ALBERT COLEMAN'S BROTHER, HASTINGS' DEADSHOT JACK (THE GREAT JOHN COLEMAN) AND HARRY CASPAR. :: FamilyTreeCircles.com Genealogy
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ALBERT COLEMAN'S BROTHER, HASTINGS' DEADSHOT JACK (THE GREAT JOHN COLEMAN) AND HARRY CASPAR.

Journal by itellya

Doug Ackerly's "Coleman" has recently been published. My aim here is to provide information that is not available in wikipedia or Doug's book.

Both played for Tyabb but in another game
Young Jack's stratospheric leaps and tons won far more fame.
When he first trained with Hastings, their offer he'd refuse
(To give him stops for better grip): "Not in my good shoes!"*

Did he squat in Hasting's goal square as he did at Windy Hill,
Nonchalantly chewing gum thrown by adoring fans, until
Rising with the speed of light from his haunches
He led into one of his spectacular launches?**

In one of Hasting's matches he was sorely pressed,
Kicking only eight; only A.Coleman was among the best.
Hastings won two premierships, won them back to back,
And Argus readers read of the feats of the "Standard's" Deadshot Jack.

(Trove, Tyabb Cricket Club website and Wikipedia. *George Slocombe,the Hastings coach.
** Fraser had felt his pulse quicken as a 10-year-old at Windy Hill when Essendon's on-ballers would win the football, Coleman would crouch in the goal square ready to explode like a sprinter from the blocks, and all in the Reynolds Stand would stamp their feet on the floorboards in anticipation. "It was just so exciting." I had written the poem before I saw Ken Fraser's account. It proves I wasn't dreaming!

Read more: http://www.theage.com.au/afl/afl-news/john-coleman-book-has-everything-except-the-answer-to-goalkickings-mystery-20140528-zrr54.html#ixzz3B2NQea9E)

John Coleman did not forget Hastings when he hit the big time. Albert was invited to play with Richmond but that must have been when he suffered his injury.

PAGE 16.-THE STANDARD, Thursday, October 27, 1949.
Hastings Acclaims John Coleman. District's Great Tribute to Champion Forward.
Last Friday was a "Red Letter Night" for Hastings when a very big percentage of the town and district population attended at the Hastings Hall to officially welcome home the former local champion goalkicker, John Coleman, at a ball arranged in honor of his triumphant first season with Essendon League team, where he kicked the record of 100 goals, and stamped his claims as the greatest Victorian goalkicker of all time.

Prominent amongst the visitors were Messrs....W. French (senior Vice-President and Life Member of Essendon League Club, and an Essendon Club official for 42 years), who was accompanied by Billy Hutchinson, first rover;
George Hassell, champion wingster; and Bob Syme, first ruckman of the Essendon League team. Popular Mr. and Mrs. A. E.Coleman, the proud parents of the champion, were accompanied at the function by their other son,
Albert, who was also a fine footballer till he suffered a knee injury. Mr. Coleman, Senr., was a good footballer with teams in the Wangaratta-Albury district many years ago.

A surprising feature of the night-and the only regrettable one was the almost complete absence of representatives of most M.P.F.L. clubs, other than Hastings, and also the non-attendance of any members of the Shire Council, although the Shire President and two Councillors live in Hastings, and Centre Riding
Councillors reside close by in the Somerville-Tyabb area. However, the hall was packed to capacity by a crowd that found great delight in all the proceedings, and danced till 1 o'clock to splendid music by Neil Whitford's
Rhythm Trio (Sorrento). Warrant-Officer McKenzie (F.N.D.)proved himself the most efficient M.C. seen at Peninsula functions for a very long time. The function was exceptionally well organised, due mainly to the work
of Mr. Mayne, Hastings Club treasurer.

The hall was appropriately decorated with seven large premiership pennants won by Hastings Club, three of these being for the three last seasons, and due in large measure to Coleman's ability in front of goals. About
200 miniature club' pennants, large balloons, and a floral-decked, stage completed a fine picture of public appreciation.

Torchlight -Procession.. .
The opening of the "Welcome Home Ball" was preceded by a torchlight procession from the Hastings Hospital, headed by the Mornington Town Band, and followed, by the Hastings Fire Brigade members, in full uniform,
...A Great Reception.
John Coleman received a great ovation as he entered the hall, all present standing to sing ''For He's a Jolly Good Fellow," and giving three mighty cheers. Mr. Mayne expressed regret that Mr. Wallace Sharland, who
was to have made the presentation to John Coleman, was unable to attend on account of illness.
Mr.Mayne thanked all donors towards the present for Coleman, and the Mornington Town Band for giving its services free. He also thanked the Ladies' Committee for the' grand job they had carried out in connection with the supper arrangements.

