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Passengers on the Rooperell to New Zealand 1874

The following is a list of immigrants per ROOPERELL, which left Gravesend for New Zealand on the 23rd of February 1874 and arrived in Auckland on the 30 May 1874.
MARRIED
Sharp: Stephen W. 27, Emma. 26, William W. 4, Ernest A. 2, Ellen, infant.
Fryer: Thomas 42, Elizabeth 41, James 11, Ann 8.
Winter: James 40 Mary 34, Ann 13, Alice 12, Emily 10, Rose 8, Jane 6, William W. 4, Herbert 1.
Stevens: William 38, Martha S. 3l, Amy F. 2.
Laurence: Maliu? 28, Sophie 26, Sarah A. 8, Rose E. 6, Cornelius 4, Alice S. 1
Barrows: Henry W. 38, Sarah A. 37, Frances S. 10, Louise 7, Susan 5, Henry E. 3, Mark W. l.
Whittle: Charles 34, Maria 35, Ann M 4, Christianne 3.
Caro: George 31, Sarah 20 Emma 1.
Rogers: Henry 46, Mary 42, Joshua 10, Lydia 8, Edward 6, Kate 5, George 1.
Crayford: William 37, Anne 37, Ellen E. 4, Edith M. 2 Daisy M. 1.
James: James 40, Lucy 3O, Emily 6, Willie 1.
Archibald: Thomas 59, Harriett 46, Catherine 18
Archibald: William 22, Esther C. 22, William 1.
Curtis: Stephen 28, Sarah 20
Bland: John 33, Ann 22, Alfred 10, Charles 9, Stephen 7
French: Robert 31, Catherine 33, Peter 10, John 7, Robert 5, Catherine 3, Thomas 1
Hunt: Frederick A. 29. Maria 30, Millicent 11, Emma 10, Clara 6, Elizabeth 4, Ellen 1
Gabon ?: Robert 56, Rachel 35, Ann S. 12, Robert, W 10, John S 9, Eliza 7, Ellen 5,
Mo?e.: David 21, Maria J 22;
Curtis: Henry 31, Sarah 3l,Anne 9, Henry 7, James 3, Florence 1.
Connoll Wm. 36, Mary A 35, Phillip 8, Alice 11, Frances 6, Agnes 4, Catherine 2. Florence 1.
Hines: Robert 22, Emily C. 20.
Downy: Charlotte 37, Benjamin R 37.
McGraham: Thomas 26, Catherine 25.
Wey: William 32, Emily 30, Charles 6, Martha 4.
Beaney: George 38, Elizabeth 36.
Battishall: Thomas 30, Sophie 29, Florence J. 2, Charles T.1.
Hayes: Charles 40, Maria 38, Mary E. 15, William 11, Charles 7, John 4, George 1.
Payne: Albert 30, Alice 26,
Gregg: Alfred 24, Rebecca 24,
Port:Thomas 44, Susannah 28, Francis 20, Martha 16, Ann 15, Robert 13, Henry 5, Emma 4, Edith 2, Frederick C.1.
Dann: Thomas 30, Esther W. 23.
Harris: James 36, Margaret 33, Elizabethh 10, Mary ?.8, John 1.
Fuller: George 26, Hannah 26.
Grange: August 38, Melanie 36, Marie 15, Jules 8, Henrietta 5, Emile 1.
Watts: Thomas 32, Ruth 34, Thomas 13, Ann 11, June 9, A?? 4, Hannah 1.
Pewtress: William 24, Grace 26.
Grisby: George 26, Frances C. 31 Gertrude 5, Charles 3, William 1.
Mitchell: Henry 34, Elizabeth 30, Fanny 10. Hannah 8, Ruth 6, Charlea 4, Henry 1.
Wood: Thomas 26, Matilda 28, Matilda 6.
McDonald: William F. 30, Alice 23, Alice 4, William J. 2, Thomas 1.
Langdridge: James 30, Sarah 32, Elizabeth 2.
Saunders: John 38 Catherine 40, John 19, Henry 15, Walter 13, Clara 10, Alfred 8, James 6.
Williams: Alfred E. 30, Amelia 8, Elizabeth 5, Arthur 4, James 2.
Andrews: Alfred 33, Rachael 33, Harriet 12.
Jarvis: William 37, Anne 35, William 13, Kate 10, Minnie 7, Kermey 4, Rose 1.
Tapp: Thomas 21, Harriet 22.
Imison: William 32, Sarah 29, Sarah M. 9, Elizabeth J. 1.
Double: Charles 27, Ellen 21, Charles 3, William 1
Lovenzi?: Bertha 30, Rosa 30, Rosa 4.
Banks: Benjamin 29, Francis 25.
Williams: Elizabeth J. 24, Willie 1, Thomas 18;
McGaghan: Margaret 43, Thomas 21, John 19, Catherine 17, Margaret 16.

SINGLE MEN
Gamble, William 23; Rutlege, George 19; Groom, Walter 20;
Davies, John 37; Hunt, William R. 30; Papps, James 19; Hill James H. 19;
Green, Thomas 18; Madden, Charles 20; Wading, William 19; Draper, James 23;
Philpot Thomas G. 18; Owen P. 17; Urquhart, John 26; Dayton, John 25;
Exeter, William 26; Smallman, Edward 24, Robert 17; Apps, Robert 40;
Reading, Thomas 25; Barakt, Isaac 20; Jefferies, John 20; Carr, Robert 23;
Skeggs, James 21; Barnes, James 21; Parkins, John T. 21; Prevost, Thomas 19;
Wooer, Robert E. 19; Holloway, James 28; Hudson, John 20; Williamson, Mark 21;
Wheaton, Hector E. 19; Lloyd, John 27; Daly, Stephen 21; Smith, John K 37;
Bold, John T. 25; Foy, William 27; Slyth, John H. 19; Hand. John 21; Stephen, William 23;
Nicholas, R. 22; Wright, James 33; Grover, Albert 21; Williamson, John 33;
Strenlocks, Thomas 22; Pearce, Edward 24; Cockfield, John 20; Jamieson, Arthur 22;
Bracewell, James 22; Stillwell, William A. 28; Tyack Joseph P. 24; McMahon, John 24;
Pegg, Richard J. 19; Porter, Alfred 19; Cooper, Henry S. 20; Larter, Henry A 20;
Robinson, William T. 19; Miller, Henry V. 30; Putman, Frederick 23; Trimmer, W. 30;
Wenn, John E. 19; Attwood, George 25; Daubney, John H. 21; Alfrey, Alfred 27;
Savill, Walter, 18; lacey. William, 28; Simmonds, James 27; Taylor, Joshua W. 25;
Quayle, Alfred, 24; Card, Thomas, W. 21; Scotchmer, William 22; Ward, H. 34;
Janes, William J. 19; Brooks, James 27; McCarthy, Thomas 20; Byrne, John 21 ;
Albaret, Charles E. 22; Sirkett, Walter 22; Kewley, Charles 42; Marshall, William H. 23;
Sykes, Thomas A. 20 Norris Charles, 33 William, 8; Merganeth, J. 22; Martisi, Emanuel 23;
Accolino Anton 23; Pader, Louis 27; Gosetti, Jacob 23; Willendorf, Albert 26;
Voigt, Frederick 28; Delewalli, Peter 30; Luge, Luoni 29; Caloas, Leopold 26;
Spannazel, Carl 25; Crawford, Dan 22; Roe, Henry 23; Tucker, Stephen 19;
Schnell, Anton 33; Thiegel, Carl 36 Lehmann, F. 26; Erdman. R. 24, Quible, 24;
Baylis, George W. 23.

SINGLE WOMEN
Frost, Martha 19; Hunt, Catherine 24; Spackman, Sarah 19; Brewer, Sarah 20;
Rogers Mary 19, Helen 17, Emily 15, Fanny 12; Raines, Esther 19; Bowsher, Kate 14;
Bailey Mary G. 19, E. C. 24; Lanfear, Elizabeth 20; Jennings, Caroline 19; Saunders, Mary A. 17;
Fryer, E. 17;Middleton, Ann 18.

NOTE:
It's my belief that this was the one and only voyage to New Zealand for the Rooperell (aka Rooperel) After leaving New Zealand the ship was towed into Newcastle New South Wales, demasted.

The source for this transcription:
Papers Past

James Maiden of Moama, twenty years on..

Below is a transcription of a newspaper article which appeared
in Victoria in December 1860.Ten years before his death.
The founder of Moama, James MAIDEN more familiarly known
as 'Jemmy Maiden' was one of 270 convicts transported to
New South Wales on the Bengal Merchant, 27 September 1834.
He had been convicted at the Lancaster Assizes for stealing
silver ware and candles (burglary) and sentenced to transportation
for 7 years. Arriving on the 30 January 1835.
He married Jane Davies (Registered as DAVIES),at
St John’s Anglican Church, Camden, in 1840.
They produced 7 children, the first three George, Mary and
Richard born in New South Wales. James Maiden received his
Certificate of Freedom in November 1841.
'Jemmy Maiden' died of Bronchial Pneumonia, on the 28 December 1869
at the public hospital in Bendigo. He was broke.
His wife Jane Davis Maiden died on the 2 October 1891 at
her home "Kootanie" Punt-road South Yarra, Melbourne at age 76,
leaving real estate to the value of £900 and a personal wealth
including the furniture and jewelry of £55/3/- Her
son George Maiden was executor....janilye


