beginnings.
Martin died on the 13 October 1860 at Windsor, New South Wales

In 1819 in Dublin, Ireland Martin married Ellen HENDLING born in 1794 in Wicklow, Ireland.
The couple had two children;
1.Catherine 1820-1896 and
2.Thomas born in 1822, both in Wicklow. Unfortunately I have not as yet been able to trace Thomas.

7th February 1824 Martin KINSELA, ploughman, was tried and convicted in Dublin, Ireland and sentenced to 7 years transportation. Description: Origin: Wexford, Ireland. Height 5'6", complexion fresh and freckled, brown hair and dark grey eyes.
In 1819 in Dublin, Ireland Martin married Ellen HENDLING born in 1794 in Wicklow, Ireland.

Martin, aged 32 sailed from the Cove of Cork on the "Ann and Amelia" under the command of William Ascough on the 8th September 1824.

On Muster held on 3rd January 1825 in Sydney Cove the prisoners declared that they had been well treated. The Muster records 197 men + 3 men in hospital; the arrival of the full complement of 200 convicts on embarkation in Ireland.

Martin was assigned to Lane (Windsor) as a labourer.
His Ticket of Leave was recorded on the Microfilm No. 914/5/6 Ticket of Leave Butts 1827-75.

Martin petitioned the Governor to allow his family to come to New South Wales and on the 6 August 1833 Ellen and her daughter Catherine arrived in Port Jackson from Cove of Cork on board the vessel 'Caroline' which was carrying 120 female convicts and 13 of their children. In addition, there were 14 wives and their children sailing 'free' to join their convict husbands in the colony.

By this time Martin has settled at the small village of Agnes Banks which runs alongside the Nepean River between Richmond and Penrith.
Martin and Ellen Had four more children;
3.Mary Agnes Kinsela 1834 – 1888
4.John Martin Kinsela 1835 – 1917
5.Ann Amelia Kinsela 1838 – 1917
6.Dorothy Kinsela 1839 – 1915

Martin's wife Ellen died on the 17 November 1862 at Windsor, New South Wales

1. Catherine KINSELA on the 11 October 1838 at Windsor, NSW married Samuel DEAN, born in 1811 at Whitechapel, London the eldest of seven children born to Samuel DEAN 1785 a butcher and his wife Susannah DUCK 1787 living in St.Osyth, Essex.

Samuel as a 15 year old errand boy was transported for breaking and entering. He arrived in the Colony on the 19th April 1833 on the 6th voyage of the ship "Mangles" leaving London on 14th December 1832. The ship's Master was William Carr. When Samuel DEAN was tried he was described as 4'11" and when he gained his Ticket of Leave on the 13 January 1840, he was 5'6".

Samuel And Elizabeth were farmers at Kurrajong and together had twelve children:-
George Dean 1839–1883
Susanna Dean 1841–1884
Ellen Catherine Dean 1842–1923
Thomas Dean 1844–1931
Samuel Dean 1846–1918
John Dean 1848–1910
William Dean 1851–1925
Mary Ann Dean 1853–1931
Martin Dean 1856–1946
Emma Dean 1858 – 1935
Elizabeth Dean 1860–1931
James Dean 1862–1934

Samuel and Catherine left Kurrajong about 1863 and went over the Blue Mountains by bullock dray and settled Greghamstown near Blayney with some of their children.
Catherine DEAN nee KINSELA died at Greghamstown on the 11 July 1896.
Her Husband Samuel died on the 4 November 1899.
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2. Thomas KINSELA b:1822-UNKNOWN
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3.Mary Agnes KINSELA married John MADDEN in Penrith in 1850. John was born in Parramatta, New South Wales in 1828, the son of Dublin born convict John MADDEN 1778-1852 and Elizabeth BIDWELL EVANS 1798-1856.
The children of Mary Agnes and John MADDEN were:-

Elizabeth Madden 1850 –
Mary A Madden 1852 –
John Malcolm Madden 1857–1931 m Charlotte KIRK
Alfred E Madden 1859-1922
Linder Agnes Madden 1866–
Frederick Martin Madden 1869–1941 m. Catherine BRADY
Mary Agnes MADDEN, nee KINSELA died at her home in Hancock Street, Balmain, Sydney on the 22 May 1888. She was buried on the 24th at Rookwood.
John MADDEN died on the 29 January 1901 and is buried with Mary Agnes at Rookwood.
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4. John Martin KINSELA was born at Agnes Banks on the 25th August 1835.
John Martin married Martha BURRELL in Sydney in 1857. Martha was born on the 17 February 1838 at Castlereagh, NSW, the daughter of John BURRELL 1798-1884 and Mary HORTON 1806-1876.
Children of John Martin KINSELA and Martha BURRELL were:-
Martha Kinsela 1859 – 1900
Mary Ann Kinsela 1859 – 1940
Ellen M Kinsela 1862 –
John Martin Kinsela 1864 – 1937
George Henry Kinsela 1866 – 1941
James Reuben Kinsela 1869 – 1955
Bernard Mark Kinsela 1872 – 1940
Dora Kinsela 1875 – 1952
William Joseph Kinsela 1877 –

Martha KINSELA, nee BURRELL died on the 10 October 1894 at Manildra, NSW and John Martin Kinsela died on the 12 November 1917 at Manildra. Both are buried at Molong General Cemetery, Cemetery Rd, Molong, New South Wales, Australia
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5.Ann Amelia KINSELA was born 0n the 19 April 1838. Ann Amelia married Alfred SMITH on the 11 October 1854 at St.Matthews Catholic Church, Windsor. Alfred was born on the 13 July 1831 at Hobartville, the illegitimate son of Adelaide Eliza de la Thoreza who was born in Madrid, Spain in 1808 she married John MASTERS 1811-1869 in Richmond in 1836.
The children of Ann Amelia KINSELA and Alfred SMITH were:-

Dora Smith
Eleanor Theresa Smith 1855 – 1920
Mary Elizabeth Smith 1861 – 1945
Alfred Adolphus Smith 1864 – 1942
George M Smith 1868 –
Clarence John Smith 1871 –
Frederick Thomas Smith 1874 –
Francis Joseph Smith 1878 –
Eugenie Agnes Smith 1881 –

Ann Amelia Smith nee KINSELA died on the 6 October 1917 at North Sydney Alfred followed on the 24 December 1917
---------------
6.Dorothy KINSELA always called Dora was born in Windsor, NSW in 1839. Dora married George EATHER on the 17 April 1860 at St. Matthews Catholic Church, Windsor. George was born in Richmond in 1834 the son of Charles EATHER 1800-1891 and Ann GOUGH nee CAIN 1797-1871.

The children of George EATHER and Dora were:-

Louisa Eather 1861 – 1950 m. Arthur Frederick Carr
Arthur G Eather 1862 – 1901 m Florence Hunt
Ellen Theresa Eather (registered as Helen)1864 – 1936 m. 1. Edward Leopold Perry. (divorced) 2. Charles Baldwin
Walter Leslie Eather 1865 – 1940
James William Eather 1867 – 1949 m. Sarah Wright (divorced).
Ambrose M Eather 1869 – 1941
Emma M Eather 1872 – 1961 m. Allan McNiven
Florence Ann (Pop) Eather 1873 – 1901
George Raphael Eather 1875 – 1877
Henry V Eather 1877 – 1878
Dorothy May Eather 1879 – 1924 m. Richard Fahy
Charles George Eather 1881 – 1881
Margaret Veronica Eather 1883 - 1927 m. Simmons

George EATHER died on the 17 May 1912 at Richmond NSW and
Dorothy EATHER nee KINSELA died on the 23 August 1915 at her daughter's home 44 Despointes St, Marrickville.


William Glas MCALPIN 1810-1902

William Glas McALPIN, the son of Peter MCALPIN 1768-1850 and Elizabeth, nee ELTON 1778-1817 was born on 6 October 1810 in Stirling, Perthshire, Scotland, died on 2 Feb 1902 in Bulga, NSW, Australia. He died on the 2 February 1902 at the age of 91. He was buried on 5 February 1902 in St Mark's, Church of England cemetery, Bulga, NSW, Australia.

William Glas McALPIN arrived age 18 months with his parents and 2 siblings, Peter and Sarah, arrived from London as free settlers on the ship "General Graham" 29 January 1812.

William was known generally in life as 'Billy Mack' and When Archibald BELL and his party discovered the alternate route over the Blue Mountains (Bells Line of Road) William Glas McALPIN was a member of his party.

William married Susannah ONUS, daughter of Joseph ONUS 1781-1835 and Ann EATHER 1793-1865, on 1 February 1833 in Christ Church, Church of England, Castlereagh, New South Wales.

Susannah was born on 28 October 1815 in Cornwallis, NSW. died on 10 August 1882 in Bulga, NSW. at age 66, and was buried on 12 August 1882 in St Mark's, Church of England cemetery, Bulga, NSW.
William McALPIN built a brick home in 1834 in the main street of Richmond, NSW with financial help from Joseph ONUS (the father of his wife) and set up a blacksmiths shop at the rear.

Their first 3 children all died within 3 years

The children of William Glas MCALPIN and Susannah, nee ONUS were:-


1.Elizabeth McALPIN was born on 25 October 1833 in Richmond, NSW. died on 11 March 1835 in Richmond, NSW, at age 1, and was buried on 1 April 1835 in St Peter's, Church of England cemetery, Richmond, NSW.

