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Jane Charlotte Eather 1851-1897

Jane Charlotte, the second child to survive infancy in the family of Thomas EATHER 1824-1909
and Eliza, nee CROWLEY 1822-1897, was born at Bulga on Wollombi Brook on 14 January 1851 and grew up there on her parents' farm. As a child she attended school in the local St Mark's Church, which was used as a school house on week days. At the age of 24 Jane was married on 8 October 1875 to Samuel PARTRIDGE, the 3rd. son of nine children to William PARTRIDGE 1818-1906 and Elizabeth nee RUSSELL 1822-1899 both from Kent, England, who were farming in the Bulga district. Samuel PARTRIDGE was known as Sam. He was very short in stature, being scarcely five feet (152 cm) in height. As a fourteen year-old boy he had been present during the hold-up on Warlands Range, when Peter CLARK 1837-1863 had been killed. It was Sam who had ridden off to Murrurundi to alert the police.
The young couple settled on a farm in the Bulga district and over the years had a family of four sons and one daughter.

1.Edgar Clarihew PARTRIDGE 1875-1960, their eldest son, married Susan Jane METTAM on 2 October 1905. The daughter of James METTAM 1838-1930 and Elizabeth, nee MERCER 1842-1880. They had two sons and five daughters. Both the sons died in childhood. All the five daughters married and four had issue numbering fifteen altogether.
Edgar and Susan both enjoyed long lives. They had been married for 55 years when Edgar died at the age of 85 on 28 November 1960. Susan survived him by over eight years and was 92 when she passed away on 6 July 1969.

2.Vera Caroline PARTRIDGE 1879-1941, the eldest daughter of Jane and Samuel, married Alfred CLARK 1864-1951 on 19 April 1911 when she was 32. He was generally known as Andrew and was about fifteen years older than her. They had two sons and a daughter.

3.Guy Russell PARTRIDGE 1881-1954, the second son and third child of Jane and Samuel, married Elizabeth Hazel SQUIRE on 2 November 1940 at Singleton. She was the daughter of Victor William SQUIRE 1878-1930 and Annie Felicia, nee CLARK 1891-1970. Annie was a daughter of Jane's sister Sarah Eather 1861-1923 who had married Ashton CLARK. Therefore Guy and Elizabeth were first cousins once removed. He turned 60 in the month that he married. His bride had been born at Quirindi on 29 March 1918 and was 22. They had three sons all born at Singleton.

4.The fourth child of Jane and Samuel Partridge, Oscar EATHER PARTRIDGE 1884-1963, he married Ethel Florence Isolda May MORGAN 1885-1962 in 1911 at Armidale, NSW. She had been born at Armidale 17 September 1885, the daughter of Hananiah MORGAN 1846-1904 and his wife, Jemima Agnes, nee McMICHAEL 1852-1928. They had four sons. Oscar died at Traralgin in Victoria in 1963 at the age of 88.

5.The fourth son and fifth child Darrell PARTRIDGE 1891-1953 married Ada Teresa CALLAGHAN 1893-1979 the daughter of Patrick and Margaret CALLAGHAN from Dungog, New South Wales.

Jane PARTRIDGE who suffered from heart disease, died suddenly whilst doing her housework on 3 June 1897 at the early age of 46, so she did not live to see any of her children married or any of her grandchildren. Samuel survived her by 31 years. Beulah SQUIRE, a sister of Guy PARTRIDGE's wife, lived at her parents' home "Gerale" at Bulga when she was young. In later years she remembered Samuel PARTRIDGE - 'Uncle Sam'. He used to go to "Gerale" every Saturday. He rode a pretty cream horse and tied it up behind the cow bails. When the school van was running, Beulah and her siblings caught it at Bill COOKE's gate. Uncle Sam used to time his arrival from town to be at the gate so that the young ones could open it for him. He then used to give them a lift down to his gate, thereby saving himself from having to open and close three gates. Sam was a small man, as were his two brothers. Sam's brother Peter PARTRIDGE 1859-1918 married Amy Hilton CLARK daughter of Macdonald CLARK 1836-1918 and Susannah, nee MCALPIN 1842-1882 at Patrick's Plain in 1887. Sam was age 72 years when he died on 11 June 1928 - his death was registered at Singleton, New South Wales
Sam and Jane are buried together at St.Mark's Church of England Cemetery, Bulga, New South Wales.

The photo below was taken in 1896, at the side of Thomas EATHER's house 'Meerea' at Bulga, NSW
Standing from left Peter McAlpin, William Glas McAlpin, William Partridge 1817-1906
Sitting Thomas Eather, Eliza Eather, nee Crowley, Elizabeth Partridge, nee Russell 1822-1899 and James Coe 1828-1910
Sitting in front is Elizabeth McDonald relict of James Swales Clark.
There are altogether 12 people in this photograph unfortunately not all are shown here, Mrs Sarah Coe, nee Howard 1828 - 1908 is seated beside her husband; whilst on the left-hand side were Thomas Hayes 1824 - 1914 with his wife Mary Ann , nee Broughton 1826 - 1904 and standing behind them is Mrs. Susannah Holmes, nee Taylor. All are related by marriage except for Mrs. Holmes.


DEMOLITION OF "THE DOG AND DUCK" HOTEL. 1896

An Old Landmark.
One by one Sydney's old buildings are being demolished, to make room for more up-to-date structures. The latest marked for destruction are the premises on Brickfield Hill, known for over half a century as the 'Dog and Duck Hotel. For the past few years the building has ceased to supply intoxicants, but has still catered for the inner man, a portion being in the occupancy of Mr. Denton, butcher.
Erected early in the thirties and in close proximity to the old cattle markets and the carriers' camping ground, the 'Dog and Duck ' was, in the ante-railway days, the principal resort for farmers and teamsters visiting Sydney on business or pleasure. This fact, in the "old days," naturally attracted to the 'Dog and Duck' not inconsideraide numbers of the sharping fraternity, who considered the countrymen easy prey. Some curious stories are, however, told concerning spoilers on whom the tables were turned.
When the 'Dog and Duck' was erected it was evidently intended to stand for many years, being most substantially built of stone, with enormous iron bark beams, squared soley by the axe. The walls are 2ft. in thickness, and each of the two storeys of which the building consists is remarkable for its paucity of windows and the lowness of the rooms.
Later in its career the 'Dog and Duck' had additional accommodation, in brick, tacked on to the original structure. At the rear of the premises are the remains of an old skittle-alley, wherein, it is stated, considerable money has changed hands.
In the latter days of its existence as an hotel, the 'Dog and Duck' was not identified with the skittle-alley which was sublet, and it was while thus occupied that a police raid was made, and over thirty men arrested on a charge of gambling, the cases, however, all being dismissed at the police court.



Source:
Evening News Sydney, NSW
Thursday 8 October 1896

The first Kingswell - Malta

The first 'Kingswell' in Malta was James Kingswell a civil engineer born in Deptford, Kent about 1782 and died in Westminster, London in 1847
He married Lydia Payne 1779-1835 in Westminster on the 15 September 1805.
The couple after their first six children were born went to Malta about 1820 James taking up the position of Block Maker at the Naval Arsenal. They then had two more children born in Malta.

Here is some info on the children of James and Lydia Kingswell:
Lydia Ann Kingswell b:1807 Deptford, Kent d: 1898 Lancashire, England m. Thomas RAMPLEY
Maria KINGSWELL b: 1809 Kent d: 1880 m. James MURRAY
Mary Anne KINGSWELL b: 1811 England m. Edward BEER
Sarah KINGSWELL b: 1813 Deptford d:1904 Wooloowin, Brisbane Queensland m. Samuel RANSLEY 1796 1843 of the Royal Navy. Their daughter Lydia Ransley married into the Australian OXENHAM family
James Kingswell b: 1816 Deptford. d: 1827 Malta
John KINGSWELL b: 1820 Deptford d: 1882 ?
William Kingswell b: 1823 Malta d: 1825 Malta
George Kingswell b:1825 Malta. d: 1902 a wardroom Steward with the Royal Navy m. Concetta Micaleff 1851 Malta
Edward Frederick KINGSWELL 1827

Sources:
From Malta Family History
Edward Frederick KINGSWELL, born 28th January 1827, the son of James and Lydia Kingswell, Block Maker in Naval Arsenal

George KINGSWELL, born 29th May 1825, the son of Lydia and James Kingswell, Block Maker in Naval Arsenal

James KINGSWELL, born 9th July 1816, the son of Lydia and James Kingswell, Block Maker in Naval Arsenal

James KINGSWELL, buried 10th October 1827, aged 11 years

John KINGSWELL, born 31st December 1820, the son of Lydia and James Kingswell, Block Maker in Naval Arsenal

John KINGSWELL, living at 8 Strada del Carmine, Cospicua, electoral list 1852

Lydia Ann KINGSWELL, 21+, spinster, of St.Nicholas Parish, Deptford, Kent, married 20th April 1830, to Thomas RAMPLEY, 21+, bachelor, of St.Lawrence Parish, Norwich

Maria KINGSWELL, born 16th September 1809, the daughter of Lydia and James Kingswell, Block Maker in Naval Arsenal

Maria KINGSWELL, of Kent, married 4th June 1826, to James MURRAY, 95th Regiment

Mary Anne KINGSWELL, born 5th August 1811, the daughter of Lydia and James Kingswell, Block Maker in Naval Arsenal

Mary Ann KINGSWELL, married 27th October 1829, to Edward BEER, Corporal, 95th Regiment

Sarah KINGSWELL, born 3rd October 1813, the daughter of Lydia and James Kingswell, Block Maker in Naval Arsenal

Sarah KINGSWELL, of Kent, married 29th June 1829, to Samuel RANSLEY, Colour-Sergeant, Rifle Brigade

William KINGSWELL, born 23rd February 1823, the son of Lydia and James Kingswell, of the Naval Arsenal

William KINGSWELL, buried 25th June 1825, aged 3 years, son of James and Lydia Kingswell

London, England, Marriages and Banns, 1754-1921
about Lydia Payne
Name: Lydia Payne
Spouse Name: James Kingswell
Record Type: Marriage
Event Date: 15 Sep 1805
Parish: Paddington St James
Borough: Westminster
Register Type: Parish Register


1861 England Census
about George Kingswell
Name: George Kingswell
Age: 37
Estimated Birth Year: abt 1824
Relation: Ward Room Steward (Ward)
Gender: Male
Where born: Malta
Civil parish: Vessels
Town: Malta
County/Island: Royal Navy
Country: England
Street Address:
Occupation: Ward Room Steward
Registration district: Royal Navy
Sub-registration district: Royal Navy
ED, institution, or vessel: Hiberhin
Neighbors: View others on page
Household schedule number: 1
Piece: 4440
Folio: 178
Page Number: 2

Malta as a Naval Base

Image below, navy hospital in the background fort ricasoli vittoriosa and dockyard
courtesy of www.carto.net


What's to become of your research?

