janilye on Family Tree Circles

sort: Date Alphabetical
view: full | list

Journals and Posts


Thomas Eather 1843-1900

Thomas Eather born 3 December 1843 at Cockfighters Creek on the Hawkesbury was the son of Mary Hedges alias DONOVAN 1807-1880 the widow of Samuel HEATHER/EATHER.

He first married Jane BARNETT the daughter of Thomas BARNETT b:1820 and Catherine DENAHY b:1824 in Mallow,County Cork, Ireland. d:16 August 1918 Mudgee,NSW.
Jane Barnett was born on the 6 October 1845 at Cassilis, NSW and died on the 29 October 1932 at Whittingham near Singleton.

Jane was a nurse/midwife who had trained under Dr.BOWMAN at Fairholme.

Thomas and Jane were married on 26 July 1865 at Warkworth and had 12 children.
They were;

1.Catherine EATHER b:15 October 1864 at Patricks Plain and sadly died of burns when her clothes caught fire on 2 August 1867

2.Thomas EATHER b:4 March 1866 died 1929 Married Selina Jane SCANLAN (1864-1950) at Narrandera in 1888
.
3.Isabella EATHER b:3 January 1871 d: 1947 Annandale. Isabella married John J SCOTT in 1895.

4.Charles Herbert EATHER b:28 March 1872 d:28 March 1942 at Moree Charles married Minnie BEITZ (1889-1941)in Queensland on 11 October 1905.

5.Clara Jane EATHER b: 1 November 1872 d:1957 at Burwood in Sydney

6.Walter John EATHER b: 19 April 1875 d:23 January 1876

7.William Henry EATHER b:22 March 1876 d:11 June 1947 at Pallamalla William married Mildred QUINN (1883-1966) at Moree in 1903

8.Ada Mary EATHER b:12 December 1877 d:1935 at North Sydney.

9.Emily Ann EATHER b:25 June 1879 d:25 January 1959 Emily married Henry ASQUITH

10.Elizabeth Catherine EATHER b:13 November 1880 at Goorangoola d:7 February 1936 at Leichhardt Elizabeth married Arthur Edward BRUCE b:1880. on 6 March 1905 at Singleton

11.James Ernest Eather b:30 March 1882 d:14 September at Mayfield near Newcastle NSW James Married Mabel May ALLEN 1880-1954 at Singleton in 1905.

12.Percy Richard EATHER b:15 August 1883 d:3 February 1957. Percy first married Anne Paterson ANDREW 1884-1906 at Singleton on 12 July 1904. Ann died in childbirth. His second wife was Madeline Sarah BALDOCK 1881-1948 in 1907 'Percy' was a very well known taxi driver in Singleton for many years.

Thomas EATHER 1843-1900 committed suicide in Sydney he is buried at Whittingham Cemetery, Section 1 Plot 25.

Irish Research

RESEARCHING YOUR IRISH ROOTS

Hopefully these sites will offer you a pathway to finding your Irish Ancestor.

P R O N I Public Records Office of Northern Ireland

GENUKI: Ireland for information related to all of Ireland

Irish Genealogy Exploring your Irish family history, step-by-step

Church records in Ireland.
The church records preserve details of the baptisms, marriages and burials which took place within a particular parish, church or congregation and were usually compiled by the relevant clergyman.

There is a great degree of variation in the level of detail contained within these records. Indeed over a period of one hundred years or more there can be considerable variation even within a single parish, church or congregation. In general, baptism records record the date of the baptism; the names of the child, the parents and the names of the childs sponsors or godparents. The family address and the name of the clergyman may also be recorded.

Marriage records generally record the date of the marriage, the names of the spouses and witnesses. Other information such as the names of the spouses parents, residences of the spouses, ages, occupations and the name of the clergyman may also be recorded.

Burial records usually contain very limited information, often no more than the date of burial, the name and address and possibly, the age of the deceased. Unlike their counterparts in the Roman Catholic Church, the majority of Church of Ireland clergy tended to record burial details.In relation to burial records the following is a quote taken from the Irish Ancestry section on the Irish Times on-line. The keeping of (RC) burial records was much less thorough than in the Church of Ireland, with fewer than half the parishes in the country having a register of burials before 1900; even where they do exist, these records are generally intermittent and patchy. For some reason, almost all Catholic burial registers are for the northern half of the island.