2.Ann McALPIN was born on 21 January 1836 in Richmond, NSW, and died on 6 February 1838 in Richmond, NSW, at age 2, and was buried on 8 February 1838 in St Peter's, Church of England cemetery, Richmond, NSW.

3.Peter McALPIN was born on 16 November 1838 in Richmond, NSW, died on 25 November 1838 in Richmond, NSW and was buried on 26 November 1838 in St Peter's, Church of England cemetery, Richmond, NSW.


4.William McALPIN was born on 19 February 1840 in Richmond, NSW. died on 12 August 1923 in Bulga, NSW, at age 83, and was buried in 1923 in St Mark's, Church of England cemetery, Bulga, NSW.

William married (1)Eva Mary PEBERDY born 1846, at Halls Creek.
on 10 September 1867 in St Matthew's Church, Mount Dangar, NSW. Eva died the following year at Bulga on the 15 October 1868.
William next married (2)Eliza CHAPMAN on 29 April 1874 in Burrowell, Howes Valley, NSW. Eliza was the daughter of Robert Chapman 1816-1888 and Mary, nee Kelk 1816-1906;
born 4 December 1850 at Penrith, died 29 July 1933 at the Dangar Cottage Hospital, Singleton. Buried at St.Mark's Bulga.
Their children were: -
Eva Mary McALPIN 1875-1878
Alpin Glas McALPIN 1877-1947 (Inspector of Police Newcastle)
William Leo McALPIN 1879-1968 ( Police Constable, Hamilton)
Hope Chapman McALPIN 1881-1947
Kenneth Omar McALPIN 1883-1886
Hilton May McALPIN 1886-1962
Essie Mahala McALPIN 1889-1891
Nellie Pearl McAlpin 1891-1971
Hilda Aileen McALPIN 1894-1950


5.Susannah McALPIN was born on 13 May 1842 in Richmond, NSW, Australia, died on 18 January 1882 in "Oreel" Station, Narrabri, NSW, at age 39, and was buried on 19 January 1882 in "Oreel" Station, Narrabri, NSW.
Susannah married MacDonald CLARK b: 20 September 1836, d: 10 February 1918. on 2 Apr 1863 in St Mark's, Church of England, Bulga, NSW.
These are their children:-
Amy Hilton Clark 1864-1935
Mary May CLARK 1865-1951
James McAlpin Clark 1866-1925
William Edward Clark 1868-1941
Susannah Eliza Clark 1869-1956
Harriet Swales Clark 1872-1948
Georgina Flora Clark 1874-1875
MacDonald Clark 1877

6.Sarah McALPIN was born on 28 July 1845 in Richmond, NSW. and died on 3 July 1922 in Singleton, NSW. at age 76.
Sarah married William WOODS b: 4 March 1844, d: 7 May 1933.
on 16 Sep 1868 in St Mark's, Church of England, Bulga, NSW, Australia.
These are their children:-
Miriam Julia Susannah Onus Woods 1869-1947
Eva Mary McAlpin Woods 1871-1962
Elsie Maud Woods 1872-1945
Ethel Sarah Woods 1874-1969
Joseph David McAlpin Woods 1876-1948
Elizabeth Ann Woods 1878-1964
Peter Woods 1880-1951
Linda Hope Woods 1882-1889
William Woods 1885-1948



7.Joseph McALPIN was born on 31 January 1849 in Bulga, NSW, Australia, died on 12 February 1913 in Bulga, NSW, Australia at age 64, and was buried in 1913 in St Mark's, Church of England cemetery, Bulga, NSW.
Joseph married (1)Elizabeth Jane DAWES b: 1849, d: 19 April 1884.
Their children were:-
Xenodochy McAlpin 1882-1942
Joseph Eclipse McAlpin 1884-1970
On 25 June 1873 in All Saint's, Church of England, Patricks Plains, NSW. Joseph next married (2)Amelia Therese ROGERS b:20 September 1861, d:8 September 1945.
on 15 July 1886 in Roman Catholic Church, Patricks Plains, NSW.
Their children were:-
Leslie Hastings McAlpin 1886-1968
Cecil Charles McAlpin 1889-1974
William Glass McAlpin 1891-1966


8. Mary McALPIN was born on 12 January 1852 in Bulga, NSW. died on 3 January 1915 in Bulga, NSW at age 62, and was buried in 1915 in St Mark's, Church of England cemetery, Bulga, NSW.
Mary married Edward ROSER b: 13 March 1848, d: 9 November 1930 on 14 December 1870 in All Saint's, Church of England, Singleton, NSW.
Their children were:-
Edward McAlpin ROSER 1872-1944
Myra Mildred ROSER 1873-1939
Una Mary Roser 1876-1950
Roy Roser 1879-1967
Malcolm McAlpin Roser 1882-1959
Frank McAlpin Roser 1884-1967


At the end of 1841 the family moved to Bulga - they settled close to their relatives on Wollombi Brook.
William's life long hobby and interest was the breeding and showing of Clydesdale horses - showing horses at many shows including Maitland, Mudgee and Sydney - and acting as a judge at many country shows.

In 1871 William Glas McALPIN, purchased 465 acres of land at Bulga. It was land that had been Thomas TAILBY's and George EATON's grants, along with land that Joseph ONUS had owned and willed to his sons. William had purchased the land from Thomas Alexander ONUS 1849-1934, the son of his sister Elizabeth 1825-1884., which had been left to him by his father.

From then on William and his family resided on this land, which he named "Glen Alpin", and were next-door neighbours to Thomas Eather 1824-1909 and his wife Eliza, nee CROWLEY at 'Meerea'


William Glas McALPIN and His wife Susannah are both buried in the Anglican Cemetery at Bulga their epitaph reads;

"Kind Hearts are More than Coronets".
janilye©2000
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THE OPENING OF THE BULGA BRIDGE
On Wednesday last after the proceedings in connection with the laying of the foundation stone of the Bulga Public School, had been successfully completed, the whole assembled company proceeded to the new bridge, situated a few hun dred yards from the site whereon ;the picnic had been held, Mr. Stavely, the contractor, having invited Mrs. M'Alpin to perform the pleasent task of naming it. The following particulars, respecting the new structure which will, be a valuable acquisition to all travellers through Bulga towards Sydney, may be given here. The total length of the bridge without approaches is' 264 feet, and the total length of approaches is 280 feet including a small bridge of 64 feet over a blind channel. The material used is hardwood timber, the roadway being, supported on six piers, each, excepting the abutment piers which contain five, consisting of six piles driven down to the rock. There are five spans, three of 70 feet each, and two of 25 feet each, and the height of the deck from the summer level of the water is 31 feet. The width of the deck between the trusses is 16 feet, and 18 feet outside measure ment. The piles are about 45 feet long, and the banks into which they are driven consist of a sandy loam. The deck is two or three feet above the level of the highest known flood. The work has been a long time in hand, about twelve months we believe, owing to unexpected difficulties in the supply of timber, and other unforseen delays. The bridge had been handed over to, and passed, by Mr. Whiteside on the previous Saturday. It is declared to be soundly, well and faithfully built; and it is expected will stand as long as the timber lasts, there being little likelihood of its being washed away. The total cost was about £1900; and the contractor was Mr. F. Staveley, of Mount Victoria.
The name of the bridge having been completed by Mrs. M'Alpin, who gave it the above title, rounds of cheers were given for the Queen, for Mr. Staveley, for Mr. W.C. Browne, M.L.A., for the Ladies, for Mr. M'Alpin, and for the Press. Wines and spirits flowed freely at Mr. Staveley's expense, and most of the cheers were accompanied with toast drinking by those on the bridge. Mr. W. M'Alpin, son's health was proposed by Mr. Joseph Clarke, who spoke in high terms of praise of the straight forward, upright and honorable career of his old friend. Mr. M'Alpin, in replying, said he had seen a great many changes in Bulga. He had arrived there in 1826, when there was nothing , but bush where they now saw open grass land, at that time the haunt of numerous kangaroos. He then speculated upon the greater changes that the young people present might see, and alluded to the chances of their being fortunate enough to have the railway to Sydney pass that way. Acknowledging the compliment paid him by Mr. Clark, he addressed some words of good advice to the young men present, and strongly advised. them never to break their word. Let them always endeavour as far as they could to keep their promises, and never deceive any man. Then men would always have faith in them. He hoped they would try and steer as straight a course as old Mac had done, and then, they would do no harm. (Cheers.) The toasting and cheering being over, Mr. Dawes produced his violin, and, for an hour and more after, the dancing of quadrilles, Scotch reels, etc, gave a lively and novel finish to a very enjoy able day, the Bulga people, (we had almost written Bulgarians,) being models of neighbourly kindness and amity.
Source: The Singleton Argus and Upper Hunter General Advocate
Saturday 19 April 1879


*Extracts from "Among the Pastoralists and Producers," an account from the roving reporter, Harold M MacKENZIE.

1895.
"On leaving Mr THORLEY's property intending to shape a course for Warkworth, I was persuaded to alter it, upon learning from that gentleman that one of the oldest and best men for recounting events of the past lived at Bulga, in the person of Mr. William Glass [sic] McALPIN, so hither I hied myself without delay".