Recently, I've had cause to investigate ways to preserve our family research,
after we go to join that great majority.
When visiting a former colleague's family after his untimely death,
I discovered they had thrown away almost 40 years of his
research when cleaning out his home.
After leaving, I sat in my car and wept,
as I'm sure he would have too. All those priceless photographs and documents - gone!

What you need to do is attach a form, like the following, to your
Last Will and Testament,as a codicil with the heading
Personal Requests.
It is not a legal document unless processed with your Will.
(Many funeral directors provide such forms or perhaps you can find one online.)
........................................................................................
IN THE EVENT OF MY DEATH PLEASE PASS ON
MY FAMILY HISTORY RESEARCH TO:

Interested family members provide name &
address. OR donate to the following institute.
Provide location of material & make sure material
is clearly marked & kept together,
preferably tied and boxed.

.........................................................................................

PLEASE GIVE MY HISTORICAL
FAMILY PHOTOGRAPHS TO:

Interested family members
provide name and address. OR
donate to the following institute.
Again provide location of material
and make sure it is clearly marked
and kept together.

.........................................................................................

All family trees online
show the location, username and passwords,
or where possible download them onto a Gedcom
file and include them with your research.
..........................................................................................

So as to make it all just so much easier for our
future family history researchers;
attach to your Will this personal information form which gives a
bit more than the usual information seen on a death certificate.
Also Death Certificate informants, you may have noticed
do not always provide the correct information :


SURNAME
CHRISTIAN NAMES
USUAL RESIDENCE
DATE OF BIRTH
PLACE OF BIRTH
FATHER'S NAME
FATHER'S BIRTH DATE
WHERE BORN
FATHER'S DEATH DATE
WHERE DIED
MOTHER'S NAME
MOTHER'S BIRTH DATE
WHERE BORN
MOTHER'S DEATH DATE
WHERE DIED
YOUR MARITAL STATUS
DETAILS OF MARRIAGE
DATE OF MARRIAGE
WHERE MARRIED
AGE WHEN MARRIED
FULL NAME OF SPOUSE OR SPOUSES
DETAILS OF CHILDREN (NAMES AND BIRTHDATES)
BANK ACCOUNTS
INSURANCE POLICIES
LOCATION OF TITLE DEEDS
FUNERAL PREFERENCES
LIST OF PERSONS, SOCIETIES AND CLUBS
TO BE NOTIFIED OF YOUR DEATH.
AND YOUR SECRET BANK ACCOUNTS IF ANY or
directions as to where the loot is stashed

Looking after your family Archive


George Leonard Lee 1860-1939

George Leonard LEE the son of John Leonard LEE 1833-1913 and
Mary, nee ECKFORD 1836-1883 was born in Maitland in 1860.
In 1896, George Leonard married Emma Onus TOWN 1867-1948 the
daughter of Andrew TOWN, of Hobartville 1840-1890 and
Emma Susannah ONUS 1843-1941.

This biography below is from the Dictionary of Australian Biography:-
[George Leonard Lee (1860-1939), soldier, was born on 25 June 1860 at West Maitland, New South Wales, son of John Lee, draper and later merchant, and his wife, Mary Ann ne Eckford. Educated at Sauchu House School, West Maitland, and Armidale Grammar School, he worked for a while in the family business, John Lee & Sons, West Maitland. He was a well-known horseman and sportsman, keen on polo.

On 4 October 1889 Lee was commissioned in the local troop of the New South Wales Lancers and during the maritime strike of 1890 acted as adjutant of the partially paid cavalry and mounted rifles who were enrolled as special police in Sydney. Next year he was sent to England for training and by October 1892 had qualified in an equitation course at the Cavalry School, Canterbury, at an Army Service Corps school and at the School of Musketry, Hythe; he also trained for several months with the 20th Hussars at Aldershot. After returning home he joined the New South Wales Permanent Military Forces in December 1892 as a captain and from then until June 1902 was adjutant of the New South Wales Lancers. The New South Wales Mounted Brigade's book of confidential reports contains laudatory references to him. During that time he was also acting staff officer, Mounted Brigade, for over two years, and commandant of the Cavalry School. On 2 January 1896 he married Emma Onus Town at St Ann's Anglican Church, Homebush, Sydney; they had no children.

On the outbreak of the South African War in October 1899 the New South Wales Lancers mobilized a draft to go from Sydney to reinforce their squadron which was proceeding to the war from England after training there. Lee, now a major, was in charge of the draft which joined the squadron in South Africa on 6 December. Lee then took command of the Lancer contingent from Captain C. F. Cox. His unit, part of Lieutenant-General French's force, was employed in operations around Colesberg, the relief of Kimberley, and actions at Paardeberg, Poplar Grove, Driefontein, Zand River, Johannesburg, Pretoria, Diamond Hill and in the Transvaal east of Pretoria to 26 October 1900 when the squadron's year of service ended. For his work in South Africa Lee was mentioned in dispatches and awarded the Distinguished Service Order.

Resuming duty with the Australian Military Forces, Lee was assistant adjutant general and chief staff officer in Victoria in 1902-07. Appointed to the Administrative and Instructional Staff in 1904, he became a lieutenant-colonel in 1909, having held brevet rank since 1902. He served in New South Wales from June 1907, and was commandant in Tasmania in 1911-12 and in Queensland in 1912-17. After that he was temporarily in command in New South Wales, with the honorary rank of major general from July 1918 until he was transferred to the retired list on 13 May 1920 as honorary lieutenant-general. He was aide-de-camp to the governor-general in 1915-20, and in 1917 was appointed C.M.G.

Warm tributes to Lee's personality and ability include praise of his fine horsemanship, geniality and ripe judgement; there was 'no hypocrisy in his make up' and he would not tolerate it in anyone under him. In retirement he worked two oyster leases at Port Stephens, New South Wales. He was a member of the Union Club, Sydney. Survived by his wife, he died on 13 April 1939 at Burwood and was cremated with Anglican rites.]

Citation details
Vernon, P. V., 'Lee, George Leonard (18601939)', Australian Dictionary of Biography, National Centre of Biography, Australian National University, http://adb.anu.edu.au/biography/lee-george-leonard-7146/text12335, accessed 12 July 2012.
This article was first published in hardcopy in Australian Dictionary of Biography, Volume 10, (MUP), 1986





OBITUARY
Printed in the Sydney Morning Herald,
Saturday 15 April 1939

LIEUTENANT-GENERAL G. L.LEE.
Lieutenant-General George Leonard Lee, who died on Thursday night,
aged 78, had a distinguished military career.
He received his first commission in the New South Wales Lancers in 1889,
and was subsequently adjutant of the Lancers for 10 years.
After reaching the rank of lieutenant-colonel he was appointed to the
administrative instructional staff of the permanent military forces.
He was Assistant Adjutant General and Chief Staff Officer in Victoria
from 1902 to 1907, Commandant in Tasmania from 1911 to 1912, and
Commandant in Queensland from 1912 to 1917.

He took part in the South African campaign, and was present at the
relief of Kimberley.
He was mentioned in despatches in 1901, and received the
Distinguished Service Order and the Queen's medal with six clasps.
He was created a C.M.G. in 1917.

A well-known sportsman and horseman, in his younger days he won renown
in many cross-country rides, winning more than one.

Before he was appointed to the permanent staff he was a member of the
firm of John Lee and Sons, general providers, West Maitland.
He was at one time Commandant of the Cavalry School of Instruction.
He was granted the rank of lieutenant-general when he retired from the
position of State Commandant in New South Wales 19 years ago."

Lieut.Gen. George Leonard LEE C.M.G D.S.O died on the 13 April 1939 at his residence,
58 Broughton Road, Homebush.
(the former residence of his mother-in-law, Emma Susannah TOWN)
His widow Emma Onus LEE died on the 15 April 1948, also at Broughton Road.


Goldfields Hotel Licenses, Victoria 1862

Saturday 21 June 1862
LICENSING COURT.
The following is a list of the applicants for publicans' licenses and the results
thereof:
John Frazer, Smythe's Creek Hotel, Linton road; no appearance; postponed
George Stoddart, Nugget HoteL Smythesdale; granted. The Bench expressed a
doubt as to whether Mr Stoddart's house was in the Buninyong district.
Mr Dunne to Mr Lynch Is that so? Mr Lynch It is. Mr Dunne believed that
the reason why the Government had proclaimed special licensing districts
was to excuse people living in bush districts like Cooper's Creek;
but he supposed that if people in those poor government districts
wanted a license they would grumble.
Robert Burrell Dent, Royal Hotel, Smythesdale; granted
Charles Milne, Banner of War; granted
Wm. Fittridge, Prospector's Arms, Staffordshire Reef; granted
Richard Whitpaine, Scarsdale Hotel, Scarsdale, (Linton district); granted
Charles Thomas Tait, Tait's Hotel, Staffordshire Reef; postponed till Friday
Edward Barrett, White Horse, Scarsdale (Linton) Road; granted
Robert Dunlop, Cherry-Tree, Ballarat Road; granted
Campbell Reid. Cherry-Tree. Monkey Gully; granted
George H. Hatfield, Rising Sun, Italian Gully; granted
William Bailey, Union Hotel, Scarsdale; granted
Jacob Jenkins, Garibaldi Hotel, Scarsdale; granted
Thomas Menzies Wilson, Crow Club, Brown's; granted
Eugene O'Connor, Washington Hotel, Brown's; granted
Robert Walton, Junction Hotel, Brown's; granted
Frederick Parkinson, Black Hill Hotel; granted
John Brennan, Reservoir Hotel, Smythe's: granted
Robert Irwin, Star Hotel, Italians;granted.
Charles Craddock, Black Swan Hotel, Browns; granted.
Andrew Scott Ward, Victoria Hotel, Brown's; granted.
Christina Weller, Royal Exchange, Scarsdale; granted.
Cornelius O'Hallaran, Miners' Home. Italian Gully; granted.
Isaac Chappell, Pound Hotel, Scarsdale;granted.
The Court then adjourned.

