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William Thomas MOYLE died Mining Accident, Beaumont 1898

Journal by ngairedith

BEAUMONT is a small town nestled in the foothills of Otago

William Thomas Moyle (1874-1898) was the 3rd of 10 children (8 sons) of:
Francis MOYLE (1842-1940 of Carnbonellis Cornwall) & Jessie Mason LAWRENCE (1848-1938 of Aberdeen Scotland)
1871 - 1910 James Lawrence Moyle
1872 - 1924 Benjamin Eddie Moyle
1874 - 1898 William Thomas Moyle
1876 - 1936 Mary Mason Moyle
1878 - ? Frances Moyle (buried with parents, no date)
1881 - 1916 George Alexander Moyle, Somme, France 3 Oct
1883 - 1964 John Adam Moyle
1885 - 1963 Henry Arthur Moyle
1887 - 1868 Charles Edward Moyle
1889 - 1916 Albert Robert Moyle, Somme, France 16 Sep

Their father, Francis Moyle, was a Miner, Builder, Carpenter & Undertaker in Havelock, Waitahuna, Lawrence

Tuapeka Times, 15 June 1898
FATAL ACCIDENT AT THE BEAUMONT - The INQUEST

... An inquiry into the circumstances surrounding the death of William MOYLE was commenced at Mr CROSSAN's Hotel, Beaumont, on Saturday, 11th instant, before Mr Thomas PILLING, J.P., acting-coroner, and a jury consisting of Messrs Robert McKAY, John JOHNSON, Hugh CROSSAN, Alexander CAMPBELL, and James RICHARDSON, Mr Hugh Crossan was chosen foreman, Sergreant KING conducted the inquiry,
... The jury having been duly sworn and an examination of the body made.
... The Coroner intimated that the Inspector of Mines had expressed a desire to be present at the inquest and it had, therefore, been decided, after taking the evidence ofidentificaiton to adjourn the proceedings till Tuesday morning, at 11 o'clock, to enable the Inspector to be present.
... Francis MOYLE, carpenter, deposed that he had viewed the body of deceased, who was his son, WILLIAM THOMAS MOYLE. He was a labourer by occupation, and had been in the employ of the Beaumont Local Co-operative Company for about 16 months. He had last seen him alive about eight weeks ago. He was born at Waitahuna and was 24 years of age.
... At this stage, in order to save time on Tuesday, the jury visited the scene of the accident and made an examination of the ground.
......... ... On resuming on Tuesday morning
... Robert LEDLIE deposed that he was the mine manager for the Beaumont Local Co-operative Company and had been in that position for about four months. He had ten men employed in the mine, and when in regular work they worked three shifts. On the 10th instant they were engaged shifting the elevator plant, when all the hands were employed from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Deceased was employed as carpenter for the Company. Witness had told him on the previous day that he wanted the elevator plant shifted and he had full control of the work, which was started on Friday morning (10th instant), James McCORKINDALE, Neil DEMPSEY and James CUMMING were assisting deceased, and he had instructions to call on any of the other men to assist when required. He saw deceased off and on while he was engaged carrying on the work. His first duty in commencing was to make a cutting into the bank for the support of the stringers of the trestle work. This was carried out on the previous day. About 2.30 p.m. on the 10th, while witness was engaged in the Company's office, he heard someone calling out as though something were wrong at the mine. He immediately went to the works and found that part of the bank where the stringer was to be placed had fallen in on deceased. He was entirely covered by the fall. With the assistance of the other men he had the dirt immediately removed and deceased taken up on to the bank. He was not dead at the time, but quite unconscious. He died while being removed to the hotel, about twenty minutes after the accident. He (witness) did not think there was the slightest danger to the men in working at that particular place. The depth of the chambers cut out were about 7ft 6in, and the length about 10ft. Although he was not personally in charge of this particular work, he was perfectly satisfied it was being carried out in a proper and workmanlike manner by the deceased. He did not think there had been any carelessness in carrying out the work. The ground was of a sandy formation, but he did not consider it of a dangerous character.
... To Mr HAYNES (Inspector of Mines): Considering the depth of the cut and that the sides were practically vertical, he did not consider a system of "shoring" necessary. He thought, from his experience of the ground, that it would stand without support. He believed the fall was due to the frost of the previous week and the thaw on the day in question. He had not reported the accident to the Inspector of Mines of the Minister of Mines , as required by the Mining Act of 1891 (section 336). He had, however, wired to the chairman of directors of the company to do all that was necessary. As a matter of fact, he was not in possession of a copy of the Mining Act.
... To a Juror: There were two chambers cut into the bank. There might have been less danger of there had been only one chamber the full width.
... To the Coroner: He had instructed deceased to fill up the chambers as soon as the stringers were in position. He was fully satisfied that by leaving the block between the two chambers the ground was better supported than by taking it out and so forming one large chamber.
... Neil DEMPSY deposed that he was a miner living at the Beaumont and in the employ of the Local Cop-operative Goldmining Co. He was at work in the Co's mine, along with Wm. Thomas Moyle and James CUMMING, on Friday last, 10th instant. He was one of the men who cut the chambers into the bank to allow of the stringers being placed in position. At the time of the accident he was working, along with deceased, in the chamber, Cumming being on the trestles. Witness saw the fall of earth which caught the deceased; it struck him on the breast and crumbled over his head. Witness was only 5ft away from deceased, on the outer side of the chamber, at the time of the accident. It took a couple of minutes to get the deceased's head clear of the earth. When he was got clear deceased was quite unconscious and remained so until he died - almost 25 minutes after the accident. He did not look upon the ground whee the chamber was cut as at all dangerous,
... To Mr HAYES: there was no perceptible evidence of weakness or liability to fall in the ground. Witness looked upon the ground as quite safe.
... To a Juror: In the course of a casual chat a few minutes before the accident happened, deceased made the remark that he did not think there was any danger of an accident happening, as no feeling himself that the ground was unsafe in any way.
... James CUMMING deposed that he did not see the bank of the chamber give way, but almost immediately after DEMPSEY called his attention to the accident which had befallen Moyle, who was then almost buried up. With Dempsey's help, witness got deceased's head clear and then went at once to the telephone office to send a message for medical assistance. He returned in about twenty minutes, when deceased had expired . Witness did not consider the ground dangerous at the spot where deceased met with the accident. He did not think there was any carelessness shown by deceased in carrying out his work,
... To the Foreman: The telegram he sent to Mr Thompson, Chairman of Directors of the Co-operative Company was: "Moyle hurt; send doctor at once."
... Mr Hayes said he was of opinion, after an inspection of the mine and more particularly the spot where the accident happened, that the sever frosts and subsequent sharp thaw which set in was the primary cause of the ground giving way, resulting in Moyle's death. He did not think any blame was attributable to the manager, as all hands apparently were thoroughly satisfied that there was no danger. He would, however, recommend that in future work of this kind appearances of safety should not be trusted to, but a few "shoring" planks and cross stays used which would practically insure safety.
... After the Acting-Coroner had briefly reviewed the evidence.
... The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death" adding that there was no blane attributable to anyone, as all necessary precaution had been taken in carrying on operations at the mine.
... The Foreman took occasion, on behalf of the jurors, to thank Mr Hayes for his attendance at the inquest and the valuable assistance he rendered in the conduct of the proceedings.

NOTE Francis & Jessie and a number of their children are buried at Block 4 Plot 12 & 13 & 14, Anglican Section Lawrence Cemetery, Otago


PHOTO
BEAUMONT HOTEL
1900

by ngairedith Profile | Research | Contact | Subscribe | Block this user
on 2013-11-05 04:55:24

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