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JACKMAN in Karrakatta cemetery PERTH, West Australia

there were 76 JACKMAN buried in the Karrakatta cemetery in Perth, Western Australia as at April 2011


NAME - AGE - YEAR of DEATH - SUBURB they lived in

JACKMAN AGNES 76 years 1975 CARLISLE

JACKMAN ALBERT 33 years 1931 FREMANTLE

JACKMAN ALBERT BERNARD 64 years 1990 LANGFORD

JACKMAN ALBERT EDWARD 78 years 1956 FREMANTLE

JACKMAN ANNETTE SHIRLEY 60 years 2008 FLOREAT

JACKMAN ARTHUR 76 years 1977 CARLISLE

JACKMAN BERNADETTE MURIEL 76 years 2006 YANGEBUP

JACKMAN BETTY JANE 85 years 2003 COMO

JACKMAN CLARA GERTRUDE 73 years 1970 HILTON

JACKMAN CLARENCE DALE WILLIAM 68 years 1987 WAIKIKI

JACKMAN CLEMENT 72 years 1949 SOUTH PERTH

JACKMAN CLEMENT JOSEPH 3 years 1911 PERTH

JACKMAN CLEON JAMES 14 years 1999 LANGFORD

JACKMAN CODY TROY 0 years 2005 REDCLIFFE

JACKMAN CONSTANCE BERYL 70 years 1992 SAFETY BAY

JACKMAN DAVID ALAN 55 years 2003 HILTON

JACKMAN DAVID LEONARD 78 years 2009 LEEMING

JACKMAN DORIS HARDING 33 years 1937 MOSMAN PARK

JACKMAN EILEEN 0 years 1921 UNKNOWN

JACKMAN ELEANOR FLORENCE 36 years 1921 SOUTH PERTH

JACKMAN ELLEN 73 years 1946 EAST FREMANTLE

JACKMAN ELSA 0 years 1913 SUBIACO

JACKMAN EMMA LOUISA 80 years 1953 MALVERN

JACKMAN ERIC BARNES 92 years 2007 COMO

JACKMAN ESTHER 57 years 1949 PERTH

JACKMAN EVELINE SEPTIMA 95 years 1972 BENTLEY

JACKMAN FRANK ELLIOTT 80 years 1953 NORTH DANDALUP

JACKMAN FRANK WHEATON 4 years 1908 CLAREMONT

JACKMAN FRED 74 years 1980 MELVILLE

JACKMAN FREDERICK MATHEW 73 years 1956 PERTH

JACKMAN GENE ANDERSON 52 years 1989 MOUNT LAWLEY

JACKMAN GEORGE ALBERT 93 years 2005 MARMION

JACKMAN GEORGE BARNES 75 years 1945 MOORA

JACKMAN GORDON DAVID 18 years 1998 FLOREAT

JACKMAN HARRY MARQUAND 72 years 1944 SUBIACO

JACKMAN HEATHER ELIZABETH 77 years 1996 SOUTH PERTH

JACKMAN HERBERT THOMAS 74 years 1949 SAFETY BAY

JACKMAN JAMES 79 years 1976 SUBIACO

JACKMAN JOHN KELVIN 52 years 1972 FLOREAT PARK

JACKMAN KATHLEEN 50 years 1946 EAST FREMANTLE

JACKMAN KATHLEEN MARGUERITE 0 years 1917 FREMANTLE

JACKMAN LEAH 88 years 1931 SOUTH PERTH

JACKMAN LEAH SARAH 78 years 1942 SUBIACO

JACKMAN LESLIE ARTHUR 59 years 1969 NORTH DANDALUP

JACKMAN LILLIAN MAY 92 years 1975 SOUTH PERTH

JACKMAN LINDA MARGARET 93 years 2007 FURNISSDALE

JACKMAN LOUISA 68 years 1989 WAIKIKI

JACKMAN MARGARET 86 years 1956 SUBIACO

JACKMAN MARGARET JOYCE 67 years 1997 LANGFORD

JACKMAN MARTHA 82 years 1980 SUBIACO

JACKMAN MARTIN 5 years 1904 EAST FREMANTLE

JACKMAN MARTIN 70 years 1936 EAST FREMANTLE

JACKMAN MARY ANN 81 years 1958 FREMANTLE

JACKMAN MAVIS ERICA 85 years 2011 PORT KENNEDY

JACKMAN MURIEL THERESA 74 years 1997 MANDURAH

JACKMAN PEGGY EILEEN 33 years 1964 BENTLEY

JACKMAN RACHAEL MARIE 0 years 1978 MELVILLE

JACKMAN RAYMOND ERNEST 72 years 1997 COOLBELLUP

JACKMAN SARAH 52 years 1925 SUBIACO

JACKMAN SARAH MAY 67 years 1937 NORTH DANDALUP

JACKMAN SIDNEY EUGENE 52 years 1955 BENTLEY PARK

JACKMAN THELMA MAY 52 years 1973 FLOREAT PARK

JACKMAN THELMA VERONICA 87 years 1999 LEEMING

JACKMAN THOMAS 60 years 1952 EAST FREMANTLE

JACKMAN THOMAS 68 years 1936 LEEDERVILLE

JACKMAN THOMAS JOHN (EXH) 77 years 1914 SOUTH PERTH

JACKMAN THOMAS LESLIE 82 years 2001 CARLISLE

JACKMAN UNKNOWN Stillborn 1903 COTTESLOE BEACH

JACKMAN UNNAMED 0 years 1961 BENTLEY

JACKMAN VALDA FAY 50 years 1980 WILLAGEE

JACKMAN VALERIE KAYE 17 years 1958 NORTHAM

JACKMAN WALTER 77 years 1934 LEEDERVILLE

JACKMAN WALTER JAMES 63 years 1982 WARNBRO

JACKMAN WALTER JOHN 66 years 1981 SCARBOROUGH

JACKMAN WILLIAM 37 years 1919 COTTESLOE

JACKMAN WILLIAM 76 years 1941 MOSMAN PARK

the OBITUARY of CHARLES HARPER 1842 - 1912 Guildford West Australia

Click this link for a look at the
LIFE of CHARLES HARPER 1842 - 1912
- politician, agriculturist, legislator, newspaper proprietor


the folloiwng was taken from the West Australian 22 April 1912
- (?) indicates not yet deciphered when transcribing
- all capitals are mine for easier name finding


the FUNERAL

... It is with profound sorrow that we have to record the death on Saturday morning, after a long and painful illness, of Mr Charles Harper, of Woodbridge, East Guildford, part proprietor of the "West Australian" newspaper. He died, it is true, in the evenng of life, and at the end of a career of usefullness, such as few indeed in Western Australian can boast of, but for all that his presence in the community, the example of his life and energies, the man himself could ill be spared and his death has created a gap which will not readily be filled.

It is some two years ago that Mr Harper first found that age had begun to weigh heavily upon him and though his indomitable will kept him ever on the path of industry, his frame could no longer stand a strain as of old.
A brief rest in a hospital was the next step but here again he did not allow himself the respite that was surely his due. Then came prostration and constant pain.
Perhaps he alone really knew the utter wearinness of the last few months.
All that unremitting care and loving attention could give was his, to no avail.
He bore his sufferings with a fortitude that might have been expected from an exceptional a personality, and when at times his fine physique and stamina enabled him to rally it seemed as if his courage and patience might after all meet their reward.
But it was not to be.
During last week his medical advisers and the members of his family viewed with alarm his rapid decline, and at half past 8 on Saturday morning peacefully, quietly and without pain, Mt Harper breathed his last.