Cock-Fighting, New South Wales.

Any article or series of articles on the "Good Old Days" that
did not treat the sports of that-period would be like a
meat pie without, the meat. I have attempted to give a complete
and comprehensive digest of the manners and customs of the people
of the times of which I write, and as cock fighting was almost an
institution in those days, some attention must be given to it.

Not many will regret the fact this kind of sport is now a thing of
the past, so far as this district is concernedand has been allowed to
fall into oblivion along with other relics of barbarism.

From the 1840s cock-fighting was one of the most popular sports
in the Hawkesbury district of New South Wales, and in those days unless you had a
game rooster that could masacre twenty of your neighbours' domestic chooks in as
many minutes, you might as well be dead, for you were considered nobody.

But now things have changed, the cock-fighting instincts of the people
are dead, though the sleek bird still retains all the combative instincts
of the olden leaven, and would even now fight till he dropped on his own or
some other party's dung-hill. Many residents well remember the old rendezvous
of the enthusiasts of this branch of sportin Holland's paddock,(Windsor)
facing the banks, In this paddock, where there is now a large pond, a pit
existed for many years, and at the trysting-ground large crowds of people
assembled nearly every Saturday to witness a good encounter between two
game cocks.
An edifying spectacle it must have been, truly, yet amongst the votaries of
the sport were many men who were then leading lights of the district.

For years cock-fighting was carried on in public, and was reckoned a legitimate
sport. Then the State stepped in and dubbed it unlawful; yet it was carried on,
almost with impunity, for yearsbut those who participated in the sport met in
some sequestered nook to hold their meetings, the ti-tree swamp on Ham Common
(Richmond) being a favourite resort.

A man named " Jacky" Carr was among the first to introduce cock-fighting into
the Hawkesbury district. He was an Englishman, and always managed to get hold of
some fine imported birds.

Amongst those who followed the game also were Frank Norris, now residing on the
Brickfields,and one of the best pugilists of his day. Also his brothers Paddy and Jim, (sons of Richard NORRIS 1779-1843)
George Cupitt 1808-1875, Charlie Eather, The Charkers,
Gaudry's and Kable's. William Hopkins 1798-1862,
Joseph and William Onus, (sons of Joseph Onus 1782-1835). Ben Richards 1818-1898, and George Bushell were
also admirers of the game-cock, and they all owned good
fighting birds. The second-named is said to have had a magnificent button-comb
bird, which ended the career of many another good one.

The Dargins, Cornwells, Dan Mayne and Jack Cribb also followed the sport.
W. Hopkins was a great breeder of these birds, and he once owned a cookoo-game,
a very rare bird which was responsible for the death of more than one man's pet.

Jim Norris also had a bird which, after winning. fourteen or fifteen successive
battles met its doom when pitted against "Daddy" Baine's in the Richmond Lane,
close to the residence of Mrs. Onus. The birds always fought with steel spurs,
and a small black red bird weighing 6 lbs, owned by George Cupitt, on one occasion
slaughtered three oponents without having his heels (as the spurs were termed) taken off.

James 'Jack' Cribb 1785-1841 always had a lot of birds, and used to spare no
expense in getting hold of good fighters to take his friends down.
He had been known to pay as much as 10 apiece for them, and once paid that
sum for a big light-grey bird, of which everybody was afraid.

Birds weighing from 6lbs to 7lbs were always very strong and fast fighters, whilst
they varied in weight from 5lbs to 8lbs. The principal breeds were black red,
duck-wing, hen-feather, and the pile. The latter breed was the progeny of two good
distinct strains, and was considered one of the gamest of the game birds.

The fighting generally carried out in what was termed "mains," i.e.,
a number (say 5 or 7) birds of dififerent weights on either side.
The birds of the opposing forces were pitted on as equal terms as possible as
regards weight, and if the result of the " main" was equal, the contest would be
decided by a "turn-out"that is, a match between the heaviest bird of both sides.
The :mains" Comprised a party from Parramatta or Sydney on the one side, and
Windsor on the other.

Phil Williams (Sydney), the Waterhouses (Parramatta), and W. Sparks (Cook's River)
frequently brought their birds to Windsor, and were met in the fray by
Cupitt, Norris and Hopkins.
Matches for 50 or to 100 aside were often made, while a good deal of out
side money was also wagered

Sources:
Windsor and Richmond Gazette
(NSW : 1888 - 1954)
The Good Old Days
Yeldap.
Research and Transcription, Janilye
20 June 2012

New South Wales 1841 Census

SUMMARY:

NEW SOUTH WALES. Census of the Year 1841.
The results of the Census taken, pursuant to the provisions of the
Census Act of 1840, officially published by the government.

The returns consist of five large tables.
It is, impracticable to lay these tables in their original
form.
They are reduced to a form which will be equally accessible and
convenient for reference, at the same time contain all details
which are necessary for general purposes.

The Census includes the population and houses in the different counties,
in the Commissioners districts beyond the bounderies of location,
and in the penal settlements, and the number of persons employed on board
colonial vessels, on the 2nd March, 1841.

The total number of the population is given at 130,856.
The number of houses is given as 16,776,

of which, although 1,447 were unfinished,
there were only 331 uninhabited. Of these houses 6,375 were of stone or brick,
and 10,401 of wood.

The population, as to its civil condition, is stated as follows :
Free males, 61,324 of these 14,819 were born in the colony;
30,745 arrived free;
15,760 are described in the terms of the Act as "other free persons."
Free females, 40,425 of these 14,630 were born in the colony
22,158 arrived free;
and 3,637 are described as "other free persons."
making the total of the free population 101,749 souls.
Bond males, 23,814 of these 5,843 held tickets of leave;
6,658 were in government employment;
and 11,343 in private assignment.
Bond females, 3,133 of these 316 held tickets of leave ;
979 were in government service; and 1,838. in private assignment,
making, the total Bond population 20,977.

In addition to the above it is stated that 2,130 males are employed in colonial vessels
no particular information regarding them could be obtained.

Free population
Males 61,324
Females. 40,425
Bond Males. 23,844
Bond Females. 3,133
- 128,720
Employed in colonial vessels. 2,130
Total.... 130,856

As to religious persuasion or profession the numbers are given as follow :
Church of England - 73,727;
Church of Scotland,- 13,153;
Wesleyan Methodists,- 3,230 ;
Protestant & Dissenters,- 1,857
Roman Catholics, - 35,690;
Jews, - 856
Mahomedans and Pagans, - 207,

The return as to the occupations of the various classes is not very satisfactory,
but it is not materially important. It states that;
4,477 are landed proprietors, merchants, and professional persons
1,774 shopkeepers, and retail dealers;
10,715 mechanics and artificers ;
the remainder are to be divided into shepherds,
agricultural labourers, domestic servants, &c.

The County of Cumberland contains,
according to the Census Returns, 58,108 souls.

The County is divided into thirteen hundreds, viz:
Sydney, Parramatta, Liverpool, Woranora, Southend, Campbelltown, Bringelly,
Evan, Richmond, Windsor, Hardlnge, Dundas, and Packenham.


The Hundred of Sydney again is divided into nine parishes.

St. Phillip is stated to contain 9,838 souls, of whom
5,752 are males, and 4,080 females.
Free Population. Of the males. 1,094 were born in the Colony;
3,797 arrived free, and 564 are described as other free persons.
Of the females, 1,151 were born in the Colony, 2,577 arrived free, and
209 are described as other free persons.
Bond, There were 33 ticket-of-leave holders 100 in Government employment,
and 164 in private assignment.

Females, 8 ticket-of-leave holders, 2 in Government employment,
and 139 in private assignment.
Free Males... 5455
Free - Females .... 3,937
- 9,392
Bond Males... 297
Bond - Females .. 149
- 440
Total......... 9,838
Of these;
Church of England, - 5467
Church of Scotland, - 1,203
Wesleyan Methodists, - 231
Protestant denominations, - 226
Roman Catholics, - 2,527
Jews, - 136
Mahomedans and Pagans. - 48

There are 159 returned as landed proprietors, &c,
244 as shopkeers and dealers,
920 as mechanics and artificers,
the remainder as domestic servants, gardeners, &c, &c.

St. Phillip's parish contains 1,444 houses, of which 1,136 are of brick or stone, and
308 of wood; 1,407 of these were inhabited; 29 were unfinished, and only 37 uninhabited.

The next parish is St. James, which contains 6,081 inhabitants,
3,620 males, and 2,461 females.
Of the former, 608 were born in the Colony
1,924 arrived free ;
295 are classified as other free persons;
44 are ticket-of-leave holders;
626 are in Government employment, and
123 in private assignment. Of the latter,
624 were born in the Colony;
1,574 arrived free,
115 are described as other free persons ;
8 are holding tickets-of-leave,
4 are in Government employment, and
136 are in private assignment thus making the Free
Males ....... 2,827
Females... 2,313
5,140
Bond Males .. 793
Bond - Females .148
- 941
Total.. 6,081

These are divided into
Church of England, - 3,650
Church of Scotland, - 402
Wesleyans, - 155
Protestant & Dissenters, - 164
Roman Catholics, - 1,544
Jews, - 155
Mahomedans and Pagans. - 7
There are 186 returned as landholders, &c.,
200 as shopkeepers and dealers,
702 as mechanics and artificers, and the remainder as
domestic servants, gardeners, &c.
St. James' parish contains 802 houses, of which 645 are stone or brick, and
157 of wood, At the time the Census was taken, 6 of these were unfinished,
and only 7 uninhabited.

