where was my family originated my grand parents names were frank miller and bertha kirk from huntington west virginia :: FamilyTreeCircles.com Genealogy
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where was my family originated my grand parents names were frank miller and bertha kirk from huntington west virginia

Question by curiousmiller

i know very little of my family and grand parents

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by curiousmiller Profile | Research | Contact | Subscribe | Block this user
on 2018-11-23 21:05:38

curiousmiller has been a Family Tree Circles member since Nov 2018.

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Answers

by charlie19 on 2018-11-24 21:54:11

Last name: Miller
SDB Popularity ranking: 110

This notable surname is regarded as Anglo-Scottish. It has over twenty-five entries in the British "Dictionary of National Biography", and no less than thirty coats of arms. It is or rather was, occupational, and described a corn miller, or at least someone in charge of a mill. The origination is from the pre 7th century Olde English word "mylene", and the later "milne", but ultimately from the Roman (Latin) "molere", meaning to grind. Job-descriptive surnames denoted the occupation of the namebearer, but only became hereditary when a son followed a father into the same line of business. The miller enjoyed a privileged position in medieval society, the mill being an important centre in every medieval settlement, and farmers gathered there to have their corn ground into flour. A proportion of the ground corn was kept by the miller by way of payment, and this was sometimes a bone of contention. Amongst the eraly recordings we have Reginald Miller in the Subsidy Tax Rolls of Sussex in 1327, whilst in May 1635, James Miller, aged 18, was an early emigrant to the new states of America. He embarked from London on the ship "Plaine Joan" bound for Virginia. James Miller (1812 - 1864), born in Scotland, was the surgeon to Queen Victoria, and a notable bearer of the name. One of the earliest coats of arms granted to the family has the blazon of ermine charged with three wolves' heads erased, in silver. The first recorded spelling of the family name is shown to be that of Ralph Muller. This was dated 1296, in the "Subsidy Tax Rolls of Sussex", during the reign of King Edward 1st of England, 1272 - 1307. Surnames became necessary when governments introduced personal taxation. In England this was sometimes known as the Poll Tax. Throughout the centuries, surnames in every country have continued to "develop" often leading to astonishing variants of the original spelling.

© Copyright: Name Origin Research 1980 - 2017



Read more: http://www.surnamedb.com/Surname/Miller#ixzz5XoNc50ep

by charlie19 on 2018-11-24 21:57:46

Last name: Kirk
SDB Popularity ranking: 856

This is an Anglo-Scottish surname which is ultimately of Norwegian pre 7th century origins. Found originally in the north of England and in Scotland, it can be either a topographical name denoting residence near a church, or a metonymic occupational name for someone employed in a church. The derivation of the name in both cases is from the Northern Middle English word "kirk", church, from the Old Norse "kirkja". Topographical surnames were among the earliest created, since both natural and man-made features in the landscape provided easily recognisable distinguishing names in the small communities of the Middle Ages. While job-descriptive surnames originally denoted the actual occupation of the namebearer, and later became hereditary. In England the surname development has included: Richard Attekirck (1301, Yorkshire); Adam Ofthenkirke (1308, Suffolk); and Robert de Kirke (1379, Yorkshire). In Scotland the surname is first recorded in 1456, in the Register of the Abbey of Aberbrothoc, where Sir Patrick Kyrk appears as chaplain of the altar of St. Mary in Perth, while Alexander Kirk was bailie of St. Andrews in 1520. A Coat of Arms granted to a Kirk family is a gold crosier, and silver sword saltireways, on a gold chief a green thistle, all on a red shield. The first recorded spelling of the family name is shown to be that of Reginald Attekireke, which was dated 1209, in the "Fines Court Records of Lincolnshire", during the reign of King John, known as "Lackland", 1199 - 1216. Surnames became necessary when governments introduced personal taxation. In England this was known as Poll Tax. Throughout the centuries, surnames in every country have continued to "develop" often leading to astonishing variants of the original spelling.

© Copyright: Name Origin Research 1980 - 2017



Read more: http://www.surnamedb.com/Surname/Kirk#ixzz5XoOVOPAl

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