Yesterday afternoon at the Karrakatta Cemetery there was witnessed one of the very largest public funerals that has ever been seen in the State. Though death had occurred only the day before, the sad news had spread with unwonted rapidity and the presence of so many hundreds of people representative of all classes of the community was indisputable evidence of the high public esteem in which the deceased gentleman was held and of the genuine regard which was universally entertained for him.
Earlier in the afternoon in the Guildford Church, of which Mr Harper had for many years been one of the chief pillars of support, a short service was held in place of the customary service in the mortuary chapel at the cemetery. The cortege arrived at a quarter to 3 and the sad procession was followed into the church by a congregation which filled it to overflowing. The officiating ministers were the Rev C.H.. Grimes who had been one of Mr Harper's most constant visitors during his illness; the Rev. A. Eddington, rector pro tem, of Guildford and the Rev. P.U. Henn, headmaster of the Church of England Grammar School in the foundation of which is the Guldford Grammar School. Mr Harper had been the movng spirit.

The service was fully choral and during its progress there were few indeed who did not show some signs of motion. To the strains of the "Dead March in Saul', played on the organ by Mr A.H. Montgomery, the procession moved from the sacred edifice and proceeded to the railway station, the hearse conveying the coffin being covered with beautiful wreaths and the choicest of white flowers.
On arrival at Karrakatta, the procession was reformed and augmented by many scores of persons who had joined the train at Perth and others who were awaiting it outside the cemetery, moving slowly to the graveside. It was the wish of Mr Harper that he should be buried there and indeed it would be hard to imagine more beautiful and more peaceful surroundings than those contained withing the four sides of that well kept burying ground.
The graveside was reached and the bearers laid their revered burden upon the supports placed to receive it. How plain and unostentatious was the casket - such was the wish of the departed one. It was of polished jarrah, unadorned save by the necessary mountings, which were in silver. Upon it was a silver plate having engraed on it, in Roman type, the simple epitaph "Charles Harper, died April 20. 1912 aged 69".

The Rev. E. MAKEHAM, representing His Lordship the Bishop, had now taken the place of the Rev. I.U. Henn. The prayers were read by the Rev A. Eddington, the closing sentences being said by the Rev C.H.D. Grimes.

Speaking with deep emotion, Mr Grimes then addressed a few words to those gathered about. It would, he said, be difficult indeed to adequately express his feelings upon so sad an occasion. Indeed the sadness was only tempered by the knowledge that at last pain and suffering were at an end for one who had borne it with such wonderful courage, manliness, fortitude and resignation.
Concerning Mr Harper's lifes work, few words of his would be necessary. He must be known to all for the manner in which he had enriched the State by his interests in agriculture, education, politics, journalism and in countless other ways. Not only in his public life had Mr Harper been known for the integrity of all his dealings, but his private life too had been blameless and completely untarnished.
All must feel the poorer for so great a loss, the loss of so invaluable a friend, so great a man. His place could not be filled. there had been in the past, and must be in the future, many great public funerals, but he questioned very much if there would be many more in which genune pubic regret was more widely marked than on that sorrowful occasion.
Measured by true standards a really great one had been taken from amongst them. But his memory remained, his works remained as monuments of his life and the example which Mr Harper had left behind must, he felt sure, be provocative of good for many years to come.

After a last look at the casket as it lay at the bottom of its resting place, mourners and friends turned away. The outward show was ended. There remained only the sorrow of the heart to which time, the great healer, may perchance some day, bring a softening influence.

The chief mourners were:
..Mr Walter HARPER, Mr Harcourt HARPER, Mr Gresley HARPER, Mr Prescott HARPER, Mr Wilfred HARPER (sons)
.. Mr James MORRISON, Mr Henry BROCKMAN, Mr Henry De BURGH (brothers-in-law), Mr Robert MORRISON, Mr James MORRISON jnr, Mr Sydeny De BURGH and Mr Ernest De BURGH (nephews).
The pall-bearers were:
.. Sir Winthrop HACKETT, Mr W.J. BUTCHER, Mr Catton GRASBY, Mr WEDGE, Mr A.R. RICHARDSON and Mr PEARCE

Among those who also took part were:
.. Sir John FORREST, Mr Justice McMILLAN, Mr W.T. LOTTON,
Mr M.H. JACOBY, Mr Charles SOMMERS, MLC., Mr S.F. MOORE,
Mr A.S. ROE, P.M., Mr James COWAN, P.M., Mr George LEFROY,
Mr Gee COUCH, Mr H.D. HOLMES, Mr A. LANGLER, Mr A. CARSON,
Mr George LUKIN, Mr J.T. SHORT, Mr C. GALE, Mr W.G. JOHNSON,
Mr F.A. MOSELEY, Mr H.S. KING, Mr A. DESPEISSIS, Mr W. TRPYLEN,
Mr C. BARNES, Mr A.C. GULL, Mr A & Mr H. HILLMAN, Mr W. PADBURY,
Mr E. SHENTON, Mr W. CLIFTON, Mr Isaac WOOD, Mr C. MANNING,
Mr E. ROBINSON, the Rev. H. BURTON, the Rev. A. HUTCHINSON,Mr G. Barra LEONARD, Mr J.M. FERGUSON, Mr D. CLARKSON, Mr T. HOOSON,
Mr J. MORRISON, Mr R.J. SANDERSON, Mr S. VIVEASH, Mr A. FARMER,
Mr B. SMITH, Messrs H. and C. and L. LUKIN, Mr Oct BURT, Mr R.A. SHELL, Mr H. SHOLL, Mr F.M. STONE, Mr Edmund BROCKMAN,
Mr R.L. HERBERT, Mr F. CRAIG, Mr T.C. VILLIERS, Mr J. HURMAN,
Mr T. S. McNULTY (representing the Agricultural Department),
Mr G. HICKLING (representing the Weld Club), Mr Fred. BURT,
Mr H. Carew REID, Mr E.S. BARKER, Mr Francis MOSELY, Mr M.M. MOSS,
Mr W. WILLIAMS, Mr F.C. FAULKNER, Mr A. Le SOUEF,
Mr George PATTERSON, Mr T. OLIPHANT (representing the W.A. Producers' Union), Mr EDMOND, Mr C. FERGUSON, Mr R. FAIRBAIRN, the members of the literary staff of the "West Australian" and the "Western Mail", the employees of the Woodridge Nursery Co., and others.

The funeral arrangements were carried out by A.D. JONES and Co., of Guildford

A BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCH

.. Mr Harper was the son of an Anglican clergyman and was born at Nardi, in Western Australia, in the year 1843. He was educated privately, and at th age of eighteen he joined Messrs E. and A. DEMPSEY and D. CLARKSON in making an exploring trip through what is now known as the Southern Cross district in search of pastoral property.
The party were, however, unsuccessful in their search on that occasion.
In the year 1864, Mr Harper, accompanied by Mr CLARKSON an Mr L.B. LUKIN, made a more thorough examination of the country and came to the conclusion that it was too dry for pastoral purposes.
Two years later Mr Harper proceeded to the North-West and spent some time in exploring the interior. While he was up there two provision vessels named The Brothers and the Emma, were lost and Mr Harper immediately started overland for Champon Bay to obtain provisions for th nearly starvng people of Roebourne. He then determned to engage in the (?) and assisted to build a boat in Roebourne for the purpose.
This craft made her first voyage fro Cossack Creek in 1868. Mr Harper and Mr S.H. Viveash were in charge and took wth them aboriginal drivers. The drivers were, however, unable to raise shell from a sufficient depth to make the work very profitable and after navigating the boat for some time, Mr Harper proceeded to Beverley where he engaged in the pursuit of farming. The sphere there was, however, too narrow for his energies and in the year 1871 he returned to the North West with Messrs McKenzie GRANT and Mr A. (?) ANDERSON and took up the nucleus of what afterwards became the De GREY station of about one millon acres.
This station was the frst wool-raising property in the State where natives were utilised in (?) in the clip.