St. Lawrence's parish which stands next on the list, has 4,814 inhabitants;
2,707 males, and
2,157 females. Of the males.
2,421 are free, and
286 bond, and of the females,
2,011 are free, and
126 bond ; thus making the
Free Males .. 2,421
Females.... 2,011
4,432
Bond Males ...286
Bond females... . . . 136
412 Total. 4,844
Of these,
Church of England, - 2,633
Church of Scotland, - 422
Wesleyan, - 110
Protestants & Dissenters, - 191
Roman Catholics, - 1,392
Jews, - 88
Mahomedans, - 2

The number is also divided as to occupation, as follows :
70 landed proprietors, &c ;
126 shopkeepers and dealers;
737 mechanics and artificers,
and the remainder domestic servants, &c, &c.
This parish contains 767 houses, of which 550 are of stone or brick,
and 217 of wood; 746 are inhabited, 17 unfinished, and only 21 uninhabited.

The next parish is that of St. Andrew : it contains 6,925 inhabitants
3,827 males, and
3,098 females;
of the males 3,708 are free, and 119 bond;
of the females 2,998 are free, and 100 bond.
Thus making the
Free Males.. 3,708
Free Females .. 2,998 6,706
Bond Males . .. 119
Bond Females ... 100
219 Total.. 6,225
Of these
3,461 belong to the Church of England,
872 to the Church of Scotland,
252 are Wesleyans,
195 other Protestant Dissenters,
2,063 Roman Catholics,
79 Jews, and
3 Mahomedans and Pagans.
As to occupation they are divided into 78 landed proprietors, &c,
189 shopkeepers and dealers,
1,203 mechanics and artificers, and the remainder are described
as domestic servants, gardeners, &c.
The parish contains 1232 houses 867 of stone or brick,
and 365 of wood; of these 1,214 are inhabited.

The parish of Alexandria contains 3,313 inhabitants
1,899 males, and 1,444 females;
of the former 1,493 are free, and 406 bond ;
of the latter 1,372 are free, and 72 bond.
Thus making the
Free Males .. 1,493
Free Females. ...... 1,372 2,865
Bond Males .. 406
Bond Females ..... 72
478 Total.. 3,343

The above are divided into
Church of England, - 1,844
Church of Scotland, - 278
Wesleyans, - 83
Protestants, - 119
Roman Catholics, - 940
Jews, - 4
Mahomedans and Pagans, - 35
There are 98 landed proprietors,
28 shopkeepers,
242 mechnnics, the remainder domestic servants, &c.
The parish contains 475 houses 330 stone or brick, and 145 of wood;
451 are inhabited.

The parish of Botany is returned as containing 554 inhabitants,
319 males and 235 females.
Of the males
248 are free and 71 bond;
of the females
225 are free and 10 bond,
Thus
Free Males ........ 248
Free Females ... ..225
473
Bond Males .. ..71
Bond Females .... 10
81
Total.. 554
Of these
Church of England, - 385
Church of Scotland, - 60
Wesleyans, - 26
Protestants, - 6
Roman Catholics, - 77
Of landed proprietors there are 36, mechanics and artificers 32 ;
the remainder servants, gardeners, farm labourers, &c.
There are 112 houses; 28 of stone or brick, and 84 of wood ; 99 are inhabited.

The parish of Petersham contains 1903 inhabitants,
1201 males and
702 females. Of the former 791 are free and 410 bond ; of the latter 764 are free and 38 bond.
Thus
Free Males .. 791
Free Females .. 664 1,455
Bond Males ... 410
Bond Females ... 38
448 - Total.. 1,903
Of these
Church of England, - 1,151
Church of Scotland, - 157
Wesleyans, - 50
Protestants, - 59
Roman Catholics, - 475
Jews, - 9
Mahomedans, - 2
There are 35 landed proprietors, 7 shopkeepers, and 120 mechanics ;
the remainder are domestics, gardeners, farm servants, &c.
There are 274 houses in the parish, 107 of stone or brick and 167 of wood;
273 inhabited.

In the Parish of St. George there are 453 in habitants,
288 males and 165 females;
of the males 238 are free and 50 bond ;
of the females 154 are free and 11 bond.
Of these
Church of England, - 305
Church of Scotland, - 38
Wesleyan, - 1
Protestant, - 1
Roman Catholics, - 107
Pagan, - 1
There are 10 landed proprietors, 53 mechanics,
the remainder servants, gardeners, &c. &c.
There are 87 houses, 10 of stone or brick and 77 of wood ; 83 are inhabited.

Concord has 884 inhabitants, 548 males and 336 females,
of the males 411 are free and 137 bond;
of the females 311 are free and 25 bond.
Church of England, - 607,
Church of Scotland, - 32
Wesleyans, - 2
Protestants, - 9
Roman Catholics, - 234

There are 32 landed proprietors, 7 shopkeepers, and 83 mechanics,
the remainder are servants, gardeners, &c. &c.
Concord has 145 houses, 30 of stone or brick, and 115 of wood;
136 are inhabited.

Having thus disposed of the Hundred of Sydney, we next come to that of Parramatta,
which is divided into six parishes, viz. :

Hunter's Hill, Field of Mars, Castle Hill, Prospect, St. John, and Liberty Plains.

This hundred contains 8,808 inhabitants, of whom
4,645 are males, and 4,163 females.
Of the males 3,599 are free and 1,046 bond;
of the females 3,073 are free and 1,390 bond.
(This includes 804 in Government employment or Factory.)
Liverpool is divided into four parishes,

Bankstown which contains 217 inhabitants, 95 males and 64 females;

Saint Luke which contains 1,242 inhabitants, 795 males and 447 females;

Minto which contains 278 inhabitants, 169 males and 169 females; and

Holsworthy which contains 184 inhabitants, 110 males and 74 females.

Woranora is divided into four parishes, which together contains 63 Inhabitants,

Southend is divided into three parishes, containing 120 Inhabitants,

Campbelltown is divided into four parishes, containing 2,442 inhabitants,

Bringelly is divided Into three parishes, containing 966 inhabitants.

Evan is divided into three parishes, containing altogether 1,293 inhabitants.

Richmond is divided into four parishes containing altogether 2,610 inhabitants,

Windsor is divided into four parishes containing 2,736 inhabitants.

Hardinge is divided into 3 parishes, containing 460 inhabitants.

Dundas is divided into five parishes, containing 360 inhabitants.

Packenham is divided into five parishes, which contain 1,502 inhabitants.

The County of Cumberland is stated to contain, as
will be remembered, 58,108 inhabitants;
and these are divided as to their civil condition in the following manner:
Free Males, .... 27,997
Females, .... 22,203 50,200
Bond Males ....5,766
Bond - Females ..2,142
7,908 Total,. 58,108

The county of Argyle contains 3,397 inhabitants ;
of these 2,434 are males and 963 females. Of the males 1,436 are free,
and of the females 899. The bond males amount to 998 ;
of these 316 are ticket-of-leave holders, 145 in Government employment,
and 537 in private assignment; the bond females amount only to 64,
Thus the population of Argyle, as to its civil condition stands thus :
Free Males ...... 1,436
Free Females .... 899 2,335
Bond Males 998
Bond - Females .... 64
1,062
Total.. 3,397
Of these
1,799 belong to the Church of England,
451 to the Church of Scotland,
4 Wesleyans,
21 other Protestants,
1,087 Roman Catholics,
30 Jews, and
5 Mahomedans and Pagans.
As to occupation, 102 are returned as landed proprietors, &c,
24 as shopkeepers and dealers, 157 as mechanics and artificers,
the remainder are left to be divided between domestic servants, shepherds, farm-labourers, &c,
The number of houses are returned at 295,
94 of stone or brick and 201 of wood, all in habited except 4.

The next county on the list is Bathurst, the inhabitants are stated to be 2,465 ;
1,793 males, and 672 females. Of the males 1,089 are free, and of the females 628 are free.
The bond males number 704, of these 243 are tlcket-of-leave holders,
42 are in Government employment and 419 in private assignment;
the bond females amount only to 44.
Thus the population as to civil condition stands as follows :
Free Males, 1,089
Free - Females .... 628
1,717 .
Bond Males, 704
Bond - Females. . . . 44
743
Total .. 3,465
Of these
1,416 belong to the Church of England,
247 to the Church of Scotland,
124 are Wesleyans,
3 other Protestants,
671 Roman Catholics, and
4 Jews.
As to occupation, 89 are returned as landed proprietors, &c.,
27 as shopkeepers and dealers, 133 as mechanics and artificers,
the remainder are servants, shepherds, agricultural labourers, &c.
The district is said to contain 257 houses; 125 of stone or brick and 132 of wood,
all inhabited.

We next come to county Bligh, the population of which is returned at 546.
473 males and 73 females.
Of the males 212 are free, and of the females 72 are free.
The bond males are 261 in number, viz., 80 holding tickcts-of-leave,
2 in Government employment, and 179 in private as signment;
there is only 1 bond female.
Thus as to civil condition the population of Bligh stands.
Free Males, 212
Free - Females...... 72
284
Bond Males, ...261
Bond - Females, 262
Total. ... 546
As to Religion,
320 belong to the Church of England,
54 to the Church of Scotland,
1 is a dissenter,
200 are Roman Catholics, and
1 a Jew.
As to occupation, 18 are stated to be landed proprietors, 3 shopkeepers and dealers,
18 mechanics and artificers, the remainder to be divided amongst servants, shepherds, &c, &c.
The number of houses is stated to be 31, 4 of brick or stone, and 27 of wood.
Thirty of these are stated to be inhabited.