Mr. Percy Wilson (captain of the Hastings Football Club), who made the presentation to John Coleman, of a bag of golf clubs valued at ?40, said that night's entertainment had been organised by the Hastings Football Club
and admirers of John Coleman in honor of the wonderful record he had put up this year, and during the past two seasons. Hastings had never had a more popular player said Mr. Wilson, and John still came along to all club
functions as a Hastings player, just as he did when he took the field with the local team
. He then presented John with the golf equipment, expressed the hope that he would be as good a golfer* as he had been a footballer, and wished him every success in the world. The Band again played "For He's a Jolly Good Fellow," and the hall rang with cheers.

(*As a golfer John made some good cricket scores. See P.22,Argus,4-8-1955.)

John Coleman, in responding thanked all concerned for a very fine gift. He would remember and appreciate this evening for many years to come. He thanked Mr. Mayne for the way he had organised the function, and also
the Hastings Club generally. It gave him great pleasure to see so many Peninsula faces in the gathering.

Mr. W. French (Senior Vice President, Essendon League) expressed great pleasure at being present. He said he would like to mention at the outset that Essendon had not "taken John Coleman off Hastings," for Coleman
had played first with the Essendon District Juniors, which team was holding its presentation night in the Masonic Hall, Essendon, that same night. He (Mr. French) had been told long ago by an official of that team, that "there is a kid here, who will be the greatest forward of all time." He (Mr. French) was sure John was
going to be the greatest forward of all time, and he was the "King of Essendon" as far as public popularity goes in that city. Essendon's gain had been Hastings' loss, but it would have been a pity to have kept a great player like John in Hastings. If it had not been for his great team spirit, in co-operating with his team
mates, John could easily have got 130 or 140 goals for his first League season, instead of 100,said Mr. French. He assured them that Essendon would look after John, and he hoped Hastings would produce another player of
his calibre for future play with the 'Dons'.

A Popular Song
During the evening pleasing songs were rendered over the 'mike'" by the talented Hastings vocalist, Mr. Dave Ward. One that "brought the house down" was the following parody (tune"Four Leaf Clover" chorus) written in the hall by the Standard representative:- "

There's not a goalman like our John Coleman,
That we've ever seen, before.
Each kick is dead-shot, and goals
come like rain,
Tired, are the scorers who can't
stand the strain;
No need explaining, one w're entertaining.
Is somebody we adore;
There's not a goalman like our
John Coleman,
That we've ever seen before.

Another Coleman Trains At Richmond
By PERCY TAYLOR
ALBERT COLEMAN, whose full forward brother is doing so well at Essendon, trained at Richmond last night, but has promised to train with his brother on Tuesday. Richmond was much impressed by Coleman, "who is a 6ft l 1/2in. half-back, with heaps of football in him. There is a feeling that he will prefer to play with his brother, but Richmond hopes to see him again.(P.16,Argus, 25-3-1949.)

Albert was obviously too busy as an orchardist to train very much but he did play in Essendon's practice match soon after.* Before I forget, I must mention two of last night's incidental findings. Albert was a former schoolmate of Harry Beitzel and Harry Caspar. The former was a successful field umpire and broadcaster and Caspar, who transferred from Northcote to Carlton was the man who cost John Coleman four matches and Essendon a premiership. The school which Albert and these two attended together has not yet been found. Was it University High School? Jack Simpson from Doutta Stars became a labour politician who held the State seat of Niddrie for many years.

*COLEMAN PLEASES IN ESSENDON MATCH
By PERCY TAYLOR " "
JOHN COLEMAN, much discussed Hastings full forward, played at Essendon for the first time on Saturday, and proved to be just as good a footballer as expected. A large crowd came specially to see Coleman, and they were
well rewarded. He is fast, leads out well, marks safely, and is a most accurate kick, scoring seven goals from seven kicks.Although he is 6ft 2in in height, he does not carry much weight*,which might be a drawback in
League company.

Simpson, 6ft 4in, came from the Doutta Stars, and played so well in the junior match that he was taken out and included in the senior game. He could easily go further. Others to shape well were Mccallum (seconds), Calder
(Wonthaggi), who worried Leehane; McGilvray (Gunbower), Luck (Shepparton), Williams(Moonee Valley),Illingsworth
(district full-forward), and Donovan (seconds). A. Coleman (brother of Jack) has ability, but he is "short of a gallop." (P.17, Argus, 28-3-1949.)

Another incidental find last night was that John Coleman had broken Hastings' record for goals in a season set by John McMillan. To say that John Coleman did not carry much weight was actually an understatement as shown by a photo of McMillan and John Coleman both of whose families had lived in the south west of Victoria. I wonder if Doug had this photo in his book. See photo in the following accompanying the text which is supplied below in italics:
Dunrobin Football Team (1921) - Glenelg & Wannon Settlers
www.swvic.org/casterton/dunrobin_football(1921).htm

John Angus "Jack" McMILLAN, son of John and Florence McMILLAN (nee McGUINESS).

Mr McMillan was a member of the Footscray Seconds first premiership side in 1936. He came to the club from Hastings in that year and played four senior games before breaking his wrist. A full forward, he held the goal kicking record at Hastings for 13 years before it was broken by John Coleman in 1947 with 136 goals. Mr McMillan?s record was 119 goals established in 1934. Born in Casterton, Mr McMillan was from a family of nine children.

