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A Hawkesbury Calender

Journal by janilye

JANUARY

1. 1827. The Australian Cricket Club held their annual meeting in Sydney;
when some good play was exhibited, lt was announced at the meeting that the
Windsor Cricket Club had refused to play their brother amateurs in Sydney.

1, 1844. Post office first established at Richmond.

1, 1870. Telegraph office opened at Richmond.

1, 1807. An address presented to Rev. Samuel Marsden- Parramatta,
Principal Chaplain of the colony signed by 302 magistrates and land owners'
in the interiorprior to his departure to England on a visit.
Marsden frequently visited ; the Hawkesbury in connection With his professional duties,
and he owned property at Windsor. He died at the Parsonage, Windsor.

1. 1839. Elizabeth Pitt, wife of Thomas Matcham Pitt, died aged 39.
The Pitts were the first free settlers to take up their residence in the Richmond district,
and were the founders of the Australian family of that name, descendants of whom still
reside in the district. The founders were related to Lord Nelson, and bore letters of
introduction from him when they arrived in the colony.

2, 1805. Advertisement appeals in the Sydney Gazette of this date of the auction sale
of a farm situated on the banks of the Hawkesbury, opposite Cornwallis, contesting
of 50 acres, mostly cleared, belonging to George Barrington (the famous Lon don pickpocket),
then deceased.

4, 1822. Governor Macquarie replies' to an address presented by Hawkesbury Settlers
on Dec. 12, 1821just prior to his departure from the colony.

4, 1814. James Gordon married, to Miss Arndell, at Windsor, by Rev. Cartwright,
chaplain at St Matthew's.

4, 1816. W. Gaudry, a well-known settler, died at Windsor.

8, 1833. Thos. Hobby, of the N.8.W. Gorps, and afterwards Lieut., of the 102nd Regiment,
died, aged 57. Buried Richmond C.E. cemetery.

11, 1800; Father Harold, General Holt, Rev. Henry Fulton, participants
in the '98 Irish Rebellion, ; arrived with William Cox; and family in Sydney Cove
in the Minerva. William Cox eventually settled down at the Hawkesbury, and became the
founder of the famous and respected Australian family of that name. Holt for a time was
overseer of Cox's farms in the Parramatta and Hawkesbury districts.
Fulton became the much respected chaplain at Richmond and Castlereagh, and conducted a
school at the latter place. Tompson, the first Australian poet, attended this school.

11, 1819. Windsor Charitable Institution (now known as the Hawkes bury Benevolent Society)
established. 300 value in wheat, and 60 head of breeding cattle donated by leading settlers
for its maintenance. The first public meeting was called on Dec. 31, 1818.
The first committee were Rev. R. Cartwright, William Cox (of Clarendon and Fairfield),
James Jones, Thomas Matcham Pitt (father of the late G. M. Pitt), Henry Baldwin, and George Hall
(founder of the Caddai family).

12, 1810. Andrew Thomson, the father of Windsor, appointed a magistrate by Governor Macquarie.
The appointment of an emancipist to the position gave great offence to the military and
prominent free settlers. Thomson died October 22, 1810, aged 37.

12, 1838. Solomon Wiseman (Wiseman's Ferry) died, aged 61.
He was the uncrowned king of the Lower Hawkesbury.

12, 1811. Thomas Gilberthorp, a Pitt Town farmer, advertises in the "Sydney Gazette"
of this date endeavouring to induce the Hawkesbury farmers to co-operate in the purchase
of wheat screens. This is the first record of practical farming co-operation in Australia.
Gilberthorp. was an industrious and honorable settler.

13, 1818. The following land grants to local settlers were gazetted at this date-
Samuel Terry, 950 acres in the Evan district ; John Palmer 1500 acres; John Pye, 300 acres;
and Richard Rouse, 450 acres.- all the latter being situated in the Bathurst district.

14, 1815, William Cox, of Clarendon, concludes the herculean task of constructing a
carriage road over the Blue Mountains from Emu; Plains to Bathurst--within six months.
Commenced July 7, 1814, and continued under adverse conditions as regards weather and
difficulties of crossing an unexplored mountain,' Distance ; accomplished, 101 miles.

15, 1855. 150yds footrace between Judd and Dalton for 100 a-side at Windsor racecourse.
Won by latter by 3yds.

16, 1837. Ann Tebbutt died, aged 71. Buried St. Matthew's Cemetery, Windsor.
Mother of John Tebbutt, F.R.A.S.