Occasionally the records may also contain further comment such as the names of additional witnesses or details of subsequent events pertaining to one of the parties


National Library of Ireland

Irish Medals The site covers medals awarded to people who fought in wars in Ireland and in conflicts around the world. The site also covers other interesting collectables relating to Irish people involved in various conflicts.


Roll of Honour For Irishmen who lost their lives while serving with the Royal Navy during World War 1. Listed are those who gave their place of birth as Ireland when enrolling into the navy. The Roll contains the names of those who died serving at home and throughout the world.

Cain Web Site from the University of Ulster. This lists all things related to the conflicts in Northern Ireland from 1968 including all those killed. Also a section of the CAIN Web site contains a selection of digital versions of public records that are held by Public Record Office of Northern Ireland (PRONI). The records selected by CAIN are ones which relate to the conflict and politics in the region. The records mainly cover the period 1968 to 1980. The records have been made available on CAIN with the permission of the Deputy Keeper of the Records at PRONI. This section was launched on 6 October 2010 and updated on 7 April 2011


Rootweb offer an excellent guide to Irish Genealogy

For Irish Clans and Surnames
About.Com Genealogy hold lots of information.

For the Australian gateway site for tracing your family history by Cora Num go to Ireland

Irish Convicts to NSW 1788-1849 from Peter Mayberry

Free Ireland Ancestor Search!
Access multiple free Irish genealogy databases online.
Search Ireland

Emerald Ancestors

On the Genealogy links.net site try Passenger lists to Australia

The State Records of Western Australia for
Passenger Indexes
Passenger & Crew Lists
Convict Arrivals
Other Passenger Records
Travellers
Immigration
Immigration Schemes
Child Migration
Naturalisation

Ireland to North America offers Emigration Lists from Irish Ports to North America
Passenger Lists from Ireland

Roman Catholic Parishes in Ireland

Records which have been destroyed/no longer exist

Unfortunately, some important records are no longer in existence mainly due to:
Fire in the Four Courts, Dublin, 1922.

The destruction of the Public Record Office of Ireland in the Four Courts, Dublin (as the result of a fire during civil disturbance in 1922) left a considerable gap in the archival heritage of Northern Ireland. Many important records were lost, including:
The census returns from 1821 to 1851
A small number of volumes survived, covering parts of Co. Fermanagh and Cavan in 1821; parts of Co. Londonderry and for Killeshandra Parish in County Cavan for 1831; and for parts of County Antrim for 1851. These are available in PRONI under the main reference number MIC/5A. Extracts from the 1841 and 1851 census returns can be found in the Old Age Pension books those for Northern Ireland are in PRONI under the main reference number T/550 see Your Family Tree Leaflet 5 - Census Records (19th Century) (27KB) for further details.

Pre-1858 original wills, administration bonds and marriage licence bonds
Although the original wills, administration bonds and marriage licence bonds were destroyed, indexes survived in manuscript and printed form. Those for the dioceses covering Northern Ireland are available in PRONI - it is therefore possible to extract some details about individuals from these indices. Copies of many destroyed wills can also be found in various privately deposited archives.

Church of Ireland parish records
The records of 1,006 Church of Ireland parishes, originally deposited in the Public Record Office of Ireland in Dublin, were largely destroyed in 1922. However, most of those relating to Northern Ireland (and several from the Republic of Ireland) that survived are available in PRONI either on microfilm or in original form. Those surviving for the majority of parishes in the Republic of Ireland can be accessed at the National Archives of Ireland in Dublin.

The destruction of census records by Government order
Census returns covering the whole island of Ireland for the years 1861-1891 were destroyed by order of the Government on grounds of confidentiality.