At the time, 1895/1896, the road between Singleton and Bulga was in good condition and the weather was hot. Bulga, an Aboriginal name for "Mountain," had a Public School, Church of England, a Wesleyan Chapel and a School of Arts. The "Band of Hope" numbered from 300 to 400 people, with William Glas McALPIN taking a leading role. Bulga was a sober place and publicans and sly groggers got short shift: "Young man, we wouldn't have 'em near us" said William Glas, who MacKENZIE found enjoyed fishing and was a fit 85-year-old. Getting produce to market was a problem and William sent his wheat to Maitland over a bad road. However cattle were no problem -they were driven over the Putty to the Hawkesbury, thence to the stock markets at Homebush.

William Glas McALPIN related that he arrived in Sydney on the ship "General Graham" in January 1812, which carried stores for the colony and a small number of passengers, who were all free settlers with a trade. His father he said was a blacksmith and he had been a smithy at Windsor. William Glas learnt the trade there. He bought a piece of land from George BOWMAN and moved to Richmond where he lived to 1841. He made his first droving trip to Bulga on Mr ONUS's account, the first in 1826 and he finally settled there in 1841. He said droving wasn't a bad life, people were very honest and he never had any problem getting paid.

William related that his sister, Sarah McALPIN, was the first white woman at Bulga and that he and his brother-in-law Mr ONUS had 1,200 acres between them at Bulga.

Between Bulga and Warkworth.
The first week of January 1896.
"The first week in January will be remembered as one of the hottest, if not the hottest, I have ever experienced." After leaving John HAYES' "Rock View," MacKENZIE journeyed to fellow orchardist George PARTRIDGE. George's 80-acre property was considered to be better than HAYES for it had two good creeks on both sides. While at PARTRIDGE's place MacKENZIE was shown a huge apricot tree which bore 1,700 dozen apricots in 1895 - plus many that fell to the ground in wind storms. He had very little problem with disease and pests but the 12 acres planted with oranges of Mr ETHER [sic] who lived thereabout was almost entirely destroyed by caterpillars. His pumpkin crop went the same way "even though a very determined Mr EATHER re-planted the crop three times, the thirty acres were ravaged on each occasion."

In The Bulga District. Among the Pastoralists and Producers.
By Harold M MacKENZIE.
15th February 1896
"In {one of my past articles} it will be remembered, I dealt chiefly with reminiscences of Bulga when Mr William McALPIN came to the place as far back as 1826 - a man of whom it may be said landed with the proverbial half-crown in his pocket, apprenticed himself to a trade, bought land, and so with thrift and perseverance gradually worked himself to the front-and stayed there. Now, in his declining years, he has the pleasure of seeing his grandchildren around him with peace and comfort reigning in the household. Can a man be expected to do more in a general way?
Amongst the various stock which this old gentleman has concerned himself through life his "hobby" seems to have been breeding draughts. Without any undue flattery, it may be stated that Mr McALPIN has taken more prizes at populous centres, such as Mudgee, Maitland, Sydney etc, than any one else in the same line. Conversing in reference to the different breeds, Mr McALPIN's experience has been solely with the Clydesdale, and as compared with the Suffolk Punch, from what he has seen, he would not be inclined to make a change. To give one instance of his success as a prize taker, it may be stated that a Clydesdale filly, now a two year old, obtained when a yearling no less than three prizes in succession. Talking of horses, concerning which the old gentleman made more pertinent remarks, he said nothing more to the point than when he exclaimed, "I don't believe in breeding mules, my friend." Latterly, of course, Mr McALPIN has not concerned himself much with horse breeding, being content to take a rod and wander forth to enjoy the pursuit that old Isaak (sic) loved.


[Research Notes: The Discovery of (St) Patrick's Plains.
(Editor).
John HOWE, with his party, discovered a route from Windsor to the Hunter River in March 1820 which varies little to the present day Putty Road. During 1887 several letters were published in the Maitland Mercury pertaining to the discovery.

The correspondents were "Jus Sanguinis" (anonymous) William Glas McALPIN, George Thomas LODER, Elizabeth YEOMANS (Mrs.) and William COLLINS. William Glas McALPIN's first letter of July 5, 1887, "trusting that "Jus Sanguinis" would not feel aggrieved at {his} correction "brought forth a response on July 16, to both prior letters from George Thomas LODER. Four days later, July 20, Benjamin SINGLETON's daughter, Elizabeth YEOMANS entered the dispute then she was followed by William COLLINS. The following letter, written by William G McALPIN, was his reply to two articles published in the Maitland Mercury that originated from George T LODER and Elizabeth YEOMANS.

July 26, 1887.
To the Editor of the Maitland Mercury.
"Sir - I observe that my letter to you on the subject of the discovery of Patrick's Plains has called forth, - first, a reply from Mr G T LODER, and secondly, from Mrs E YEOMANS. Both of whom seem to think I have been misinformed on the subject, and as I have good reason to believe that the information which I conveyed was perfectly correct, I beg that you will again allow me space in your valuable columns to make reply. Now, as Mr LODER was the first to take exception to what I had written, I purpose to deal with him first. In confirmation of his information he has sent you various extracts on the subject from the journal of the late Mr John HOWE, but strange to say, he has not given one date; and not a word is said about the journey from the point at which the party crossed the branch at TURNBULL's farm, till they reached a point some forty miles further on, namely, "Puttee". The extract then states that they were unable to proceed further, on account of the numerous lagoons and creeks in the way. Now although I have travelled the road many times, (and my first trip dates back as far as 1826), I have never seen anything in the shape of creeks or lagoons to impede my progress. I have travelled the road in company with two of the party who first found it, namely, the late Messrs G LODER and T DARGAN (sic), and although we often conversed on the subject, I have never heard of either of them state that they met with any such difficulties, or that they went by any other but that known as the Bulga. I am not therefore much inclined to place much confidence in what is supposed to be Mr HOWE's journal. The information I afforded you in my last was collected from the late Mr Phillip THORLEY just about a year before his decease, and as that gentleman was noted for his sterling truth and integrity, I do not see why I should doubt that which he told me with his own lips. So much for Mr LODER: now for Mrs YEOMANS".
"The lady states that her father was the first white man who ever set foot upon Patrick Plains, and discovered the grand country that it comprises, but I can tell Mrs YEOMANS that the Government were well aware already of the fertility of the Hunter River valley, and were only endeavouring to find an overland route to it. Regarding any desire on my part to cast a slur upon the memory of the late Mr B SINGLETON on account of his determination to return when his blackfellow told him how close he was to the river, I must state that far from any such thought entering my head, I rather, on the other hand, commend him for his common sense. For undoubtedly, had he gone on with PARR he would never have received any compensation for his discovery (having no appointment in the expedition) and that the honour of the discovery should have been his, had he gone on, has been proved by the fact that PARR failed in finding a road. As to Mrs YEOMANS ignorance of PARR, I must inform her that she has not studied Australian history very closely, or she would know that PARR was a mineralogist in the service of the Government, and that previous to the expedition which I mentioned in my last (of which he was the head), he had been with OXLEY in his exploring excursions in the east. With reference to the Randel PARR of whom Mrs YEOMANS speaks, I may say that I probably knew him as well, if not better than she did. This lady also says that her mother, the wife of the late Mr B SINGLETON, and Mrs Phillip THORLEY were the first white women who set foot on Patrick's Plains. But though her memory is so green, I must yet refresh it by asking her if another white woman by the name of * HOYLE did not accompany them? Mrs YEOMANS also states that her father was the leader of the expedition, who found the track over the Bulga; but if such was the case it is singular that the Government in granting members of the party compensation awarded Mr SINGLETON only 200 acres, and Mr HOWE 700 acres. Another significant fact regarding this matter is that not one place along the route bears the name SINGLETON, while no less than three were named after Mr HOWE - namely Howe's Waterhole, Howe's Valley, and Howe's Mountain - all of which names have been retained to the present day. In my opinion, it is evident that Mr HOWE was the leader of the party, though Mr SINGLETON, no doubt, rendered valuable assistance as a guide".

"In conclusion, I may state that I have no wish to enter a controversy on the subject, but I am fully convinced that neither * Mr HOWE nor Mr SINGLETON ever stood on Patrick's Plains till they did so together when they crossed the Bulga in the expedition mentioned in my last". (* The date given by William in his prior letter was 1818. Ed.).

"Apologising for again trespassing upon your space - I am, etc.,"

W G M'ALPIN.
Glen Alpin, Bulga, 26th July, 1887.

* In a published answer (Maitland Mercury) to William G McALPIN's question about the woman named HOYLE, Elizabeth YEOMANS replied:-
"She was the wife of the man who brought Mr H BALDWIN's sheep over. She was a nurse, and came to attend my mother at the birth of a ** son in January 1823 and she returned with her husband shortly after.

** This son would have been John SINGLETON who married in 1844 Jane Ann ROTTON and died of dysentery in 1849 whence returning to NSW from the Californian Gold Fields. (according to our other records John SINGLETON died at sea during the voyage to the Californian Gold Fields !!!). The later would be correct as John SINGLETON & Jane Ann ROTTON had 3 daughters born between 1845 and 1850.



Lee Macdonald Cooke 1890-1936 grandson of Susannah McAlpin 1842 - 1882 and Macdonald Clark 1836 – 1918.
Thomas Eather 1800 - 1886
janilye©2000

PIONEERS.
Now, at this time their shadows fall
Across the intervening years,
Bringing remembrance that stirs
The blood; let memory call
Back, back from out the shadowy past These men who tilled the virgin soil,
Blazoned new trails; by dint of toil
Gave us our heritage, so that at last
We who follow on may reap
The harvest sown by those who gave
E'en of life's blood; yet, o'er their graves
Do monumental stones that mark their sleep
Give greater tribute than this land,
Primeval yet-but for their hands.
-Thomas Wentworth.