16, 1897. Windsor Swimming Club held successful aquatic carnival in the river.
150 Sydney swimmers and New Zealand champions present.
Chief events-One mile championship of Australia won by Percy Cavill;
championship of Hawkesbury (440yds) won by Tom Atkins ;
monster banquet at the Fitzroy Hotel in the evening; Austrian band present.

17, 1900. John Low Thompson died at Burwood. He was Principal of Dookie College, Victoria ;
instructor in agriculture to the government of N.S W. ;
and the first Principal of the Hawkesbury Agricultural College.

20, 1850. William Cox, Junr., of Hobartville died, aged 60.

20, 1829. Jas. Watson died, aged 43. Buried Richmond.

21, 1815. Road over Blue Moun tains constructed and opened for traffic.
Superintended by William Cox, J.P., of Clarendon.

21, 1809. Andrew Thomson appointed auctioneer for the district of the Hawkesbury
by Deputy-Governor Paterson, the Hawkesburys first auctioneer.

21, 1809. The Portland Head Christian etc. Society at a meeting at this date agree to
engage William Harvey and William Barrow, stone masons (free men), to build the wall
of the Ebenezer chapel, and David Dunstan, carpenter, to do the carpentering.

26, 1788. Assistant-Surgeon Arndell arrives with the first fleet- as surgeon on "Friendship."
Captain Walton with 100 male and female convicts. Arndell soon afterwards resigned
from his government appointment, and received a land grant at Caddai, where he resided for
many years, as the first Hawkesbury magistrate and as a prominent settler identified with
farming pursuits. He was much respected.

26; 1788. Commissary John Palmer, purser Of the " Sirius," arrives in the first fleet.
Cobbold, the author of the life of Margaret Catchpole, makes frequent mention of Palmer
as the friend and patron of the Richmond midwife.

28, 1808. Governor Bligh deposed. Although Bligh incurred the enmity of the N.S.W. Corps,
he was well respected at the Hawkesbury, owing to his efforts to stop the iniquitous drink traffic
by the "Rum Selling Corps." Bligh stated that if he could have escaped to his friends at the
Hawkesbury, the high-handed proceedings of Johnston and Macarthur would never have occurred.

28, 1858. John Single died, aged 66.

30, 1889. Ann Elizabeth Hobby, widow of Thomas Hobby, died, aged 72.

31, 1855. 150yds footrace between Dalton and Davenport for 100 and championship,
run on Parramatta-rd, Won by Dalton.

January, 1805 (day uncertain). George Barrington, the famous London pickpocket,
died at Parramatta, now compos mentis.

January, 1826, (day uncertain). Black snake, 22ft long (?) killed near the Hawkesbury by a
free settler named Fleming.

January, 1794. About the middle of this month the first farms were established on the
Hawkesbury by Deputy-Governor Grose, who placed 22 settlers there.
Amongst those receiving land were J.Ruse and C. Williams, the first Australian farmers.
These had previously been placed on poor land at Rosehill, but were after wards given land grants
at the mouth of South Creek and the Hawkesbury. They did not, however, enter into possession
at the Hawkesbury with the other settlers until some months afterwards, when they had disposed
of their farms at Rosehill. Ruse eventually left the Hawkesbury, and years afterwards died,
and was buried in the Camden R C. cemetery, his tombstone denoting the fact that he "sowed"
the first grain in this colony. Williams held his grant, which is now still held and
cultivated by his descendants, the Hannabus family.

FEBRUARY

1795, The firspublic store established at Green Hills ( Windsor) by Government
early in this month. Baker appointed first storekeeper.

1800. Captain Wm. Cox (after wards of Clarendon) purchases Brush Farm, on the
Parramatta River, early in this month, and commences farming. He appoints General Holt,
the '98 Irish Rebel, as his manager.

1, 1871. Hawkesbury Race Club established. Arthur Dight, president; John L. Smith, secretary.

1, 1828. Francis Beddek, better known as the Hawkesbury lawyer, admitted to practise
as a solicitor in the colony. He lived at Windsor for many years. He was the fifth lawyer
admitted to practise in Australia. It is said that he was the first solicitor practising
in Windsor, but one George Crossley (transported for forgery), preceded him.
William Walker was articled to Beddek.

2, 1802. Mary Pitt (Matcham) arrives with four daughters and a son at Sydney Cove
by the Canada. Founder of the Australian family of that name.
They settled at Mulgrave Place on the Hawkesbury. Mary Pitt died 1815, and the son
Thomas died in 1821, aged 39. The late G. M. Pitt, of North Sydney, was a son of the latter.