Brisbane, the next county on the list, is stated to contain 1,560 inhabitants,
1,210 males and 350 females ; of the males 685 are free, and of the females 334.
The Bond males number 625 ; of these 200 hold tickets-of-leave,
2 are in government employment, and 423 in private assignment; there are 16 bond females.
The civil condition may be thus stated :
Free Males, 585
Free - Females.... 334
919
Bond Males, 625
Bond - Females.. . 16
641
Total, 1,560
The religious classification is as follows;
Church of England 899,
Scotland 203,
Wesleyan 1,
other Protestants 10,
Roman Catholics 445,
Jew 1,
Mahomedan 1.
Of landed proprietors there are 30, shopkeepers 5, mechanics 99,
the remainder to be taken as shepherds, farm labourers, &c., &c.
The number of houses is stated at 94, 18 of stone or brick, and 76 of wood,
all inhabited except I,

Camden, the next on the Returns, is stated to possess a population of 6,286 souls;
4,114 males and 2,172 females. Of the males 2,862 are free, and of the females 2,058 are free.
There are 1,252 bond males, consisting of 372 tlcket-of-leave holders,
263 in government employment, and 617 in private assignment.
There are 114 bond females.
So the civil condition of the population of Camden is as follows:
Free Males, 2,862
Free - Females .... 2,058
4,920
Bond Males, 1,963
Bond - Females .... 114
1,306
Total.. 6,880
The religious denominations are thus given;
3,359 Church of England,
749 Church of Scotland,
164 Wesleyans,
49 other Protestants,
1,929 Roman Catholics,
86 Jews.
1 Mahomedan.
The occupations are given thus; landed proprietors, &c, 450,
shopkeepers 80, mechanics 549,
the remainder to be divided as stated with regard to previous counties.
There are also stated to be 933 houses, 137 of brick or stone,
and 796 of wood, of which 927 are Inhabited.

Cook, the next county on our list, is returned as having a population of 2,892 souls ;
1,854 , males and 1,036 females; of the males 1,411 are free,
and of the females 1,010 are free.
The bond males number 443 ; of these 162 hold tickets-of-leave,
155 are in government employment, and 126 in private assignment.
The number of bond females 1s 28, thus the population stands :
Free Males, 1,411
Free - Females .... 1,010
2,421
Bond Males, 443
Bond - Females .... 28
471
Total.. 2,892
Of these the Church of England claims 1,796,
the Church of Scotland 211 ;
83 are stated to be Wesleyans,
22 other Protestants,
770 Roman Catholics,
6 Jews,
4 Mahomedans or Pagans.
The occupations are set out as follow :
landed proprietors, 152, shopkeepers, 32, mechanics, 113 ;
the remainder of the population to be divided as in other counties.
Of houses there are stated to be 480; 61 of stone or brick, 419 of wood ;
478 inhabited.

Cumberland is the next on the list of Counties.
We have before given a lengthened abstract of the return for the county,
and therefore shall not repeat it here.
'Durham, County, has 6,238 inhabitants, 4,287 males, and 1,951 females.
Of the males, 2,754 are free, and of the females, 1,839 are free.
The bond males number, 1,033 ; of these, 421. hold tickets-Of-leave,
22 are in Government employ ment, and 1,090 in private assignment.
The bond, females amount to 112. The population as to civil condition, will be found to stand thus:
Free Males, 2,754
Free - Females..., 1,839
4,593
Bond Males, 1,533
Bond - Females .... 112
1,645
Total ..6,238.
The division of the populatlon as to religion is given in the following manner :
Church of England, 3,568,
Church of Scotland,- 1,024,
Wesleyans, 96,
other Protestants, 65,
Roman Catholics, 1,440,
Jews, 21,
Mahomedans or Pagans, 19.
The number of landed proprietors, &c. is given at 255,
shopkeepers, 45, mechanics, 413,
leaving the remainder to be divided as stated with regard to previous counties.
The number of houses is stated to be 764 ; 52 of stone or brick, and 712 of wood;
757 inhabited.

Georgiana is stated to contain a population of 749 souls ; 563 males, and 186 females.
Of the former, 375 are free, and of the latter, 112,
The number of bond males is 188 ; 64 of these hold tickets-of-leave,
8 are in Government employment, and 116 in, private assignment;
the bond Females are only 6 in number.
Thus the population as to civil condition is :
Free Males, 375
Free - Females .... 180
555
Bond Males, 188
Bond - Females .... 6 .
194
Total .. 749
Of these,
429 are stated to be of the Church of England,
46 of the Church of Scotland,
1 Protestant Dissenter,
273 Roman Catholics.
Their occupations are stated as follows :
35 landed proprietors, 1 shopkeeper, 22 mechanics ;
the remaining number to be divided as stated with regard to other counties.
There are stated to be 64 houses ; 7 of brick or stone, and 57 of wood, all inhabited.

Gloucester, the next County on the list, is stated to contain a population of 1,424 souls;
1,051 males, and 373 females. Of the males, 506 are free, and of the females, 354 are free.
The bond males 545 ; of these 101 hold tickets of-leave, 1 is in Government employment,
and 443 are in private assignment ; the bond females are 19 in number.
The civil condition of the population consequently stands thus:-
Free Males, 506
Free - Females, 354
860
Bond Males, 545
Bond - Females, 19
564
Total.. 1,424
The religious classification is as follows :
Church of England, 907,
Church of Scotland, 133,
Wesleyans, 33,
other Protestants, 15,
Roman Catholics, 327,
Jews, 4,
Mahomedans and Pagans, 5.
The occupations are stated as 46 landed proprietors,
7 shopkeepers, 169 mechanics; the remainder to be divided Into the various other basics,
The number of houses is given at 274 ; 39 of of brick or stone, and 235 of wood;
261 in habited.

Hunter, the next county in the returns, is returned as having a population of 999 souls,
655 males and 344 females. Of the males 614 are free, and of the females 337.
The bond males number 141, and the females 7.
Thus the civil condition of the population of county Hunter is:
Free Males, 514
Free - Females, 337
851
Bond Males, 141
Bond - Females .... 7
148
Total .... 999
To the Church of England belong 733,
Church of Scotland 46,
14 are Wesleyans,
201 Roman Catholics,
3 Jews,
2 Mahomedans.
There are 75 landed proprietors and shop keepers and 47 mechanics, the remainder divided into the various classes not mentioned as in other counties.
The number of houses is stated to be 174 ; 11 of brick and stone and 163 of wood;
172 in habited.

King county is returned as containing a population of 598 souls,
433 males and 165 females.
Of the males 260 are free, and of the females 147.
The bond males are 171, 69 holding tickets-of-leave, and 104 being in private assignment;
the bond females number 18.
Thus the civil condition stands as under :
Free Males,. 260
Free - Females, 147
407
Bond Males ...... 173
Bond - Females .... 18.
191
Total .... 598
Of these 368 belong to the Church of England,
14 to the Chureh of Scotland,
1 Wesleyan,
2 other dissenters,
213 Roman Catholics.
Landed proprietors are 23 in number, shopkeepers 4, mechanics 31,
the other classes occupying the remainder of the population.
There are 64 houses, 7 of stone or brick, and 57 of wood, 63 inhabited.

Macquarie, the next county, is stated to have a population of 3,409 souls,
1,919 males and 490 females. Of the males 837 are free, and of the females 381.
The bond males number 1,082, of these 150 hold tickets-of-leave,
691 are in Government employment, and 341 in private assignment.
The bond females amount to 109.
Thus the civil condition of the population may be stated as follows: -
Free Males, 337
Free - Females, 981
1,318
Bond Males .... 1,082 ,
Bond - Females,... 109
1,191
Total 2,409
Of these 1,361 are returned as belonging to the Church of England,
290 to the Church of Scotland,
37 Wesleyans,
39 other Protestants,
709 Roman Catholics,
89 Jews,
4 Mahomedans or Pagans,
Of landed proprietors there are 89, shopkeepers 16, mechanics 336,
the remainder may be divided in the same way as stated in previous counties,
The number of houses is 121, 47 of brick or stone and 74 of wood, 120 inhabited.

Murray County is returned as containing a population of 2,111 souls.
1,562 males and 549 females; of the males 896 are free, and of the females 535;
the bond males number 666, of these 186 hold tickets-of-leave, 34 are in government employment,
and 446 are in private assignment ;
the bond females amount to 24.
Thus the civil condition may be recapitulated as
Free Males ..... 896
Free - Females .... 525
1,421
Bond Males... 666
Bond - Females,.....24
690
Total .. 2,111
Of these 1,024 belong the Church of England
238 to the Church of Scotland,
6 are Wesleyans'
26 other Dissenters,
806 Roman Catholics
11 Jews.
Landed proprietors 105, shopkeepers 18, mechanics 127,
the remainder to be divided amongst the other classes.
The houses are said to be 274 in number, 31 of brick or stone, and 143 of wood 172 inhabited.

Northumberland County is returned as containing a population of 9,975 souls.
6,567 males and 3,408 females ; of the males 4,362 are free and of the females 3,125.
The bond males number 2,205; of these 632 hold tickets-of-leave, 618 are in government employment,
and 955 are in private assignment.
The bond females amount to 283.
The population as to civil condition will stand thus :
Free Males, 4,362
Free - Females.... 3,125
7,487
Bond Males .... 2,205
Bond - Females .... 283
2,488
Total . 9,975
The Church of England claims 6,291,
Church of Scotland 835,
160 are Wesleyans,
63 other Protestants,
2,566 Roman Catholic,
46 Jews,
14 Mahomedans or Pagans. ;
The landed proprietors are stated at 442
shopkeepers, at 203, and mechanics at 1,085.
There are stated to be 1,272 houses, 338 of stone or brick, and 934 of wood,
1,261 inhabited.