4 comment(s), latest 2 years, 10 months ago

Data Accuracy for Shipping Records to Australia

Often, the source material for arrivals and departures contain different dates for the same event. This can be confusing and it is difficult to determine which date is the correct one. Even the official records held by the archive organisations have differences in the dates from one record to the next for the same vessel.

Besides an outright transcription error by a clerk, there can be significant variations in the records as to the dates of departure and arrival due to the viewpoint of the source of the information. For example, a vessel sailing into harbour at 11:00 pm will have the current day's date in the ship's log, but the harbourmaster might record the event in the next day's arrivals, especially for those vessels arriving on a Sunday.

Similarly, some papers might record the event two or three days later, when the captain and crew have landed. Other papers might record the date that the vessel sailed into the heads, dropped anchor, or cleared quarantine.

For the earlier periods, the dates from newspapers are sometimes open to interpretation. For example, the dates in the Sydney Gazette for the first two weeks of May 1804 are out by a day (it appears that they allowed 31 days for April), although the day of the week was correct. This means that there is some question as to the reported dates for vessels arriving and departing during this period.

Another issue is that many of the entries are listed by day (ie, Monday, Thursday, etc), not date. Although this was common in the early period, it still occurred occasionally in the 1840's.

The dates used in the Convictions database come from many sources. The determining factor in the date used is based on the likely accuracy of the source material. In most cases, I have relied on the dates found in the "Shipping Gazette and Sydney General Trade List", as this periodical was specifically published for the distribution of shipping information and is more likely to contain the correct information.

For ports other than Sydney, or those periods when the Shipping Gazette was not in circulation, I tend to favour the details provided by local newspapers, when they are available.

When looking for vessels in indexes using the date, the user should remember that some entries do not include a day or month. This means that the user should also check entries at the beginning of the month and the beginning of the year when looking for entries.

There is an additional problem with some coastal shipping. In the 1830's, many of the arrivals and departures for these vessels were listed with a date range, not the actual date of arrival. In these cases, the vessels are listed either at the start of the date range, or at the beginning of the month, depending on the information available.

The handwritten official records can at times be very difficult to read and interpret. This is due to both the clerk's handwriting and the fading of the ink used. Because of this, there are often several interpretations possible for the material being transcribed. Often, the correct interpretation is only possible with outside knowledge, such as knowing that a person was on a particular vessel.

Elizabeth Lee 1771-1860

The daughter of William L LEE born at Portscatha, Cornwall, England in 1744 and died in England in 1827. Her Mother was Margaret born in 1750 in England. A birth name or a death date has not been found for Margaret.
Elizabeth LEE was born on 7 September 1771 and christened at Cocky Moor Presbyterian Church, Ainsworth Lancashire on the 15 September 1771. In the cemetery adjoining the Cocky Moor church there is one grave marked 'Lee' with, unfortunately no other information.

In 1789 when Elizabeth LEE ( sometimes known as Elizabeth Johnson) was about 17, she was employed by Elizabeth BUCKLEY as either a domestic servant or shop assistant.

On 4 December of that year Elizabeth LEE was arrested and committed by T H BAILEY for trial on the charge of "having stolen and carried away a grey cloak out of the dwelling house of Elizabeth BUCKLEY of Manchester".

The trial was at the Epiphany Quarter Sessions at Manchester 21 January 1790 - "Indictment charges that Elizabeth LEE late of the Parish of Manchester in the said County Singlewoman on the thirtieth day of November in the thirtieth year of the reign of our Lord George the third now King of Great Britain and so forth with force and Arms at the Parish aforesaid in the County aforesaid one Woman's Cloak to the value of six pence of the proper Goods and Chattels of one Elizabeth BUCKLEY then and there being found feloniously did steal and take and carry away against the Peace of our said Lord the King his Crown and Dignity" - sentence 7 years.

The trial was reported in the Manchester Mercury newspaper.
Elizabeth LEE pleaded guilty to the charge.

Elizabeth LEE was returned to the goal in the Lancaster Castle and incarcerated there until February 1791. She was then conveyed from Lancaster to the ship "Mary Ann" at Gravesend on the Thames River.