Mr. James Maiden, whose name must be familiar to a
large portion of the inhabitants of New South Wales
and the adjoining colonies, first became a border man
about sixteen years ago : it was in the year 1840 when
he first crossed the Murray, in the employ of Mr. Purcelwhaite,
in order to settle on that part of the Cowpasture now
known as Jeffries' Station (about twenty-five miles from
the junction of the latter river with the Murray). This
was antecedent to the great rush of the settlers from Maneroo
and the adjacent country to the borders of the Edward and the
Murray, and the outskirts of Port Phillip, which was then
termed the new country.
Mr. Maiden having done the work assigned to him by his employer,
went back to Seymour for a time, from which locality he had
migrated.
In a short period fortune again directed him in the direction
of the Murray and the Edward, and he settled down on
Morogo (Heelyman), on the Edward.
Maiden was at this but little, in position, above a laboring
man; but parties who were acquainted with him for some time
previous to this, state that he was always recognised as a
very superior man for his Station: possessed of great shrewdness,
or what is denominated 'natural talent,' with more than an
average shine of mental and physical energy.
Maiden about this time became connected with a settler of the
name of Clarke, to whom he was related by marriage, and for whom,
on Maiden leaving the station on the Edward, he brought a
large number of cattle down to this favorite portion of the Murray.
The locality in which he was then for many years to act a
prominent part, seemed to have an uncommon attraction for him:
perhaps it was that he saw a wide opening for an active minded
man — it was untrodden ground, whereon any one who sowed might
safely expect to reap.
Travelling with cattle then was a different affair to what it now is.
The country was then, as we have said, uninhabited, — a trackless
waste. There were no yards wherein to stow safely your herds;
no comfortable hotel as now. Wherein speculators could put up
nightly, eat and drink well, and calculate their gains from the
prices current of the daily journals of the colonies.
Camping out day and night, crossing lagoons and rivers, and all
the unpleasant etceteras, which, if it were possible that a
new chum in his mind could realise, would certainly convey to
him no very pleasing ideas of colonisation.
There was also another and a very different affair to contend
with; the natives of this part of the country were by no means
desirous of fraternizing with the whites; on the contrary, were
very troublesome, in driving away and spearing the cattle, and
it required a vigilant eye to protect men and cattle from the
onslaught of the blacks. In all those disagreeables Maiden had
more than his share: and, on one occasion, so hostile had the
aboriginals become, that he and his wife (the latter in
order to deceive the blacks, wore male attire) had to stand a
siege for many weeks, their hut being surrounded, attacked, and
watched day and night, terror having driven away Maiden's mates.
After a year or so 'roughing it,' as the colonial phrase goes,
exerting his energies in the services of others, Maiden began
to turn his attention to setting up for himself.
The start in life is the thing - how to set the machine in
motion, and then to keep it going; these are the two phases
of Australian life.
Maiden's means were small - very small. The Murray here, as
in its whole length, was without a punt, the white man being
up to this time under the necessity of imitating the black fellow
by crossing this fine stream in the frail bark canoe; but
Maiden slightly improved this by building a small punt, which he,
for a time, worked himself; thus it carried 'Caesar and his fortunes.'
This was in the year 1843, hence we date the foundation of his
prosperity. By diligently plying this little punt for two years, Maiden
was enabled to build the large one so well known throughout these
colonies as Maiden's Punt. He now removed the small punt to the Edward
River, at Deniliquin, and thus he had the command of the two crossing
places. Following up his good fortune, he, in July, 1846, opened his
licensed house the 'Junction Inn,' and Maiden's worldly prosperity
improved rapidly. Postal communication now began to occupy his attention,
and he established a private mail from Seymour and Deniliquin, to run
every other week; the year following, he also ran a mail from
Kilmore to Deniliquin. The money for those contracts was raised by
private subscriptions among the few settlers on the route. For the
Seymour and Deniliquin mail, Maiden received the munificent sum of £50
per annum; and for the Murray and Moulamein one he also realised
£50 per year, the sum being made up by subscrptions of 50s. each
settler who received his letters by this medium; the Kilmore and
Deniliquin post(about 150 miles in length) obtained the sum of
£70 - if carried out according to the present rate of payment
for the same work, it would amount to something like £700.
For several years Maiden held these contracts or sub-contracts,
and in the meantime he built a large punt for the Edward, to
correspond with that on the Murray.
Persevering in these matters for a few years, sometimes as
barman at his own inn, at another as his own mailman, and then
again making his own punts - he seemed to be ubiquitous. Always
a hard worker himself, those under him were compelled to
follow his example.
When the gold discovery changed the face of things in Australia,
it found Maiden a man of substance for those days; and ultimately
when the famous Bendigo astonished the people of these colonies,
Maiden (distant about 55 miles from this goliath of all the gold-fields)
received an additional impetus on the road to fortune. He immediately
began buying gold and fitting out parties for the diggings, until he
drew down upon him the wrath of the neighboring settlers, because
as they alleged, he encouraged their men to desert their hired service;
they imagined, 'ruin stared them in the face' their flocks and herds
were deserted. Maiden was therefore made the scapegoat for the sins
of a great many runaways, with whose absence from their legitimate
employers he had, as he said, "neither act or part."
The settlers determined on a victim, and positively met in Maiden's
own inn to consider the best means of depriving him of his license.
He called for proof of his complicity in the guilt of the missing
shepherds and stockmen: none being forth coming, the wrathful settlers
were checkmated in the movement - Maiden soothingly assuring them
that the tide would soon turn in their favor.
The tens of thousands flocking to the Bendigo would require lots
of animal food; "the settlers would thus have a market for their
cattle and sheep in the room of boiling them down"
This foresight of Maiden's was rapidly realised; in less than
three short years, some of the settlers who wished
to take away Maiden's license having gone home to England with
ample fortunes.
This unpleasant affair having thus passed over, Maiden felt that
he wanted 'elbowroom.' Punt, post, and public house were now
subordinate matters, he looked for a wider sphere for the exercise
of his undeniable talents. To supply the Bendigo with cattle and
sheep was his aim; no light matter to provide chops and steaks for
a hundred thousand diggers.
With limited capital, however, he commenced the enterprise, by
gradually creeping onward, boldly but cautiously making his purchases,
he soon accomplished this, and he soon had also a very fair share
in the supply of Melbourne. Beginning with purchases of hundreds of
pounds, he advanced to thousands, from thousands to tens of thousands.
Stock alone have not occupied his attention; but in stations
and land in fee-simple he has invested largely ; he has purchased
seventeen runs, for one of which alone he paid forty thousand guineas!
he owns 18,000 head of horned cattle, many thousands of sheep,
about 500 horses, and has in his employ about 100 men, nearly all
of whom are occupied in driving stock; he owns lands in various parts
of New South Wales and Victoria, which in itself would make him a
wealthy man all the township of 'Moama' or Maiden's Punt, save a few
allotments, is his he is still a publican and post master; in fact,
it is difficult to say what he is not, excepting that he is not an idler.
The men of the rank from which he sprung look upon Maiden as a god.
With them the wonder has been, -
"That one small head should carry all he knew."
Those who are far above him in education and station
(Maiden makes it no secret that he can neither read nor write)
seek and receive his counsel, he certainly is a colonial phenomenon.
His public house, like himself, has crept on apace from its original
size to a large inn, wherein more business is transacted in cattle
and sheep than perhaps in any ten houses in these colonies.
Those who have had an opportunity of judging, estimate that in
Maiden's big parlor, bargains to the amount of a quarter of a million
are annually made — Maiden's purchases reach to £100,000 in the year.
SOURCE:
The Age
(Melbourne, Vic. : 1854 - 1954)
Wednesday 26 December 1860
p 7 Article
transcription, janilye


The Cobcroft-Benson Wedding

BENSON-COBCROFT.
All Windsor was en fete for the marriage ceremony of Miss Olive Cobcroft,
daughter of the late Mr. R. W. Cobcroft and Mrs. Cobcroft, of "Glenroy," with Mr. Walter Benson,
of Milson's Point, Sydney,
The ceremony took place precisely at 1.30 p.m. on Tuesday of last week at
St. Matthew's Church of England, the Rev. S. G. Fielding officiating.
Needless to remark, the old church was well filled with sightseers and guests from all
parts of the district, and also from Sydney.
The bride's girl friends had been busily engaged during the morning at the church. The
wedding bell and two hearts with initials were exceedingly pretty.
As the bride entered the church on the arm of Mr. Thompson, of St. Marys (an old friend of her father's),
the choir sang "The Voice That Breathed O'er Eden." She was beautifully dressed in
white glace silk, tucked and trimmed with ivory lace, the court train being a mass of tiny frills,
veilled in spotted chiffon, very prettily shirred. The yoke was of embroidered chiffon,
and the bodice was also trimmed with the same. She wore a coronet of orange blossoms and jessamine,
and a lovely embroidered veil. Also a pearl and diamond star and pearl necklace,
and carried a shower bouquet of jonquils and hyacinths (the gifts of the bridegroom).
She was attended by three bridesmaids, Misses Ruby Pateson (cousin), Carrie Cobcroft (sister),
and little Pearl Thompson.
The two older bridesmaids were dressed in smart frocks of white silk voille over
glace silk, trimmed with Paris lace and shirrings. Their hats were of cream straw,
with lace and chiffon, and they wore gold brooches, and carried posies of daffodils,
gifts of the bridegroom.
The tiny bridesmaid wore white insertion-pleated chiffon, with a tucked hat of white silk.
Mr. Eustace Pinhey acted as best man, and Mr. Reggie Butler and Master Cecil Young as groomsmen.
During the signing of the register, Miss Carlotta Young sang "O Perfect Love."
Mrs. Eather presided at the organ, and played the wedding march.
After the ceremony, Mrs. Cobcroft held a reception at "Glenroy," where the many costly
and handsome presents (93) were admired.
The wedding breakfast was served in the billiard-room, which was beautifully draped
with flags and wattle, the table having buttercup and white flowers, with maiden hair fern.
Several toasts were honored.
Mr. Fielding proposed the "Bride and Bridegroom," and Mr. Walter Benson happily responded.
Mr. Alec Hunter proposed "The Bridesmaids," which was responded to by Mr. Eustace Pinhey.
Mr. Brinsley Hall proposed the "Parents of the Bride and Bridegroom." Mr. Thompson responded
in most feeling terms of the late Mr. R. W. Cobcroft, having known that gentleman for eighteen years
prior to his death.
The "Ladies" was proposed by Mr. G. McCauley, and Mr. Clarence Pitt responded most flatteringly.
The bride received numerous telegrams during the breakfast.
Music was indulged in, and later on the whole group of visitors was photographed
by Mr. J. H. Bloome.
Mr. and Mrs. Walter Benson later on left for their home in Sydney, the bride going away
in a pale green voille frock, the skirt being shirred ; also a black lace picture hat,
and blue parasol.

DRESSES.
Mrs. Cobcroft, black silk striped voille, with lovely insertions and tucks,
the bodice draped with embroidered chiffon threaded with black velvet bebe ribbon,
and white chiffon front embroidered in black.
Mrs. Paterson, black canvas frock and
white trimmings, black toque with green leaves
Mrs. Seymour (bridegroom's mother),
black glace silk shirred, with cream silk and lace trimmings
Mrs. T. H. Young, white silk bodice,
and black silk skirt
Miss M. A. Cobcroft, black striped
cloth and ruched with silk front
Miss Batler, black frock, trimmed
with pale blue
Miss Cranley, black spotted silk,
cream net and white lace
Mrs. Sid. Benson, pale blue linen and
white boa
Miss Connie Batler, green cashmere,
white silk and green guipure
Miss Thompson, cream voille over
glace silk and Paris lace, black pic-
ture hat
Mrs. Fielding, black frock, with
black bonnet and pink roses
Mrs. James Martin, black silk voille,
with white front and helitrope
Mrs. Jack Dunston, black voille, and
sequin trimmings
Mrs. Harry Dunston, black frock,
with beautiful maltese collar
Mrs. Callaghan, black brocaded silk
Mrs. Brinsley Hall, black striped
voille, and white chiffon front
Mrs. Paine, green flaked voille,
green glace and oriental guipure
Mrs. Jack Tebbutt, pale grey voille,
black medallions over white silk, and beautiful black hat
Mrs. W. McQuade, black silk, and
white trimmings, and floral hat
Mrs. Lobb, black silk striped voille,
silk guipure and white chiffon
Mrs. A. D. Playfair, grey silk voille,
black and white chiffon applique,
and black hat
Miss Carlotta Young, green flaked
voille, cream crepe-di-chine, and guipure trimmmings
Miss Champley, cream voille, lace
and shirrings, and ribbon sash, beautiful black hat
Miss Dolly Young, fawn silk, Irish
poplin, pale blue crepe-di-chine,
and embroidered chiffon
Miss McCauley, green flaked muslin,
cream net, pink velvet, and a very pretty blue and pink hat
Miss Callaghan, white silk blouse,
cream voille skirt with lace, white hat and pink roses
Miss Ada Ward, pale blue voille and
guipure, and black hat
Mrs. Eather, navy blue muslin, and
white valeneiennes insertions
Miss Eather, white muslin, and pretty
floral hat
Miss Hilda Toting, cream silmas
muslin, red sash and floral hat
Miss Dulcie Hall, pale blue fancy
muslin, hat to match
Mrs. Flexman, green velvet blouse,
canvas skirt, oriental embroidery over white satn
Mrs. John Hunter, black brocaded
satin, lace motifs and pale blue crepe de chine, green bonnet
Mrs. Hotten, green cloth and guipure
Mrs. Metcalf, black satin frock, velvet
cape
Mrs. Woodhill, black frock, white
trimmings, pretty hat
Miss Dunston, white striped voille,
black hat
Miss Ruby Dunston, silk striped white
voille and net, white hat
Miss Primrose, black matalasse cloth,
gale blue brocaded silk, and medal-
lions of chantilly lace
Mrs. Law, navy blue voille, white
silk, and lace
Miss Pidgeon, cream voille and lace,
black hat with plumes
Miss Hutchinson, pretty pale blue
voille, herring-bone and lace medal-lions in guipure
Miss Louie Berckelman, black frock
and hat, gold chain with emeralds

PRESENTS.
Mother of bride, sewing machine and house linen ;
Miss Carrie Cobcroft, silk and point lace cushion ;
Mr. and Mrs. T. H. Young (bridegroom's sister), cheque and water colorpainting of Sydney harbour ;
Mr. Thompson, cheque ;
Mr. W. J. Young and family, silver hot water kettle;
Mr. C. Gosney, silver and cut glass salad bowl ;
Mrs. Bushell, silver butter dish;
Mr. and Mrs. Burnell Jones, silver carver rests ;
Mr. E. Pinhey, unique cucumber dish;
Mrs. Brown, bread platter;
Misses Brown, glass jar ;
Mr. and Mrs. Seymour (parents of bridegroom), cheque and kitchen utensils ;
Miss Cheeseman, pair silver specimen glasses;
Mrs. Eather, salt cellars;
Miss Eather, point lace cushion ;
" Esther," silver salt cellars ;
Mr. and Mrs. Lobb, silver entree dish ;
Mr. and Mrs. B. Hall, silver salver ;
Miss Dulcie Hall, silver icing sugar bowl;
Mr. and Mrs. Paine, silver mounted bread platter;
Mr. Easy, silver cake basket;
Dr., Mrs, and Miss Callaghan, silver cake basket;
Mrs. McQuade, point lace cosy and hand painted cloth;
Miss Butler, butter and jam dish;
Mr. McCauley, ivory and silver fish carvers;
Miss McCauley, cake fork; Miss Champley, silver honey pot ;
Mr. C. M. Pitt, silver photo frame;
Mr. S. M. Pitt, silver teaspoons ;
Miss Colliss, silver salt cellars;
Mr. and Mrs. Bryant, silver card tray ;
Mr. F. Head, mirror ;
Mr. R. Simpson, mirror;
Mr. and Mrs. Beveridge, silver jam dish;
Mrs.Mullinger, pair glass vases ;
Miss A. Dunstan, specimen glasses on silver stands;
Mr. and Mrs. Playfair, afternoon tea spoons, sugar spoon, and butter knife;
Mr. Chambers, silver gong;
Appointment Branch G.P.O., silver egg cruet;
Mr and Mrs. Dunstan and family, silver ink stand and candle combination ;
Mr. and Mrs. John Hunter, pair silver backed hair brushes and comb ;
Miss Hunter, cut glass and silver topped scent bottles;
Mr. A. Hunter, handsome marble clock ;
Mr. and Mrs. O'Hehir, combination cheese and salad bowl;
Mr. and Mrs. Flexham, hall gong;
Mr. and Mrs. T. Cobcroft, celery bowl ;
Miss Robinson, cupid ornaments ;
Miss V. Robinson, silver specimen vases ;
Mr. and Mrs. Moses, silver butter dish;
Miss Moses, glass bowl :
Miss Berckelman, silver butter dish ;
the employees of the late Mr. R. W. Cobcroft, silver sugar basin ;
Mr. and Mrs. H. Dunston, afternoon cake forks;
Mr. and Mrs. Hotten, silver toast rack;
Mr. and Mrs. Woodhill, set of carvers ;
Mr. and Mrs. Metcalfe, afternoon tea forks;
Miss Gurney, Doulton vases ;
Mrs. and Miss Barnett, silver-mounted scent bottles, filled;
Miss Williams, silver book mark;
Mrs. James Martin unique silver rose bowl;
Misses Dorothy, Kathleen, and Queenie Lobb, hat pin holder, pair of d'oyleys, and cup and saucer ;
Mr. and Mrs. Ward, silver cake basket ;
Miss Ward, breakfast cruet ;
Misses Holland, silver double jam dish;
Mr. and Mrs. Harry Pateson (aunt), cutlery ;
Miss Pateson, (cousin), pearl necklet ;
Mrs. and Miss Pendergast, preserve dish;
Mr. and Mrs. F. Alderson, pair silver entree dishes ;
Miss Bushel, pair silver serviette rings and tea spoons ;
Mr. and Mrs. J. Tebbutt, silver sugar scuttle;
Mr. John Tebbutt, silver ink stand ;
Miss Jane Tebbutt, silver cake forks ;
Mr. R. and Miss Butler (cousins), silver flower pots;
Mr. and Mrs. G. Law, silver ornaments;
Miss Primrose, point lace collar ;
Mr. and Mrs. Hutchinson (aunt), silver teapot ;
Miss Ruby Pidgeon (cousin), afternoon tea spoons ;
Mrs. Davis, pair vases ;
Rev. and Mrs. Fielding, rose bowl, silver and glass;
Mr. G Podmore, silver horseshoe toast rack ;
Mr Geo. Cobcroft (uncle), pair lovely carvers ;
Mr. Harvey Cobcroft (uncle), unique silver claret jug ;
Mr. and Mrs. Daniel Hogan, handsome travelling clock;
Mr. and Mrs. Rodda, pair silver jam spoons;
Mrs. Clarke (aunt), set of pretty China jugs;
Miss Clarke (cousin), silver teapot ;
Mr. J. Ruthven, silver-mounted cut glass knife rests ;
Mr. A. Simpson, oil painting ;
Mr. P. Rigg, case preserve spoons ;
Mr. and Mrs. S. Benson (uncle and aunt), afternoon tea set ;
Mr. Butler (uncle), cheque.

