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William SHAKESPEARE & the tragedy of MacBETH

Journal by ngairedith

WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE (baptised 26 April 1564 - died 23 April 1616) was an English poet and playwright, widely regarded as the greatest writer in the English language and the world's pre-eminent dramatist.

He is often called England's national poet and the "Bard of Avon".
His surviving works, including some collaborations, consist of about 38 plays, 154 sonnets, two long narrative poems, and several other poems.
His plays have been translated into every major living language and are performed more often than those of any other playwright.[3]

Shakespeare was born and raised in Stratford-upon-Avon.
At the age of 18 he married Anne HATHAWAY, with whom he had three children: Susanna, and twins Hamnet and Judith.

Between 1585 and 1592, he began a successful career in London as an actor, writer, and part owner of a playing company called the Lord Chamberlain's Men, later known as the King's Men. He appears to have retired to Stratford around 1613, where he died three years later. Few records of Shakespeare's private life survive, and there has been considerable speculation about such matters as his physical appearance, sexuality, religious beliefs, and whether the works attributed to him were written by others.
... read a lot more at the above link

One of my favourite Shakespeare tragedy is his play MacBETH
Over the centuries, the play has attracted some of the greatest actors in the roles of Macbeth and Lady Macbeth. It has been adapted to film, television, opera, novels, comic books, and other media.

REMEMBER THIS ?

... picture the scene, a dark cave, in the middle is a Caldron boiling and bubbling, thunder crashing outside. Enter three Witches

Thrice the brinded cat hath mew'd.
Thrice and once, the hedge-pig whin'd.
Harpier cries:'tis time! 'tis time!
Round about the caldron go;
In the poison'd entrails throw.
Toad, that under cold stone,
Days and nights has thirty-one;
Swelter'd venom sleeping got,
Boil thou first i' the charmed pot!
Double, double toil and trouble;
Fire burn, and caldron bubble.
Fillet of a fenny snake,
In the caldron boil and bake;
Eye of newt, and toe of frog,
Wool of bat, and tongue of dog,
Adder's fork, and blind-worm's sting,
Lizard's leg, and owlet's wing,
For a charm of powerful trouble,
Like a hell-broth boil and bubble.
Double, double toil and trouble;
Fire burn, and caldron bubble.
Scale of dragon; tooth of wolf;
Witches' mummy; maw and gulf
Of the ravin'd salt-sea shark;
Root of hemlock digg'd i the dark;
Liver of blaspheming Jew;
Gall of goat, and slips of yew
Sliver'd in the moon's eclipse;
Nose of Turk, and Tartar's lips;
Finger of birth-strangled babe
Ditch-deliver'd by a drab,
Make the gruel thick and slab:
Add thereto a tiger's chaudron,
For the ingrediants of our caldron.
Double, double toil and trouble;
Fire burn, and caldron bubble.
Cool it with a baboon's blood,
Then the charm is firm and good.

Surnames: HATHAWAY SHAKESPEARE
Viewed: 942 times
by ngairedith Profile | Research | Contact | Subscribe | Block this user
on 2011-05-12 07:35:36

PECK of TAITA

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Comments

by janilye on 2011-05-12 08:37:00

I remember it well. It's a wonderful play.

by 1bobbylee on 2011-05-13 04:15:07

This play was performed in my high school many years ago. I really enjoyed it. Even if done in a strong Southern accent. The cast was given a standing ovation. I had a wonderful 10th grade English teacher, Mr. McWhirter. He would read to us for at least twenty minutes. Poetry! He loved poetry. He would walk around the room reading to us. Wonderful man. Seemed as if most students loved Mr. McWhirter.

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