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Matilda Sarah EATHER 1858-1941

Matilda Sarah EATHER, the sixth child and third daughter of Charles EATHER 1827-1891 and Eliza nee HOUGH 1825-1870, was born at North Richmond on 28 April 1858 and baptised at St Peter's Church, Richmond on 9 June 1858. She was still a small girl when her family moved to "Henriendi". On 23 November 1880 she married Alexander Munro COUSINS at Muswellbrook. Alexander Munro COUSINS had been born in 1853, the son of Walter COUSINS and his wife Harriet (nee MUNRO).

Walter COUSINS had been born in 1829 at Heytesbury, Wiltshire, England and had married Harriet MUNRO at Bathurst, New South Wales in 1853. Harriet was the foster/adopted daughter of Alexander MUNRO 1812-1889 and his wife Sophia, nee LOVELL 1812-1889. Her 'father', Alexander MUNRO 1812-1889 , the first Mayor of Singleton, had been born at Campbelltown in Scotland on 18 July 1814, the son of George MUNRO and Isobel MAIN. He had arrived in New South Wales in 1831 and had purchased land in Singleton and had become an hotel-keeper. In due course he had engaged in a number of pastoral investments in the north-west of the colony and became quite wealthy. He built a fine home at Singleton and named it "Ardersier House", and by the time his grandson married Matilda Sarah he was involved in grape growing and wine-making on a large scale.

During the 1880's Matilda and Alexander had four sons: Glencairn, born in 1883 at Patrick's Plains (Singleton); Royston, born 1885 at Patrick's Plains; Alexander, born 1887 at Muswellbrook; and Ardarsier, born 1889 at Singleton. Patrick's Plains was the original name for the Singleton district, so from the birthplaces of their children we can gather that Matilda and her husband resided in the Hunter Valley until at least the year 1890. The youngest of their four sons was named after his great-grandfather's home Singleton.

In their later years Matilda and Alexander resided at Narrabri. They both died there, Alexander in 1923 and Matilda in 1941. Their son Royston had died in infancy. Sons Glencairn and Ardersier both married during the 1920's.
Children from this marriage were:

Glencairn Munro COUSINS was born in 1883 in Patricks Plain, Singleton, NSW, Australia and died in 1941 in Mosman, Sydney, NSW, Australia at age 58.
Glencairn married Ruby Ada Beryl DUNSTAN in 1924 in Quirindi, NSW, Australia.

Royston C COUSINS was born in 1885 in Patricks Plain, Singleton, NSW, Australia and died in 1885 in Newtown, Sydney, NSW, Australia.

Alexander Munro COUSINS was born in 1887 in Muswellbrook, NSW, Australia and died in 1946 in Narrabri, NSW, Australia at age 59.
Alexander married Marjorie Agnes R TOWNSEND (b. 1907) in 1941 in Manly, Sydney, NSW, Australia.

Ardersier Munro COUSINS was born on 3 Oct 1889 in Singleton, NSW, Australia and died on 10 Dec 1963 at age 74.
Ardersier married Gladys Elvina DENNE (b. 1892, d. 1961) on 12 May 1921 in Sydney, NSW, Australia.

Harriet Munro's birth parents were Thomas and Catherine Phillips
V1837521 121A/1837 PHILLIPS HARRIET THOMAS CATHERINE
Thomas and Catherine Phillips had two other children Thomas 1838 and Mary A 1839 I have not researched this Phillips Family

Alexander Munro had no biological children


Irish Naming Patterns

These are the Irish naming patterns.

These rules are generally followed.

The 1st son was usually named after the father's father

The 2nd son was usually named after the mother's father

The 3rd son was usually named after the father

The 4th son was usually named after the father's eldest brother

The 5th son was usually named after the mother's eldest brother

The 1st daughter was usually named after the mother's mother

The 2nd daughter was usually named after the father's mother

The 3rd daughter was usually named after the mother

The 4th daughter was usually named after the mother's eldest sister

The 5th daughter was usually named after the father's eldest sister

The Scots and English are similiar. This pattern may help when looking for possible forenames of ancestors.

In Ireland if the first wife dies and the man remarries, the first daughter born to the second wife is named after his deceased first wife.


1 comment(s), latest 5 years, 8 months ago

Elijah PLUCKNETT from Queen Camel to Wollongong NSW


6 comment(s), latest 3 months, 3 weeks ago

Doctor Frances DICK Australia

I'm seeking information about the family of Frances DICK

born between 1866 and 1870

Dr Frances Dick graduated from London School of Medicine for Women and the University of Ireland. She was not a graduate of Sydney University as written in pencil on the back of this photograph.

Her qualifications included: LSA (London) 1891 and MB Ba Surg, Royal University of Ireland

Appears on the 1891 Census of England and Wales, as boarding with James Main and family at Marlybone, London

1892. She was the first woman to practise medicine in New South Wales preceding Dr M A Corliss by a few months. She was registered on 13 January, 1892.