The ship sailed to Portsmouth under the command of Captain MUNRO and departed from there for the voyage to the NSW Colony 23 February 1791. She arrived in Sydney on 7 July 1791.
Elizabeth LEE was probably transferred on arrival to Parramatta.She completed her sentence in 1797.

Elizabeth LEE married Thomas EATHER formerly HEATHER 1764-1827 in 1791. They had eight children.

1.Ann EATHER 1793 1865 m.(1)Joseph ONUS 1782-1835 (2) William SHARP 1810-1897
2.Robert EATHER 1795 1881 m. (1)Mary LYNCH 1802-1853 (2) Elizabeth BROWNE nee CREAGH 1802-1873
3.Charlotte EATHER 1797 1862 m. (10 Joseph WINDSOR (2)Robert WILLIAMS 1795-1839 (3) William James MALONEY 1818-1883
4.Charles EATHER 1800 1891 m. Ann GOUGH nee CAIN 1797-1871
5.Thomas EATHER 1800 1886 m. Sarah MCALPIN 1805-1884
6.John EATHER 1804 1888 Never Married
7.Rachel EATHER 1807 1875 m. John NORRIS 1803-1864
8.James EATHER 1811 1899 m. Mary Ann HAND 1815-1894

Thomas EATHER died on the 22 March 1827 at Windsor, New South Wales.

Elizabeth Died on the 11 June 1860 at Richmond, New South Wales.

The number of her decendants was reckoned at that time to be 157.

St.Peter's Pew Prices-Richmond, New South Wales,

Back in the olden days you didn't just walk into church and sit down. No! a fee was paid to be comfy at church. Church on Sunday was the place to be seen and meet up with neighbours. Now, to have a pew you were definetly one of the IN crowd. The pews were more expensive and came with a certain prestige. The benches were not as comfortable but were half price. The women prefered to sit at the back with the clergyman and his family. And no doubt a better view.

By paying the rental it mean't that certain seats were reserved for you and your family. If you didn't pay you stood.

On the 14th June 1841 St. Peter's Church of England,in Richmond, New South Wales, held a meeting to establish their pew rates, which they set at 10 shillings per year, per seat in a pew, a pew sat 8 people. A bench was 5 shillings a year. The clergyman and his family were allowed to sit free. These rates seem to have been open to some negotiation because Mr. FAITHFULL paid 2 pounds 10 for his 8 seats, whereas John TOWN Jnr. paid the same for only 5 seats. Mr. COX of Hobartville paid 4 pounds for 8 seats.

Here is a list from St.Peters church of the pew holders.

NAME

Mr Cox of Hobartville
Mr. Faithfull
Mr.George Bowman
Mr. William Bowman
Mr. John Town Jnr.
Mr T. Sharpe
Mr George Pitt
Mr A. Cornwell
Mr. Joseph Onus
Mr. George Guest
Messrs. Potts and Harland
Mr. Thomas Eather
Mr. Isaac Cornwell
Messrs. Cribbs and Watts
Messrs. Paine, Oxley and Richards
Mrs. Aston
Messrs. Crawley and Markwell
Messrs. Bainer and Hogsflesh
Mr.& Mrs. Faucet, Messrs. Bannister, McGraw
and Preston
Mrs. Dight
Mrs Towns
Mrs. Teiginour
Clergyman and Family
Mrs. Bell of Belmont

This list was transcribed from "St.Peter's Richmond" the early people and burials" by Yvonne Browning

SWALE of Swale Hall

The following information is for those who are interested in the surname Swale, Swale Hall and Swaledale in Yorkshire.

The owners of Swale Hall have told us that the building as it is today dates back to the mid 16th century and that there are no visible signs of the original Swale Hall.