2, 1840. Frederick Bridges, chief inspector of schools, N.S.W., born at
Windsor. His father was one of the Scotch masons Dr. Lang brought out from Scotland.
The family left the Hawkesbury owing to disastrous floods.

3, 1821. Thomas Spencer, a mariner in the first fleet, died. Buried at Richmond.

8, 1837. William Harrington, who came with the 73rd regiment, died.
He was an honest and industrious man. Buried Richmond.

9, 1805. William Roberts advertises in the " Sydney Gazette" that he intends to run
at this date a covered waggon, to and from the Hawkesbury-once in three weeks-
with goods and passengers. Probably the first recorded regular communication with Sydney.

10th and 11th, 1791. Terrible heat at Rosehill (Parramatta.) 105 in shade at Sydney.
Birds and flying foxes dropped dead whilst on the wing. Bush fires. (Collins.)

10, 1873. John Richard Rouse died, aged 72. Buried Riohmond.

12, 1796. J. Brabyn, captain of the famous. 102nd regiment, better
known as the Rum Selling Corps, arrives in the colony with his regiment
in Marquis of Cornwallis. Magistrate from 1808 to 1810. Was concerned in the
deposition of Governor Bligh. For this he went to England in 1810
with others of the 102nd regiment to attend the trial of Major Johnston.
Re-appointed magistrate on his return to the colony shortly after.
Presided at Windsor for several years. Street named after him.
His residence, York Lodge, in George-street, near railway station, still stands.

12, 1822. Six men sentenced to death for breaking into the dwelling
of James Mackenzie at Caddai, and putting him on the fire and dreadfully beating him.

12, 1801. Shock of earthquake ; very sensibly felt at Parramatta and Hawkesbury at 11 p.m.,
lasting three minutes, and giving repeated shocks.

14, 1807. Governor Bligh issues ; an order at this date, forbidding the exchange of spirits
for food, on account of the destitution amongst the Hawkesbury settlers.

15, 1815. At a meeting of the Portland Head Society, it was decided
to establish a sabbath school. It was opened, but only continued a few weeks.
Probably the first recorded Sunday school at the Hawkesbury.

26, 1803. Andrew Thomson, chief constable at the Hawkesbury, takes into custody
two escaped convicts for rioting at Baulkham Hills.

17, 1797. William Cox, of Clarendon, appointed Lieutenant 68th Foot.

20, 1819. First ale and spirit license granted to Black Horse Hotel,
Richmond (Paul Randall, owner) The Inn was then known as the Black Horse Prince.
This is now the oldest licenssd hotel in Australia.
It has an nteresting history, and as a honeymoon resort at one time for leading colonista,
it was called "Honeymoon Cottage."

22, 1838. Samuel Terry died, leaving half a million in real and personal estate.

25, 1834. Caroling Louisa W. Calvert, author and botanist of Kurrajong, born.
Died April 28th, 1872. She was a talented lady, and a friend of Reverends Drs.
Woolls and Cameron, of Richmond.

25, 1868. James Stanbury, a champion sculler of the world, and a native of the Hawkesbury, born.

26. 1828. William Walker, member of the Legislative Council, born at Glasgow-
Represented Windsor in Parliament from I860 to the end of 1869. Alderman and Mayor
of Windsor. Founder of the Windsor School of Arts and its first president,
which position he occupied for many years. Secretary of tne Hawkesbury Benevolent Society
for eleven years, and wrote its history ; afterwards president. Writer of poetry and prose.
An early correspondent for the "Sydney Morning Herald," etc. His father was one of the
Presbyterian teachers induced to come to the colony by the late Dr. Lang.
He was educated by his father in Windsor, articled to Francis Beddek, of the same town,
and admitted an attorney in 1852, since which time he has practised in Windsor.

26, 1816. John Anderson murdered in his house at Caddai, aged 36 years.
Buried Church of England cemetery, Windsor.

27, 1815. Miss Wilshire, second daughter of James Wilshire
(Deputy Commissary General under Governor Macquarie) and Hester Pitt, born.
Died November 5, 1900.

MARCH

1800. Several floods at Hawkesbury during this month.

1811. Floods destroyed maize crops during this month

1, 1795. Official communication of this date from Lieut Gov. Paterson states
that he "had erected a small store at the Green Hills (Windsor), putting Baker,
the Superintendent, in charge "--Windsor's first store.