1893. Practiced as a surgeon at 195 Elizabeth St. Sydney

Left from Sydney for Germany on the 'Gulf of Genoa' on the 18 December 1899

[Dame Mary Gilmore described her: "when everyone else was dressed in floral or other soft materials, Dr Dick wore tailormade tweeds as like a mans, without aping man, as possible.' It is thought she later went to Germany to become a specialist where she died." ]

According to the Loxtons Medical Directory of Australia in 1900 Dr Dick is not listed

The reference attached to the photograph below which was taken in 1892 by J Hubert Newman at 12 Oxford St, Sydney held by the State Library of NSW

REFERENCE:
Hutton Neve, M. This mad folly : the history of Australia's pioneer women doctors, Library of Australian History, Sydney 1980 p. 145
Contents
Dr Dick wears a bachelor's cap and gown with no hood


Contributing Creator
Photographer's stamp lower edge of mount
Signatures / Inscriptions
"Dr. Dick, / First Lady Doctor / Syd. Univ.?" -- in pencil on the reverse
General Note
Transferred from P1/Dick, Dr. (BM), January 2010

Copying Conditions Copyright expired - created before 1955


The missing 1890 US census records

In answer to an email I received yesterday.

On 10 January 1921 a fire and water damage from the subsequent efforts to extinguish the fire destroyed and damaged much of the 1890 US Census. Although several groups lobbied to begin salvage attempts, they could not get the money appropriated. From 1922 through 1932 there is little history on the storage and use of the 1890 census schedules.

[In 1932, the Chief Clerk of the Bureau of Census sent the Librarian of Congress a list of papers no longer necessary for business. The Librarian was not asked to report back with any documents that should be retained for their historical interest. On the Chief Clerk's list for the Bureau of the Census was "Schedules, Population . . . 1890, Original." The Librarian identified no records as permanent, and Congress authorized destruction.]

The actual date of destruction was probably sometime in 1935.

In 1942 during a move of the Census Bureau the National Archives came across a damaged bundle of Illinois schedules. It was thought that they were the only surviving fragments. However, in 1953, more fragments were found.

These fragments are from Alabama, Georgia, Illinois, Minnesota, New Jersey, New York, North Carolina, Ohio, South Dakota, Texas, and the District of Columbia. There are no fewer than 6,160 names indexed on the surviving 1890 population schedules
If anyone can get hold of it, the National Archives in their quarterly magazine 'Prologue" in 1996 published the full details of this sad tale.

The surviving 1890 schedules which can be viewed on ancestry,com provide the address, number of families in the house, number of persons in the house, and number of persons in the family. Individuals are listed by name; whether a soldier, sailor, or marine during the Civil War; and whether Union or Confederate or whether the widow of a veteran; relationship to head of family; whether white, black, mulatto, quadroon, octoroon, Chinese, Japanese, or Indian; sex; age; marital status; whether married during the year; if a mother, number of children and number living; place of birth of the individual and his or her father and mother; if foreign born, how many years in the United States; whether naturalized or in the process of naturalization; profession, trade, or occupation; months unemployed during census year; ability to read and write; ability to speak English; if not, language or dialect spoken; whether suffering from acute or chronic disease (if so, name of disease and length of time afflicted); whether defective in mind, sight, hearing, or speech; or whether crippled, maimed, or deformed (with name of defect); whether a prisoner, convict, homeless child, or pauper; whether the home is rented or owned by the head or a member of the family (if so, whether mortgaged); if the head of family was a farmer, if he or a family member rented or owned the farm; and, if mortgaged, the post office address of the owner.


2 comment(s), latest 5 years, 7 months ago

Standards For Sharing Genealogy Information With Others


9 comment(s), latest 5 years, 6 months ago

John W Taylor from Nantucket to Port Fairy in Victoria

I've just begun research on John Taylor and would appreciate some help from anybody who may have some clue as to his ancestry.

I have been told, John was a runaway slave who made his way to Nantucket around the 1850s He took a job on one of the Whalers which made it's way to Bass Strait between Tasmania and Victoria, Australia. John Taylor must have made quite a bit of money at the job because he settled in Port Fairy and built a very grand hotel named 'The Star of the West' in 1856, which still stands today.
He married and his decendants continued to run the hotel and live in the Port Fairy district. From oral history I have heard that John Taylor never complained about his time on the vessel and was paid the same money as a white man and treated fairly by his captain. In Port Fairy he was very well liked and respected. That's about all I do know, and so it seems, does anybody else know.

I know about Nantucket,the whalers, the runaway slaves and Port Fairy and the Whaling industry. It's just John Taylor I'm interested in.


1 comment(s), latest 5 years, 8 months ago

Last name: SMITH