Charlotte EATHER 1797-1862

The many decendants through this female line include links with very well known Hawkesbury families - MARKWELL, FARLOW, DEVLIN and MCQUADE. It appears, too, that Elizabeth and Jane, two of the children of Robert and Charlotte WILLIAMS, married into the EATON family, already allied through the ONUS connection,( Ben RICHARDS, son of Mary Ann EATON, married Elizabeth WILLIAMS and Susannah EATON, daughter of Daniel EATON, married James WILLIAMS.

Charlotte EATHER Daughter of Thomas EATHER 1764-1827 and Elizabeth LEE 1771-1860, was born on the 5 June 1797.
At the age of twenty Charlotte gave birth to a daughter Mary Ann WINDSOR 1817-1791. Little is known about her father Joseph WINDSOR apart from his name on Mary Ann's Christening record. Mary Ann although born WINDSOR was raised as Mary Ann WILLIAMS.

On the 24 August 1818 at Windsor, Charlotte married Robert WILLIAMS the son of Robert WILLIAMS born in England in 1765 and married Elizabeth YOUNG born 1765 at Parramatta on the 11 September 1791.
When son RObert was 19 months old his mother Elizabeth was murdered by a neighbour at 'The Ponds' Parramatta. Robert's father died on the 8 July 1811.
So when Robert and Charlotte were married Robert had no living relatives, he had inherited his father's property of 60 acres of land at Castlereagh.

In partnership with Joseph Onus Robert Williams began to send cattle across the mountains to the Hunter River district where they established a run of 1,000 acres near the junction of Wollombi Brook and Parson's Creek, in the Bulga area.

It is a gauge of Robert Williams prosperity that in 1828 he was in control of 1200 acres of land, 13 horses, 400 head of cattle and 200 sheep.
The children of Charlotte and Robert Williams were:-

1.Mary Ann WILLIAMS 1817-1891 m. William FREEMAN 1812-1881

2.Robert Eather WILLIAMS 1819-1899 m. Mary Ann Williams 1819-1911

3.Elizabeth WILLIAMS 1821 - 1896 m. Benjamin RICHARDS 1818-1898

4.Thomas WILLIAMS 1824 - 1888 m. Jane CRIBB 1826-1873

5.Ann Eather WILLIAMS 1826-1882 m. Thomas George MARKWELL 1826-1908

6.James Eather WILLIAMS 1829-1913 m. Susannah EATON 1831-1916

7.Charles EATHER WILLIAMS 1831-1887 m. Sarah CRIBB 1831-1898

8.Charlotte WILLIAMS 1834-1918 m. Peter EATHER 1831-1911

9.John WILLIAMS 1836-1917 m. Maria Elizabeth FARLOW 1843-1923

10.George Eather WILLIAMS 1838-1887 m. Elizabeth Janet BRAND 1855-1911

Robert WILLIAMS died on the 28 November 1839 at Agnes Banks, Richmond.

On the 17 April 1841 Charlotte WILLIAMS nee EATHER married William James MALONEY 1818-1883. William was only 23 when he married Charlotte, 21 years his senior. Charlotte, from her previous marriage had been left a very rich widow. William signed a Deed of separation from Charlotte on the 6th August 1850 registered with the Supreme Court of NSW.

Charlotte WILLIAMS, nee EATHER died on the 8 November 1862 at Richmond. She is buried at St.Peter's Church of England Cemetery, Richmond, New South Wales.
janilye
To view some of my Family Tree Images

Below is a photograph of daughter Charlotte WILLIAMS 1834-1918 holding one of her granddaughters. taken at Boggabri around 1910


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Joseph ONUS 1782-1835 Last Will and Testament

On Monday, 22 September 1834, Joseph ONUS wrote his last will and testament.
He evidently thought that it was time that he safeguarded the fruits of his years of endeavour for the lasting benefit of his children and grandchildren. In drawing up his will he appointed his son-in-law John EATON, and his eldest son, Joseph ONUS Jnr, as his
executors. In the introduction to his will, which was quite a lengthy document, Joseph stated that he was "in good health and sound of mind and understanding". The document was witnessed by John EATON, George PAWLING, Joseph ONUS Jnr and James GRIFFITTHS.

In the autumn of 1835, Ann and Joseph had their daughter Mary Ann back with them again for another lying-in. On 8 May she was delivered of another daughter who was named Mary Ann Elizabeth.
Five weeks later, on 17 June 1835, Joseph ONUS added a codicil to his will. Perhaps he took advantage of the presence of John EATON in town to add the codicil while both of his executors were able to be present to witness it. Perhaps his health had declined since he had drawn up his will in the previous year.
The codicil was witnesed by the same four persons who had witnessed the will itself.

On 22 June 1835, just five days after he had added the codicil to the will, Joseph ONUS died. Ann ONUS was a widow at the age of forty-two. Her three sons were still teenagers. Joseph had become a well-known identity in Richmond, and indeed, throughout the whole of the Hawkesbury district. It was a large crowd that gathered for the funeral when his mortal remains were interred in the burial ground that is now St Peter's Cemetery, and where the ONUS family vault still stands. Recorded as being fifty-four when he died, Joseph had failed to live long enough to enjoy the experience of seeing his sons reach adulthood, marry and have children of their own; an experience that is dear in the hearts of most fathers.

Transported across the seas to permanent exile from his native land for a part in the theft of stores to the paltry value of less than six pounds sterling, Joseph had died a farmer and pastoralist of prestige and honour, and had earned for himself a minor place in the pages of Australian history. Many of the landed gentry in England would have envied him the extent of his estates; the number of stock that he grazed upon them, and the size of his bank account.
It is obvious from the wording of his will, which Joseph appears to have written himself, that he was determined to be the progenitor of a dynasty of land-owners. Repeatedly in his will he stressed that the lands which he bequeathed were "not to be sold, exchanged, mortgaged or given away on any pretence whatsoever but shall fall from heir to heir and in default of any issue then to the next eldest brother's son and so on in the succession of heirship".

It would have been a sad occasion when the family gathered soon after the funeral to hear the contents of Joseph's will. The reading of it would have been rather tedious because of the spelling errors, inconsistent punctuation and some quaint modes of expression that he had used.
The codicil which he had added just prior to his death, covered the disposal of lands which he had apparently bought after he had made his will the previous year. At that time he had appointed another executor, his son-in-law William McALPIN. However, both John EATON and William McALPIN withdrew from their responsibilities, so Joseph ONUS Jnr was left as the sole executor. Because he was a minor, the court granted, on 28 September 1835, Ann ONUS widow of the deceased, administration of the estate during the minority of Joseph ONUS.

Under the terms of the will the following allocation of property and stock was made:-

To Ann ONUS, widow of the deceased:-
- the house and outbuildings in Francis Street, Richmond, and all the lands belonging thereto, namely farms known as LANGLEY's and GILE's, which Joseph had purchased;
- Andrew NORTH's allotment in the township. These were to be passed on to William ONUS upon the decease of Ann; or if she remarried she was to forfeit all right to them and they were to go to Joseph ONUS to hold until William turned 21.
- 560 acres of land in Howe's Valley known as Welsh's Farm which was a purchase from the Crown ;
- 50 of the best cows; 7 horses or mares; and a fourth of the remaining cattle.

Ann was to receive all rent and pay all debts on land allocated to the children until they turned 21. Presumably Ann received also the money in Joseph's bank accounts, although the will does not stress this specifically.

To Elizabeth TOWN, eldest daughter, aged 24:-
- 50 acres at Kurrajong (the grant made in 1821), to go to John TOWN Jnr when he turned 21; - 20 cows.

To Mary Ann EATON, second daughter, aged 22:-
- 300 acres (the northern part of the 1000 acres on the west bank of Cockfighter Creek or Wollombi Brook, that Joseph had been granted in 1825). Upon her death it was to be divided amongst her three eldest children not including the deceased one or any other deceased.
- 5 cows.
- husband John EATON received half the sheep.

To Susannah McALPIN, third daughter, aged 19:-
- 40 rods of land, being part of 4 acres in the main street (George Street), to go to her eldest surviving child when it turned 21;
- 20 cows.

To Joseph ONUS, eldest son, aged 17:-
-25 acres, part of Dight's Farm, currently held by Daniel EATON;
-45 acres known as Reeve's Farm, currently held by Jacob INNESS;
-3 allotments facing George BOWMAN's - "one where they are making bricks at present; one occupied by Henry CRICKETT and one occupied by Daniel EATON".
- 650 acres adjoining Festus TONG's purchase, "part of it is 100 acres grant from the Crown and THomas SPICER's and sold by auction";
- 500 acres in Howels Valley, known as Welsh's Station, adjoining Mrs ONUS's land;
- a third of the remaining horses and a fourth of the remaining cattle;
- 3 allotments (currently held by Daniel SWEET, Arthur ELLINGHAM and John CORNWELL) until William turned 21 when they were to go to him.

To Thomas ONUS, second son, aged 15:-
-190 acres at Wollombi Brook, 100 acres of which was George EATON's grant next to John EATON's and 90 acres of which were Thomas TAILBY's grant next to Thomas EATHER's farm;
- 300 acres "at the back of Thomas EATHER's land at Wollombi";
- 5 acres purchased from John WATTS adjoining Daniel SWEET's land and bounded by the Lagoon on one side and the Government Road on the other;
- 35 acre farm purchased from John WATTS, bounded on two sides by Government Roads; on one side by Mr WILSON and on one side by Mr SKUTHORPE;
- three and three-quarter acres ofthe 4 acres in the main street (George Street) of Richmond "which I purchased from Mr Edward POWELL;
a third of the remaining horses and a fourth of the remaining cattle.