2nd to 9th, 1788. Between this date Pitt Water (mouth of the Hawkesbury),
named by Gov. Philip, during an exploration.

2,1801. John Stogdell, a free settler, lost his life in the big flood in
attempting to swim his horse over a hollow 3 miles from Hawkesbury (Windsor).
Horse and rider were drowned. This man was evidently buried at Sydney in the
old cemetery upon which the Town Hall now stands.
A resident in Sydney not long ago stated in the press that he had a coffin nameplate
referring to this man which had been unearthed from this cemetery.

3,1799. Heavy flood at the Hawkesbury, lasting until the 19th.

4,1804. Insurrection of prisoners at Castle Hill. Martial Law proclaimed.
Repealed March 9.

4,1871. Windsor Municipality proclaimed, R. Dight first Mayor,
J. T, Smith Council Clerk.

4,1815. Laurence May (father of Christie May), advertises in the " Sydney Gazette "
of this date that he "has erected a horse flour mill in the middle of the town
of Windsor, and that he is prepared to grind his neighbour's wheat expeditiously."

5, 1819. Rebecca, wife of William Cox, of Clarendon, died at Clarendon after
several weeks' illness, aged 56, leaving 5 sons.

6, 1822. Road from Richmond to Wallis Plains (Newcastle) opened to the public.

6,1898. Benjamin Richards died, Aged 81.

10,1813. Terrific hailstorm in the Hawkesbury district, much damage done to crops.
The windows in the Windsor chapel and Fitzgerald's residence were broken,
poultry were killed, and Crossley, Armitage, and other settlers were, injured.
Some of the hailstones measured 6 inches in circumference.
The chapel referred to was situated on the site occupied by the present School of Arts.
Crossley a convicted attorney was prominent in the time of Governors Hunter, King
and Bligh, figuring largely as the friend of the latter during his (Bligh's) deposition
by the military.

11, 1804. The "Sydney Gazette" of this date states that Cunningham, one of the rebel chiefs
of the Castle hill insurrection was hanged at Hawkesbury (Windsor).
He was hung on the staircase of the public store, Hawkesbury, which he had boasted
in his march at the head of the rebels he would plunder.
He had been overseen by stone-masons at Castle Hill. The public store was situated
on the site where Mr. Brinsley Hall's residence now stands.

11, 1799. Rev. Ralph Mansfield, Wesleyan minister, and a prominent Sydney citizen,
was stationed at Wind sor; died June, 1880, at Parramatta.
Editor and co-proprietor "Sydney Gazette."

12, 1833. Mary, wife of Richard Fitzgerald, died, aged 53.
Buried Church of England Cemetery, Windsor.

15, 1837. William Cox, J P., Lieut, and Paymaster of N.S.W Corps or 102nd Regiment,
of Clarendon, died at Fairfield, aged 72. Buried at St. Matthew's Church of England, Windsor.
Founder of the Australian family of that name.

22, 1806. Memorable flood; immense damage done; caused a famine.
Bread rose to 4/6 and 5/-loaf of 2lbs. Wheat sold 70/- and 80/- per bushel.
This flood rose 8ft. higher than on any previous occasion. 36,000 worth of property was
destroyed, and several lives lost. It commenced last week of February, and its greatest
height was reached on March 22, 6000 bushels of corn were destroyed.
100 persons, who had taken refuge upon the tops of their houses were saved through the
exertions of Arndell and Biggers, two settlers. Arndell was the founder of the
Hawkesbury family of that name. He arrived as a surgeon in the First Fleet.

1897. J. Ayling, Presbyterian minister at Pitt Town, and a noted apiarist,
died in New Zealand, aged 71.

24, 1807. The vessel Governor Bligh (owner, Andrew Thompson) launched from
the Green Hills (Windsor).

25, 1897. Sen. Coastable McNeely retires after 21 years' service in the
district.

25, 1804. Governor King thanks the settlers for their assistance in putting down the
Irish insurrection at Castle Hill.

28, 1828. First postmaster at Windsor appointed. Salary 84/7/9 per annum.

1814. Rev. Wm. Wools, Ph. Dr., A.L.M., F.L.S., born.
Incumbent of St. Peter's, Richmond, and Rural Dean.
Literateur and scientist, botanist, lecturer. Died 1894

Surnames: NONE
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by janilye Profile | Research | Contact | Subscribe | Block this user
on 2012-06-01 23:54:41

janilye - 7th generation, Convict stock. Born in New South Wales now living in Victoria, carrying, with pride 'The Birthstain'.

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