The following gentlemen were present:- Messrs. Brinsley Hall, W. J. Young,
J. J. Paine, Thos. Lobb, Chambers, Podmore, Seymour, Head, Simpson, Alec. Hunter,
Ruthven, J. Tebbutt, Rev. Fielding, G. Woodhill, C. Pitt, S. Pitt, A. D. Playfair,
R. and G. Cobcroft (brothers), Harvey and George Cobcroft (uncles), Dunstan,
W. Moses, and O'Hehir.
Mr. and Mrs. Benson left by the 4.20 p.m. train amidst showers of
rice and confetti.
The bride's and bridesmaids' frocks and the trousseau were made at Mrs.
Lobb's dressmaking establishment, and reflected great credit.

Source:
Hawkesbury Herald
Windsor, NSW : 1902 - 1945
Friday 11 September 1903
Page 8
Transcription, janilye 2014

The COLLISION BETWEEN the BARRABOOL and BONNIE DUNDEE.

The inquest on the body of Sarah Brown, one of the
victims to the collision between the Bonnie Dundee and
Barrabool, was concluded yesterday, the jury finding a
verdict of manslaughter against the captain and mate of
the Bonnie Dundee. The inquest was commenced on the
12th instant, and that day's evidence we published, but the
following day the Coroner made an order against the pub-
lication of the evidence until the conclusion of the inquiry,
so we were unable to record the evidence from day to day.
The following are the statements of the witnesses, with the
exception of those taken on the 12th, which we have
already published :-
Dr. Owen Spencer Evans deposed that on Tuesday he was
called to a house in Darling-street, Balmain, and there saw
the dead body of a woman, about fifty years of age, which
he recognised as that of a woman known to him by the
name of Sarah Brownhe examined tho body and found
no direct marks of violence ; froth was oozing from the
mouth and nostrils, and the body generally presented the
usual appearances of death by drowning; witness was of
opinion that death had been so caused.
Thomas Crawford deposed that he was chief officer of the
lost steamship, Bonnie Dundee, a screw steamer, trading
between Sydney and the Manning River; she left
Sydney at forty minutes past 1 o'clock on Monday
afternoon, the 10th instant, her destination being
the Manning River: when the vessel got clear
of the heads her course was shaped N. by E. half
E.; the weather was fine and clear, a light breeze blowing
from the northward and eastward until tho evening, when
the wind fell and it became calm; witness took charge of
the deck at 6 o'clock; the vessel was then steering the same
course; shortly after 6 o'clock the coloured side lights and
white masthead light were lit and slipped in their usual
places; the steamer was then going at the rate of seven or
eight knots, and was about two or two and a half miles off
the land; the vessel had not a full cargo and was not deep
in the water; she answered her helm readily; about half
past 7 o'clock witness saw a masthead light, bearing about
north by east and about two and half miles distant ; at the
same time that witness saw the light, the look-out man on
the forecastle reported "a vessel a-head; the strange
vessel appeared to be steering a S. S. W. course; at this time
the moon was up a little, and the night was fine and clear,
with smooth water and little or no wind; a few minutes
after the look-out man reported the vessel, witness saw her
red light; he then ordered the man at the wheel to keep the
vessel off a point, and her course was accordingly changed
to north-east by north; the Bonnie Dundee kept on this
course until witness saw the green light of the approaching
steamer, about five minutes after he saw the red light; at
this time the captain of the Bonnie Dundee was on the
bridge on deck, witness was also on the bridge; the quarter-
deck of the Bonnie Dundee was raised about two feet above
the main deck; her deck was about 120 feet in length, and
her tonnage was 130 tons; at the time the strange steamer
was approaching, the Newcastle light was in sight about 15
miles on the port bow of the Bonnie Dundee; immediately
on seeing the green light of the approaching steamer,
witness gave the order to put the helm hard-a-starboard, and
then when the two vessels got to within half-a-length of each
other, he saw that the stranger had altered her course, so
that her red light was again showing; the captain, who
was on the bridge at the time, ordered the man at the wheel
to keep the helm as it was, and then he gave the order to
stop the engines and go full speed astern, but by that time
the stranger was close on to them on the starboard side,
and immediately afterwards struck the Bonnie Dundee
amidships; the water began to pour in on the main deck,
and the vessel heaved ovor heavily to port; witness saw
some of the men jump on board the other steamer, and he
had tho ship's hoat lowered, and took charge of it; the
Bonnie Dundee sank almost at once, foundering about four
minutes after the collision; there were four lady pas
sengers on board the Bonnie Dundee; one of them was a
Mrs. Brown, whose dead body witness viewed on Wed-
nesday, in a house in Balmain, in the presence of
the Coroner and jury; after the Bonnie Dundee had
foundered, witness's boat was pulled alongside the
strange vessel, which was then ascertained to be
the Barrabool, and witness was taken on board,
after assisting in recovering the body of Mrs. Brown;
(witness here expressed a wish to make a correction in his
former evidence: when the mast-head light of the Barra-
bool came in sight, the Bonnie Dundee was steering
N.N.E.;) at the time of the collision, the engines of the
Bonnie Dundee were going astern, but the vessel had still
a little way on, probably about two knots an hour; witness
could not say exactly at what rate the Barrabool was
going when she struck the Bonnie Dundee, but she was
going at great speed, and she struck with great force;
witness did not hear any order given on board the Barra
pool; in his opinion, after the collision, everything that
could possibly be done to save life was done by both ships.
To Mr. Rogers: Witness did not see the green light of the
Barrabool first, but the red one; when ships met in a line
the rule was to keep red light to red light, or green to
green; when the ships met end on, each ship ported her
helm. To a juror: Witness held a certificate of master in
a coasting vessel from the Marine Board; when the captain
was on deck, the charge of the ship devolved on him.
;John Alexander Stewart stated that he was master of the
BonnieDundee which left Sydney on Monday afternoon for
the Manning River: the Bonnie Dundee was 121 tons register,
an 45-horse power; her length was about 20 feet, and her
full power of steaming 8 knots an hour; witness went on
deck about 6 o'clock in the evening, and at about a quarter
to 8 he heard the officer of the watch, who was on the bridge,
sing out to the man at the wheel "hard a starboard;"
witness rushed up on the bridge and saw a vessel's green
light; he then asked the man at the wheel how his helm
was, and the reply was that it was hard a starboard, and
witness ordered the seaman to keep it so; very shortly after-
wards the green light of the approaching vessel disappeared,
and the red light became visible; on perceiving this,
witness gave orders to stop the engines, and this was done,
and about a minute afterwards the stranger having ap-
proached to within fifty yards of the Bonnie Dundee, the
engines were reversed full speed astern; very shortly after
this the stranger struck the Bonnie Dundee amid-
ships on the starboard side cutting about four feet
into the deck and smashing the starboard life-boat;
at once a number of the crew rushed to the part
of the deck where the collision took place and climbed up
the bows of the Barrabool; witness, not knowing exactly
the extent of the damage sustained by his vessel, ordered
the engines full speed ahead in order to try and reach the
beach which was about two and a-half miles distant; after
giving this order he perceived the uselessness of such an
attempt, and stopping tho engines, gave orders to lower
a boat which was promptly done; by this time
the lady passengers, four in number, were on the
bridge with witness and he, cutting away the lifo buoys
gavo them to the ladies; as soon as the boat touched the
water and got rid of the tackling, the stewardess, who had
a child in her aims, threw it into the boat, and immediately
afterwards the vessel went down with witness and the four
women on the bridge, all the others having left the ship
either in the boat or by climbing up the bows of
the Barrabool. Between three and four minutes elapsed
from the time of the collision until the vessel went down;
there were 21 hands on board all told at the time of the
collision; witness did not know, there was a vessel in sight
until he heard the mate give the order "hard a starboard;'
it was not the duty of the officer of the watch to report a
vessel in sight, to witness unless he thought there was
danger; when witness first saw the light of the Barrabool
she must have been about 300 or 400 yards distant, and the
Bonnie Dundee was going at the rate of 7 knots an hour
when the collision occurred, the Barrabool was, in witness's
opinion, going at a speed of about 3 knots.
To Mr. Sly: In witness's opinion the vessel was properly
handled after the light of the Barrabool had been sighted
the steam whistle was not used; it was not customary to use
it on a clear night like that on which the collision occurred
when the red light of the Barrabool was sighted, it was too
late to port the helm of the Bonnie Dundee, as the former
vessel was almost on top of her; at the exact time of the
collision the Bonnie Dundee was almost stationary; there
was no time to get the passengers into the boat before the
vessel went down.
To Mr. Rogers: The Bonnie Dundee was heading about
north-west when she was struck; everything was done by
the Barrabool people to save life.
To Mr. Manning: Witness did not think, under the cir
cumstances, that there was any occasion for the chief officer
(to communicate with him before allowing the ships to come
so close together if the green light of the Barrabool had
continued in sight; witness had given the Herald news
paper a report of the occurrence; - he was in bed when the
reporter came, and the chief officer was in the room; wit
ness was the only man left on board the vessel when she
went down.
Henry Dose, able-bodied seaman of tho Bonnie Dundee
joined tho vessel on Monday last; he was at the wheel at
the time of the collision with the Barrabool; he went to
the wheel about 6 o'clock, when about twelve or fifteen miles
south of Newcastle; the vessel's course was thena north
by east half east; about 7 o'clock witness was directed
by the mate to change the course to N.N.E.; the
vessel had passed Bird Island when that order was given;
the N.N.E. course was continued until the red light of a
steamer, afterwards found to be the Barrabool, was sighted
about four miles distant, and bearing about north on the
port bow; on seeing the red light, the mato gave the order
to keep the vessel off a little, and accordingly witness kept
her off another point, her course then being north-east by
north; that course was kept until the Barrabool, when
nearly abreast of the Bonnie Dundee, showed her green
light; the mate then gave the ordor, "Hard a starboard,'
and witness brought the vessel round till her head was
about north-west; the Barrabool was then almost on top of
them, and showing her red light, and immediately after
that she struck the Bonnie Dundee on the starboard side;
the captain went on the bridge about 10 minutes before the
collision took place; when the vessel waa struck, the captain
shouted, "look out for yourselves;" if the Barrabool
had not altered her course there was sufficient room for her
to have passed between the Bonnie Dundee and the land.
John Petersen, seaman of the Bonnie Dundee, was look-
out man on the forecastle when the collision occurred; he
went on the lookout about 6 o'clock; between 7 and 8
o'clock, while on the lookout, he sight a bright masthead
light, which appeared to be straight ahead; about five or
ten minutes after sighting the masthead light the red light
of the vessel came in sight; witness reported the light to
the officer in charge of the deck, and he said " All right:"
witness continued on the lookout on the forecastle, and soon
afterwards, when the vessels began to near one another the
red light disappeared and the green light came in sight
almost immediately after the green light of the approaching
vessel come in sight she ran into the Bonnie Dundee; when
first witness sighted the masthead light it was about two or
three miles off.
To Mr. Rogers: Witness did not notice whether the
Bonnie Dundee slackened speed; he could not tell that,
being forward.
To Mr. Monning: Witness did not see the red light of
the Barrabool a second time; he was looking at the Barra-
bool from the time she showed the green light until the
collision occurred; he climbed the bows of the Barrabool
after the collision.
To the Coroner: Witness heard the steam-whistle
sounded on board the Bonnie Dundee; there was so much
confusion and excitement that he could not tell whether a
bell was rung or a whistle sounded on board the Barrabool;
but he was quite certain that the whistle sounded on board
the Bonnie Dundee.
Thomas Crawford, recalled, deposed that when he first
saw the green light of the Barrabool it was on the port bow
of the Bonnie Dundee, nearly straight ahead; he lost the
red light, and a minuto or two afterwards saw the green
light; from the position the steamers were in to one
another, a slight movement of the helm would have caused
the change of lights; when he first saw the green light the
Barrabool was about her own length off; there was nothing
in the relative positions of the two vessels that would have
led witness to apprehend danger until he saw the green
light of the Barrabool.
John Charles Simmons, chief engineer of the Bonnie Dundee,
was attending, to the engines of the vessel when the collision
took place on Monday night; about a quarter to 8 o'clock
that evening he received an order by telegraph to stop, and
then "full speed astern" ; he obeyed both orders without
any delay; about a minute after he received the latter
order he felt a shock, and almost immediately afterwards
received the order "full speed ahead," quickly followed by
"stop"; after stopping the second time he went on deck,
and found the vessel sinking.