To William ONUS, third son, aged 15:-
- 700 acres lying "around the big lagoon and bordered on one side by Mr WILLIAMS; on one side by the creek; on one side by Mary Ann EATON and on the other side by Government land" (the southern half of the 1000 acres on the western side of Cockfighter Creek at Bulga);
- 300 acres adjoining Thomas ONUS's 300 - "my last purchase on the Wollombi";
- 10 acres now held by Daniel SWEET lying by Kirby's Lagoon; 9 acres known as Kirby's Farm, now rented by Arthur ELLINGHAM; 25 acres known as part of Dight's Farm now let to John CORNWELL;
- a third of the remaining horses and a fourth of the remaining cattle;
- the gold watch, chain and keys, engraved with "my name, Mrs ONUS's name and William ONUS's name";
- the big iron boiler fixed to the brickwork behind the house;
- the house and land belonging thereto when his mother died, or if she remarried, when he turned 21.

The "remainder of the horses" were those left after Ann ONUS had had her pick of them, and the "remainder of the cattle" were those left after Ann had selected 50 and the three daughters had made their selections. The three ONUS sons, still in their teenage years, found themselves in the position in which they had no need to be concerned about their respective futures. All would, upon reaching their respective majorities, be able to establish themselves as well-to-do farmers with extensive acreages and adequate stock.

Mary Ann and John EATON found their position in life suddenly improved, with their farm increased from 100 to 400 acres and their flock of sheep greatly increased in size. Elizabeth and Susannah were able to add to the sizes of their respective husband's dairy herds. William McALPIN could give up his life as a smithy and turn to being a dairy farmer if he so desired. Elizabeth's husband was already established as a very successful dairy farmer in the Richmond
district.

The will reveals that Joseph ONUS had at least one acquaintance in the district whom he had known in the days before he had been transported over thirty years previously. Jacob INNESS, who was leasing from him 45 acres in the Richmond district, hailed from his home town of Sheerness, and was one of the other three men tried and convicted with him in 1801 for stealing naval stores.

A History of THE EATHER FAMILY:

Thomas EATHER and Elizabeth LEE
by John St PIERRE
for the EATHER Family history committee.


Below is a map of ONUS's land holdings in Bulga, New South Wales


Ann EATHER 1793-1865

Ann EATHER the first born of Thomas EATHER and Elizabeth, nee Lee was born on the 18 April 1793 at Parramatta, New South Wales.Ann was baptised on the 5 May 1793 long before the parish of St John had been established and before a proper Church had been erected at Parramatta.The only clergyman in the colony was the Reverend Richard JOHNSON who had come out with the First Fleet.
When she was four years of age, Ann EATHER moved with her parents and younger brother and sister, Robert and Charlotte, to the land grant in the bushland near the Hawkesbury River at Mulgrave Place. There her father was setting about converting the virgin scrub into a farm. It was there, under primitive conditions, that Ann spent her childhood. Her playmates of those years were an increasing number of younger brothers and sisters, and by the time that she reached the age of fourteen she was the eldest of seven children. Another brother was born after she married. Undoubtedly, Ann had very little formal education during her childhood, living as she did in a community that was largely illiterate, and at a distance from the townships of Sydney and Parramatta. Formal education in the environment of the day was restricted to the children of the few farmers who were sufficiently wealthy as to be able to employ the services of tutors. Nevertheless, it appears that Ann did not grow up completely illiterate. In adult life she was able at least to sign her name upon documents. Ann did not have to wait long for matrimony to come her way. In a community that was still short of eligible spinsters, most girls tended to find husbands while still in their teenage years. About the age of sixteen Ann EATHER became the wife of Joseph ONUS 1782-1835 , a convict who was then about the age of twenty-nine years. Whether Joseph and Ann had a wedding ceremony will probably never be known. There is no record of their marriage in any of the Church registers then in the colony. However, this lack of the record of such an event does not necessarily mean that theirs was a de facto relationship, as the Church registers of those years prior to 1830 are known to be wanting in many instances.Of the six children of Joseph and Ann, only two are listed in the births index of the New South Wales Registrar-General's Department. It was about 1809 that Ann EATHER became the wife of Joseph ONUS and from then until 1835 her life story runs parallel to that of her husband.

The children Of Ann EATHER and Joseph ONUS were:-

1.Elizabeth ONUS 1811 - 1882 m. John Gordon TOWN 1806 - 1843
Children;
John Thomas TOWN 1831 - 1889
Elizabeth Jessie TOWN 1833-1908
William Barker TOWN 1836 - 1838
William Gordon TOWN 1838 - 1858
Mary Ann TOWN 1842 - 1846

2.Mary Ann ONUS 1813 1887 m John EATON 1811-1904
Children;
Mary M EATON 1831 - 1831
Ann EATON 1833 - 1924
Mary Ann Elizabeth EATON 1835 - 1870
Jane EATON 1837 - 1872
Elizabeth Mary EATON 1839 - 1933
Susannah EATON 1842 - 1937
Charlotta EATON 1844 - 1923
Infant EATON 1846 - 1846
William EATON 1847 - 1887
Caroline EATON 1850 - 1850
Martha Mary Richmond EATON 1851 - 1931
Euphemia EATON 1854 - 1939
Veronica EATON 1854 - 1942

3.Susannah ONUS 1815 - 1882 m. William Glas MCALPIN 1810 - 1902
Children;
Elizabeth MCALPIN 1833 - 1835
Ann McALPIN 1836 - 1838
Peter McALPIN 1838 - 1838
William McALPIN 1840 - 1923
Susannah McALPIN 1842 - 1882
Sarah McALPIN 1845 - 1922
Joseph McALPIN 1849 - 1913
Mary McALPIN 1852 - 1915


4.Joseph ONUS 1818 1895elected Mayor of Richmond 1875
m.(1) Margaret SILK 1824-1884
1 child; Maria Emma SILK 1841 - 1883
(2) Emma POWELL 1819-1865
children;
Mary Ann ONUS 18381861
Joseph Edward ONUS 1840-1891
Emma Susannah ONUS 1843-1931
Joseph Tertius ONUS 1844-1928
Laura Australia ONUS 1854-1855
(3) Clara HUNT 1820.
1 child; Linda ONUS 1869 - 1894

5.Thomas ONUS 1820 - 1855 m. Elizabeth EATHER 1824-1884
Children;
Ann ONUS 1842-1905
Sarah ONUS 1845-1910
Susannah ONUS 1847-1935
Thomas Alexander ONUS 1849-1934
Matilda J ONUS 1852-1853
Elizabeth A ONUS 1854 - 1855
+1 child from relationship with Eliza JAMES 1819-1862
Ann ONUS 1841-1927

6.William ONUS 1822 1855 m. Ann HOUGH 1822-1889
children;
Joseph ONUS 1844-1928
William ONUS 1846-1913
Elizabeth ONUS 1848-1892
Emily A ONUS 1851-1907
Andrew ONUS 1853-1855

Joseph ONUS died on the 22 June 1835 leaving Ann a very wealthy woman according to the terms of his Last Will and Testament.

On 14 February 1837, approximately twenty months after the death of Joseph ONUS, his widow Ann, married again in a ceremony held in St Matthew's Church at Windsor. Her second husband was William SHARP, a widower without any children. Ann was 43 and William only 26. A number of relatives and friends were present at the ceremony and no fewer than five signed the register as witnesses to the event. They were Thomas EATHER and his wife, Sarah EATHER; John TOWN, son-in-law of the bride; Susannah McALPIN, daughter of the bride; and Mary SHARP, a relative of the groom. The Reverend H T STILES conducted the ceremony. William SHARP had been born at Parramatta on 6 November 1810, the fifth child and fourth son of Thomas SHARP and his wife, Martha BURRELL. He had married Sarah REEVES, but she had died. His father, Thomas SHARP, had been born circa 1775 at Honeybow in the English county of Gloucestershire. He had enlisted in the New South Wales Corps as a private, and arrived in the colony on the ship "Sugar Cane" on 17 September 1793. Upon arrival he was stationed at Parramatta and lived there until about 1814. In 1800 he had assigned to him Martha BURRELL, who had arrived in the colony on the ship "Speedy" on 11 April 1800. She had been born circa 1775 in Surrey, England, and had been tried there and sentenced to seven years transportation in January 1796. She brought to the colony with her her son, John BURRELL, born in 1798 while she was in prison. In the period between 1801 and 1821, Thomas and Martha had a family of eight children; the first six being born at Parramatta and the last two at Richmond. They married at St Phillip's Church, Sydney on 13 March 1810, although they were at that time still residing at Parramatta. By the time of the 1814 muster, they were living in the Hawkesbury district and were still there in 1822. Thomas was still a soldier and at that time a member of the 102 Regiment. He died on 30 January 1823 at Richmond and was buried in St Peter's Cemetery. At the time of the 1828 census, his widow, Martha, was living with James PAGET. She lived to see the two daughters of her son, William, before she died at her home in Richmond on 14 November 1852, almost thirty years after the death of Thomas. She had been pre-deceased by two of her daughters and one son. In her decision to marry again, Ann was evidently undeterred by the stipulation in her first husband's will that, upon so doing, she would forfeit the family home. Her son William was still a minor and could not inherit it until he was 21. Technically, upon her marriage, the house passed to her eldest son, Joseph, to hold in trust until William turned 21, but he too was still a minor. Undoubtedly a satisfactory arrangement was worked out whereby Ann and her new husband resided in the house along with her sons until they eventually married and moved into homes of their own. As far as it is possible to ascertain, Ann and William resided in the house until her death in 1865, and by then her son, William, was already deceased. William SHARP continued to reside there for many years after he became a widower again, but eventually the house became the home of William ONUS's elder son, Joseph, as it rightfully should have.