Walter de Gaunt became the first Lord of Swaledale; he had married Matilda the daughter of the Breton Earl of Richmond. Matilda's father gave her the whole of Swaledale as a dowry. Walter then subsequently gave the Manor of West Grinton to his nephew Alured, who adopted the surname Swale after the name of the river Swale. Swale Hall remained in the possession of this Swale family and their descendants until the days of Queen Anne. The most distinguished of this Swale family was probably Solomon Swale, a barrister, who became Member of Parliament for Aldborough, which is near Boroughbridge, North Yorkshire. This Solomon was created a baronet in 1660 and is buried at St. Martins-in-the-Fields in London. Sir Solomon Swale, the third baronet and grandson of the Solomon above, failed to renew the lease of the main part of the Swale estate and this resulted in Swale Hall being sold by auction. Sir Solomon the third baronet died in a debtors prison in 1733.

There is a pedigree titled "Pedigree of the Blood of Sir Solomon Swale, of Swale Hall, in the County of York, who was created a baronet, ad 1660." Along the foot of this pedigree is written, "Vouched- G.H.De.S.N.Plantagenet Harrison (Signed)." This pedigree may well have been prepared when the Reverend Sir John Swale, the 7th Baronet claimed the title, which had been dormant after the death of the fifth Baronet. This pedigree begins an A.D 800 with Syderic, Count of Harlebeck, Governor & Hereditary Forester of Flanders. A.D.800. It then gives Engelran? Count of Harlebeck, Governor & Hereditary Forester of Flanders. A.D 814. It then gives Odoacre, Count of Harlebeck, Governor & Hereditary Forester of Flanders. A.D 850. It would take too long to give the pedigree up to 1873 but because the pedigree was vouched by G.H.De.S.N.Plantagenet Harrison makes it dubious.

George.H.De.S.N.Plantagenet Harrison wrote a one volume History of Yorkshire that was published in London in 1879 and there is a note on the library index card in the Leeds reference library in Yorkshire that this history of Yorkshire is now considered to be semi-fictitious. It would appear that those who are familiar with any written work by George.H.De.S.N.Plantagenet Harrison consider his work as semi-fictitious and this applies to the pedigree of the blood of Sir Solomon Swale.

John Eaton 1811-1904

John Eaton 1811-1904 Son of
William Eaton 1769-1858 and Jane Ison LLoyd 1770-1823
Mary Ann Onus 1813-1897 daughter of Joseph Onus 1782-1835 and Ann Elizabeth Eather 1793-1865

Not long after John Eaton married Mary Ann at St.Matthews, Windsor on the 17th of January 1831, they too moved to the Hunter River district as a prelude to more distant interests. John Eaton and his brother Daniel, rode in 1836 to the vicinity of the present town of Inverell and in the same area, closer to the modern town of Moree, Daniel Eaton established at that time his "Binniguy" run on the Gwydir river. John was spending little time at home in his restless search for land. Mary Ann had only one child between 1833 and 1837.

In 1844 the family moved to the Roseberry Run on the Richmond River and ten years later there was yet another wholesale removal, this time to "Teebar", a consolidated property of 58,000 acres, near Maryborough in Queensland. John leased Teebar from Henry Cox Corfield in 1849 and later in 1854 Corfield transfered the property to John Eaton. Henry Cox Corfield's wife Jessie, nee MURRAY 1824-1853 had died in 1853 and he was so affected he felt he could not live on the property again.

John was keen to send the family by ship to Queensland, along with the furniture and personal possessions. However, Mary Ann insisted that the family go overland with him, and family records indicate that it was just as well she did, as the vessel carrying their possessions to Wide Bay was wrecked and all their belongings lost. Life at Teebar was made very difficult by the frequent and determined onslaughts of the aborigines but the area was gradually pacified and the station extended.

John became Mayor of Maryborough in his time there while holding a position on many projects and public establishments.
In 1869 with his son-in-law, the husband of Mary Ann Elizabeth, Walter HAY, John bought a paddle Steamer named "Sir John Young". This vessel was used on the Mary River as a tug, towing loads of sugar cane to the mills.


On one of the later acquisitions, Eatonvale, in 1859, John Eaton built a palatial residence, set overlooking the Mary river. Built from home-made clay bricks and fitted with beautiful rich cedar from James Eather's farm at Dorrigo. He named the home 'Rosehill' and it came complete with ballroom, and on one occasion the Governor of Queensland stayed there when visiting Maryborough.