Henry Dose rocallcd: When he first saw the Barrabool
he saw the red light and the mast-head light.
To a juror: At the time he first saw the red light he did
not see the green light; when the mate saw the red light he
told witness to keep off a little, and witness then ported his
helm, which would have the effect of showing the red light
more; about a quarter of an hour elapsed between the time
witness first saw the red light, and the timo he received the
order "hard a starboard" he did not see the greenlight till
he got the order, "Hard-a-starboard;" if the Bonnie
Dundee had kept the course she was on before that order
had been given the Barrabool would have struck her on the
port bow; witness did not hear the lookout man sing out,
but that would be accounted for by the fact that he
(witness) was standing alongside the steam funnel, and the
noise from that would probably drown the shout of the
lookout man; witness got on board the Barrabool by the
bows.
Hercules Dalzell, one of the seamen of the Bonnie
Dundee, first saw the Barrabool's masthead light bearing
on the port bow about two points and about three miles
distant; he next saw the red light and some time after-
wards the green light almost abreast of the Bonnie Dundee;
as soon as he saw the green light, he heard the order given
by the mate, "Hard-a-starboard," and directly afterwards
the Barrabool ran into the Bonnie Dundee, which sank
about three minutes after the collision.
To Mr. Want: The first time that the vessel's helm was
shifted it was to starboard; witness was sure that it was
not ported before it was put to starboard; he could not say
whether the helm was not ported when the Barrabool's
red light was first sighted; it might have been at that time
without his noticing it.
To Mr. Sly: After the vessel's helm had been put to
starboard witness again saw the Barrabool's red light before
the collision.
To Mr. Manning: When the Barrabool's green light first
came in sight witness was forward on deck; if no other
change had been made from that time in the course of either
vessel, witness did not think there could have been a colli-
sion; after he first saw the green light of the Barrabool the
latter vessel appeared to change her course, and then her
green light came in sight; he heard the look-out report the
masthead light.
John Redmond Clarke deposed that he was master of the
screw steamer Barrabool trading between Melbourne,
Sydney, and Newcastle; she left Newcastle on the evening
of Monday, the 10th instant, clearing Nobby's Head at
half-past 6 ; it was a beautiful clear, moonlight night, with
a light north-easterly, wind blowing and the water
smooth; after clearing Nobby's the vessel's course
was shaped S.S.W. by compass, and that course
was kept until half-past 7, when it was changed
to S. by W. three-quarters W.; when the course was
altered the vessel had gone about ten miles; a quarter-of'
an-hour after leaving Newcastle the second mate took
charge of the deck; witness also was on deck; about twenty
minutes to 8 o'clock a masthead light was reported; witness
looked over the side and saw a masthead light about two
points on the starboard bow, and about 3 miles distant; a
few minutes afterwards he sighted a green light
he then spoke to the mate asking him if that
was not a green light the stranger was showing, the
mate replied in the affirmative, and witness then ordered the
man at the wheel to starboard the helm a little; the order
was hardly given, and was not executed, when the mate
drew witness's attention to the fact that the approaching
steamer (which afterwards turned out to be the Bonnie
Dundee) was showing her red light; witness then counter
maned his former order to the steersman, and gave the
order " hard-a-port," which was immediately obeyed
the light of the Bonnie Dundee, now about half
a mile distant, disappeared across the Barrabool's
bow; witness telegraphed to engine-room, "Stop her," and
directly afterwards, from the position of the Bonnie Dun
dee's light, thinking that they were going all clear, he was
about to telegraph to the engine-room to start her ahead
again, when suddenly the green light of the Bonnie Dundee
came in sight, and all three lights were in sight, revealing
that the vessel was bearing down right upon the Barrabool
witness instantly telegraphed the engineer, "Full speed
astern," and proceeded to blow the steam-whistle, several
times, at the same time the red light of the Bonnie Dundee
went out of sight, showing that she was bearing up towards
the bow of the Barrabool; immediately afterwards the
vessels collided, and witness gave orders to lower a boat
which was done without any delay; the boat was manned
by the chief mate and two seamen, who were instructed to
pull with all speed to the Bonnie Dundee, then in a sinking
condition on the starboard bow of tho Barrabool; witness
ordered the engines to go slow ahead, and when
his vessel had approached to within fifty yards
of the Bonnie Dundee, the latter went down; the
Barrabool was then stopped among the wreckage, and three
life buoys and some cork fenders were thrown overboard in
case there should be any person in the water; the boat of
the Barrabool, accompanied by that of the Bonnie Dundee
soon came alongside, and witness shouted out to them to
know if all hands were saved; receiving no answer
he went on the main deck, and hearing someone say there
had been four women on board, looked over the rail and in
quired if there were any women in the boats; the reply
was "no," and witness ordered the chief mate to go
back and see if he could find any one floating; the Bonnie
Dnndee's boat was also ordered away for the same purpose;
soon the chief mate of the Barrabool returned with a lady in
his boat; she was got on board, and though she appeared
to be quite inanimate, efforts were made to endeavour to
restore animation for more than an hour and a half, but
without avail: after bringing the lady on board, the boat
returned to search among the wreckage, but no one else was
found and witness asked Captain Stuart if he thought there
was any use staying longer; Captain Stuart replied that he
thought everv thing possible had been done, and after the
damage which had been done to the Barrabool's bow had
been repaired as well as could be under the circumstances,
the vessel proceeded on her course to Sydney; about a
hour and a half elapsed between the foundering of the
Bonnie Dundee and Barrabool's resuming her voyage to
Sydney. To Mr. Want: The look-out man of the Barra
bool was on the top-gallant forecastle, and to prevent any
mistake being made by the look-out man, the signals were
given by bells; there was nothing to interrupt witness's
view-nor that of the mate, the look-out man, or the man at
the wheel; there were passengers on board the Barrabool,
two of them-Mr. and Mrs. Lovell-were on the saloon
deck; when two bells, the signal of the Bonnie Dundee
coming in sight, were struck, Mr. Lovell asked
if that was 8 o'clock, and witness replied
"No, it is a light on the starboard bow;"
when first the Bonnie Dundee was sighted, if each
vessel had kept on her course they would have cleared each
other by a good half-mile; witness gave the order "star-
board a little to clear them a little more, but before the
order was obeyed the red light of the Bonnie Dundee came
in sight (here the models were again brought into use, and
at this time and throughout the remainder of his evidence
the witness explained the positions and manoeuvres of the
two vessels by their aid); seeing that the red light of the
Bonnie Dundee was on the starboard bow of the Barrabool
it was the duty of the latter to keep clear, and accordingly
witness had the helm put to port aud stopped the engine
and supposing they had gone on as they were then, they
would have passed each other quite clear; the green light
of the Bonnie Dundee, however, then came into sight; the
evidence of some of those on board the Bonnie Dundee had
stated that the green light of the Barrabool was seen
by them after they sighted her red light, but that was
quite impossible, as the Barrabool was on her port
helm after it was first ported; it was not true that after
showing her red light to the Bonnie Dundee the Barrabool
came across and showed her red light; when the
vessels collided, the Barrabool's speed was under a mile an
hour; the Bonnie Dundee was going about five or seven
miles; if the Bonnie Dundee had stopped her engines
the same time as the Barabool did there would have been
no collision, as the two vessels would not have reached one
another; the damage to the Barrabool was on the port bow,
about 20 inches from the stern, and was caused by the
Bonnie Dundee tearing across the Barrabool's bow; if the
Bonnie Dundee had not been going so fast she would not
have made the hole in the Barrabool's bow that she did.
To Mr. Sly: The Bonnie Dundee was about 3 miles
distant when witness first sighted her masthead light, and
about a mile distant when her green light was first seen
witness would positively swear that, at the time of the
collision, the Bonnie Dundee was going at a rate of about 5
knots an hour, and the Barrabool was going at a rate of less
than one mile an hour; immediately after the collision the
Barrabool had stern way on; when first the red light of the
Bonnie Dundee was sighted the vessels were about three
quarters of a mile apart.
To Mr. Manning: The masthead lights of each vessel
would probably have been sighted by the other at about the
same time, but the Bonnie Dundee would most likely have
sighted the side lights of the Barrabool before her own
lights could have been visible to the latter, as the moon was
rising and was putting the Bonnie Dundee's lights in the
shade; witness had heard the examination of the mate
the Bonnie Dundee; he (the mate of the Bonnie Dundee)
did port his helm in the first instance, and then after showing
a red light put his helm hard-a-starboard, and as a
matter of fact the helm of the Barrabool was first put a little
a-starboard and then hard-a-port; if the mate of the Bonnie
Dundee was right in saying that when he first sighted the
Barrabool, she was two miles on his port bow, that would
put the Bonnie Dundee about a mile further out to sea than
she really was; the Barrabool was about three miles out
from land when she first sighted the Bonnie Dundee.
To a juror: The Barrabool's full speed is ten knots an
hour; after giving the order to stop, if the engines were
reversed full speed astern, she would go about one-third of a
mile before she stopped altogether; there was a rule of the
road that when ships are meeting end-on, all lights being
in view, each vessel must port; that was the only case in
which that rule held good; when witness gave the order to
stop the engines immediately before the collision, it was
not, he considered, an error of judgment; if he had not
dono so the Bonnie Dundee would have run into the Barra-
bool; when witness gave the order "stop" the Barrabool
was going about 10 knots an hour; he did not think he
could have got ahead of the Bonnio Dundee by going full
speed ahead; when the Bonnie Dundee's red right was on
the Barrabool's starboard bow, it was the Barrabool's duty
to give way, and the Bonnie Dundee should have held on
her course.
Arthur Nelson Pidcock, second mate of the Barrabool,
with a master's certificate, was in charge of the deck when
the masthead light of the Bonnie Dundee was reported;
on looking at the light he saw it was bearing two
points on the starboard bow, and about 4 miles distant;
about 10 minutes after sighting the masthead light
of the Bonnie Dundee, the green light became visible ;
Captain Clarke who was on deck asked what lights
the steamer was showing, and witness replied, " Green, but
burning indistinctly ;" the captain replied, "Yes, oh yes,"
and then gave orders to the man at the wheel to starboard a
little; this order was scarcely given before the Bonnie
Dundee showed a red light; witness mentioned the fact to
the captain, who immediately had the helm put hard-a-port,
and gave the ordor to stop the engines; very soon after the
engines had been stopped the Bonnie Dundee showed both
her lights, but the red light soon went out of sight and the
green light showed close on the starboard bow of the Barrabool,
which at that time was going very slowly; shortly
afterwards the two vessels collided; tho Bonnie Dundee
appeared to have a pretty good speed; when the collision
took place the Barrabool's boat was lowered and sent away
to render assistance; after being absent someo time, the
boat returned with the body of the deceased Mrs. Brown;
after hanging about the scene of the wreck for over an hour
the vessel continuod on her course to Sydney.
To Mr. Waut: From the position of the Bonnie
Dundee when first she was sighted, it would have
been impossible for her to have seen the red light of the
Barrabool, and if the mate of the Bonnie Dundee had stated
that the gresn light of the Barrabool was the one first
sighted he would be correct; witness had read a report in
the Echo of the 11th instant, with reference to the mate's
statement about his seeing the green light of the Barrabool
first-that was correct; if the Bonnie Dundee had not
ported, the two vessels would have passed one another about
half a mile distant; t was only the Bonnie Dundee star-
boarding after her porting that brought her across the bows
of the Barrabool; it was untrue that the Barrabool after
porting her helm ever showed her green light to the Bonnie
Dundee; the Barrabool had not more than half a knot way
when the collision took place; the Bonnie Dundee appeared
to be going over four knots.
To Mr. Sly: Witness did not hear the Bonnie Dundee
blow her whistle at all; when first the green light of the
Bonnie Dundee came in sight the two vessels were about a
mile distant; the engines of the Barrabool were stopped on
the red light of the Bonnie Dundee becoming visible; witness
was of opinion that, according to the regulations of the
Navigation Act, the Bonnie Dundee was the vessel which
should have kept on her course while the Barrabool was the
giving way vessel, consequently the Bonnie Dundee should
not have altered her course.
Thomas Crawford recalled, in answer to a question as to
whether he had given a report of the occurrence to a reporter
of the Echo newspaper, stated that some persons had come
to him two or three hours after he arrived in Sydney,