Pearling had now become more profitable and the firm in which Mr Harper had an interest startd with three boats, which were manned by natives from the station. The natives at the time proved as expert at diving as they were at shearing and it now became Mr Harper's practise to spend six months of the year on the pearling grounds and six months on the station.

In 1876 he paid a visit to England and three years later sold his share in the pearling industry to Mr John EDGAR.

In March of the latter year he married Miss Fanny de BURGH, daughter of the late Mr Robert de Burgh of Caversham, Guildford and sister of Mrs (?) MORRISON of Waterhall, Guildford and took up his residence at Woodbridge, close to his brides old home.
In the following year, when his first child, a son, was born, Mr Harper established, with Mr A. McRAE, a sheep station on the Ashburton River and in partnership with Sir Thomas Cockburn Campbell purchased the then Perth Gazette and West Australian Times which was issued three times a week. At a later period, following the retiremment of Sir Thomas Campbell, Mr (now Sir) J.W. HACKETT joined the firm as partner and very soon after the "West Australian" as it was then designated, became a daily paper.

Mr Harper began a long and useful Parliamentary career in the year 1878 when he was elected to represent the North Western Province in the old Legislatvie Council.
After two session there was a dissolution and Mr Harper did not seek re election.

Some nine years later he declined a nominee seat in the council, which was proffered by the then Governor, but was soon afterwards elected to represent the York and Beverley electorate in the Legislative Assembly.

On the introduction of Responslible Government, in the year 1890, Mr Harper headed the poll for the representation of Beverley and continued as member for that electorate until his retirement from politics in the year of the dissolution of 1905 - a period of 15 years.
As an indication of his standng in Parliament, it may be stated that he was elected Chairman of Committees on August 24 1897 and for some time prior to the death of Sir James Lee STEERE occupied the position of Deputy Speaker.
On the death of Sir James, Mr Harper was, in October 1903, appointd to the (?) but he retired from the post on July 28 of the following year.

In the House Mr Harper was looked upon as a thoughtful speaker and was one who always commanded a respectful and attentive hearing from all parties. He never rose to his feet without havng some useful and clearly expressed contribution to make to the deabte. His calm, judicial temprement was strikingly indictated in his speeches and if he had been more fiery in declaraton or had been a rancourous partyman, he would probably not have occupied the high position he did in the esteem of his fellow-members and the community at large, which set such value upon his impartial spirit and unclouded judgment.

One of the many important (?) whch Mr Harper took up during his life in Parliament was when he accepted the Chairmanship of the Commission which was appointed during the term of the Labour Government in 1904-05 to enquire into that whole question of immigration.
The report of this Commission was one of the most voluminous and withal informative documents ever presented to the local Parliament. In this report too, there was also advocated the construction of light agricultural railways for the purpose of opening up the country at a minimum of expense.

Mr Harper played many important parts in leading movements which have left their mark on the progress of the land of his birth.
When a Royal Commission was appointed to inquire into the condition of the yeoman class, to devise measures for liberalising the land laws and encouraging settlement, his special experience and judical cast of mnd marked him as one of th most eligible members of th board, whose (?) was adopted as the basis of subsequent legislation.

The creation of the Agricultural Bureau gave Mr Harper another opportunity of well-deserved distinction. The Bureau was formed for the purpose of using the agicultural class and fostering the natural resources of the country. It also acted as advising body to the Government in all that related to the cultivation of the soil and was entrusted with (?) spending powers in order that it might be of real service to pastoralists, fruit growers and farmers.
The choice of the chairmanship of this bureau fell upon Mr Harper whose tact, firmness and force of character admirably qualified him to fill the office with credit to himself and advantage to the public interest.
Under the auspices of the Bureau a "Farmers Parliament" was called each year and under the presidency of Mr Harper, the proceedings were conspicuous for harmony and the excution of a great deal of practical work.
Being himself, one of the largest fruit growers in the State at the time of his death and being the owner of part owner of numerous station properties, Mr Harper naturally had the greatest symmpathy for those who were struggling on the land.
It was chiefly though his instumentality therefore that in March 1902
a meetng of producers from all parts of the State was called at the Departmentof Agriculture with the object of taking steps to promote thefoundation of a Producers Co-operative Union.
A committee, of which Mr Harper was a leading member, was appointed to draw up a scheme, the outcome of which was the registration in October of the same year of the West Australian Producers' Union.
Mr Harper was the first, and at the time of his death, the only, Chairman and Managaing Director of the Union and be always placed all his influence and business experience at the disposal of the Union with a view to firmly establishing it and increasing the sphere of its usefulness.

Even in his earlier days, before the great mining development which brought the State so much more public attenton, he had supeme faith in the potentailities of theu State as a fruit-growing country to be planted prior to the big influx of population in the early '90s.

As some recognition of the valuable work which the deceased gentleman had performed in the cause of the agricultural industry, generaly at the last (1911) conference of Western Australian producers in Perth, the following resolution was carried - 'That this conference of producers, representing all sections of the agricultual community of the State, deeply regrets that Mr Charles Harper, who has occupied the position of president since the inception of the conferences many years ago, is prevented by serious illness from being present. The conference at the same time desires to record its recognition of the splendid servcies rendered by Mr Harper for the good of the State for over half a century. It recognises that for may years his chief and absornig interest has been the promotion of agricultural education and co-operation and hopes and believes that his example will serve as a stimulus to others in working unselfishly for the welfare of the State. The conference, while expressing its sympathy, earnestly hopes that Mr Harper may speeily be restored to health to continue his good work'.

Mr Harper possessed a considerable amount of inventive genius and amongst other things did a great deal towards demonstrating the possibilites of hitherto despised blackboy (so common in Western Australia), showing particularly the value of the pulp or pith as a stock food.
He was always to the fore in the trial of new and advanced agricultural machinery. He was undoubtedly the first in Australia to indicate the value of the pea crop for feeding off by sheep and although it was afterwards found that he was slightly anticipated in this in America, his work was without the knowledge of what was being done in Colorado.

Amongst the other positions which he filled for years past was that of a director of the Western Australian Trustee, Executor and Agency Co., Ltd.
He was also for many years a member of the local board of directors of the natioal Mutual Life Assurace Society.

Although essentially a practical man and living a life of strenuous, arduous work, Mr Harper was a thorough student and on his last trip to England three years ago interested himself keenly in the latest inventions, notably in the Brennan monorail which he greatly desired should be turned to account in Western Australia.

Mr Harper had also exhibited his interest in literature and the arts and sciences by his association with the committees of the Victoria Library, Zoological Garden and the Western Australia Museuem and Art Gallery.
Further, he was the founder and one of the governors of the Guildford Grammar School (now the Church of England High School) before the acquisition of that institution by the Anglican Church authoities and from the time of its establishment, he manifestd the deepest possible iterest in the welfare of the school and of the cause of education generally.