In 1843 Ann SHARP turned fifty. With all six children of her first marriage now wedded and raising families of their own, she probably felt a great deal of contentment and satisfaction. She was now one of the senior citizens of Richmond, the town that had not existed when she was first married. She was surrounded by numerous relatives. Nearby, in the town, was her brother,Thomas, landlord of the "Union Inn", and also her youngest brother, James, now a married man with several young children and earning his living as a wheelwright. Just down the road at "Agnes Bank" was her sister, Charlotte, now remarried to William MALONEY. Up in the hills above North Richmond, each with a spouse and children, there dwelt on their respective farms, eldest brother, Robert and youngest sister, Rachel. The latter had returned to the district only two years
previously after having lived for seven years at Hobart Town in Tasmania. Over at Cornwallis near Windsor on another farm was another brother, Charles, with his wife and younger children, and somewhere around the district was her other brother, John, now nearly forty and still unmarried.

Now and then Ann would make the journey by cart to Windsor to visit her aged mother, the matriarch of an increasing number of descendants in three generations. Ann now saw less of her daughter, Mary Ann, who had ceased the practice of coming home from the Hunter Valley for the births of her children. Patrick's Plains and the Wollombi were now well-populated and the township of Singleton was taking shape. Mary Ann's last two daughters had been born at home at Bulga. Eldest daughter, Elizabeth, was living close by at North Richmond, where her husband, John TOWN, had several farms along Wheeney Creek. Youngest daughter, Susannah, was also living close by in Richmond, but before long she was to move out over the hills with William and their children to take up farming at Bulga close by Mary Ann and John EATON.


If Ann SHARP had caused some raised eyebrows in Richmond in 1842 when she had a baby at the age of forty-eight, she must have caused some stifled gasps of surprise when she gave birth to yet another daughter on 11 May 1845, a fortnight after she turned fifty-two. This is the oldest at which any member of the EATHER family is known to have given birth to a child. The period of time between the births of Ann's first and last children - thirty-four years - is probably another family record, on the female side at least.

The children of Ann and William SHARP were:-

1. Ann Elizabeth SHARP 1842 - 1902 m. Richard John AINSWORTH 1834-1896 at Richmond in 1860.
Their children were:-
Thomas Robert Ainsworth 1863 -1888
William Richard Ainsworth 1863 - 1922
Joseph Ainsworth 1864 - 1944
Anne Elizabeth Ainsworth 1867 - 1938
Emma S Ainsworth 1872 - 1886
Martha Euphemia Ainsworth 1874 - 1910

2. Martha Mary Ann SHARP 1845 - 1908 m. Arthur Phillip MCMANIS 1836-1918 at Richmond in 1865
Their children were:-
Emily Sharp McManis 1866 - 1947
Annie Elizabeth McManis 1868 - 1957
Ida Evelyn McManis 1871 - 1871
Marion Martha McManis 1873 - 1967
Ethel Constance McManis 1876 - 1960
Zeta Linda McManis 1879 - 1957
Arthur William McManis 1881 - 1968
Roy Onus McManis 1884 - 1915
Bashti Irene McManis 1886 - 1912
Lance Erby McManis 1888 - 1971

----


Part of the above is sourced from
John St PIERRE, writer of
Thomas and Elizabeth Eather
for the EATHER Family history committee.
janilye


The photograph below is Susannah Onus 1815-1882
3rd. daughter of Joseph and Ann Onus, wife of William Glas McAlpin


Thomas Eather 1824-1909

Thomas EATHER born on the 27 September 1824 the son of Thomas EATHER 1800-1886 and Sarah, nee MCALPIN 1805-1884 married Eliza CROWLEY 1822-1897 on the 25 July 1843 at St.Peter's Church of England, Richmond, New South Wales.
Following their wedding, Thomas and Eliza took up residence in the house in West Market Street, Richmond next door to the "Union Inn" where Thomas's parents were residing. There they conducted business as a butcher and baker. Their first child, a son whom they named John William, was born at Richmond on 8 March 1845, but by the time their second child was born in June 1847, they had left the Hawkesbury district and had taken up residence on the farm over the range at Bulga where Thomas had lived when a small boy. He had been given the farm by his father and took over the management from the overseer who had been in charge there.
When his parents had come to Bulga in 1826, the flats along the creek had been open forest country with large eucalypts and very little undergrowth, and therefore attractive grazing land The stream had been known as Cockfighter Creek then, but that name had given way to the aboriginal name - the Wollombi. The district had become known as Bulga, the aboriginal name for a mountain ridge just to the west. The Wollombi Valley had been and still was the territory of the Geawe-gal clan of aborigines. Their territory extended to the junction of the Wollombi Brook and the Hunter River, where it adjoined the most southerly of the Kamilaroi clans. Not much is known of how the Geawee-gal had reacted to the intrusion of the white men into their territory in the 1820's. It had been quite a populous clan then, and though depleted somewhat during the following twenty years, was still able to hold large bora ceremonies from time to time.
In 1848, not long after Thomas and Eliza had settled on their farm at Bulga, a family named CLARK arrived in the district and settled on the farm opposite them across the creek. It was part of the 1,500 acres that Joseph ONUS had purchased in 1825 and lay on the opposite side of the creek from the rest of his purchase. It had been inherited by Joseph ONUS Jnr and he had agreed to lease it to the CLARK's. Mrs CLARK promptly named it "Willow Farm", a name which it retained indefinitely. James Swales CLARK had been born in Yorkshire and his wife Elizabeth, nee McDONALD at Dalkeith in Scotland. They had married at Largs in Scotland in 1835 and had arrived in Sydney as immigrants in January 1843 with three young children. They had spent a while at "Glendon" on the Hunter River, getting experience in farming in New South Wales, and had then started farming at a place called Black Creek. It had been while James CLARK had been out looking for grass for his cattle during drought times, that he had first seen Bulga and found more grass there than anywhere else. By then two more children had been born to them. Over the years that followed Thomas and Eliza became very close friends with James and Elizabeth CLARK and their children grew up as fellow schoolmates at the local school. The farm of 100 acres on the western bank of Wollombi Brook remained the residence of Thomas and Eliza for the remainder of their lives. It was given the aboriginal name "Meerea", said to mean "Beautiful Mountain". The name has been retained down the years and was in use as recently as 1995. The Bulga community had increased in number over the years as more farms had been settled. Most of the folk living there were assigned convicts or ticket-of-leave men employed on the farms. Some of them had wives. The town of Singleton had sprung into being not many miles away. An increasing number of the local residents were cousins of Thomas. Important amongst them were Mary Ann and John EATON, who had been there since 1831, and Thomas's aunt and uncle, Susannah and William Glas McALPIN. Life was not as remote as it had been when Thomas's parents had lived there fifteen years before. Singleton offered services which had not been available a decade before. There was even a resident doctor there. Another five children were born to Eliza and Thomas during their first fifteen years on the farm, and all were born at Bulga. Unfortunately, three of them died in infancy. At "Meerea" Thomas grazed cattle and grew various vegetable and grain crops, and as was the custom on most of the farms, he developed an orchard. When the children became of school age they were able to receive formal education at a small school that John Eaton had established on his farm for Mr WAGSTAFF whom he employed to teach his and his neighbours' children. Eventually, when the little Church of England Church had been built, it was used as the school house. Mr WAGSTAFF was quite an identity in the district. He had been a London Bank Manager until drink had become his downfall. He had come to Australia to be away from his temptations if he could and was at home in the farming district. He used to board in turn about amongst the farmers in the neighbourhood, and those with children attending his school paid him what they could and did not charge him for his lodgings. Therefore he changed his lodgings every week or so. He was a true type of old English gentleman of the day, and always wore a black silk top-hat and a fine black cloth swallow-tail suit. He was kind and gentle to all and lived a reserved and quiet life. He owned a few good horses and loved hunting, probably because it reminded him of his younger days when he had ridden with the hounds. He taught little more than the three 'rs', but what he taught he taught thoroughly and many of his pupils became fine readers and writers. In 1850 Thomas and Eliza lost the EATON's as neighbours, when they left the district permanently and moved to the "Roseberry" cattle station which John had established on the Richmond River. William Glas McALPIN (known generally as Billy Mack) leased the EATON farm and the little school continued to operate. Mr WAGSTAFF often boarded with them. Gradually William McALPIN increased his landholdings by buying adjoining land from Thomas ONUS. It was not an unusual sight to see parties of aborigines moving along the creek during their daily hunting and gathering. Sometimes they fished in the waterholes and sometimes they camped temporarily nearby. In the district was one of their large bora rings where ceremonies were held from time to time. The year 1852 saw a great influx of visitors to the Bulga district. Over 500 aborigines from tribes far and near gathered at the local bora ring on the McALPIN farm for an initiation ceremony. Aboriginal bora ceremonies transcended tribal boundaries. When they were held every few years, tribes from over a wide area were invited to attend and kippas from all of them were initiated at each ceremony. The tribes took turn at holding the ceremonies, so it was only occasionally that any one bora ring was the site of the gathering. Tribes from as far away as Mudgee attended the ceremony at Bulga that year and it was well remembered by the white folk as it was the last great initiation held there. Needless to say, the white people and the aboriginal womenfolk were not allowed to witness all the rites that were involved in the ceremony. Nevertheless the local farmers were interested in seeing so many visitors gathered together and the event remained a vivid memory in the years that followed.