and he gave them some account about the ships; he did not
know what he said to them; he could not say whether they
told him they were reporters for a paper; he could not say,
so far as he was aware of, that he gave the statement to the
reporters that appeared in the Echo of March 11th, he never
saw any account of the occurrence in the Echo.
To Mr. Sly: Witness was in the Caledonian Hotel when
they came and asked him some questions; he gave them no
written account ; it is not a fact that he first saw the green
light; he could not possibly have said so to a reporter ; he
did not say so; he could not say whether an account
appeared in the Evening News about the same time; ho did
not take notice of any newspapers; he was quite sober when
he made the statement in the Caledonian Hotel.
John Tucker, able seaman on board the Barrabool, went
to the wheel a few minutes after clearing Nobby's Head;
about an hour afterwards witness saw the mast-head light
of a steamer on the starboard bow, which had been signalled
by the lookout; she appeared to be running an opposite
course to that of the Barrabool; some time afterwards the
mate reported the green light of the steamer, and the
captain gave tho order, "starboard a little" ; witness was
just obeying that order when the mate reported a red light,
and the captain ordered the helm "hard a-port"; witness
obeyed the order, and, as he did so, saw the red light of the
Bonnie Dundee on the starboard bow; when the Barrabool
came round in answer to her helm, both the side-lights of
the Bonnie Dundee came in sight, and the red one disap-
pearing, she crossed the bows of the Barrabool; the captain
ordered the engines to stop, and a minute after gave "full
speed astern "; before the Barrabool had completely lost her
way, she struck the Bonnie Dundee amidships.
To Mr. Want: The helm was not put astarhoard at all
after it was ported; if any of the witnesses on board the
Bonnie Dundee had sworn that they saw the green light
of the Barrabool after having seen the red light, they
would have stated what was untrue; witness thought
that the Bonnie Dundee had more way on at the
time of the collision, but he would not swear to it;
it was about two or three minutes from the time witness
first saw the red light of the Bonnie Dundee until he saw
both lights, and about the same time between when the two
lights first showed and the collision.
William Lovell deposed that he was a passenger on
board the Barrabool at the time of the collision; he was on
the saloon deck of the Barrabool when the Bonnio Dundee
was first sighted, and on hearing the bell struck asked
if it were 8 o'clock, but the captain replied that it
was a vessel on the starboard bow; tho captain then
went to the starboard side of the vessel and look-
ing over said, "she is showing a green light;"
and then gave the order to the steersman "starboard a
little;" shortly after the mate on the bridge reported that
the vessel was showing a red light in place of the green,
and Captain Clarke gave the order "hard a port;" a few
minutes subsequently someone said that the vesssel was
showing a green light again, and the captain said "where
is she coming to ?" a few minutes after that the collision
took place; witness saw the white mast-head light of the
Bonnie Dundee when it was reported, and very soon after-
wards saw the green light; it was immediately after the
Bonnie Dundee showed the red light that the Barrabool's
engines were stopped.
To Mr. Want: He never heard any order given to star-
board the helm after the order to port it had been given ;
when he first saw the light of the Bonnio Dundee he had
no fear of a collision; there was no confusion on board the
Barrabool; Captain Clarke was very calm and cool, and
appeared to be exercising his judgment calmly.
Charles Wilson, able seaman on board the Barrabool, was
on the look out when the collision occurred; he saw the
masthead light of the Bonnie Dundee and reported it by
striking two bells, which signalled "a light on the starboard
bow;" when he first sighted it the light was two points
on the starboard bow and about four or five miles
distant; the vessel appeared to be steering in an
opposite direction to the course of the Barrabool;
about seven minutes after the masthead light was
sighted the green light became visible; several minutes
after the green light first came in sight, it disappeared, and
the red light took its place; Captain Clarke then sang out
"Hard a-port," and the Barrabool went round until the
red light of the Bonnie Dundee was on her port bow;
directly after that, both the Bonnie Dundee's side-lights
became visible, and then the red light disappeared, and the
Bonnie Dundee crossing the bows of the Barrabool, was
struck amidships, and shortly afterwards sank.
To Mr. Sly: The Barrabool was forging ahead very
slowly when the two vessels collided.
To the Foreman: The Bonnie Dundeo must have been
going at a rate of 4 or 6 knots an hour when she was crossing
the bows of the Barrabool.
Thomas Ashford, an able seaman belonging to the Barrabool,
was on the after part of the saloon deck when the
Bonnie Dundee's light was signalled; directly after the
light was signalled witness looked at the time and saw it
was twenty minutes to 8; shortly afterwards the officer on
the bridge reported a red light, and then witness went to the
assistance of the man at the wheel, and caught sight of the
red light bearing about two points on the starboard bow; as
soon as the mate announced the red light the captain gave
the order "hard-a-port;" the helm was put hard-a-port
and kept so until the collision took place.
To the Foreman: The Bonnie Dundee seemed to be going
very fast when she crossed the Barrabool's bows.
Isaac Wagland, second engineer of the Barrabool, was in
charge of the engine room when the collision occurred,
the chief engineer being off duty at that time; some time
between half-past seven and a quarter to 8 o'clock the
telegraph signalled "slow"; witness obeyed the order,
and then the telegraph signalled "stop" and "full speed
astern " in one order; the engines were at once stopped and
reversed, and about two minutes afterwards there was a
shock as if the vessel had struck something.
To Mr. Sly: If the Barrabool were going full speed
ahead, and the engines were stopped and reversed, it would
take two or three minutes before tho steamer would be
stopped.
William H. Dick, a reporter on the staff of the Sydney
Morning Herald, remembered hearing a rumour on the
night after the 10th instant that the Barrabool and Bonnie
Dundee steamers had collided; and in consequence of this
rumour he made inquiries to ascertain the truth of the
report; he saw the man before the Court, who
gave his name as Thomas Crawford; he stated
that be was the chief officer of the Bonnie Dundee;
the man giving his name as John Stewart was
present when witness interviewed the chief officer;
they were in the bedroom of an hotel, and Stewart,
who stated that he was the master of the Bonnie
Dundee, was lying on a bed; witness got the mate's state-
ment, which was to the effect that he was in charge of the
vessel at the time of the collision, that he saw the green
light about two miles ahead, and that he steered his vessel
so os to show his own green light: that suddenly he saw a
red light exhibited, and that soon after that Bonnie
Dundee was 'struck amidships on the starboard, the
captain was present when the mate made the statement
and did not contradict it in any way.
To Mr. Want: Witness reduced the mate's ?? to
writing; he went back a second time (after he to??
of the mate's statement), in company with the ??
reporter, in order that he might heur the stat ??
had a greater knowledge of nautical matters ??
was possessed of; the same statement was made and
time as had been on the first occasion; which he took
down the statement in shorthand and t?? it
into writing; he saw it afterwards in print it
was correct; the fifth paragraph after the ??
of the occurrence in the Echo of March ll, citing
" The chief officer of the Bonnie Dundee states, ??
ing with the words " escaping the suction,' was ??
ment made to witness by the mate; the same ??
wards appeared in the Herald of March 12th; ??
never asked to contradict these statements, nor ever
heard of any complaints about their being incorrect took
down the mate's statement in shorthand; ??
sitting in the same room with the captain; ??
very little about shipping matters, and the ??
to him what the three lights were.
To Mr. Manning: The mate did not appear under
the influence of liquor.
Thomas Crawford recalled : Had been ??
Sydney and the north for about 10 years; he ??
course steered by the Bonnie Dundee ??
particular occasion; it was the course generally used
in fine weather; the Bonnie Dundee was bound for the
Manning River, and had gone the same trips ??
18 months: when witness first saw the Barrabool ??
light she was about 225 yards off ; if he had seen ??
light on his port bow it would have been his duty ??
on his course, but he did not see her green light ??
bow; he saw it almost ahead; the Barrabool ??
been 1 or 2 points on the port bow when she ??
her red light; sometimes a couple of minutes ??
tween the time of losing one light and sighting the other;
it was a fact that the losing of one light necess??
immediate picking up of the other; when the ??
was first sighted it was ahead, but was if anything ??
on the port bow; as soon as witness saw the green he
put his helm to starboard; Witness had had no ??
the captain; there was no confusion or quarrelling on board
the Bonnie Dundee before she left the wharf; as ??
captain had heard the order 'hard-a-starboard," ??
up on the bridge and took charge; witness never ??
sounding the steam whistle; if he had not given ??
"hard-a-starboard," he believed the Barrabool would have
run into them on the port side.
John Alexander Stewart, recalled, stated that he had
been trading to the north for about twelve ??
course the Bonnie Dundee steered was, under the circum
stances, the proper course to steer; had heard ??
the Herald reporter, give his evidence; was present on the
11th instant when the chief officer gave him an account of
the collision; the report in the Echo of the llth instant
was not a correct report of what the mate told the reporter;
the orders that witness gave-"Stop her," " ??
astern "-wereo given, the one immediately after that.
To. Mr. Manning: When the reporter came witness was
too unwell to notice what took place; he did not ??
the mate said to the reporter, but he knew that he ??
say what afterwards appeared in the Echo.
To Mr. Want: There was no break between the orders,
"Stop her" and "Full speed astern;" witness ??
ously sworn there was a break of a minute between;
he did not consider that when the order "hard-a-starboard"
was given it was a serious thing, although he had previously
stated it was; there was no great probability ??
when the helm was starboarded; there might have been a
little danger.
To Mr. Want: The Bonnie Dundee was steering ??
close in to shore to avoid currents; she kept within ??
or three miles from the coast, and went from point ??
it was the general practice for coasting steamers going
south to go outside steamers going north; if witness ??
miles from Bird Island, and had the Barrabool been ??
out he would stand a pretty good chance of seeing ??
light.
The foregoing being all the evidence that was ??
anent the collision, the Coronor stated that previous ??
jury retiring to consider their verdict they would be
addressed by Mr. Manning, the legal rcpresentative of the
Crown. It had hitherto been his custom not to permit any
lawyers to address the jury, but in the present case
would follow the precedent offered lately in England ??
inquest on the body of the victims in the collision of Her
Majesty's yacht Misletoe, when the Crown Prosecutor
summed up and addressed the jury. Mr Manning accordingly
proceeded to review the evidencee,
and summed up greatly against the officers of
the Bonnie Dundee. He remarked that, in that
place, the jury were to consider whether the collision was
the fault of the Bonnie Dundee or the Barrabool. Accord-
ing to the evidence of the officers and crew of the Barra-
bool, the Bonnie Dundee was entirely to blame for the
occurrence, for she had twice offended against the regula-
tions of the Navigation Act in not holding to her course
when her green light, was to the Barrubool's green light,
and, subsequently, when red light was to red light,
of which positions she should have hold on her course. He
also pointed out that even by the showing of the Bonnie
Dundee's own men, she was in fault in crossing the Barra-
bool's course the second time. If the jury took the view
that the Bonnie Dundee committed a breach of the regula-
tions, they must further decide who was actually to
blame for the act, and return a verdict accordingly.
The jury were then left to consider their verdict
and after a deliberation of an hour and a half
returned the following verdict:-" We find that
the deceased, Sarah Brown, came by her death
on the night of the 10th instant by drowning, the result of a
collision between the steamer Bonnie Dundee and
the steamer Barrabool, in the former of which she was at the
time a passenger, which collision was brought about by the
gross negligence of the first mate of the Bonnie Dundee,
Thomas Crawford, and Captain John Alexander Stewart
of the same vessel; and we consequently return a verdict of
manslaughter against the said Thomas Crawford and John
Alexander Stewart." The Coroner accordingly proceeded
to commit the prisoners to take their trial at the next sittings
of the Central Criminal Court. Bail was allotted to
each prisoner in 300, with two sureties of 150 each.
Before the Court broke up the Coroner, in the warmest
terms, expresscd his thanks to the jury for the ??
careful, and intelligent way in which they had investigated
the case. He entirely concurred with them in their verdict
and he had much pleasure in stating his conviction that
was as good and true a verdict as could have been given
Source:
The Sydney Morning Herald
Saturday 22 March 1879
Page 6
Transcription, janilye
NOTE: This newspaper article is badly creased down the
right hand side; for the parts
unreadable I've used question marks.
Mrs. Sarah Brown wife of David Brown of Balmain was 53 and
came from County Derry,
Ireland.