Phillip County is stated to contain 453 inhabitants, 363 males and 90 females ;
of the males 195 are free, and of the females 85.
The bond males number 168, of whom 43 hold tickets-of-leave, 9 are in government employment,
and 116 in private assignment. The bond females are only 5.
Thus the civil condition may be recapitulated as
Free Males, 195
Free - Females ,.... 85
280
Bond Males ...... 168
Bond - Females .... 5
173
Total ..463
Of these 259 are of the Church of England,
37 of the Church of Scotland,
3 Wesleyans,
153 Roman Catholics,
2 Jews.
Landed proprietors are put down as 19, shopkeepers 1, mechanics 13.
There are 23 houses, 5 of stone or brick and 18 of wood, all inhabited.

Roxburgh, the next county on the list, contains 1,520 inhabitants, 1,074 males and 446 females.
Of the males 700 are free,and of the females 406.
Of bond males there are 374. 159 holding tickets-of-leave, 5 in Government em ployment,
and 210 in private assignment; the bond females are 40 in number.
The civil con dition of the inhabitants of Roxburgh will show then ;
Free Males, 700
Free - Females . .. 406
1,106
Bond Males, 374
Bond - Females .... 40
414
Total .. 1,520
These are divided as to religion into the following classes:
Church of England 919,
Church of Scotland 159,
Wesleyans 40,
other Protestants 5,
Roman Catholics 388,
Jews 9.
Landed proprietors are numbered at 67, shopkeepers at 13, and mechanics at 89.
There are 137 houses, 69 of stone or brick and 68 of wood, all inhabited.

Saint Vincent, County, has a population of 1,762 souls;
1,308 males and 454 females. Of the males 686 are free, and of the females, 434.
The bond males are 622 in number, of them 175 hold Tickets-of-Leave, 22 are in Government employment,
and 425 in private assignment.
The bond females are 20 in number.
Thus the civil condition of the population of Roxburgh may be stated as follows :
Free Males, 686
Free - Females .... 434
1,120
Bond Males, 622
Bond - Females .... 20
642
Total .. 1,763
Of these
262 belong to the Church of England,
259 to the Church of Scotland,
6 are Wesleyans,
6 other dissenters, 5
26 Roman Catholics,
3 Jews.
Landed proprietors are returned as 48, shop keepers 6, and mechanics 89.
There 137 houses; 9 of brick or stone and 128 of wood; 136 inhabited.

Wellington, the next County, contains 510 in habitants, 390 males and 120 females.
Of the males 236 are free and of the females 113. The number of bond males is 164;
52 holding tickets-of-leave and 102 in private assignment; the number of bond females is 7.
The civil condition stands thus:
Free Males, 236
Free - Females .... 113
349
Bond Males, 154
Females .... 7
161
Total ....
510 Of these 331 belong to the Church of England,
40 to the Church of Scotland,
3 are Wesleyans and 136 Roman Catholics.
There are 10 landed proprietors, 6 shopkeepers and 25 mechanics.
There are 37 houses; 12 of brick or stone, and 25 of wood; all inhabited.

Westmoreland has a population of 619 souls; 435 males and 184 females.
Of the males 312 are free and of the females 179.
The bond males number 123, of whom 50 hold tickets-of-leave, and 73 are in private assignment.
There are 5 bond females.
The civil condition of this population is therefore as follows:
Free Males ...... 312
Free - Females .... 179
491
Bond - Males, 123
Bond - Females .... 5
128
Total .... 619
Of these, 200 are of the Church of England,
46 of the Church of Scotland,
9 Wesleyans,
7 other protestants,
267 Roman Catholics.
There are 37 landed proprietors and 15 mechanics.
There are 90 houses; 7 of brick or stone, and 83 of wood; 88 are inhabited,

We now come to tho Commissioners' District beyond the boundaries, These are nine in number, namely Wellington, Bligh, Lachlan, Monaroo, Murrumbidgee. Peel's River, New England, Clarence River, M'Leay River

Wellington has a population of 935 souls, 837 males and 98 females.
The free males are 466 in number and the free females 95.
The bond males are 371 in number; of them 128 hold tickets-of-leave.
9 are in Government employment, and 234 in private assignment.
There are 3 bond females.

Bligh has 672 inhabitants; 577 males and 95 females.
Of the males 339 are free and of the females 94.
The bond males are 238 in number; 71 hold tlckets-of-leave, 5 are in Government employment,
and 162 in private assignment.

Lachlan has a population of 1,345 souls; 994 males, and 251 females,
Of the males 649 are free and of the females 244.
There are 345 bond males; 121 hold tickets-of-leave, 9 are in Government employment,
and 315 in private assignment.

Monaroo has a population of 1833 souls; 1509 males and 374 females.
Of the males 1041 are free, and of the females 370.
The bond males are 498 in number; 198 hold tickets-of-leave, 6 are in Government employment, and 294 in private assignment.

Murrumbidgee has 1639 inhabitants; 1208 males and 261 females.
Of the males 782 are free and 272 females are free.
The bond males are 476 in number; 104 hold tickets-of-leave,
35 are in Government employment, and 277 in private assignment.
There are 9 bond females.

Peel's River District has 1591 inhabitants ; 1424 males and 167 females.
Of the males 795 are free, and of the females 158. The bond males number 629;
of these 178 have tickets-of-leave, 17 are in Government employment, and 445 in private assignment.
There are 9 bond females.

New England has 1115 inhabitants; 1003 males and 112 females.
Of the males 536 are free, and of the females 107.
The bond males are 467 in number; 76 hold tickets-of-leave, 11 are in Government employment,
and 380 in private assignment. There are 5 bond females.

Clarence River District has 416 inhabitants, 343 males, and 73 females.
Of the males, 237 are free, and of the females 71.
The bond males number 106; 11 hold tlckets-of-leave, 10 are in Government employment,
and 85 in private assignment. There are 2 bond females.

M'Leay River District has 584 inhabitants ; 443 males, and 141 females.
Of the males, 229 are free, and of the females, 123.
The bond males number 214 ; 60 hold tickets-of-leave, and 154 are in private assignment.
There are 18 bond women.

At Moreton Bay there are 200 souls ; 176 males, and 24 females.
Of the. males, 45 are free, and of the females 22.
The bond males number 131 ; 1 holds a ticket-of-leave, and 130 are in Government employment.
There are two bond females.

Norfolk Island here there are 1,288 bond males, and 3 bond females.
There are 254 free males, and 102 free females.

district of Port Phillip, which according to the census contains 11,738 inhabitants.
Of these 8,274 are males, and 3,454 females.
Of the males 8274 are free, and 518 bond ; of the females only 6 are bond.
We have thus concluded our synopsis, which may be resumed as follows :
Free Males .. 61,324
Females, 40,425
101,749
Bond Males .. 23,844
Bond - Females, 3,133
26,977
Employed in Colonial Vessels 2,130
Total 130,856





Sources
New South Wales State Records
The Australian
(Sydney, NSW : 1824 - 1848)
Saturday 4 September 1841
Tuesday 7 September 1841
Transcription, janilye
4 June 2012


Land Grants 1821

These 1821 Land Grants listed below appeared in three(3) Sydney Gazettes, rather than lump them all together I have copied them as they appeared.


The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (NSW : 1803 - 1842)
Saturday 28 April 1821


THE following LIST of NAMES of NEW SETTLERS, who are to receive GRANTS of LAND,
and of OLD SETTLERS, who are to have additional LANDS located for them
in the Year 1821,
is published for general Information :

James Atkinson, Thos. Arkell, Edw. Alcorn, Robt. Aull, Jas. Arndell, Thos. Allen,
George Alleburn, Samuel Arndell, Richad Adams, Francis Allen, Jos. Atkins, Wm Alsop,
J. Aiken, Francis Able, Michael Ansell, Edw. Allen, Thos. Asplin, Thomas Ashford,
Charles Armitage, Pat. Allen, J. Andrew, J Agland, Alex Berry, Geo. Barber, Wm. Baker,
David Brown, Wm Bradbury, Robert Bateman. Geo. Best, sen. Bryan Byrne, Mich. Bryan,
J. Brown, Noah Bryan, Charles Beasley, Timothy Brophy, J. Brown, John Bryan,
Wm. Bruce, Thos. Byrne, John Booth, N. Boon, Wm. Beaumont, Thos Bowers, Thos. Bates,
Wm. Beggs, Dennis Bigley, Jas Bolsover, J. Brown, J. Brackfield, George Bradley,
Wm. Bannister, Thos. Bowning, Sam. Barber, Thos. Bird, Michael Byrne, Jas Brackenry,
J. Bent, Thos. Bates, Thos. Baker, J. Barker, J. Byrne, Thos. Biggen, Andrew Biggen,
Jas. Beckett, J. Bell, Thos. Benson, Bursella Bensley, Edw. Burke, Brien Bagnall,
Jos Bullock, Jas. Badgery, H. Batman, Owen Byrne, Jas. Butler, Richard Bryan, H. Butler,
Aaron Burt, J. Burrell, Daniel Brown, J. Bentley, Stephen Burr, Wm. Britain, J. Bradford,
Jon. Broker, J. Bowman, Wm. Barron, Jas. Byrne, Martin Burke, Geo Best, jun. James Barker,
Jas. Brailey, Jas. Burgess, H. Bray, Thomas Byrne, Robert Brodie, Jas. Burke, Thos. Brown,
J. Brown, Thos Brian, Wm. Burridge, D. Burne, Wm. Briant, Eber. Bunker, James Butler,
Silvester Butler, Owen Boyne, J. Bennett, D. Brown, John Bayley, Edward Bailes,
John Bull, John Bailes, jun. Daniel Bisex, Michael Boland, Thos. Cowper, James Cobb,
Donald Cameron, George Cutter, Adam Clink, Isaac Cornwall, William Chadworth,
Timothy Connor, James Carroll, John Cahill, John Cheers, Benj. Carver Owen Connor,
Peter Cooney, John Crawley, Thomas Campbell, Richard Cavanagh, Jas. Cavanagh,
James Cox, George Clarke, Samuel Craft, Thomas Cross, John Cribb, Peter Carrol,
Roger Connor, John Cowley, John Craft, John Colcroft, William Craig, Farrell Cufie,
John Cromen, Dennis Connolly,James Connell, Michael Cartwell, Peter Carroll,
John Collins, Hugh Crabtree, Abraham Champray, Thos. Cowling, John D. Campbell.
Richard Carr, Dennis Conway, John Cummins, William Cheshire, Thos. Clarke,
Edward Churchill, John Chaseling, James Connelly, Thomas Chesbie, John Day,
John Dight, Andrew Doyle, William Davis, Edward Doyle, Thos. Dutton.
Jas. Donnelly, Jas Duffey, Wm. Douglas, Jas. Devlin, Jas. Daly, Jas Dempsey,
Pat. Downey, Thos. Davy, Peter Dunn, Edmund Doyle, Cyrus Doyle, Jas. Donahar,
Stephen Dunn, Pat. Devoy, Pat Dacey, Michael Doran, Nicholas Dukes,
Thos. Downes, Charles Dodding, Geo. Dowling, J. Dell, Francis Dalton,
Jas. Dearing, Wm Dockrell, Michael Duggin, Richard Donelly,
J. Darrah, Isaac Dowse, Garrett Donally, John Dewhurst, Christopher Downes,
John Dogharty, Walter Duggan, Joseph Dargon, George Davis, Shady Davey,
Samuel Davis, John Davis, Thomas Davis, William Davis, John Dalton, Patrick Downey,
Edward Dillon, John Dunn, John Eyre, John England, James Eldridge, Eliker Everitt,
Joseph Eades, Charles Eather, Thomas Eather, Thomas Eather, sen. Joseph Emm,
Joseph Earles, Daniel Eaton, Joseph Eyles, Henry Early, William Edney, John Edney,
Wm. Edwards, Wm. Eagleton, Wm. Etsell, John Ellison, John Wm. Fulton, Wm. John Fitz,
Henry Fleming, Bernard Fitzpatick, John Frazier, Samuel Fry, George Freeman, Wm. Field,
Bernard Fitzpatrick, Robert Farlow, James Frazier, Edward Field, sen. John Finch,
Wm. Fulford, John Freebody, S. Foley; James Freeman, Thomas Frost, Geo.Fieldhouse,
Francis Frendard, John Floyd, and J. Forster.