You can visit Rosehill and tour this beautiful homestead, and still, today in the grounds is the original well, the washouse complete with it's copper. And attached to the washhouse are 'his' and 'her' thunderboxes.

John Eaton owned many properties in the Wide Bay area, he died on 19 June 1904, at Brooweena, Queensland,Australia at age 93
His grave is close to the Teebar homestead at Brooweena in Queensland, Australia

The Brisbane Courier, Tuesday 21 June 1904
DEATH OF AN OLD RESIDENT.

Mr. John Eaton, proprietor of Teebar and other stations in this district, died at the residence of his son-in-law. Mr. R Maitland, of Westwood, on Sunday. The deceased was the oldest pioneer in the district, and was 94 years of age. He was born at Richmond Bottoms, Maitland district, New South Wales. in the year 1810, and leaves some hundreds of descendants, down to tho fifth generation.


Obituary of John Eaton

The Maryborough Chronicle - Tuesday 21st June, 1904


The duty has at last fallen upon us to record with deep regret the death of that splendid old pioneer settler of the Wide Bay district Mr. John Eaton the Squire of Teebar Station at the grand old age of 94 years. The venerable gentleman had only been ailing for a short time and died quietly and peacefully at Westwood the residence of his Son-in-law Mr. Richard Maitland on Sunday night June 19th. Mr. Eaton was in every sense of the word a splendid colonist and one that not merely the district but all Australia might well be proud of. Born at Richmond Bottoms in the Maitland district it is questionable whether any older born Australian colonists were alive at his death. As a boy he worked in Sydney and afterwards had a hard life up country, farming and cattle breeding. About 44 years ago he took up Teebar run and arrived there overland with his wife and family from New South Wales. He had resided there ever since with the exception of some time spent in Maryborough in the early sixties. During his long occupation of Teebar Mr. Eaton carried on grazing pursuits most successfully. He also invested largely in Maryborough property, and was one of the founders of the once famous Eatonvale sugar plantation and factory. In the earlier days Mr. Eaton took a most active interest in the public affairs of Maryborough. He was one of our first aldermen and was the second Mayor of the town succeeding Mr. Henry Palmer our first Mayor, who is still happily with us, in 1861 and holding office to the end of term in 1862. Our esteemed old citizen Mr. C. E. S. Booker was also a member of that first council, and now that Mr. Eaton has gone, he and Mr Palmer alone remain of the original body of aldermen who laid the municipal foundations of the town. I he present council induced Mr. Eaton a year or so ago to have his photograph taken and his portrait now adorns the gallery of past Mayors in the Municipal chamber. Mr. Eaton was a man of fine physique in his prime and enjoyed an iron constitution, hardened by a very rough bush life in his early days. For many years past he had been famed for his wonderfully sustained vitality and energy. At 90 he could go out on his horse all day and muster stock with the best of them; and even up to two years ago it was his habit to ride about and look after his affairs very keenly. His was a green and vigorous old age almost to the last. He had a family of one son and eight daughters, and at the time of his death he was the head of several hundred descendants down to Great-Great- Grand children. Of his family, Mrs. Eaton died about eleven years ago and the only son William at the same time, Two daughters, Mrs. George Walker and Mrs. Hayes also predeceased him by some years. The surviving daughters are Mrs. Thompson, Mrs. G. Thomas (Clifton), Mrs. Gordon, Mrs R. G. Gilbert, Mrs Maitland and Mrs. Ezzy most of who reside in the district and in the neighbourhood of Teebar with their children and their children's children to the fifth generation, an excellent group of settlers on the land, and primary wealth producers. We have lost from our midst a grand old man upright in all his dealings and generous to a fault. His honoured name which strangely enough is not borne by his host of descendants who are the children of his daughters, will ever be indelibly impressed upon the history of the early pioneering days and development of Maryborough and the Wide Bay District. It has been arranged that the funeral shall take place at Teebar on Wednesday afternoon - when the remains of the deceased will be laid beside those of his wife. Mr. Ammenhauser, Undertaker, is proceeding by train to Teebar tomorrow morning, taking the hearse and horses with him.