The late Mr Harper leaves a widow and five sons and four daughters with whom the greatest sympathy is felt.
The names of the children are: Walter (the eldest), Clara, Harcourt, Gresley, Prescott, Kitty, Maidie, Wilfred and Eileen.


the LUKINs buried at KARRAKATTA cemetery Perth West Australia

the 23 LUKIN bured at Karrakatta cemetery Perth West Australia
- (as at April 2011)

NAME - AGE - YEAR fo DEATH - SUBURB they lived in

LUKIN DAVID BRUCE 81 years 2001 COTTLESLOE

LUKIN DORIS ELIZABETH 87 years 1980 NEDLANDS

LUKIN DORIS MILDRED 86 years 1972 BASSENDEAN

LUKIN DOROTHY MURIEL 90 years 2005 OSBORNE PARK

LUKIN DOUGLAS REDE 66 years 2010 MARANGAROO

LUKIN EMILY MARY 73 years 1989 MANNING

LUKIN FRIEDA MARY 88 years 1966 SOUTH GUILDFORD

LUKIN GEOFFREY HARPER 84 years 1971 ATTADALE
- serve WWI as Private 10/15/1 with the 10th Light Horse Regiment, A Squadron. Mother was Mrs Lionel Boyd Lukin, (nee Isabella Maxwell FERGUSON) Toodyay, WA
- hs brother 1745 Sergeant Henry Wedderburn LUKIN, 28th Battalon, was killed in action, 29 July 1916

LUKIN GEORGE 78 years 1931 BASSENDEAN

LUKIN GEORGE FRASER 85 years 1993 MANNING

LUKIN GLADYS ELIZABETH 88 years 1985 MT LAWLEY

LUKIN GLADYS ETHEL 73 years 1964 COTTESLOE

LUKIN GRESLEY W H 43 years 1911 SUBIACO
- married Muriel Ross DODDS (1869-1949 Paddington NSW - Subiaco WA)
- they married Sydney NSW in 1893 and had twins Dorothy & John Hall Lukin on 7 August 1893 in Sydney
- Murial was the 6th of 11 children of Henrys DOODS (1833-1907) & Harriet Anne BINNIG (1842-1884) of New South Wales

LUKIN HERBERT GEORGE 90 years 1993 CITY BEACH

LUKIN JOAN 69 years 1977 WILSON

LUKIN JULIA PRUDENCE Stillborn 1990 GLEN FORREST

LUKIN LIONEL JOHN 64 years 1940 BASSENDEAN

LUKIN MARGARET JUNE 87 years 2005 GOSNELLS

LUKIN MURIEL 80 years 1961 ARMADALE

LUKIN MURIEL ROSS 80 years 1949 SUBIACO

LUKIN NELLIE PHYLLIS 75 years 1986 ARMADALE

LUKIN RACHEL EMILY 86 years 1993 MANDURAH

LUKIN ROBERT BOYD 78 years 2001 ROCKINGHAM

PARKHURST BOYS to New Zealand 1842 & 1843

PARKHURST PRISON

Although not officially classed as convicts, a group of convict boys called the Parkhurst Boys were sent to Western Australia, New Zealand, Tasmania, Victoria and even to Norfolk Island.
They had been rehabilitated at Parkhurst Prison and were transported under a similar arrangement to the exiles who began to arrive a few years later. The aim was to apprentice them to local settlers.

In the ten years between 1842 and 1852 just under 1499 boys aged from twelve to eighteen were transported to Australia and New Zealand from Britain's Parkhurst Prison. Parkhurst was designed especially for boys and was built on the Isle of Wight. On December 26, 1838, Robert Woollcombe, the prison governor, arrived at Parkhurst with a team of taskmasters and the first 102 boys.

The prison was enlarged and extended during its time as a juvenile prison and until that time on March 30, 1864, the boys did much of the work as part of their training in carpentry, stonework and ironwork. In all, 4088 boys passed through the Parkhurst system.


the PARKHURST BOYS from Devonshire
Many Australians can trace their ancestry back to early immigrants, and for some a convict-connection is a badge of pride. Some families in Australia and also in New Zealand are descended from "Parkhurst Boys", a fairly short-lived scheme for the rehabilitation of young offenders, and just a few of these descend from boys sentenced in Devonshire

Quakers arranged for young offenders at Parkhurst Prison to be sent to the Isle of Wight to be taught trades.
Another offer was made that if they agreed to go to New Zealand to live and work they would be pardoned.
Most of the boys had been jailed for misdemeanours such as stealing fruit, or poaching

The Parkhurst Boys were treated with open hostility by some Aucklander's
Taken in by Auckland's harbour master, Captain David ROUGH, the Parkhurst Boy descendants became some of the most distinguished of Auckland citizens

PARKHURST APPRENTCIES

List of ships that brought Parkhurst apprentices to Australia and New Zealand

Ship - Arrival - Parkhurst apprentices - Colony

Simon Taylor - August 1842 - 18 - Western Australia
St George - November 1842 - 92 - New Zealand
Shepherd - October 1843 - 28 - Western Australia
Mandarin - October 1843 - 51 Tasmania
Mandarin - November 1843 - 31 - New Zealand
Halifax - December 1844 - 18 - Western Australia
Strathedin - December 1845 - 74 - Tasmania
Cumberland - January 1846 - 16 - Western Australia
Maitland - October 1846 - 70 - Victoria
Thomas Arbuthnot - May 1847 - 89 - Victoria [4]
Joseph Somes - September 1847 - 84 - Victoria
Marion -J anuary 1848 - 125 - Victoria
Orient - March 1848 - 51 - Western Australia
Eden - February 1849 - 62 - Victoria
Ameer - February 1849 - 50 - Western Australia
Hashemy - abt July 1849 - 29 - Tasmania
Randolph - August 1849 - 85 - Victoria
Mary - October 1849 - 53 - Western Australia
Adelaide -November 1849 - 30 - Tasmania
Blenheim - July 1850 - 85 - Tasmania
Maria Somes - August 1850 - 30 - Tasmania
Nile - October 1850 - 30 - Tasmania
Rodney - November 1850 - 40 - Tasmania
Mermaid - May 1851 - 43 - Western Australia
Lady Kennaway - May 1851 - Tasmania and Norfolk Island
Pyrenees - June 1851 - 29- Western Australia
Minden - October 1851 - 30 - Western Australia
Aboukir - December 1851 - Tasmania
Fairlie - March 1852 - Tasmania
Equestrian - August 1852 - Tasmania
Oriental Queen - October 1852 - Tasmania
Dudbrook - February 1853 - 1 - Western Australia
Lincelles - January 1862 - 1 - Western Australia


The Parkhurst apprentices were juvenile prisoners from Parkhurst Prison on the Isle of Wight, sentenced to "transportation beyond the seas" and transported to Australia and New Zealand between 1842 and 1852. Either before leaving England[1] or on arrival at their destination[2], they were pardoned on the conditions that they be "apprenticed" to local employers, and that they not return to England during the term of their sentence. In the ten years between 1842 and 1852 nearly 1500 boys aged from twelve to eighteen were transported to Australia and New Zealand from Parkhurst Prison

the St GEORGE departed London in 1842 and arrived at Auckland on 25 Oct 1842
...The St George also carried passengers who paid their own way. She disembarked 13 cabin and 21 steerage passengers for Auckland in October, 1842