Settlers, who may have received separate Orders for Land, and whose Names are not inserted in the above general List, are requested to bring their Orders to this Office, that the same may be entered.

JOHN OXLEY, Surveyor General To be continued in our next Gazette

The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (NSW : 1803 - 1842)Saturday 5 May 1821

SURVEYOR GENERAL'S OFFICE, SYDNEY,
28 th April, 1821.
THE; following LIST of NAMES of NEW SETTLERS, who are to receive GRANTS of LAND,
and of OLD SETTLERS, who are to have additional LANDS located for them in the Year
1821, is published for general Information :

Robert Forrester, Wm. Forrester, John Farrell, John Fowler, Richard Friar,
John Foley, Edward Franks, Edward Fletcher, William Flynn, Thomas Francis, jun.,
Patrick Flynn, Peter Fitzpatrick, John Ferguson, J. Golledge, Wm Guise,
J. Galvin, Jas. Gooding, jun., James Goddard, Benj. Grimshaw, P. Garey,
J. Grono, George Graves, Jas. Greenslade, J. Grant, Mich. Geary, Robt. Gray,
Henry Gaskin, Mich. Gavagan, Robt. Garratt, Benjamin Goddard, Wm. Gwillim,
Jas. Griffiths, Dennis Green, Wm. Goodere, Wm. Galvin, Dennis Guinny, John Glade,
Val. Goodwin, Richard Guise, J. Goodwin, Thomas Galvin, Thos. Gilbert,
J. Gosport, Joseph Gosport, J. Gardner, Joseph Gilbert, Isaac Gorrick,
John Higgins, George Howe, J. Howe, Wm. Holmes, Wm. Hayes, Wm. Hardman,
Joseph Hately, Pat. Harper, Francis Hainsworth, William Hearn, Henry Howell,
Mich. Hogan, Richard Haviland, Philip Hogan, J. Harris, J. Harris, William Hawkins,
John Hanabus, Charles Herbert, Thos. Hinton, Pat. Hand, Lawrence Harvey,
David Horton, jun., J. Hope, Thomas Hall, Wm. Hill, Peter Hough, Joseph Hunt,
Henry Hunt, Samuel Harding, D. Hawkins, George Hambridge, Jas. Henry,
Maurice Hallihan. Edw. Harrigan, Thos. Howell, George Hill, Christopher Harris,
Joshua Holt, Tim. Hoy, Wm. Harrington, John Hodges, Mich. Hughes, John Hoile,
Henry Hoile, Joshua Heap, Abraham Herne, Lawrence Halfpenny, James Harper,
John Herbert, jun., J. Hazard, Jas. Higgins. Robt. Higgins, Enoch Hutchinson,
Thos. Higgins, PeteirHibbs, jun., J Holden, Wm. Hewitt, Edw. Hobbs, J. Hearn,
Thos. Hansey, Hugh Hughes, jun., Jas. Hall, Henry Huff, George Hughes, J Holt,
George Higginson, Peter Hibbs, J. Holden, Thos. Hooton, Wm. Howell,
Francis R. Hume, J. Hendle, Jas. Hayden, Jesse Hudson, David Horton sen.,
Robt. Johnston, George James, John Johnston, John Jacklin, Thomas John,
George Johnstone, Wm. Jones, Wm. lkin, Joseph Inch, Wm. Jacklyn, Charles Ivory,
Edward Jones, Mich. Joyce, Thos. Jones, George Jubb, jun., Thos. Jones,
John Innes, John Johnson, Richard Johnson, Charles Jackson, John Joyce,
James Kay, William Klen endorlff, Pat. Kirk, John Kennedy, Wm. Kearns,
J. Keighran, Thos. Keane, J. Kirlaghan, R. Kibble, Cornelius Keoe,
Donald Kennedy, jun., John Kelly, Joseph Lendall, Jas. Kavannagh,
Duncan Kennedy, John Kennedy, Wm. Kellow, Wm. Kenney, Thomas Kelly,
Archibald Kane, Daniel Kelly, Thos. Kelly, D. Knowland, Thos. Kendall,
James Kelly, James Kenney, J. H. Lawson, Walker Lawry, Wm. Lilly,
Francis Lawless, Samuel Leverton, Henry Lendon.

Settlers, who may have received separate Orders for Land, and whose Names are not inserted in the above general List, are requested to bring their Orders to this Office, that the same may be entered.

JOHN OXLEY, Surveyor General. *** To be concluded in our next Gazette.

The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (NSW : 1803 - 1842) Saturday 12 May 1821

SURVEYOR GENERAL'S OFFICE, SYDNEY,
28th April 1821.
THE following LIST of NAMES of NEW
SETTLERS, who are to receive GRANTS of LAND, and of OLD SETTLERS,
who are to have additional LANDS located for them in the Year 1821,
is published for general Information :