Below is The steamer Barrabool in Duke's Dock after the collision.


PUBLICANS' LICENSES 1851 New South Wales

Published Saturday 10 May 1851 in The Sydney Morning Herald
THE following is a list of applications for Publicans' Licences considered by the Session of Justices held for that purpose.
Those applications to which no remark is appended have been granted.
It will be seen that two are open for a hearing on Monday next.

1. Edward Robertson, Harbour View Hotel, George-street.
2. Louisa Wood, Commercial Hotel, George-street North
3. Edward Hancock, King's Head, George-st.
4. William Howell, King's Arms, George-st.
5. Thomas Waldock Smith, Observer Tavern, George-street
6. James Chapman, Marine Hotel, George-st.
7. William Sullivan, New York Hotel,George-street
8. Robert White Moore, Fortune of War,George street
9. Isaac Moore, Patent Slip, George-street
10. John Henry Humphreys, Land we live in, George-street
11. Charles Hargrave Salmon, Australian Hotel, George street
12. Abraham Levy, American Hotel, George-street
13. Richard Hawkins, Rose of Australia, George-street
14. John Reed Harman, Blue Posts, George-street
15. William Livingston, Glasgow Arms, George-street. Applicant deceased. The Session agreed to
recommend the case to his Excellency the Governor, as one in which he might exercise his power
of granting a license to the widow.
16. Nicholas Bray, Liverpool Arms, George-street
17. William Cankett, Vine Tavern, George-street
18. Hugh M Lachlan, Crooked Billet, George-street
19. Charles Bath, St. John's Tavern, George and Bridge streets
20. George Scott, Castle Tavern, George and Bridge streets
21. Thomas Moore, City Wine Vaults, George-street
22. Richard Kenyon King, Forth and Clyde,George and Jamison streets
23. Donald Munro, General Washington, George-street
24. George Skinner, Skinners' Hotel, George and Hunter streets
25. Archibald Menzies, Star Hotel, George-st.
26. Robert Rowland, Golden Fleece, George and King streets
27. William Edward Rider, Black Boy, George and King streets
28. John Holman, White Horse, George-st.
29. John Sparke, Royal Hotel, George street
30. Michael Farrell, Farriers' Arms, George-street
31. Henry Robberts, Crown and Anchor,George and Market streets
32. Isaac Titterton, White Horse Cellar, George and Market streets
33. James Cunningham, Bull's Head, George-street
34. George Wilkie, London Tavern, George st.
35. Benjamin Palmer, Swan with Two Necks, George and Park streets
36. William Aitkenhead, Emu Inn, George-st.
37. Refused
38. Refused
39. John Daly, Friendship Inn, George-street
40. Thomas Leary, Currency Lass, George st.
41. Edward Conyngham, Dublin Tavern, George-street
42. Thomas Lee, St. John's Tavern, George and Liverpool streets
43. Thomas Johnson, Crown, George-street
44. Henry Harris, Jew's Harp, George-street
45. Philip Whelan, Britannia Arms, George and Goulburn streets
46. Charles Adrain, Fountain of Friendship, George and Goulburn streets
47. Michael Daly, Golden Fleece, George st.
48. John Francis, Square and Compass, George-street
49. Refused
50. James Stewart, Woolpack, George-street
51. Andrew Byrne, Peacock, George street
52. John Wright, Omnibus Inn, George-st.
53. Abraham Marcus, Steam Engine, George-street
54. John Dishington, Odd Fellows' Hall, George-street
55. George Coulton, Black Swan, George-st.
56. Peter Hanslow, Dog and Duck, George-st.
57. David Roberts, Farmer's Home, George-street
58. David Taylor, Wheat Sheaf, George-st.
59. Thomas Parkinson, Wellington Inn,George street
60. William Ford, Rising Sun, George-street South
61. George Simpson, Currency Lass, Pitt and Hunter streets
62. Matthew Mullaney, Fortune of War, Pitt-street
63. Maria Kelk, Spread Eagle, Pitt-street
64. Denis Kearney, Brougham Tavern, Pitt-st.
65. Joseph William Roche, Rainbow Tavern, Pitt and King streets
66. Edward Samuell, Liverpool Arms, Pitt-and King streets
67. John Alheit, Elephant and Castle, Pitt and King streets
68. Stephen B. Murrell, Sir Richard Bourke, Pitt-street
69. John Mullen, William the Fourth, Pitt-st.
70. Joseph Wyatt, Victoria Hotel, Pitt-street
71. Joseph Faris, Shakspeare, Pitt-street
72. Mary Stone, King's Arms, Pitt-street
73. Edward Borton, Cricketers' Hotel, Pitt and Market streets
74. Thomas Spencer, Toogood's Hotel, Pitt and Market streets
75. John Somerville, Fermanagh Hotel, Pitt-street
76. Refused ; but to be reconsidered on Mon-day next.
77. John Smith, Nags' Head, Pitt-street
78. Michael Cohen, Glasgow Hotel, Pitt-st.
79. John Dane, Railway Tavern, Pitt and Bathurst streets
80. Sarah Doran, Edinburgh Castle, Pitt and Bathurst streets
81. Matthias Hooper, Cottage of Content, Pitt and Bathurst streets
82. George Chambers, Curriers' Arms, Pitt-st.
83. John McCabe, North Star, Pitt and Liverpool streets
84. George Turner, Brown Bear, Pitt and Goulburn streets
85. James Oatley, Sportsman, Pitt and Goul-burn streets
86. Withdrawn
87. James Davison, Settlers' Arms, Castlereagh-street
88. Thomas Martin, Commercial Hotel, Castlereagh and King streets
89. Henry Peter Hook, Painters' Arms, Castlereagh-street
90. Louisa Watkins, Globe Tavern, Castlereagh and Market streets
91. Roger Murphy, Travellers' Rest, Castlereagh and Market streets
92. Edward Borton, jun., Sydney Arms, Castlereagh-street
93. Edward Canter, Barley Mow, Castlereagh and Park streets
94. William Tunks, Curriers' Arms, Castlereagh and Bathurst streets
95. Robert Collins, Cherry Tree, Castlereagh and Bathurst streets
96. George Clayton, Dungate Inn, Castlereagh and Liverpool streets
96. William Windred, Painters' Arms, Castlereagh and Goulburn streets
97. Baron Burnett Cohen, Nelson Hotel, Castlereagh and Campbell streets
98. Emanuel Crabb, Golden Fleece, Castlereagh-street
99. James Turley Jones, Crown and Kettle,York-street and Barrack-lane
100. John Hawkins, Original Hope Tavern, York-street and Barrack-lane
101. James Entwiste, Masonic Hall, York-st.
102. John O'Dowd, Forbes Hotel, York and King streets
103. William White, Garrick's Head, York and King streets
104. John Malcom, Adelphi Hotel, York-st.
105. Joshua Hutchinson, Harp and Shamrock, York-street
106. John Ward, Redfern Inn, York street
107. Sarah Kilpatrick, Harp of Erin, York-st.
108. John Nobbs, Gardeners' Arms, York-st.
109. Christopher Somerville, Erin-go-Bragh, York-street
110. Thomas Buck, Lamb Inn, Clarence-street North
111. Thomas Thorn, White Hart, Clarence-st.
112. Abraham J. Levy, Solomon's Temple, Clarence-street
113. Joseph Davis, Crispin Arms, Clarence-st.
114. James Cavanagh, Australian Inn, Clarence-street
115. Joseph Spinks, White Hart, Clarence and King streets
116. Michael Blakeney, Leinster Arms Clarence and King streets
117. James Holloway, Blue Lion, Clarence and Market streets
118. Saul Solomon, Australian Hotel, Clarence-street
119. Patrick Conlan, Tradesman's Arms Clarence-street
120. William Wells, Lord Nelson Hotel, Kent and Argyle streets
121. Ralph Benjamin, Dumbarton Castle, Kent-street
122. Andrew Goodwin, Lord Rodney, Kent-st.
123. William Davis, Gas Hotel, Kent-street
124. James Gomme Stanes, Steam Navigation Inn, Kent-street
125. Joseph Kelp, Steam-boat Inn, Kent-street
126. David Fernandez, Green Dragon, Kent and Erskine streets
127. Dulcibella Beath, Masonic Arms, Kent and Erskine streets
128. James Prescott, City Inn, Kent street
129. William Murphy, Wollongong Hotel, Kent and King streets
130. William Brinkley, St. Andrew's Tavern, Kent and King streets
131. Hugh F. O'Donnell, Australian, Kent and Market streets
132. George John Jilks, Union Inn, Kent-st.
133. John Lonergan, Ship Inn, Kent-street
134. John Smedley, Brisbane Inn, Kent-street 135 Refused
136. Jane Woodriffe, Macquarie Inn, Kent and Bathurst streets
137. Andrew Scotland, Hunter River Inn, Sussex-street
138. William Carss, Clarence River Inn, Sussex street
139. Duncan McLennon, Ship Inn, Sussex-st. 140 Refused
141. Robert Henderson, Dove Inn, Sussex and Erskine streets
142. Thomas Stewart, Royal Oak, Sussex and Erskine-streets
143. Patrick Casey, Toll Bar Inn, Botany Road
144. James Maxwell, Saracen's, Head, Sussex and King streets
145. William Stevens, Patent Slip, Sussex and King streets
146. James Yied, Commercial Hotel, Sussex and King streets
147. Henry Linden, Woolpack, Sussex-street
148. James Clarke, Governor Bourke, Sussex-street
149. Cornelius Murray, Cheshire Cheese, Sussex-street
150. Cornelius O'Neal, Darling Harbour Inn, Sussex-street
151. Matthew Charlton, Charlton's Hotel, Market Wharf
152. George Coleson, George and Dragon, Market Wharf
153. George Spears, New Inn, Sussex-street
154. Matthew Hezlett, Labour in Vain, Sussex-street
155. Susan Leggatt, Hope and Anchor, Sussex-street
156. John Kirkman, Lancashire Arms, Sussex-street
157. Alexander Gray, Light House Hotel,Sussex-street
168. Daniel Bissland, Sir Walter Scott, Sussex-street
159. James Smail, Robert Burns, Sussex-street
160. Eliza Boyle, Builders' Arms, Sussex-street
161. Patrick Comerford, Angel and Crown, Sussex-street
162. William Harrison, Butchers' Arms, Susex-street
163. Patrick Lee, Harp of Erin, Sussex-street
164. Jane Coulson, Whitehaven Castle, Sussex-street
165. William Cole, Bee Hive, Prince and Arglye streets
166. Edwin Marlow, Neptune Inn, Prince st.
167. Thomas Buxton, Glenmore Cottage, Prince-street
168. James Casey, Rock of Cashel, Cumberland-street
169. Edward T. McDonald, Forth and Clyde, Cumberland street
170. John Hurley, Coach and Horses, Cumberland-street
170.Charles James Bullivant, Three Crowns,Cumberland-street
171. John Sims, Whalers' Arms, Gloucester-street
172. William Andrews, Ship and Mermaid, Gloucester-street
173. Richard Wild, Black Dog, Gloucester st.
174. John Bruffell, Ship Inn, Gloucester-street
175. John Rochester, Erin-go-Bragh, Cambridge street
176. Margaret Brown, Rose and Crown, Argyle-street
177. Jonathan Brown, Hero of Waterloo, Fort and Windmill streets
178. William Ford, Napoleon Inn, Windmill-street
179. James Merriman, Whaler's Arms, Miller's Point
180. John Pomroy Bond, Royal Oak, Miller's Point
181. Lawrence Kearney, Captain Cook, Miller's Point
182. Refused
183. George Clarke, Clarke's, Hotel, Circular Quay
184. William Collie, Circular Quay Hotel, Circular Quay
185. Henry Barnett, Royal Admiral, Macquarie-place
186. George Pike, Custom House Hotel, Macquarie-place
187. John Henderson, Dolphin Hotel, Bridge-street
188. Henry Webb, Captain Cook, Spring andBent streets
189. George Snell Clarke, Horse and Jockey, O'Connell and Hunter streets
190. Refused
191. John Raynor, Star Inn, Phillip and Hunter streets
192. Robert Edward Heaney, Lord Nelson Inn, Phillip and Hunter streets
193. Anthony Tuohy, Lemon Tree, Phillip-street
194. William Baxter, Sir Maurice O'Connell, Elizabeth and Hunter streets
195. Richard Driver, Three Tuns, Elizabeth and King streets
196. Durell De la Faste, Cricketers' Hotel, Elizabeth street
197. Mountford Clarkson, Spread Eagle, Elizabeth-street
198. Charles Roberts, Crown Inn, Elizabeth and Goulburn streets
199. William A. Cahill, Albion Hotel, Elizabeth-street
200. Joseph Coquelin, Cheshire Cheese, Elizabeth street
201. James Kelly, Friendship Inn, Bathurst-st.
202. Robert Maxwell, Sir William Wallace, Bathurst street
203. Sarah Wallis, Hand and Heart, Liverpool and Dixon streets
204. Timothy Alfred Cowell, Builders' Arms, Liverpool and Charles streets
205. Thomas Quigley, St. Patrick's Inn, Goulburn-street
206. Arthur Walker, Picton Arms, Campbell-street
207. Maurice Walsh, Bee Hive, Campbell-st.
208. Philip Hart, Harp, Campbell-street
209. Richard Loseby, Pack Horse, Campbell-street
210. Elizabeth Benham, Museum Hotel, Woolloomoolo
211. Michael O'Keefe, Richmond Hotel, Woolloomooloo
212. Charles Shaw, Boomarang, Woolloomooloo
212. John Walpole Ireland, Cottage of Content, Woolloomooloo-street
213. Joseph Carter, Dublin Castle, Crown-st.
214. William Ebbetts, Fitz Roy Hotel, William and Palmer streets
215. Frederick Thompson, Riley Arms, Woolloomooloo and Riley streets
216. Thomas Baker, Woolloomooloo Inn, William-street, Woolloomooloo
217. Zachariah S. Moore, Sir Maurice O'Connell, Riley-street, Woolloomooloo
218. Charles Morris, Willow Tree, Victoria-street, Woolloomooloo
219. Joseph Brady, Shamrock, Woolloomooloo and Crown streets
220. Daniel Clarke, White Conduit House, Rushcutter Bay
221. Alexander Kyle, Terrace Inn, South Head Road
222. Thomas Blake, Robin Hood, South Head Road
223. Anthony Finn, Pelican Hotel, South Head Road
224. Robert Steel, Rising Sun, South Head Road
225. James Teare, Eagle Tavern, South Head Road
226. William Osborn, Half Moon Inn, South Head Road
227. Christina McDonald, Downshire Arms, South Head Road
228. Stephen Newby, Sportsman's Arms, South Head Road
229. Jane Elizabeth Allison, Queen's Arms, South Head Road
230. Jeremiah Healey, Victoria Inn, South Head Road
231. Thomas Taylor, Happy Vale, South Head Road
232. Benjamin Haigh, Rose and Crown, Glenmore Road
233. Margaret Canavan, Greenwood Tree, South Head Road
234. Michael Newman, Odd Fellows' Arms, South Head Road
235. Isabella Gilchrist, Greenwood Tree, South Head Road
236. John Wilson, Sir William Wallace, South Head Road
237. Thomas Hopkins, Prince Albert Inn, South Head Road
238. Jane Beard, Paddington Inn, Paddington
239. Elizabeth Marshall, Waverley Hotel, Waverley
240. Thomas Newell, South Head Hotel, South Head
241. George Francis Baker, Green Isle, Bourke street, Surry Hills
242. Joseph Benjamin Oliffe, Cookatoo Inn, Bourke-street, Surry Hills
243. John Barlow, Pine Apple, Cross-street, Surry Hills
244. James Bluck, Bluck's Family Hotel, Surry Hills
245. John Robinson, Boundary Stone, Surry Hills
246. Thomas Curtis, Bristol Inn, Crown and Campbell streets
247. Emanuel Martin, Madeira Inn, Devonshire-street
248. Thomas Wheeler, Strawberry Hill Inn, Strawberry Hill
249. William Walsh, Napoleon Inn, Kensington-street
250. David Armstrong, Crown Inn, Chippendale
251. Daniel Hickey, Old Rock of Cashel, Chippendale.
252. William Ryan, Railroad Inn, Chippendale
253. John Doyle, Stirling Castle, Chippendale
254. John Maillon, Chippendale Hotel, Chippendale
255. Michael Williamson, Belfast Wine Vaults, Botany Road
255. Patrick Casey, Toll Bar Inn, Botany Road
256. James Chamlis, Redfern Inn, Redfern
257. Daniel Toole, General Gough, Botany Road
258 Refused ; leave given to make application on Monday next for re-hearing.
259. Honora Simes, Pilot Inn, Parramatta and Harris streets
260. William Sullivan, Erin's Green Isle, Parramatta street
261. Thomas Bass, Britannia Inn, Parramatta-street
262. William R. Green, Wellington Inn, Parramatta-street
263. John C. Webb, Red Bull, Parramatta-st.
264. Thomas Clune, Clare Castle, Parramatta-street
265. Joseph Holder, Albert Inn, Parramatta-street