This is a list of the 'Parkhurst Boys' on the St George

ASTLE William 12 tailor
AXFORD John 18 tailor
AXFORD William 16 shoemaker
BAKER George 16 shoemaker
BALDWIN William 14 tailor
BEASLEY William 14 tailor
BELLAMY David 15 tailor
BIGGS Arthur 16
BLACKWELL William G 14 tailor
BOTTOMLEY George 15
BRIGGS James 17 tailor
BROWN George 16 shoemaker
BRYANT James 15 shoemaker
BURFORD William 18 tailor
BURGESS James 12 tailor
BURKE Michael 12 tailor
BURNARD Isaac 15 tailor
BURNARD Thomas 17 shoemaker
CARTER Edward 14 tailor
COLEY James 15 tailor
COLEY Joseph 17
CHAPMAN Charles 15
COOK Samuel 18
COPPING John 16 tailor
COTEY Joseph 17
CRAWFORD William 15
CRITCHLEY Thomas 17 tailor
DAVIS James 14
DAWES Frederick 16
DILLION Thomas 14
DOBBY Michael 15 tailor
DOWIE Henery Buller 19
EDGE George 19 shoemaker
ELDER Alexander 18
FAWIAN Thomas 16
FLOYD John 18
FOX Robert Waylett 15
GARN William 18
HARDY Thomas 17
HARVEY Thomas 18
HITCHCOCK Benjamin 17
HOLLIS William 16 tailor
HOLLOWAY Charles 17 shoemaker
HOPKINS Gabriel 13 shoemaker
HORNE Frederick 15 tailor
JONES John 17
KING George 18
KING Thomas 15 shoemaker
LEE John 14 tailor
LIDDLE Adam 17
LLOYD John 15 tailor
MAHONEY John 14
MACKAY William 14 tailor
MALCOLM John 19
MARSH David 15
MARSH James 16 shoemaker
MATTHEWS William 17 tailor
MELLOM Walter 18
MILLER John 15 shoemaker
MINHINNICK John 15 shoemaker
MOODY John 14 tailor
MURGUARD Charles 16
MYLER Richard 14 tailor
McGUINESS James 17 shoemaker
McOUARRlE Andrew 17
NICHOLSON John 18
NICHOLSON William 18
OGAN John 14 tailor
PARSONS James 16
PHILLIPS Joseph 14
PINEY James 14
POOL James 15
POTTER James 17
PROCTOR Thomas 15 tailor
RAMPLING James 15 tailor
RICHMOND Peter 14 tailor
ROOK Thomas 19
RYAN John 18
SAUNDERS John 14 shoemaker
SAYLES James 18
SEAMELL Henry 20
SHEARS John 17 shoemaker
SHERIFF Charles 17 tailor
SHERIFF Charles 17 shoemaker
SMITH William 18
STOKES James 18
STRONG Henry Stephen 18
THORN William 18
TUFT John 17 shoemaker
TOPPENY William 13
TOPPING William 13 tailor
TUCK William 11 tailor
TUGGET John 17
WARNUTT William 16 tailor
WHITEHEAD John 18
WILLEY John 15 tailor
WINES Henry 15 tailor
WOODGATE William 16


the MANDARIN departed Gravesend, London on 18 June 1843 and arrived in Auckland 14 Nov 1843
... The Mandarin also carried passengers who paid their own way, arriving 1843. Most of the
fare-paying passengers went to Wellington.


This is a list of the 'Parkhurst Boys' on the Mandarin with their trial place & date and the offence they were charged with

ADAMS Thomas 17 carpenter
- Central Criminal Court 11 May 1840, larceny
- Free on arrival; retrained as a carpenter

ALLEN George 16 tailor and cooper
- Middlesex 22 Feb 1841, simple larceny
- received 7 years at age 13
- Apprenticed on arrival; retrained as a tailor & cooper

BASSAN Henry 16 bricklayer and tailor
- Central Criminal Court 23 Nov 1840, larceny
- received 7 years at age 13
- Apprenticed on arrival; retrained as a bricklayer & tailor

BEALES William 18 carpenter
- Falmouth 20 Oct 1837 stealing sovereigns
- received 7 years at age 12
- Free on arrival; retrained as a carpenter;

BINNIE Alexander 19 tailor - (aka BENNIE)
- Ayr 28 April 1838 house breaking
- received 7 years at age 12
- Free on arrival; retrained as a tailor

COTTERELL John 17 tailor (aka COTTERELL - COTTRELY)
- Birmingham sessions 26 Oct 1839 stealing chattels
- received 7 years at age 13
- Free on arrival; retrained as a tailor

DAY Thomas 18 tailor
- Oxford 19 Oct 1840 larceny
- received 10 years at age 13
- Free on arrival; retrained as a tailor

DENMAN William 15 tailor
- 10 Feb 1841 unknown where
- received 7 years at age 10
- Apprenticed on arrival; retrained as a tailor

EGGERTON Isaac 17 cooper and shoemaker (aka [EGGERTON)
- Central Criminal Court 6 June 1840 larceny
- received 7 years at age 13
- Free on arrival; retrained as a cooper & shoemaker

FARRELL John 16 cooper and shoemaker
- Central Criminal Court 17 Aug 1840 larceny
- received 10 years at age 12
- Free on arrival; retrained as a cooper & shoemaker

GOULBUFIN/GOULBURN Thomas 18 carpenter (aka GOLBURNE)
- Central Criminal Court 11 May 1840 larceny
- receive 7 years
- Free on arrival; retrained as a carpenter

GRIFFITHS James 17 carpenter and shoemaker
- Portsmouth 2 April 1840 house breaking
- received 10 years at ag 13
- Free on arrival; retrained as a carpenter & shoemaker
- connections not respectable

HERMITAGE-HERITAGE John 16 carpenter
- Worcester 19 Oct 1840 felony
- received 7 years at age 12
- Free on arrival; retrained as a carpenter

HILL Robert 17 sayer and shoemaker
- Exeter 4 Jan 1841 larceny
- convicted at age 13
- Free on arrival; retrained as a sawyer & shoemaker
- lead astray by evil advisers

HUNTLY Walter 16 bricklayer
- Reading 24 Feb 1841 larceny
- received 7 years at age 13
- Free on arrival; retrained as a bricklayer

INCHIE James 19 cooper (aka HINCHLEY & HINCHIE)
- Central Criminal Court 17 Aug 1840 larceny
- received 10 years at age 12
- Free on arrival; retrained as a cooper

LAMB Michael 16 bricklayer and shoemaker (AKA DALEY)
- Central Criminal Court 17 Aug 1840 larceny
- received 7 years at age 12
- Apprenticed on arrival; retrained as a brickmaker & shoemaker

LAY George 20 carpenter (aka JAY & LAW)
- Central Criminal Court 4 Feb 1839 larceny
- received 7 years at age 14
- Disembarked in NZ; Free on arrival; retrained as a carpenter

LYNCH John 17 carpenter
- Central Criminal Court 19 Oct 1840 larceny
- received 7 years at age 13
- Free on arrival; retrained as a carpenter

NEIL Charles 16 shoemaker
- Knutsford 25 March 1840 larceny
- received 7 years at age 12
- Free on arrival; retrained as a shoemaker
- previous convictions

ORGAN Richard 16 plumber and glazier
- Gloucester Assize 15 Aug 1840 house breaking
- received 10 years at age 13
- Free on arrival; retrained as a plumber & glazier