The Western Champion and General Advertiser for the Central-Western Districts, Monday 19 September 1904

THE will of the late John Eaton, of Westwood, Bompa, grazier, has been
proved at £29,998,

The Brisbane Courier, Tuesday 15 November 1904
SALE OF LAND

One of the largest attendances of people that his ever attended a public auction sale in Maryborough was witnessed on Saturday morning last at Bryant and Co's auction mart, when a number of properties in the estate of the late John Eaton of Teebar were ofiered for sale, and also some of the personal effects of the de
ceased Bidding was not spirited. Half an acre of land it the corner of Richmond
and Ellena streets opposite the Sydney Hotel on which is erected a small but cher shnop was passed in at £230. Half an acre facing Adelaide, Alice and Lennox streets was passed in at £250. The Bid well paddock at Tinana, containing over 600 acres occupied by Mycock and Son which is considered to be one of the best dairying properties in the district had £2. 5s per acre offered but the owners re quired more. A 300 acre paddock at the Two- mile in the Tinana district was bought by Mycock and Son at 14s. per acre. A 74 acre paddock at the junction of the Tinana Creek and the Mary River was bought by Mr. L. Steindl at £4 10s. per acre. Seventeen allotments in the original township of Tiaro were bought by Mr. Waracker at £20 per allotment An area of 1 acre in Owanyilla township was bought by Mr.Geo Pitt foi £1. A 112 acre paddock fronting the Mary River near Etchell's Falls was bought by Mr. Sorrensen at 18s per acre. The deceased's undivided share in selections at Calgoa sold for £25


There are no descendants named 'EATON' from John and Mary Ann EATON as his only son, William, died without issue.




The children of John and Mary Ann
Mary M Eaton 1831 1831
Ann Eaton 1833 1924 m. Richard GILES 1812-1876 2. William THOMPSON 1842-1909
Mary Ann Elizabeth Eaton 1835 1870 m. Walter HAY 1833-1907
Jane Eaton 1837 1872 m. John George WALKER 1819-1914
Elizabeth Mary Eaton 1839 1933 m. Boyce James NICHOLS 1832-1879
Susannah Eaton 1842 1937 m. Thomas CORNWELL 1837-1916
Charlotta Eaton 1844 1923 m. William Isaac INMAN 1840-1869 2. Henry GORDON 1840-1923
Infant Eaton 1846 1846
William Eaton 1847 1887 m. Julia CORNWELL 1849-1942 died without issue
Caroline Eaton 1850 1850
Martha Mary Richmond Eaton 1851 1931 m. Richard MAITLAND 1846-1923
Veronica Eaton 1854 1942 m Abraham John EZZY 1851-1921
Euphemia Eaton 1854-1939 m. Robert Grant GILBERT 1842-1900


The photograph below is Rosehill
which was taken on the occasion of the Governor's visit in the 1860s and was donated to the Maryborough Wide Bay & Burnett Historical Society by Kay Gassan


George Bannister 1768-1864

George Bannister was one of three youths who were convicted at the Old Bailey on 21 April 1784 for the theft of clothing from a house at Millbank. A small girl saw one of the boys getting out of the window with the clothes under his arms. They were traced through their tracks in the snow. Bannister said he had gone to look for his mother's ass, and was running along the river bank to warm himself when he heard the cry of 'stop thief'. He was found hiding behind some willows: he said he had taken shelter there from the storm. After being sentenced to 7 years transportation to Africa, Bannister was sent to the 'Ceres' hulk on 5 April 1785, aged 18, and delivered from the 'Censor' hulk to 'Alexander' on 6 January 1787 of the First Fleet.

On 15 March 1789, Bannister suffered 50 lashes for theft of three pounds of flour from James Stewart, though he pleaded it was his first offence. On 15 November a daughter, Sarah, by Ann Forbes was baptised. Bannister was sent to Norfolk Island by 'Sirius' on 4 March 1790, as also was Ann Forbes, though she does not seem to have stayed with him. At 1 July 1791 he was maintaining two persons on a Queenborough lot, of which he had cleared 66 rods and felled 25 rods of timber. His only recorded misdemeanor on the island was a theft for which he received 50 lashes in March 1791. He had been supplied with a pig under the lieutenant governor's scheme to make as many persons as possible independent of stores for meat. On 7 January 1792 he was settled on 12 acres at Morgan's Run, Queenborough: by the end of the year he was selling grain to the government.