On page 3

266. James Harris, Golden Anchor, Parramatta-street
267. George Williams, Australian Inn, Parramatta-street
268. Margaret Onan, Victoria Inn, Parramatta-street
269. Phil Macdermott, Sportsman, Parramatta-street
270. Peter Brenan, Coopers' Arms, Pyrmont
271. Thomas Burdon, Edinburgh Castle, Pyrmont
272. John Clissold, Foresters' Arms, Glebe
273. Edward Cadden, Glebe Tavern, Glebe
274. James Simpson, Lady of the Lake, Glebe
275. Michael Doyle, Captain Cook, Botany
276. William Beaumont, Sir Joseph Banks, Botany
277. Andrew Guy, Sportsman's Arms, Newtown
278. Thomas Gettens, Robin Hood, Newtown
279. James W. Corbett, Antrim Arms, Newtown
280. Joseph Blackstone, White Horse Inn, Newtown
281. Robert Bates, St. John's Tavern, Newtown
282. George Rose, Pulteney Hotel, Cook's River
283. Michael Gannon, Union Inn, Cook's River
284. William Trinby, Bold Forester, Cook's River
285. Evan Evans, Man of Kent, Cook's River
286. John File, Canterbury Arms, Canterbury
287. Refused 288 Refused
289. William James Stack, Sugar Loaf Inn, Canterbury
290. Thomas Collins, Omnibus Inn, Parramatta Road
291. Richard Williams, Sir Richard Bourke, Parramatta Road
292. William Walker, Union Inn, Camperdown
293. Thomas Perren, Victoria Inn, Camperdown
294. William O'Brien, Royal Oak, Camperdown
295. John Lucas, Patriot, Camperdown 296 Refused
297. George Shirbin, Red Lion, Parramatta Road
298. Not entertained ; applicant being an uncertificated insolvent
299. Thomas Weedon, Cherry Gardens, Parramatta Road
300. Charles Hearne, Baldfaced Stag, Parramatta Road
301. Robert Oliver, Woolpack Inn, Parramatta Road
302. John Jones, Wheelwrights' Arms, Parramatta Road
303. William Henson, Norwood Inn, Parra-matta Road
304. James Clifton, Union Inn, Parramatta Road
305. Jane Hill, Cheshire Cheese, Parramatta Road
306. Lawrence Ryan, Wheat Sheaf, Liverpool Road
307. Charles Whitney, Cottage of Content, Liverpool Road
308. George Davis, Bark Huts, Liverpool Road
309. Mary Aiton, Unity Hall, Balmain
310. Thomas Rostrow, Shipwrights' Arms, Balmain
311. James Barr, Balmain Hotel, Balmain
312. William Carter, Marquis of Waterford, Balmain
313. William Roberts, Burnbank Hotel, Balmain
314. Thomas Redgrave, Fig Tree Cottage, North Shore
315. Susannah Lavender, Macquarie Inn, North Shore
316. William Dind, Lily of St Leonard's, North Shore
317. Isabella Beirne, Union Inn, North Shore
318. Daniel Gallagher, Traveller's Home, Lane Cove
Note.An application was made by Samuel Taylor, of Canterbury, that a license might be granted to a house occupied by him, to be called the Rising Sun, but having been lodged with the Chief Constable a day too late it was not published with the other applications. It is believed that application will be made for the welfare of the magistrates that it is one of those special applications which the Governor may grant with advantage to the public.

Our First Farmer - Colony of New South Wales

The claim on the headstone of James Ruse 1760-1837 that he sowed the first grain in the Colony is not accurate. Ruse certainly was the first person to cultivate the ground for his own benefit, but he was not our first farmer. That distinction belongs to Henry Edward Dodd, Governor Phillip's servant, who was instructed by him to cultivate an area of ground near Sydney Harbour on part of the present Botanical Gardens, called Farm Cove to the present day. That was during 1788.
The Farm Cove attempt failing, Phillip turned his attention to Rose Hill, afterwards called Parramatta, and Dodd was instructed to commence operations west of the present town. This area became known as the Government Farms, and was situated between Westmead and Wentworthville. Here was gathered the first harvest in the colony during December, 1780, It consisted of two hundred bushels of wheat, sixty bushels of barley, and a small quantity of flax corn and oats. This was a few weeks after Ruse entered into possession of his grant and twelve months before he reaped his first harvest.
This, of course, does not detract from the credit due to Ruse as the first to cultivate the ground on his own behalf, but it is not an historical fact to assort that he sowed the first grain.
Henry Edward Dodd died in 1791, and is buried in St. John's Cemetery, Parramatta, his grave being marked by a large flat stone inscribed with his name and the year of his death.
In "The History of New South Wales" we read, "The first farm in the colony was at Farm Cove, whence its name." And there nine acres were laid in corn soon after the settlement was formed. But nine acres were not enough, and Phillip had to explore the country for bettor soil. The only available land he found, was at a place which he had named Rose Hill, not knowing at the time that the native name was Parramatta. Here in November, 1788, he commenced operations on a large scale, In a foot note to page 142 we read that Phillip, "had luckily brought out with him. from England a man servant who, joined to much agricultural knowledge a perfect idea of the labour to be required from and that might be performed by the convicts. This man was said to be the only free person in the colony who had any knowledges of farming."
Thirty years ago I often found military buttons, old coins, portions of old farming tools, and, on one occasion, a pair of leg irons in the paddocks just west of Hawkesbury Road, Westmead, when part of this area was cultivated by the late Richard Houison (d:1922). Subsequently the timber on the portion near the railway line was cut down by my old friend, the late William Garner.
In the early records reference is made to the sufferings of the convicts working at Toongabbie. Large numbers died every week from overwork, exposure, and insufficient food, I remember many years ago a round flat stone being found close to the railway at Wentworthville, which had been the floor of one of the sentry boxes, and there is a similar stone near tho railway close to the bridge in Parramatta Park, east of Westmead.

Source:
William Freame
Nepean Times
Saturday 21 January 1933
Page 5
Transcription, janilye 2012

ST. PETER'S OLD CEMETERY Richmond NSW.