PARKER Vlhlliam 12 tailor
- Westminster 10 Feb 1841 simple larceny
- received 7 years at age 10
- Apprenticed on arrival; retrained as a tailor

PATON William 19 bricklayer (aka PAYTON)
- Central Criminal Court 18 June 1838 larceny
- receved 10 years at age 14
- Free on arrival; retrained as a bricklayer & ivory turner

ROSE Edwin 17 farmer (aka William)
- Gloucester sessions 4 March 1840 stealing bread
- received 7 years at age 14
- Free on arrival; retrained as a farmer

SHAW John 17 shoemaker
- Central Criminal Court 2 March 1839 larceny
- received 7 years at age 13
- Free on arrival; retrained as a sawyer & carpenter

SMITH Joseph 18 plasterer and bricklayer
- Middlesex 6 April 1840 simple larceny
- recevie 7 years at age 16
- Free on arrival; retrained as a plasterer & bricklayer

SMITH William 16 farmer
- Central Criminal Court 1 Feb 1841 larceny
- received 7 years at age 12
- Apprenticed on arrival; retrained as a farmer

WALLER Alfred 15 carpenter
- Central Criminal Court 21 Nov 1840 larceny
- received 7 years at a
- Parkhurst Register error states sent to VDL
- Apprenticed on arrival; retrained as a carpenter

WEST William 16 bricklayer and tailor
- Reading 24 Feb 1841 robbery
- received 10 years at age 13
- Apprenticed on arrival; retrained as a bricklayer & tailor

WILLIAMS Joseph 17 cooper (aka [John RICHARDSON)
- Central Criminal Court 17 Aug 1840 larceny
- received 10 years at age 13
- Free on arrival; retrained as a cooper

WILSON George 16 shoemaker
- Central Criminal Court 17 Aug 1840 larceny
- convicted at age 13
- Apprenticed on arrival; retrained as a shoemaker


When the Parkhurst Boys landed in Auckland, they were taken in hand by the Harbour-master and migration officer, David Rough. He did not think much of their prison-taught trades, for he immediately tendered them as farm labourers in the Government Gazette.
Some stayed in Auckland, with no alternative but to accept whatever employers and wages were offering. From the beginning, they were regarded by their contemporaries as black sheep, or worse


NOTES
see also The PARKHURST BOYS at Fred Shears site
see also SHEARS at Timaru (who had the Brickyards from 1874)

2 comment(s), latest 5 years, 1 month ago

GAY marriages New Zealand 1875 - 1930

some of the GAY surname marriages New Zealand 1875 - 1930:

the GAY BRIDES

Ada Evelyn Gay
- married Frederick William Cotton in 1912

Agnes Elizabeth Gay
- married Robert Thomas Rand in 1909

Amy Gay
- married George Richardson in 1892

Bertha Gay
- married George Francis Smith in 1897

Christina Gay
- married John Fotheringham Bell in 1893

Doris Helen Gay
- married Vincent Ivan Berryman in 1926

Edith Maude Gay
- married Charles Coombs in 1901

Edith Maude Gay
- married John Ealam in 1915

Elsie Evelyn Gay
- married William Hugh Leathem in 1912

Emily Gay
- married George Summers in 1875

Emily Harriett Gay
- married George William Cadrie Cole in 1907

Emma Louise Gay
- married Urban Wilton Budden in 1910

Enid Helena Maude Gay
- married Leo Frederick George Barritt in 1930

Ethel Annie Gay
- married Edgar Henry Bashford in 1912

Eva Adeline Gay
- married Alfred Portloch Davis in 1911

Flora Ellen Gay
- married Valentine Brown in 1922

Florence Gay
- married William Alexander Fraser in 1906

Frances Fulton Gay
- married George Raymond Cloake in 1928

Harriet Elizabeth Easton Gay
- married Edward William Roper in 1889

Helen Fulton Gay
- married Walter Brodie Galbraith in 1893

Iris Gwendoline Gay
- married Alex Robert Hinemoa Gardiner in 1923

Isabella McGregor Gay
- married William Nelson Paul in 1907

Jane Gay
- married Hugh Alexander Patterson Tanner in 1921

Letitia Gay
- married James Scrimgeour in 1900

Louisa Gay
- married Herbert Hamblin Reade in 1894

Louisa Jane Gay
- married Albert Osborne Barns in 1918

Lucy Sarah Gay (1861-1952)
- married William Henry Manhire (1859-1930) in 1882

Margaret Gay
- married John Hewson Finlinson in 1906

Marion Gay
- married Henry Montague O'Meara in 1920

Marion Melva Gay
- married James William Victor Parsons in 1926

Marjorie Ivy Gay
- married Victor O'Grady in 1928

Mary Gay
- married Charles Miles in 1877

Mary Anne Gay
- married Clement Thomas Crooke i 1888

Mary Buchanan Gay
- married Patrick Ryan in 1906

Maud Gay
- married William Arthur Mead in 1900

Mildred Gay
- married Cyril Waines in 1910

Myra Brenda Gay
- married William John Mortimer Hale in 1929

Nellie MacLaren Gay
- married William Laird in 1919

Susan Gay
- married Charles Cook in 1881


the GAY grooms

HARPER buried KARRAKATTA cemetery Perth WA

the HARPER bured at Karrakatta cemetery Perth, West Australia
- as at April 2011 ... stillborn & unnamed babies not included in this list