Bannister left Norfolk Island by 'Kitty' in March 1793 and by this time Ann Forbes had started a relationship with William Dring and remained at Norfolk Island.

William Dring 1767-1854

William Dring was convicted of feloniously stealing six bottles of brandy three blue and white shirts two pair of trousers a pair of red leather boots and several other things of the value of ten pence from Joseph Mitchinson.

William Dring was tried at Kingston upon Hull, Yorkshire on 7 October 1784 for theft of unknown value. He was sentenced to transportation for 7 years and left England on the 'Alexander' of the First Fleet aged about 17 at that time (May 1787). He had no occupation recorded.

Governor Phillip sent a party of Officials, Marines and convicts to settle Norfolk Island and in October, 1788 Dring was one of those sent. He was employed there in various ways, probably in preparing the land for farming. In 1790 Dring and another convict volunteered to swim out to the "Sirius", which had been wrecked on the reef, in order to throw off the livestock and any remaining stores, which were still on the ship. They were allowed to do this and were successful in their efforts. They remained on board after they had completed the task and got drunk on the alcohol still on the ship. Eventually a marine was sent out and he removed the two men. They were punished by being put in prison and also made to wear leg irons. Even when they were released they were forced to continue wearing the irons.

Dring was apparently a competent seaman and contributed much in the associated work. He was praised by Governor King for his work. He was given a grant of land on Norfolk Island and then formed a relationship with Ann Forbes who had arrived in the First Fleet, on the "Prince of Wales". She had been convicted of stealing ten yards of cotton, the property of James Rollinson. Her trial was held in 1787 at the Surrey Lent Assizes. She was sentenced to be hanged but was reprieved and her sentence changed to seven (7) years transportation. Ann was sent to Norfolk Island and with her was the child she had borne to George Bannister, in 1789.

During their lives together William and Ann had three children, the last of whom was born in 1796. There was a great deal of unrest on the Island, because there were many marines stationed there and they endeavoured to entice the wives away from their husbands or the men with whom they lived. This brought many complaints form the emancipists and Dring had had cause to complain that his wife had been 'tempted away' twice. Finally he assaulted a marine and was charged. Governor King interceded on his bahalf and Dring was only fined 20 shillings. This judgement was another source of trouble on Norfolk Island. The family returned to Port Jackson in 1794 by the "Daedelus". They stayed together at least until the 20 August, 1796, when the last child was baptised. After this the partnership broke up. Little is known about Dring except 'he died in the Colony'.

1 comment(s), latest 1 year, 4 months ago

Roadside Inns of NSW 1830

The Australian Roadside Inn was a witness to a grand parade of history, characters and communities. The roads that passed their doors carried on its corrugated surface the future of the fledgling colony and the inns were encouraged by the Governors to assist the adventurous travelers. There were good inns and then there were just barley inns. The glow of the light in the distance was welcoming to the weary traveler and the warm fire in the parlor was eagerly looked forward to at each stop. Once inside, the cozy glow of the fire was a good setting for cheerful discussions with fellow travelers. Conversation was as varied as was on the state of intoxication were the travellers. It was a chance to catch up with the news from the regions and swap stories and titillate over tales of scandal.

A law was passed in 1825 that stated that every inn must provide accommodation for at least 2 persons and in 1830 another law came into being which required all innkeepers to burn a whale oil lamp outside the inn at night

In 1830 the first year that license fees were introduced and a fee of 25 pounds had to be paid to keep a Common Inn, Alehouse or victualling House, and to sell fermented and spirituous liquors in any quantity, The 25 pound license fee commenced on the first July and continued in force until the 30th June of the following year. In 1833 the fee went up to 30 pounds which was quite a large expense.