The children of Thomas EATHER and Eliza nee CROWLEY were:-

John William EATHER 1845 ? 1915 m. Harriet CLARK 1849-1928
Mary Jane EATHER 1847 ? 1847
Peter M EATHER 1849 ? 1851
Jane Charlotte EATHER 1851 ? 1897 m. Samuel PARTRIDGE 1850-1928
Alexander George EATHER 1859 ? 1859
Sarah Elizabeth EATHER 1861 ? 1923 m. Ashton CLARK 1844-1925


Alexander Munro 1812-1889 NSW

Alexander MUNRO was born in Ardersier in the Scottish Highlands, on the Moray Firth, east of Inverness, near Fort George, and Nairn,Scotland on the 18 July 1812 the son of George MUNRO and Isabel MAIN.

On the 3 September 1829 Alexander was transported for seven years, he had been sentenced the day before in Inverness, where the family had moved after the death of his father. Along with two other boys, Alexander robbed a grocery store.

He arrived with 200 other convicts onboard the ship, York on the 7 February 1831. Measuring only 5'3" tall, he could read and write and his occupation was given as a Farm Boy. Alexander was assigned to John BROWNE a settler of Patricks Plains.

Alexander gained his Certificate of Freedom in 1836 and soon began buying up depasturing licenses all around the Singletom Area.

On the 6 July 1838 the Reverend HERRINGTON at Whittingham married Alexander MUNRO to Sophia LOVELL 1812-1889, Sophia, a convict sentenced to seven years had come from Isle of Ely, Cambridgeshire, on the 'Diana', arriving in 1833.

Sophia and Alexander failed to have children of their own and in 1840 adopted 3year old Harriet. Harriet was the natural child of Thomas PHILLIPS and his wife Catherine.

Harriet 1837-1873 became known as Harriet MUNRO and married Walter COUSINS 1829-1904.

Alexander in 1839 began a successful carrying business in 1839 and with his depasturing licenses soon began to acquire wealth. In 1841 he built the Sir Thomas Mitchell Inn on the corner of Cambridge and George Streets in Singleton and managed several other hotels and began his mail coach service from Singleton.

In 1851 Alexander built Ness House in George St., Singleton which is still standing today and he replaced the old Sir Thomas Mitchell Inn with the large Caledonian Hotel. In the 1868 Rate Book it was stated as "two,story,brick iron roof,13 rooms". The Singleton Argus 9th November 1901 advertisement stated" 14 bedrooms, 2 dining rooms, 2 parlours, sample room,kitchen,bathroom, laundry, pantry, man's room, stables, 4 stalls, buggy house etc". It had a 73ft frontage to George St, 73ft to High St, and 332ft to Cambridge St. The sale was on account of Mrs R.H.LEVIEN his grandaughter Harriet Emma COUSINS 1860-1946

MUNRO began the 'Bebeah' Vineyard and his wines won more than 2000 prizes all over the world; more than 500 first prizes. He built his house 'Ardersier House' on the grounds of Bebeah.

Alexander MUNRO was elected the first mayor of Singleton in 1866, when Singleton became a municipality.

Alexander MUNRO was a good man with a big heart, always putting back into the community and always helping those less fortunate than himself. He was very much admired by both the wealthy and the not so wealthy.

When the council in 1884 was not interested in building a gas making plant themselves, they passed an act on the 16 May 1884, to allow him to build it himself thereby giving the town light. He then turned the plant over to the town at cost price.

He donated the land for the Glenridding Church and Cemetery, the Masonic Hall and was a huge benefactor in the building of the Singleton Grammer School. He was the founder of the Oddfellows Lodge and his Hunter River Building Society financed the building of a north wing on the hospital in John Street and gave money to the hospital. He had a beautiful fountain made in Glasgow and gave it to the Town

In 1878 Alexander Munro retired from politics and was given a large banquet by the town, he returned to Scotland with Sophia for a short holiday.

On the 2 February 1889 Alexander MUNRO died at Ardersier House. Two days later on the 4 All the shops in Singleton were closed at 1:00pm to allow the town to mourn in what was to be the largest ever funeral Singleton had ever seen. The cortege being a half a mile long.

Sophia followed on the 26 July 1889.

Alexander in his will left 6,000 to various lagacies and 500 to the Singleton Benevolent Society. All this from a man who had been transported for stealing groceries.

The Maitland Mercury paid homage to Alexander Munro with this stirring obituary
in their newspaper on the 5 September 1889

SINGLETON.

"DEATH OF MR. ALEXANDER MUNRO.The kind and sympathetic voice is
hushed for ever, and the noble eye will no longer speak the sentiments
of a heart that for three-quarters of a century was beating full of
truly Christian love.
Alexander Munro is no more-the Great Conqueror claimed him to join
the silent majority.
Singleton has lost one of its greatest citizens, and the colony,
a prominent philanthropist and one of Nature's gentlemen.
The sad event took place at the residence of the deceased,
Ardesier House, near Singleton, on Saturday, the 26th instant, at half-past
two o'clock in the afternoon. For more than a week all hope had been
abandoned by Mr. Munro's medical attendants, and it was only a
question of time when the end should come. During nearly the whole
of that period the deceased was in a comatose state, but when
consciousness returned at intervals he appeared to suffer much pain.
Life, however, ebbed gradually away until the last grain
had dropped out of the glass and a merciful Providence ended
the earthly troubles of our noble friend and fellow townsman.
Mr. Munro was born at Ardesier, Invernesshire, Scotland, in the
memorable year 1812, and arrived in the colony in 1831, and has
resid ed here ever since, with the exception of a trip to his native
land about 11 years ago.
Arriving here when quite young, he soon adapted himself to the
rough mode of life then prevailing in New South Wales, with that
readiness and endurance for which the national character of Caledonia's
sons has so eminently qualified them as the best colonizers in
the world.
One of his first ventures in Singleton was to build the Caledonia Hotel.
Having made some money at hotelkeeping, he subsequently took up stations
in the Liverpool Plains district, where he was squatting for many years.
In all his undertakings he was singularly prosperous, and wealth flowed
in from all sides.
About thirty years ago Mr. Munro, being fully convinced
that viticulture as an important industry would eventually take root
as an important industry in the valley of the Hunter, he started
to work with that determination and enterprise so characteristic of
the man, and having obtained a suitable piece of land-a portion of the
well-known Kelso estate, near Singleton-planted there the Bebeah vineyard,
now so famous throughout the length and breadth of the Australian colonies.
At an early period of the establishment of Bebeah, Mr. Munro
engaged the services of Mr. Mackenzie, under whose excellent management
Bebeah wines attained such a celebrity that at length
they appeared at the table of the gracious Sovereign who rules the
destinies of this great Empire. The late Emperor William of Germany also
patronised Bebeah wines, and expressed himsnlf in approving terms of
their excellent character.
As the demand for Bebeah wines was increasing at a rapid rate, in
order to add to the supply, Mr. Munro about a dozen years ago purchased
the adjoining Greenwood Vineyard from Mr. James Moore, and between
the two vineyards there are now about eighty acres in full bearing.
After purchasing the Greenwood Vineyard, Mr. Munro built there, on
an excellently elevated site, the residence where he ended his days.
When in England some eleven years ago, Mr. Munro ordered a gas plant
for Singleton, and, having subsequently got an Act passed through
Parliament, the gas works were established.
the first lamp in Burdekin Park being lit by Mr.James P. Quinn, then
Mayor of Singleton, in October, 1881.
Throughout his long residence in Singleton, Mr. Munro took an active
part in all public matters. On the establishment of the municipality
in the year 1867, he was elected the first mayor, and was twice re-elected
after wards, thus remaining in office for three years.
The subject of this notice took an active part in the establishment
of the Singleton and Patrick's Plains Benevolent Society some forty-five
years ago, and throughout that long period Mr. Munro was always, we believe,
on the Committee of Management,
He was subsequently for many years Vice-President of the Society,
and on the retirement of the late President, Mr. J. C. S. M'Douall,
Mr. Munro was elected as President, an office which he held up till
his death.
Mr. Munro's sympathetic disposition made him at all times take a
deep interest in the poor inmates of the Asylum and nothing gave him greater
delight than to provide an ample feast for the old men and women on holidays,
namely Christmas and New Year, Easter, and Queen's Birthday, etc.,
making it a point to be present at the meal and enjoying
the hearty manner in which the old people appreciated his kindness.
Many years ago Mr. Munro showed his deep interest in the welfare of
the Benevolent Society by giving a munificent donation of 1000 towards
completing the Benevolent Asylum in accordance with the original design
prepared by Mr. Rowe, architect, Sydney.
In order to recognize this noble act the people of Singleton determined
to perpetuate Mr. Munro's memory by erecting a marble bust of the
generous donor in that building, and the ceremony of unveiling it
was performed last year by Miss White, eldest daughter of the
Rev. Dr. J. S. White, in the presence of a large number of people;
the day having been made a half-holiday in Singleton.
Mr. Munro was an ardent Freemason, and took an active interest
in masonic affairs. He joined the first lodge established in Singleton
in the year 1864, and passed the chair, and remained in connection
with various lodges here ever since.
Some time ago he presented the brethren with an allotment of land
in a central position in John-street for the purpose of erecting
there on a Masonic Hall, and further contributed a donation of 100
towards the building fund.
Mr. Munro was also one of the founders of the Oddfellows' Lodge
in Singleton many years ago, and remained a consistent member till
his death.
He took great interest in the Northern Agricultural Association from
its establishment in the year 1868, and for several years was one
of the vice-presidents ot that society.
He was a liberal contributor to the funds of the Mechanics' Institute
and all public movements which in his opinion were worthy of support.
Quite recently he gave the handsomesum of 1000 to the funds of
St. Andrew's Presbyterian Church for the purpose of building
a new church ; but although a consistent supporter of the church of
his forefathers, he was at all times ready to support any calls made
upon him by other denominations, and his charitable feelings made no
distinction between creed or country : no poor man was ever turned
away from the door of good Alexander Munro without a crust of bread.
An instance of the genuine charitable character of Mr. Munro was
lately conveyed to us from a trustworthy source, and it may not be
out of place to give it here. It appears that when in Scotland
some 11 years ago he ascertained that some of his relatives were
rather reduced in circumstances, and in order to provide against
want for the rest of their lives he built four cottages, one for each,
and allowed each an annuity of 40 per annum, the money having been
remitted regularly since then.
All honor to the noble departed. May a glorious resurrection be his reward."