NAME - AGE - YEAR of DEATH - SUBURB they lived in

ADA DORIS Harper 78 years 1976 PALMYRA

ADRIAN CHARLES Harper 42 years 1933 PERTH

AILEEN FANNY Harper 86 years 1981 MOSMAN PARK

ALAN Harper 51 years 1999 ORELIA

ALAN BIRDWOOD Harper 70 years 1989 BAYSWATER

ALAN VICTOR Harper 47 years 2006 KEWDALE

ALEXANDER ROY Harper 84 years 2005 YOKINE

ALICE LOUISE Harper 0 years 1905 LEEDERVILLE

AMANDA DAWN Harper 0 years 1983 BAYSWATER

ANNIE Harper 72 years 1960 BELLEVUE

ARCHIBALD Harper 64 years 1920 STH FREMANTLE

ARCHIBALD SALVADOR Harper 50 years 1930 FREMANTLE

ARCHIBALD TULLOCK Harper 62 years 1969 PALMYRA

ARTHUR FREDERICK Harper 88 years 2004 GOSNELLS

ARTHUR HENRY Harper 54 years 1939 WEST PERTH

ARTHUR LEWIS Harper 71 years 1955 BELLEVUE

ARTHUR ROBERT Harper 79 years 2000 KIARA

ARTHUR ROBERT BERTRAM Harper 82 years 2000 KALLAROO

AUDREY ISABEL JEAN Harper 83 years 1994 MAYLANDS

BERTHA MABEL Harper 78 years 1983 CARLISLE

BERYL THORA Harper 89 years 1997 SUBIACO

BESSIE Harper 89 years 1963 VICTORIA PARK

BRIAN PAUL Harper 84 years 2002 NORANDA

BRUCE STANLEY Harper 43 years 1974 ALFRED COVE

BRYANT EDGAR VIVIAN Harper 69 years 2002 MUCHEA

CATHERINE AMELIA Harper 84 years 1998 MOUNT CLAREMONT

CATHERINE LILLIAN Harper 27 years 1939 KUNUNOPPIN

CECIL SAMUEL JABEZ Harper 85 years 1995 BICTON

CECILIA URSULA Harper 82 years 1968 RIVERVALE

CECILIE Harper 85 years 2002 GREENMOUNT

CHARLES Harper 69 years 1912 GUILDFORD

CHARLES Harper 84 years 1954 VICTORIA PARK

CHARLES ADRIAN Harper 57 years 1980 NORTH PERTH

CHARLES DARTNELL Harper 42 years 1984 SUBIACO

CHARLES DRUMMOND Harper 87 years 2000 NORTH FREMANTLE

CHARLES HARRY Harper 60 years 1991 HIGHWYCOMBE

CHARLES STIRLING Harper 87 years 1993 SOUTH PERTH

CHARLES SUTTCLIFFE Harper 80 years 1966 DALKEITH

CHARLES WALTER Harper 76 years 1956 SOUTH PERTH

CHERYL ANNE Harper 56 years 2010 BALLAJURA

CHRISTOPHER Harper 46 years 1924 EAST PERTH

CHRISTOPHER EDWARD Harper 0 years 1953 SCARBOROUGH

CLARENCE ABEL Harper 74 years 1988 MOUNT CLAREMONT

CLEMENT STORMONT DENHAM Harper 67 years 1966 MOUNT PLEASANT

CLEMENTINA Harper 86 years 1945 MOUNT LAWLEY

COLIN ALLAN Harper 63 years 2006 MAYLANDS

COLIN CLIVE Harper 76 years 1976 EAST FREMANTLE

COLIN JOHN Harper 80 years 2008 BENTLEY

CORALIE LILLIAN TALBOT Harper 99 years 2008 MOSMAN PARK

CYRIL FREDERICK Harper 79 years 1997 PALMYRA

DAISY Harper 87 years 1970 EAST GUILDFORD

DAPHNE Harper 70 years 1986 BICTON

DAPHNE LORETTE Harper 78 years 2002 BALCATTA

DAVID MONCRIEFF STEWART Harper 46 years 1992 GIRRAWHEEN

DESMOND GERARD Harper 50 years 1974 SHOALWATER BAY

DORA GLADYS Harper 75 years 1966 TUART HILL

DOREEN LILIAN Harper 76 years 2011 ELLENBROOK

DOREEN WENSLEY Harper 87 years 1991 ROLEYSTONE

DOROTHY JEAN Harper 74 years 1987 PEPPERMINT GROVE

DOUGLAS Harper 55 years 1973 MARGARET RIVER

EDGAR CECIL Harper 81 years 1985 BENTLEY

EDGAR SAMUEL Harper 74 years 1965 BASSENDEAN

EDNA MARION Harper 92 years 2000 BENTLEY

EDWARD Harper 80 years 1971 OSBORNE PARK

EDWARD ALFRED Harper 69 years 1975 FLOREAT PARK

EDWARD ERNEST Harper 85 years 2009 GOSNELLS

EDWINA BRIDGET GRACE Harper 79 years 2000 KEWDALE

EILEEN ROSA Harper 86 years 2005 ARMADALE

ELEANOR ANNE Harper 76 years 1974 NEDLANDS

ELIZABETH Harper 75 years 1916 FREMANTLE

ELIZABETH Harper 82 years 1927 VICTORIA PARK

ELLEN Harper 77 years 1926 W PERTH

ELLEN Harper 94 years 2003 BENTLEY

ELVIRA LETETIA AUGUSTA Harper 60 years 1936 BAYSWATER

EMILY LOUISA LAVINIA Harper 67 years 1947 NEDLANDS

ERIKA PAULINE Harper 85 years 2010 GOSNELLS

ERNEST FRANK EDWIN Harper 69 years 1966 PERTH

ETHEL MAY Harper 84 years 1989 BATEMAN

EUPHEMIA Harper 83 years 1972 EAST FREMANTLE

EVA Harper 89 years 2008 MANDURAH

EVA PEARL Harper 31 years 1933 PERTH

EVELYN Harper 27 years 1929 CLAREMONT

EVELYN MAUD Harper 71 years 1955 ALBANY

FANNY Harper 76 years 1925 PERTH

FLORA JEAN Harper 89 years 2010 BASSENDEAN

FLORENCE Harper 76 years 1958 WEMBLEY

FLORENCE Harper 77 years 1963 NEDLANDS

FLORENCE MARGARET Harper 90 years 1991 FLOREAT PARK

FRANCINE Harper 0 years 1963 BICTON

FRANK Harper 43 years 1967 BALGA

FRANK ERNEST Harper 21 years 1946 PERTH

FRANK VICTOR Harper 62 years 1935 WEST PERTH

FREDA Harper 91 years 1992 COMO

FREDERICK Harper 84 years 2004 GWELUP

FREDERICK ERNEST Harper 77 years 1995 ALFRED COVE

FREDERICK GEORGE Harper 101 years 2008 REDCLIFFE

FREDERICK JAMES Harper 90 years 1989 SOUTH FREMANTLE

FREDERICK JOHN Harper 79 years 1997 MAYLANDS

GEOFFREY STEVEN Harper 29 years 1985 BALGA

GEORGE Harper 89 years 1982 BICTON

GEORGE FREDERICK Harper 73 years 1962 WEMBLEY

GERTRUDE Harper 17 years 1902 FREMANTLE

GORDON DAVID Harper 23 years 1994 GIRRAWHEEN

GRACE WILLIAMSON Harper 35 years 1928 PERTH

GRESLEY WALTER Harper 5 years 1923 EAST GUILDFORD

GUY FREDERICK Harper 57 years 1993 CORAL BAY

GWENDOLINE ELIZABETH Harper 61 years 1980 BASSENDEAN

GWENETH JOAN Harper 0 years 1922 FREMANTLE

HAMILTON ANDERSON Harper 51 years 1952 PALMYRA

HANNAH Harper 87 years 1934 SUBIACO

HARCOURT ROBERT Harper 75 years 1957 GUILDFORD

HAROLD Harper 0 years 1913 EAST FREMANTLE

HAROLD FORREST Harper 79 years 1987 HILTON

HAZEL Harper 87 years 2008 MANDURAH

HELEN Harper 48 years 2005 TUART HILL

HELENA SARAH Harper 76 years 1976 MT LAWLEY

HENRIETTA CATHERINE Harper 54 years 1939 BEACONSFIELD

HILLESDEN Harper 82 years 1991 TOODYAY

HUGO MURDOCH Harper 35 years 1918 BROOME

IAN GORDON Harper 79 years 1980 PALMYRA

IAN GRAHAM Harper 71 years 1985 KALAMUNDA