J. Holmes, J. Lynch, Samuel Leverton, jun. Jas. Lewis, Richard Lillis,
Thos. Lawrence, J. Leadbeater, sen. J. Larken, Peter Lawry, George Lilley,
James Lyons, Wm. Land ron, Miles Leary, John Lavis, Jas. Layton, Nicholas Lacy,
William Lees, Peter Lillis, Elijah Lane, Wm. Lawrence, J. Lapish, Mich. Lamb,
J. Lees, J. Lacey, Owen Lenaghan, John Longford, Wm. Lovegrove,, H. Lamb,
J. Lyons, Hannibal M'Arthur, Jas. M'Arthur, Wm. M'Arthur, Charles M'Arthur,
Andrew M'Dougal, J. M' Henry, Henry Marr, Wm. Minchin, Wat Mobbs,
J. Mobbs, George Mobbs, Isaac Mobbs, J. M'Loughlin, Fred. Meurant,
Jos. Meyrick, Tristram Moore, Cornelius M'Arthy, P.Moore, Pat. Mernan,
J. Madden, Mich. Maloney, Wm. Morgan, John Mills, Jas. M'Arty, jun.
Thomas Martin, jun. Jas. M'Arty, J. Mackey, Thos. Miller, Christopher M'Guire,
Thos Mortimer, J. May, Pat. Mason, Put. Moore, Thos. Maloney, Jas. M'Guire,
Matthias Miller, Jas. M'Arty. John M'Arty, William Makepiece, Thos. Moran,
Fred. Murphy, Patrick Mulhall, Thos. M'Caffery, George Maginnis,
Edw Merrick, Thos. M'Kenna, Robert Maxwell, Henry M'AIlister, James M'Manis,
John Murphy, George Marley, Kennedy Murphy, Patrick M'Hall, George Murphy,
Thos. Mustagh, Owen Martin, jun. George Mortimer, Thos Murray, Charles M'Carty,
William Mobbs jun. Jas. Mosely, H. Morton, J. Merzagora, J. M'Peake,
Isaac Mills, Jas. Macdonald, Jas. Milson, Dennis M'Neary, Jas. M'Aloney,
Brian M'Cormic, John Moss Wm. Mannix, Mich. Macdonald, John M'Donald,
Joseph Mason, John. M'Guigan, Joseph Ma'ckinley, Thos. M'Guire, Jas. Marshall,
Thomas Moakson, Andrew' M'Dougall, Jame M'Dougall, J. M'Dougall, J. Moss,
Alexander M'Guigan, Patrick Mahar, Thomas McVitie, Simon Moulds,
Edward Meurant, jun, J. Matthews, Robt. Marshall, William M'Haslan,
Alexander M'Donald, Hugh M'Avoy, J. Murphy, Mich. Minton, Jas. M'Donald,
Patrick Naughton, Richard Norris, J. Nash, Thos. Nugent, Thos. Newman,
Andrew Nash, Jas. Nugent, James Nowlan, Wm. Newport, J Norris, John Nowland,
George Nash. J. Neil, J. Nicholds, Walter Noy, F. O'Meara, J. O'Meara,
p. Oakes, Jas. O'Brian, Chas. O'Brien, James Owen, Thos Owens, Wm. Osburne,
Saml. Owen, Jas. O'Harra, Wm. Olds, Mark Opong, Brien O'Brien, Wm. Oliver,
Jos. Onus, Terence O'Brien, Chas. Pennon, G. T. Palmer, George Panton,
Wm. Pithers, Mr Parmeter, J. Price, Wm. Parkins F. Pendergral, J. Pike,
J. Pike, Morgan Poor, N. Payton, J. Pitcher, Saml. Paine, Wm. Page,
John J. Peacock, Robt. Plumb, J. Patfield, Thos. Prentice, J.
Phillips, Mich. Parker, George Pinkerton, F. Peisley, George Phillips,
J Pendergrast, Wm. Paris, J. Pye, jun. Wm. Pritchard, Daniel Pegg,
Saml. Perkins George Plummer, H. Pullen, R. Partridge, Joseph Pashley,
Mich. Power, J Pugh Deison Post, Tim Poor, F. Piper, Wm. Piper, H. Paul,
J. Pender, Jas. Pender, Edwin Rouse, Edw. Riley, Thos. Rose, Edw. Redmond,
J. Robinson, Chas. Rushton, John Riley, Malachi Ryan, Thos Riley, J. Ready,
J. Redmond, Wm. Reynolds, J. Ross, Barnabas Rix, Wm Rafter, Mark Russell,
Wm. Rose, Wm. Roberts, Joseph Rye, jun. Mich. Rourke, Alex. Routledge,
J. Riley, Nich. Ryan, Wm. Rixon, Robt. Ray, Owen Riley, Thos. Rudd, J. Rudd,
J. Rentwell, Richard Ruff. H. Rochester, Barnabas Rix, Chas. Smith, Wm. Smith.
Mich. Stack, Jas. Stack, Jas. Shepherd, sen. G. Smith, Wm. Scott, Jas. Shepherd,
jun. F. Spencer, Andrew Scott, J. Sunderland, Martin Sweeney, Dennis Shield,
Dan. Smallwood, George Sewell, Edw. Stinton, Jos. Smith, H. Styles, Jas. Smithers,
Wm. Skinn, Joseph Smith, jun. Wm. Smith, Wm. Stenson, Jas. Smith, Edw. Shipley,
Wm. Speers, Hugh Scott, W. Scott, Wm. Smith, J. Smith, Jas. Smallwood,
Roger Shea, J. Scully, J. Stone, Thos. Stevens, Jos. Stubbs, Jas. Speers,
Wm. Stubbs, Wm Simms, Thos. Stone, Thos. Stack, Jos. Smith, Jas. Smith,
F. Stafford, Jas. Smith, Dennis Stacey, Chas, Summerell, Stephen Smith,
J. Smith, Edw. Stowers, Dan. Step, Thos. Smith, Dan. Sweeney, Thos. Sanders,
jun. J. Smith, J. Stanbury, jun. Robt. Smith, George Scott, Murty Shields,
Wm. Sherries, J. Sewell, Wm. Stabler, Chas. Throsby, jun. Robt. Turnbull,
Chas. Thompson, Wm. Tuckwell, J. Tindell, J. Tarlington, Edw. Tompson,
J. Turnbull, Jas. Thompson, Chas. Thomas, Bishop Thompson, Thos. Thompson,
J.Tague, J.Taylor, H. Fretheway, Jas. Toucher, S. Tuckman, Chas. Tunks,
H. Thorn, jun. J. Thorm, jun. Jos. Tuzo, Jeon Francois Theon, J. Town,
Jas. Turner, Wm Thorn, jun. Jas. Thomas, D.^Thompson, J. Taylor, Thos. Trotter,
Jas. Turner, George Tuckwell, Wm. Tyson, Philip Tully, George Trace,
Owen Tierney, Wm. Tompson, Thos. Turner, Jas. Vaughan, J. Vardy, R. Virgin,
Thos. Vardy, J. Voildes, Thos. Upton, Edw. Wollstonecraft, Wm. Walker,
George Woodhouse, G. P. Wood, George Ward, J. Whalan, Wm. Welsh, Thos. Woolley,
J. Williams, Edmund Wright, Robt. Wilkinson, Daniel Wellings, J. Wright,
J. Walker, Jas. Williams, Wm. Wright, Chas. Wilson, Thos. Warner, P. Workman
Aaron Walkers, Job Wilson, Wm. Williams, Robert Wells, Thos. Wilson,
Thos. Wood, J. K. Williamson J. D. Wood, Wm. White, Chas. Watson, J. Williams,
Jas. Walbourn, J,. Weevers, Chris. Ward, H. Wells, Wm. Walker, J. Warby,
J. Warby, jun. J. Wood, James Wright. Wm. White, Wm. Wakeman, James Whalan,
Jas. Were, J. Wright, Wm. Wall, Jos. Walker and Charles Yorke.

Settlers, who may have received separate Orders for Land, and whose Names are not inserted in the above general List, are requested to bring their Orders to this Office, that the same may be entered.
JOHN OXLEY, Surveyor General.

The Norris Mealey case 1840

SUPREME CRIMINAL COURT.
WEDNESDAY, 6th May 1840 (Before Mr Justice Stephen).

Richard Norris, and Philip Mealey, were indicted for stealing at Currency Creek, near Richmond, on the 12th March last, one heifer, and one cow, the property of Thomas Lynch.

The prisoners were defended by Messrs Foster and Windeyer.
It appeared from the evidence that the prosecutor, an aged man (upward, of seventy-eight years old) was a small settler residing at Freeman's Reach, distant about four miles from the residence of the prisoners, who were small farmers living about a quarter of a mile apart from each other, at a place called Salley's Bottom.
Lynch had a small herd of milking cattle, about twenty-six in number, which had been depasturing for some years at Currency Creek, near the residence of the prisoners, who likewise possessed a few herd of cattle which were being depastured on an adjoining run.
The prisoner's cattle had occasionally mingled with those of the prosecutor. He mustered his cattle on the 12th March, and found them all correct in number, and in consequence of some information which he received, he mustered them a few days afterwards, and found his herd scattered, and two of his cows missing.
One was a white poley cow, and the other a red one, having very sharp pointed horns, with remarkable small knots at the tip of each horn, and both were branded A. F. on the right rump.
They were in good condition, and fit for slaughtering. The prosecutor made inquiry for them, and advertised their loss, offering a reward for their recovery, both in the township, and at Windsor.
In consequence of some information which the prosecutor subsequently received, he accompanied Mr John Cobcroft, district constable of Wilberforce, and another constable named, Gollagher, to the homes of the two prisoners, in both of which they found a considerable quantity of recently salted beef. The beef was packed in rather a suspicious manner, the fresh meat being at the bottom of the harness-casks which contained it, while two or three layers of beef, which had been cured a much greater length of time, were placed at the top. About a rod in front of Norris's house, the constable picked up the horns of a recently slaughtered beast, lying on a heap of rubbish, and Lynch, on inspecting them, identified them immediately as the horns of his red cow. Their identity was also sworn to by two of the prosecutor's servants, who had milked the animal for some years, and had frequently felt the peculiar knots at the tip of the horns, while the cow was in the bale. About four hundred yards from Mealey's house, there was found by the side of a small pool, part of the offal of a recently slaughtered beast, and a considerable quantity of fat floated on the surface of the pool.
Both prisoners, upon being questioned by the constables, admitted that they each slaughtered a beast, and on being asked to produce the hides, each stated, that he had sold his hide to some person whose name or address he did not know. Norris said, that the horns identified by Lynch as belonging to his red cow, were the horns of a bullock slaughtered by his brother, but he called no evidence to prove this to be the fact.

A woman named Margaret Hawkey, swore most positively that she saw the two prisoners about the middle of the month of March, driving about ten head of cattle across the ranges of Sally's Bottom, in the direction of Mealey's house, and that one of them was a white poley cow, and another a red cow, both branded AF on the right rump; she further stated that she saw Norris a few days afterwards, and informed him of Lynch having lost two cows, to which he replied "d--- him he has plenty of cattle, and can afford to lose them as he has neither chick nor child." This witness however was very pert and flippant in her manner of giving evidence, and prevaricated grossly in her testimony ; it was moreover sworn to by Mr James Gannon (although Hawkey on being questioned had denied the fact) that she met him at the door of the Supreme Court that morning, and asking him whether he was not summoned to attend us a juror, to which he replied in the affirmative, pointed out the prisoners to him telling him she was a witness against them, and requesting him, should he be one of the jury upon their trial, to find them guilty and she would give him anything for doing so.

During Mr Foster's address on behalf of the prisoners, in which he made some allusions to one of the witnesses who endeavoured to tamper with a juryman, Hawkey went out of the court on pretence of obtaining a drink of water, and seeing Mr Gannon in attendance made an attempt to address him, but he declined entering into any conversation with her.

The learned judge, in putting the case to the jury, remarked that he thought they must leave out of their consideration the evidence of the infamous and abandoned woman, Hawkey but it was for them to say, whether independent of her testimony, there was not sufficient evidence to satisfy them of the guilt of the prisoners.

His Honor then went through the evidence remarking on it as he proceeded, how it made for and against the prisoners, and leaving it for the jury to determine the balance of guilt or innocence, at the same time recommending them, should they entertain any reasonable doubt upon the subject, to give that doubt in favor of the prisoners. The jury, after about half an hour's consideration, returned a verdict of Guilty against both the prisoners, at the same time intimating that they believed the evidence of Mr Gannon in opposition to that of Margaret Hawkey. The learned judge, after commenting in severe terms upon the baseness of the witness's conduct sentenced her to be imprisoned for six months. The prisoners were remanded for sentence.


Source:
The Australian
Sydney, NSW : (1824 - 1848)
Issue: Saturday 9 May 1840
The Sydney Herald
(NSW : 1831 - 1842)
Issue: Wednesday 13 May 1840
transcription, janilye 2012