WILLIAM WESTGARTH'S VISIT TO YERING IN THE EARLY 1840'S AND YERING PIONEERS. :: FamilyTreeCircles.com Genealogy
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WILLIAM WESTGARTH'S VISIT TO YERING IN THE EARLY 1840'S AND YERING PIONEERS.

Journal by itellya

I had never heard of Yering until I wrote my journal about George and Ollie Johnstone of Purves Rd near Dromana. William wrote his memories of Early Melbourne while sailing back to visit his old haunt. They included his visit to Yering and the effect of the 1843 depression which ruined many squatters. Strange to think that the Ryries' misfortune gave rise to a Yering product even more famous than the acclaimed wine, marathon champion, Robert de Castella! Perhaps descendants of pioneering Yering families might like to provide information about their families' contributions in the early days of the area. I have made a start in the first comment box with a tribute by the Yering correspondent to the area's pioneers and mention of the departure of the teacher, Mr Lohan (who obviously had been at the Yering school for some time.) As people add their stories, I will include their ancestors' surnames to the surnames list as I have done with Mr Lohans.

PIONEER SURNAME INDEX.
LOHAN,MITCHELL,GIBSON-COMMENT 1.

WILLIAM WESTGARTH'S VISIT.
Another pleasant trip about this time was to Yering, the Ryries'
station, situated nearly half-way up to the cool mountainous sources of
the River Yarra. This had already been made a charming home to any
contented mind, satisfied to fall back upon country resources. It was a
cattle station, for, in the thickly wooded hills, hollows, and flats
about sheep could not live--at least, to any purpose--and the homestead
had the importance of a little straggling street, with the main dwelling
at the top, as the end of a cul-de-sac, and the dairy and what not in
marshalled line below. We revelled in pastoral abundance. I wandered
into the adjacent woods, experiencing the sense of overpowering grandeur
amidst their vast solitudes, with the gum-trees rising straight above me
with colossal stems, not seldom 300 feet and more in height, and 100
feet, or even much more, from the ground without a branch. When this
"redgum" has elbow room, it expands in all variety of form, attaining in
favouring circumstances vast dimensions, as in one example met with in
the Dandenong Ranges, which measured 480 feet in height. But in this
Yering case, crowded as they were impoverishingly together upon flats of
the river, they did not bulk out into such dimensions, but they shot up
side by side, straight as arrows, rivals en route to the clouds. Sad
changes came to Yering's happy and hospitable owners since, for, like
many others, they had to "realize" in the bad times, and to quit a most
pleasant home. But Yering itself has thriven, and has since advanced
into a great wine-producing district, whose wines Mr. De Castella, its
later owner, has made to carry prizes even at European Exhibitions.

Surnames: DECASTELLA GIBSON LOHAN MITCHELL RYRIE
Viewed: 569 times
by itellya Profile | Research | Contact | Subscribe | Block this user
on 2015-10-02 09:55:25

Itellya is researching local history on the Mornington Peninsula and is willing to help family historians with information about the area between Somerville and Blairgowrie. He has extensive information about Henry Gomm of Somerville, Joseph Porta (Victoria's first bellows manufacturer) and Captain Adams of Rosebud.

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by itellya on 2015-10-02 10:23:25

GENERAL TRIBUTE TO YERING PIONEERS. MR LOHAN, HEAD TEACHER, AND HIS CLEVER SON.DAME NELLIE MELBA, GIBSON.

YERING. (FROM OUR OWN CORRESPONDENT.)
As I sat this morning on the verandah, admiring the light and shade which appeared on the hills in the distance, and viewing the verdant paddocks which were tenanted with sheep and cattle peacefully grazing, I reflected for a moment. I thought with myself what a marvellous change took place in the landscape in the comparatively short period of 30 odd years.

Then the country was a wilderness made up of gum trees,scrub, and most of it swamp, and having for its tenants a few tribes of nomadic blacks. To-day the whole district blossoms as the rose, and is dotted in every direction with handsome homesteads, which give ample evidence of the prosperous condition of its people. I could not help admiring the pioneers, to whose perseverance in the face of obstacles, which to a weakling would be insurmountable, and to whose grit the marvellous transformation is due.

The very routine of the work they faced stamps them at once as men who were quite beyond the ordinary, and who were the men to make any country prosperous. The
slight impression that a day's work made in the forest of saplings which faced them had no disheartening effect on them. They worked on manfully from day to day, till in the end their efforts were crowned with complete success. Who were these pioneers?

Some were Englishmen, others Scotch,whilst the Emerald Isle provided its quota; but, whether they came from England, Scotland or Ireland, they were all animated with the same spirit. The land was there, and they meant to make it a Paradise for themselves and their children, and they succeeded. One would think that such worthy sires should have their names perpetuated in a land which owed so much to them, but I am
afraid, and I regret it very much, that their names are destined to become extinct in the not distant future.Take the Olinda Creek from Lilydale to the Yarra. What do we find? A regiment of single men, and what is worse, there seems no prospect what
be ever of a change. What is the cause? It is very difficult to say, but whatever
the cause the effect will be that the handsome estates which were left by their parents will go the stranger. .......

I am glad to see that an old boy of the school has distinguished himself in the recent University examination. The boy, Master J. Lohan, obtained 2nd class honors in English and history, and 2nd class honors in mathematics (Algebra, geometry and
and trigonometry). He also obtained one of the scholarships annually offered by
by the authorities of Trinity College, Melbourne University. ...

Mr. Lohan, our late H.T., is to make his departure for Williamstown on Friday or Saturday next, and so far there is no mention of a successor. It is possible, therefore, that the school will not be open again for a week or two after the holidays. (P.2,Healesville and Yarra Glen Guardian,16-1-1904.)

DAME NELLIE MELBA HOSPITAL.
LILLYDALE (sic), Sunday.— A highly successful garden fete was held at Chateau Yering, the home of Mr. and Mrs. Gibson, from which about £100 was raised for the Dame Nellie Melba Bush-Nursing Hospital at Lillydale. Opened by Mrs.A. E. Syme, the fete held much of interest for local people and visitors, who found much to admire in Mrs. Gibson's old-world garden containing trees and palms (over a hundred years old.(???) There was also a wonderful collection of antiques on view.
(P.11, The Age, 19-3-1934.)

by itellya on 2015-10-07 18:29:25

SOURCE FOR THE ABOVE.
http://www.familytreecircles.com/william-westgarth-and-early-melbourne-index-of-pioneers-in-order-of-appearance-at-start-of-journal-57802.html

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