St. Peter's Churchyard, Richmond is one of the most historical in the State of New South Wales. ln it are buried many old pioneers of the Nepean district. It was consecrated in 1814, but the earliest burials date from 1809. Several buried there reached very great ages. There were six who lived 90 to 100 years, and 47 who lived from 80 to 90 years. William Magick [sic] who died June 6, 1860, was 108 years when he passed away. The oldest date seen is that of George Rouse, who died on September 9, 1809; his father, Richard Rouse, arrived in the colony in 1801 by the ship 'Nile,' the ship that brought Margaret Catchpole to these shores. One of the oldest vaults bears the names of Thomas Hobby, Esq., formerly of the 102nd Regiment, who died January 8, 1833, aged 57; and Ann Elizabeth, his wife, died June 6, 1839, aged 72 years.
An old stone bears the name of Joseph Hobson, killed by the blacks 1816; Thomas Spencer, who was a marine in the first fleet, died 1821; Thomas 'Jonds,' arrived in 1792, died December 12, 1817.
The most curious epitaph is that of John Sutherland, died 1830. It reads:"Afflictions long time I bore; Physicians was in vain; Till God did please to give me ease, and free me from my pane."
William Harrington, of the 73rd Regiment, arrived 1810, and died !
In the same ground are the remains of two men who were hanged for stealing a bullock, The register in forms us that, the wife of one died of grief a few days after.
The epitaph of John and Honor Bowman concludes: "Without a trouble or a fear, they mingled with the dead." John Bowman, died 1813.
There are two headstones, both broken and fallen, that hold history, Ellen Innes, died August 2, 1853, aged 23 years, and Jacob Innes, died 1849 aged 69, lying between them there is another, the inscription downwards.
The Cox vault is in need of repair. It bears the names of William Cox, of "Hobartville," died 20/1/1850, aged 60; Sloper Cox, died 24/9/1877, aged 53; Francis, wife of Henry Cox, died 15/8/1851; and Louisa Stafford, wife of Charles C. Cox, died 6/7/1850.
Two old names are those of Catherine Hand, died 4/2/1825, aged 48 and Patrick Hand, died 15/12/1827, aged 50.
One notices the many generations of the same families buried in this churchyard, notably the Cornwells Farlows, Singles, Draytons, Towns, Travis, and the Marlins; John Single, born 1791, died 28/1/1858, and Sarah, his wife, born 1801, died 27/9/1868; John Towns, died 27/10/1846, aged 77; Mary Farlow, died 22/10/1842, aged 36; William Farlow, died 6/12/1864, aged 55; Ellen Maria, his widow, died 27/5/1900; Phillip Marlin, died 29/ 9/1859); Abraham Cornwell, died 18/7/1884, aged 82; Susannah, his relict, born Richmond 10/6/1807, died Bathurst 13/6/1888; William Drayton, died 20/11 /1925, aged 78; Emily Drayton, died 2/2/1930; William Drayton, died 30/1/1855, aged 46; Henry Drayton, died 1/4/1874, aged 57.
The Dights were an old family. Mary Dight, born 1804, died 1819; Sarah Dight, born 1800, died 17/2/1832; John Dight, born 1772, died 2/7/1837; George Dight, born 1810, died' 26/2/1851 and Hannah Dight, born 1781, died 27/5/1862
Several of the inscriptions are so faded as to make them wholly or partly indecipherable, and rather than perpetuate an error I will omit names and dates I have not been able to read. We will continue With the names of John Barwick, died 7/5/1858, aged 65; and Charlotte, his wife, died 14/7/1893, aged 93 years; George Barwick, died 8/12/1864, aged 16; Mary Leonard, died 1849, aged 29; William Aull, died 1830, aged 26; Thomas Cross, died 10/3/1843, aged 66; and Martha, his wife died 3/9/1839, aged 42; George Howell, died 22/2/1839, aged 79; Hannah Howell, died 2/10/1851, aged 81; Peter Howell, died 16/4/1861, aged 49; Elizabeth Ann Howell, died 3/8/1885, aged' 78; Thomas Griffiths, died 1826, aged 29; Thomas Griffiths, died 1910, aged 70 ; Albert Uriah Hibbert, accidentally killed on 26/4/1897, aged 27; Frederick J. Griffiths, died from a gunshot wound on 1897, aged 22; and Thomas, Gordon Griffiths, accidentally killed at Clarendon Camp on 26/4/1905; aged 4 year's. What a sequence of tragedies!
Names on other tombstones include: Sarah Sharpe, died 3/12/1836, aged 55; William sharpe, died 17/11/1897, aged 88; Mary Mason, died 1835; William Mason, died 27/3/1839; Thomas teaton, died 2/9/1840; aged 45; Francis Willis, died 3/6/1840, aged 33; Job Moore, died 17/11/1840; Sarah Begley; died 29/4/1839, aged 50; Mary Richardson, died 22/11/1839, aged 35; Thomas Huxley, died 1834, aged 84; Elizabeth Bridger, died 4/9/ 1840, aged 42; William Bridger, died 11/12/1859, aged 92; Mary Hives, died , 25/6/1837, aged. 30; Joseph Young, died 1842, aged 29 ; Catherine Bishop, died 24/8/1835, aged 62; Elias Bishop; died 26/9/1835, aged 65; John Henderson, died 11/10/1846, aged 81; John Fawcett, died 27/9/1847, aged 58; Stephen Field, died 26/7/1883; Jacob Innes, died 1849, aged 69; Ellen Innes, died 2/8/1853, aged 23 the two Innes headstones have fallen and broken William Faithful, died 16/4/1847, aged 73; and Susanna; his wife, died 5/9/1820, aged 46; and Maria, his widow, died 29/5/1859,' aged 65. (Note. It will be seen that William Faithful, married 'twice, his second wife surviving. him. W.F.,).
William Bowman, born 1799, died- 11/12/1874; and Elizabeth, his wife, born 1798, died 21/11/1885 ; Laban White, died 5/9/1875, aged 80 years; and Jane, his wife, died 12/3/1846, aged 68 years; Jane Guest, born 1818, died 20/3/1865; George Guest, born. 1811, died 9/2/1893; Matilda Guest, died 26/1/1853, aged 18 months; Grace, the wife of Robert Lambert, late of 'Holwood,' King's Plains, Bathurst, died 16/2/1849, aged 65 years; Edward Merrick, died 1839, aged 76 years; James Watson, died 20/1/1853, aged 43; John Greenhalch, died 1832; Margaret Patton, died 8/5/1831, aged 27 years; Elijah Lane died 1826; Catherine Hand, died 4/2/1825; aged 48 years,' and Patrick Hand, died 15/12/ 1827. (Note. The name Greenhalch is usually spelt 'Greenhalgh,' but I have spelt it as I found it on the stone. Probably the stone cutter erred. W.F.)
We now notice a few more notable names, such as John Town, senr. died 27/10/1846, aged 77; Mary Town, died 26/5/1852, aged 80; William Town, died 5/5/1868, aged 51; Mary Town, died 4/4/1886, aged 67; Andrew Town, born. 1840, died 10/2/1890; also two children and John Thomas Town, son of John and Julia Town born 1863, died 7/11/1929; Thomas Hobby, Esq., formerly of the 102nd Regiment, died 8/1/1833, aged 57; and Ann Elizabeth Hobby, died 30/6/1839, aged 72 years; William Magick, died 16/6/1860, aged 108 years; and Elizabeth, his wife, died 8/8/1869, aged 80; Isaac Cribb, died 1841 [sic]; James Cribb, died 13/7/1841; Samuel Thorley, died 9/8/1821, aged, 53; and Agnes, his wife, died 18/4/1821, aged 47. George Rouse, died 23/9/1809, aged 5 years; Elizabeth Rouse, died 1/8/1811, aged 19 days; Elizabeth Rouse, their mother, died 28/12/1849, aged 76; and Richard Rouse, the head of the family, who, having arrived in this colony in the ship 'Nile' in 1801, departed this life 18/5/1852, aged 78; also John Richard Rouse, died 10/2/1873, aged 72; George Rouse, born 27/7/1816, died 29/7/ 1888; and Elizabeth, his wife, died 1/3/1863, aged 42; also 2 children. Maria Gow, died 26/9/1865, aged 59; William P. T. Gow, died 2/2/1872, aged 77; Mary Ann Powell, died 30/11/1870, aged 30; Henry Powell, died 14/2/1920, aged 84; Ann Powell, died 1921, aged 75; Wm. Ritchie, died 1856. aged 42; Geo. Sutherland, died 4/6/1850, aged 49; Mary, wife of Robert Martin, died 3/3/ 1841, aged 78; Robert Martin, senr., died 15/6/1846, aged 79; Mart Martin, junr., died 7/10/1855, aged 60; Robert Martin, junr., born 1797, died 11/9/1872; Wm. Martin, junr. born 1832, died 4/5/1871; Henry Newcomen, died 10/10/1884, aged 61; and Emily Jane, his wife, died 6/4/1871; Andrew Wellington Hough, born 1864, died 20/12/1870; Mary Ann, wife of George Hough, died 16/6/1875, aged 55; George Hough, died 25/12/1878, aged 64; and Mary Ann Hough, died 5/2/1911, aged 71; Mary Dight, born 1804, died 26/12/1819; Sarah Dight, born 1800, died 17/2/1832; John. Dight, born 1772, died 2/7/1837; George Dight born 1810, died 26/2/1851; Hannah Dight, born 1781, died 27/5/1862; Sophia Thurston, died 23/6/1825, aged 2 years and 7 months; Mary Ann Crosbie, died 1877, aged 73. John Gordon Town, died 9/4/1883, aged 70 and Elizabeth, his wife, died 23/8/l882, aged 71 years; Wm. Gordon, 3rd son of the above, died 25/12/1858, aged 20; Frederick M., son of G. M. and E. Pitt, died 16/6/1903, aged 36; Elizabeth, wife of George Matcham Pitt, died 18/10/1908, aged 7'5; George Mat chem Pitt, died 19/3/1912, aged 74; Clarence M. Pitt, died 30/7/1920, aged 51. One of the oldest vaults bears the names of Sloper Cox, died 24/9/1877, aged 53; Frances Cox, wife of Henry Cox, died 15/8/1851; Louisa Stafford Cox, died 6/7/1856; William Cox, Esq., of 'Hobartville,' died 20/1/1850, aged 60; also two infant children. Part of the inscriptions on this vault are freeting away. On one of the largest vaults we read the names of Benjamin Richards, born 1818, died 5/3/1898; and Elizabeth, his wife, born 1821, died 30/7/1896; and Mary Ann, their eldest daughter, died 11/11/1867; Elizabeth, wife of Theodore Charles Badgery, died 27/i8/1870; Lucetta, 4th daughter, born 1857, died 18/1/1874; Wallace, 5th son, born 1865, died 11/10/1880; William James, 2nd son, born 1846, died 2/8/1885.
Many well-known names are seen on, another vault, viz., Mary Farlow, died 22/10/1842, aged 36; William Farlow; died 6/12/1864, aged 55; Ellen Maria, his widow, died 27/5/1900, aged 75; Emily, wife of Robert W. Farlow, died 7/11/1900, aged 56; Robert W. Farlow, died 16/6/1913, aged 83 years; and also several of recent dates.
The Skuthorpe vault is difficult to read. On it we see the name of Mary Ann Skuthorpe, died 20/2/1854, aged 32; and John Long, died 2/1/1856, aged 26.
The Onus vault bears several names from which we copy: Joseph Onus, died 22/6/1835, aged 54; Thomas Onus, died 28/3/1855, aged 35; William Onus, died 8/5/1855, aged, 33. On another stone are Joseph Onus, died 22/4/1891. He was born in 1840; also Emma, wife of Joseph Onus, died 30/11/1865. Other well known names seen are John Single, born 1791, died 28/l/1858; and Sarah, his wife, born 1801, died 27/9/1868; Sarah Wilmot, their daughter, died 1871; Alfred, Single, died 5/11/1889, aged 48; Henry Single, died 5/7/1896, aged 66. Abraham Cornwell, died 18/7/1884, aged 82; and Susannah, his wife, born at Richmond 10/6/1807, died at Bathurst 1888; John Cornwell, died 26/8/1914, aged 82; also Ann Cornwell, died 20/2/1915, aged 81 years. Louis Jockel, 10 years Government Medical Officer at Richmond, died 20/5/1888, aged 37; and Martha, his wife, died 13/7/1922, and buried at Manly; William Drayton, died 30/1/1855, aged 46; and Harriet Province, his widow, died 1886 aged 68; Mary Ellen Drayton, born 1853, died 23/5/1858; Henry Drayton, died 1/4/1874, aged 57; Jane Drayton, died 8/10/1876; William Paris, died 18/3/1840, aged 52; Phillip Marlin, died 29/9/1859; James Burril; died 6/10/1858, aged 34; James Douglas, died 24/11/1858, aged 41; Mary Ann Norris, died 8/2/1856, aged 49; Mary'Biddle, died 7/3/1855, aged 32; James Andrew Biddle, died 11/3/ 1879, aged 22.
We again come across a few old dates, viz., Thomas Wheeler, died 15/2/1820; Thomas Mason, died 27/11/1827, aged 46; Mary Ann, the wife of Mr. Charles Palmer, died 1824; Ephriam Palmer, died 1827; Athelia Stack, died 1839; Charles Palmer, died 14/4/1846;. and Mary Ann Stack, died 26/4/1829, aged 14 months.
The Williams vault bears many names. We mention Robert Williams, born 1794, died, 28/11/1839; Mary Ann Williams, born 1850, died 14/10/1852; Charlotte Malony, born 1795, died 1862; Jane Williams, born 1826,. died 18/12/1873; Thomas Williams, born 1824, died 26/7/1888;. John Eather Williams, died 25/1/1917, aged 83; Ann Eather Williams, died 1/8/1913, aged 83.
The most imposing monument in the cemetery is the Hordern memorial inscribed with the names of Edward Hordern, senr. died 14/8/1883, aged 45; and Christina, his wife, died. 24/4/1904, aged 59; and Cecil, son of Edward Hordern, senr.; died 14/9/1931, aged 63 years.

Since commencing , these articles I have seen the report of the consecration of St. Peter's. As a record it may be not only interesting, but also useful: In the Sydney Herald' of Monday, July 19, 1841, there is a brief account of the opening and the consecration of the church by the Lord Bishop of Australia on the previous Thursday, when all the respectable families of the town and neighborhood were present. In the 'Herald' of July 22, 1841, there is a fuller report of the event. Rev. T. Hassal acted as chancellor, Rev. H. T., Stiles read the prayers, and Bishop Broughton, after the consecration, preached, his text being Matt. 16 vlS. Revs. R. Allwood, T. Makinson, W. B. Clarke, E. S. Pryce, C. Kemp, and J. Vincent were also present in the chancel. After the service the Bishop, clergy, police magistrate, etc., were entertained, at 'Hobartville' by Mr. and Mrs. W. Cox.


Sources:
Expressly written By WILLIAM FREAME for the
Windsor and Richmond Gazette in 1933
Saturday 25 February 1933
Page 3
Friday 10 March 1933
Page 8
Transcription, janilye 2014

William Freame, b:27 November 1867 in Geelong Victoria and died at Randwick in New South Wales on the 19 September 1933, was a familiar figure, in every historic cemetery in New South Wales and Victoria, and an authority on Australian genealogy. Mr.Freame, spent many years copying and preserving the inscriptions on headstones at St. John's, Ebenezer, Camden, Windsor and other cemeteries, and it was he who rediscovered the headstones of Thomas Allen, Sydney's first miller, and a number of other pioneers. He wrote a number of historical books, including "Sweet St. Marys." Mr. Freame represented the 'Evening News' in the Parramatta district for many years, and contributed to the Nepean Times. He was an alderman of Holroyd for more than 20 years and also a life member of the Parramatta District Hospital, a member of the Black Preceptory, of the L.O.L. and of Masonic Lodge, worthville. He was a founder of the Parramatta and Windsor, Historical Societies.