Singleton, 3rd February, 1889.




researched, written and transcribed
by janilye 1999


Family Note:

Thomas EATHER 1824-1909 established a vineyard which was soon producing wine grapes of good quality and Thomas sometimes sold Alexander grapes from his vineyard at "Meerea" to help his growing business. Family legend has it that his wife, Eliza nee CROWLEY threatened to leave Thomas if he persisted in selling grapes to MUNRO for his "immoral liquor trade". Faced with this threat, Thomas is said to have dug out his wine grapes and replaced them with table grapes. However later on the family again began to grow good wine grapes as you see here in Meerea Park Today
The photograph below taken in George Street, Singleton around 1900 shows The Caledonian Inn on the left and the horses drinking from Munro's fountain.


Stepney Alured Clarke 1839-1889 NSW

As a 10 year old, I recall sitting on Blaney railway station in the middle of the night waiting to change trains for Cowra, where I was a boarder at the school. I would sit on the hearth in the waiting room trying to keep warm by the a dying fire. Today, when I remember Blaney I remember thinking it was the coldest place on earth.
I've since found out that Blaney was also the scene of one of the most frightful suicides on record, which took place on Friday night 12 April 1889 at about a quarter to 8 o'clock.
Mr. Stepney Alured CLARKE, the council clerk, blew his head off with a charge of dynamite.
I believe, just as shocking, was the graphic detail in which the press of the day published the story.

A SHOCKING SUICIDE
BLAYNEY COUNCIL CLERK BLOWS HIS HEAD OFF WITH DYNAMITE.
[A brief telegraphic account has already appeared, but we take the following details from the S. E. News.] A special council meeting was to take place at 8 o'clock, and a finance meeting at half-past 7. When the finance meeting met they found the papers and everything on the table ready for the meeting, but the council clerk was outside conversing with Alderman Gillkrest. He shortly afterwards went into the council, but soon left again, and a very few minutes afterwards a report was heard which shook the Town Hall. The mayor and Alderman STINSON then went out, and on going at the back of the Town Hall they found the council clerk lying at the back of the hall with his head completely blown off and the skin and brains scattered all over the wall of the building. Some time after deceased's hat and a portion of his skull were found in the yard of the Commercial Bank, which adjoins the Town Hall. The report of the explosion caused as much excitement as though an earthquake had occurred, people running out in the streets in all directions, wondering what had taken place. It appears that a special council meeting was called in consequence of the last audit, just finished, showing a probable deficiency of about ?70, and it is supposed that the council clerk was endeavouring to get Alderman GILLKREST to assist him in his unpleasant position, and, having failed, he thus put an end to himself. After the unfortunate thing occurred Mr. BARRY, one of the auditors, received a letter through the post thanking him and the other auditors for their kind consideration and not blaming them at all. Alderman Gillkrest also received a letter enclosing the key of a box in the council chambers, stating it contained something belonging to Mr. BLOOD, a cousin of deceased. The box has not yet been opened. Though a diligent search has been made for the key of the safe it cannot be found anywhere. The explosion broke some windows in the vicinity. In addition to severing the head from the body, deceased's legs and one arm were broken. Deceased is well connected in England, and one of the oldest residents of this district, and this sad end has cast quite a gloom over the town. If the explosion had occurred in the council chambers of the Town Hall it is most likely the aldermen would have been blown to atoms. Crowds of people assembled to witness the horrible sight.]


2 comment(s), latest 3 years, 1 month ago

William CROUCHER 1833-1912

William CROUCHER the son of Robert CROUCHER and Mary Ann GAUNT was born in Ashford, Kent England on the 1 February 1833 and died at Gally Swamp later known as Gallymont on the 30 June 1912. He's buried at the Lyndhurst Church of England Cemetery.
William married Jane LUCKHURST in 1852 at Little Chart, Kent England. The children of William and Jane were:-
1.Charles CROUCHER b:11 JUly 1853 Kent, England d:18 June 1911 m. Anne GOODACRE 1855-1938 on 11 March 1878 at Carcoar, NSW

2.Ann CROUCHER b:1856 d:25 JUne 1886 m. Eugene SULLIVAN in 1877 at Wagga Wagga, NSW

3.William Edward aka Edward William CROUCHER b:1858 d: 8 August 1930 m. Eva Jane PETTS xxxx-1957 in 1906 at Cowra.

4.Frederick CROUCHER b: 28 August 1861 Roxburgh, NSW d:14 April 1917 Mary Ann DRADY 1865-1951 on the 29 April 1885 at Trunkey Creek, NSW


5.George CROUCHER b: 20 June 1864 Roxburgh, NSW d: 27 April 1901 Gallymont, NSW. m. Elizabeth DIGBY 1866-1931 at Gally Swamp on 29 December 1886

6.Harriett Alice CROUCHER 1866 ? m. Charles E LOCK on the 19 August 1891 at Trunkey Creek, NSW

7.Mary Jane CROUCHER 1869 d:xxxx m. Reuben DIGBY b: 1865 d: XXXX. in 1886 Carcoar

8.Caroline Elizabeth CROUCHER 1871 ? 1872

9.Sarah Elizabeth CROUCHER b: 17 March 1873 Trunkey Creek, NSW d:5 October 1954 m. John DIGBY b:1870 Mandurama, d:30 July 1930 at Carcoar, on 5 August 1896 at Carcoar.He was found in a dam with his throat cut. Inquest declared it suicide. They lived in Madurama.
John DIGBY was the son of John DIGBY 1840-1911 and Mary Anne PEARCE 1841-1911.
10. Alfred James CROUCHER 1876 ? m. Frances Margaret BERG 1878-1951
on the 17 October 1900 at Carcoar, NSW

John DIGBY (This is John Digby from Morpeth)was part of the HOMEWARD BOUND Gold Mining Company of Gally Swamp, at one time lodged a cake of gold weighing 102oz with the City Bank. The result of crushing 45 tons of stone from the Homeward Bound Reef.

The following article from the Bathurst Free Press and Mining Journal
18 July 1893
.
GALLEY SWAMP.
Carcoar, Friday.
John Digby and party have discovered a very rich reef at Galley Swamp. Some specimens exhibited by them yesterday were literally spangled with gold.
Digby worked on the same lease 14 years ago, but afterwards abandoned it. Several claims on these diggings are in full swing, and mining operations appear very promising.



The image below is Belubla Street, Carcoar, in 1885. The Post Office on the right was built in 1879, it still stands and today is used for tourist accommodation.


John TREMILLS 1778-1862

This is just one TREMILLS family decending from Nathaniel TREMILLS 1709-1785 living on the lands of Widecombe In The Moor, Devon, England.

John TREMILLS, the son of Richard TREMILLS 1745-1782 and Jane KIVIL 1753-1805 was born at Widecombe In The Moor, Devon in 1778 and died there in 1862. To date I have only found one sister to John TREMILLS being Phillipa 1773-1814.
John TREMILLS married Elizabeth HAMLYN 1783-1846 on the 25 September 1803 at Widecombe In The Moor, Devon.

The children of this marriage all born at Widecombe In The Moor were:-
Mary Tremills 1804
Nicholas Tremills 1805
John Tremills 1807
Elizabeth Tremills b:1811 and died 18 August 1904 Melbourne, Victoria. Married Robert Roger NANKIVELL 1811-1904
Ann Tremills 1813
Susan Tremills 1815
Martha Tremills 1818
Avis Tremills 1820 - 1844
William Tremills 1823 - 1850
Richard Tremills 1826 - 1871

Information Regarding North Hall.

1800 - North Hall and North Hall Mills, part of Wootons Lands leased from Lord Ashburton 1800-1833

1803 - Richard Barre Dunning, let to John and Elizabeth Tremills, the North Hall Mills, Field and Garden.
1817 - Richard Barre Dunning let to John Tremills, the North Hall Mills and Garden.

5 comment(s), latest 2 years, 10 months ago