INGRID EMMA CATHARINA Harper 47 years 1979 EAST FREMANTLE

IRIS CHRISTINE Harper 55 years 1984 CANNINGTON

IVETTA CLARA KATE Harper 85 years 1981 MT LAWLEY

JABEZ Harper 56 years 1901 FREMANTLE

JANET BROOKS Harper 79 years 1984 BENTLEY

JEAN Harper 67 years 1994 ESPERANCE

JEAN CHRISTINA Harper 72 years 1999 SUBIACO

JEAN FANNY Harper 83 years 2005 CLAREMONT

JEAN MARGARET Harper 45 years 1978 ALFRED COVE

JENNIFER LOUISE Harper 10 years 1978 CLOVERDALE

JOAN MARY Harper 47 years 1974 BICTON

JODI LEE Harper 18 years 1982 MOSMAN PARK

JOHN ALEXANDER Harper 79 years 1954 LEEDERVILLE

JOHN GERARD Harper 51 years 1979 HAMILTON HILL

JOHN HOWEY Harper 51 years 1903 PERTH

JULIE MYRTLE Harper 45 years 2002 PARMELIA

JUNE Harper 59 years 2009 ASHFIELD

KATE Harper 0 years 1986 ROTTNEST

KATHLEEN MARY Harper 87 years 2010 KINGSLEY

KATIE ALICE Harper 64 years 1964 PALMYRA

KEITH Harper 70 years 1997 MANDURAH

KENNEDY ALEXANDER Harper 89 years 2006 WEST PERTH

KENNETH Harper 33 years 1982 EAST VICTORIA PARK

KENNETH MICHAEL Harper 45 years 1986 LEEDERVILLE

KERRIE LEE Harper 53 years 1996 COOLOONGUP

KIARA LEIGH Harper 20 years 2009 KINGSLEY

KIM CAMPBELL Harper 60 years 2009 MIDDLE SWAN

LENNARD MERVYN Harper 61 years 1982 FORRESTFIELD

LESLIE Harper 75 years 1989 MANDURAH

LILA GLADYS Harper 74 years 1969 CLAREMONT

LILLIAN Harper 49 years 1942 FREMANTLE

LILLIAN MAY Harper 87 years 1998 CLOVERDALE

LILY Harper 94 years 1991 WATERSUN

LINDA PHOEBE Harper 85 years 1976 BASSENDEAN

LORRAINE EDNA Harper 70 years 2011 MANDURAH

LUCAS JAMES Harper 3 days 2009 INNALOO

LUIDA Harper 0 years 1915 UNKNOWN

LUKE Harper 72 years 1980 WEMBLEY

MADGE Harper 86 years 1986 SOUTH FREMANTLE

MARGARET Harper 73 years 1979 EAST FREMANTLE

MARGARET Harper 96 years 1998 MIDLAND

MARGARET GRIEVE STRATHERN Harper 98 years 2000 JOONDANNA

MARGARET HELEN KATHLEEN Harper 83 years 1991 GOOSEBERRY HILL

MARGARET JANE Harper 52 years 1921 PERTH

MARGARET ROSE MAXWELL Harper 83 years 1974 SOUTH PERTH

MARJORIE ELIZABETH Harper 91 years 1989 MELVILLE

MARRIE FANNY Harper 61 years 1929 PERTH

MARY ALISON Harper 89 years 1995 NEDLANDS

MARY ANN Harper 74 years 1932 BELLEVUE

MARY ANN Harper 94 years 1972 NEDLANDS

MARY ELIZABETH Harper 91 years 1979 CLAREMONT

MARY JANE Harper 81 years 1963 OSBORNE PARK

MICHAEL Harper 56 years 1916 VICTORIA PARK

MICHAEL JAMES Harper 62 years 2003 KELMSCOTT

MYRTLE IRENE Harper 82 years 1998 GUILDFORD

MYRTLE JANE Harper 88 years 1982 MT LAWLEY

NAN FANNY Harper 88 years 2004 ELLENBROOK

NANCY ANNE FLORENCE Harper 86 years 1969 NEDLANDS

NATHANIEL WHITE Harper 88 years 1954 WEST PERTH

NORA CLEGG Harper 93 years 2003 NOLLAMARA

NORMAN Harper 55 years 1941 UNKNOWN

OLIVE ESTELLE Harper 77 years 1969 WEST PERTH

OLIVER Harper 0 years 1912 NEDLANDS PARK

OLIVER Harper 83 years 1962 BAYSWATER

ORMONDE STEELE Harper 0 years 1926 PERTH

PATRICIA IRIS Harper 72 years 2001 GERALDTON

PEARL Harper 84 years 2003 MOSMAN PARK

PETER Harper 67 years 1971 NORTH BEACH

PETER GRAHAM Harper 60 years 2004 MORLEY

PETER WILLIAM Harper 68 years 1991 EDGEWATER

PHILIP ROBERT Harper 80 years 1984 SUBIACO

PRESCOTT HENRY Harper 70 years 1957 GINGIN

REGINALD Harper 79 years 1990 BELMONT

REGINALD FRANK Harper 71 years 1980 TUART HILL

RICHARD GILBERT Harper 54 years 1941 UNKNOWN

RICHARD JOHN Harper 68 years 1954 BASSENDEAN

ROBERT Harper 68 years 1948 NEDLANDS

ROBERT CHARLES Harper 77 years 1996 NEDLANDS

ROBERT FRANCIS Harper 0 years 1930 COMO

ROBERT NATHANIEL Harper 10 years 1911 PERTH

ROBERT RICHARD Harper 67 years 1995 BENTLEY

RONALD Harper 60 years 1975 KEWDALE

SAMUEL ARTHUR Harper 79 years 2010 BALDIVIS

SARAH ANN Harper 80 years 1955 INNALOO

SARAH ANN Harper 72 years 1948 COTTESLOE

STANDLEY BLISS Harper 95 years 2005 ROCKINGHAM

STANFORD WILKINSON Harper 87 years 1996 BENLTEY

SYDNEY JAMES Harper 82 years 2005 FLOREAT PARK

TERENCE NORMAN Harper 72 years 2011 COODANUP

TERRENCE WILLIAM Harper 34 years 1982 VICTORIA

THOMAS Harper 64 years 1949 WEMBLEY

THOMAS ANDERSON Harper 76 years 1965 DIANELLA

THOMAS FREDERICK Harper 72 years 1995 FREMANTLE

THOMAS HENRY Harper 71 years 1954 EAST FREMANTLE

THOMAS JOHN Harper 82 years 1959 OSBORNE PARK

THOMAS JOHNSTONE Harper 66 years 1984 WEMBLEY

THORA MARNEY Harper 69 years 1992 MAYLAND

VERNON Harper 89 years 1993 BALCATTA

WILLIAM Harper 40 years 1930 MANDURAH

WILLIAM Harper 46 years 1905 DAY DAWN

WILLIAM Harper 43 years 1950 MADDINGTON

WILLIAM Harper 75 years 1963 BAYSWATER

WILLIAM ALFRED Harper 23 years 1960 ORANGE GROVE

WILLIAM BRYN Harper 72 years 1981 BALCATTA

WILLIAM FREDERICK Harper 63 years 1940 INGLEWOOD

WILLIAM HENDERSON Harper 37 years 1933 EAST FREMANTLE

WILLIAM HOPE Harper 81 years 1961 COTTESLOE

WILLIAM LEWIS WARD Harper 72 years 1919 CLAREMONT

WILLIAM ROY Harper 74 years 1995 MELVILLE

WINIFRED MARY Harper 84 years 1998 HILTON

WIRRABARA FOREST Harper 83 years 1964 DAVIS PARK

1 comment(s), latest 5 years, 6 months ago

TABUTEAU marriages New Zealand 1885 - 1917

some of the TABUTEAU marriages New Zealand 1885 - 1917

the GROOMS

Richard Arthur Tabuteau (1875-1956)
- married Mabel Vaughan JOHNSTON (1887-1932) in 1906

Walter James Tabuteau
- married Lina Eliza FULTON in 1889


the BRIDES

Harriette Tabuteau
- marrie John Alexander Lindesay HALL in 1885

Ida Augusta Tabuteau
- married William Hamilton ALLEN in 1914

Irene Melita Tabuteau
- married William Foster in 1917

Zillah Guido Tabuteau
- married Alfred de Tracy GAULD in 1912