A primary school teacher, Mr McMillan had been actively associated with sports administration. He was coach of the Victorian Schoolboys football team in 1955 and 1962 and was manager of the side in 1968. He was also on the Council and the committee of the Kooyong Lawn Tennis Association. Mr McMillan was a member of the City of Hawthorn Lodge No 363, and had been Secretary of the Gould League of Bird Lovers for the 11 years prior to his death in 1969.

Thanks to Libby McMillan for the above images.




RUNS IN COLEMAN FAMILY
Alan (sic) Coleman, brother of Essendon League football champion, John, kicked another six goals for Hastings on Saturday to make his total for three games 22. In this period his team has scored 32 so Coleman's feat is equal to, if not better than, some performed by his now better-known brother, John, who were both former
residents of Port Fairy. Coleman's father, a former manager of the Port Fairy butter factory, residing at Tyabb, when asked to compare Alby with John, replied, "Alby hasn't had the chance John has had, on account of
trouble. I would not say that he is better than John, but without injury he would be just as good. When asked if Alby would go to the 'big game,' Coleman, senr., said, He doesn't intend to carry on with football. He is looking after an orchard and has his hands full. (P.2,Portland Guardian,26-6-1950.)

John Coleman was such a sensation that every time somebody kicked a bag he was touted as the new John Coleman. Most of them,such as the Spotswood lad that was invited to train with Williamstown, are unknown to me. However this article is of interest to me for two reasons. Firstly, John and Alby's father,Albert Ernest Coleman, had been a noted player in the Albury area and secondly Ken Smale had been the coach of East Shepparton in 1970 when I was on the V.F.L. list and umpired one of their games.

BULLDOGS CHASE NEW "JOHN COLEMAN"
Warracknabeal, Monday
Wimmera League's "John Coleman," Ken Smale, was interviewed today by Mr.Roy Russell, secretary of Footscray Football Club. Mr Russell made a special trip to Warracknabeal to do so. Smale, who is only 19,would have been Wimmera League's leading goal-kicker last season but for National Service training. He kicked 10 goals for
Warracknabeal against Murtoa on Saturday. Smale is similar in build to Essendon star John Coleman. He is 6ft. tall and a brilliant high mark. (P.9, Argus, 12-5-1953.)
Ken kicked 98 goals in 60 games with Collingwood and was belatedly made a life member of the club. See:
Pies honour Smale fo life | The Wimmera Mail-Times
www.mailtimes.com.au/story/965788/pies-honour-smale-fo-life/
Nov 4, 2008 - WARRACKNABEAL football living legend Ken Smale has been awarded a belated life membership to Collingwood Football Club. Smale, 78 ...

Doug Wade grew up in the Wimmera with Ken Smale as one of his heroes.
My all time hero was John Coleman but guys like Ted (Jarrard)and Kenny Smale who was from Warracknabeal weren't far behind him. Kenny played in three Grand Finals, including the famous 58 side.
(KEN PIESSE FAVOURITE SON'S FROM THE WIMMERA
www.footyalmanac.com.au/ken-piesse-favourite-son?s-from-the-wimmera/)


A PORT FAIRY PERSPECTIVE.
THE role Port Fairy played in the life and times of an Australian sporting legend has seen the town take up a prominent place in a new e-book.

Former Essendon champion the late John Coleman is the subject of the e-book, Coleman: The Untold Story of an AFL Legend, which has been written by former Heywood man and author Doug Ackerly.

The e-book is a prelude to a full biography about Coleman that Ackerly will release next April.

The release of the e-book coincided with the unveiling of the Avenue of Legends at the MCG yesterday of which Coleman was a part.

In the e-book, Port Fairy is the central location on the chapter which focuses on Coleman's early life.

The chapter explains how Coleman's parents moved to Port Fairy in 1922 when his father was appointed as the manager of the Port Fairy Cheese, Butter and Ice Factory in Gipps Street.

The young couple wasted no time in starting a family, with daughters Lawna and Thurla and oldest son Albert.

John Douglas Coleman was then born on November 23, 1928, with the story behind his second name an interesting one.

It appears his mother was struggling to find a second name when Sunday school teacher Ruth Engish suggested Douglas, which was the name of the guest house she ran in Gipps Street opposite the Colemans home.

Football was always a part of John Coleman's life as he and his brother would play football matches with the Pevitt boys, Frank and Don, along what was a then small back road covered in grass called Regent Street.

The book says the Pevitt boys remember John Coleman as a talented footballer but with an extremely competitive nature.

John Coleman may never have played official competition with the Port Fairy Seagulls, but these early games of street football give Port Fairy some right to the claim the town was the first step in his decorated football career.

The Colemans stayed in Port Fairy until January 1939 before moving to Melbourne.
(Legends link to Port Fairy | Moyne Gazette
www.moynegazette.com.au/story/1784599/legends-link-to-port-fairy/)

ONE GAME WONDER.
A great fan of Daryl Pittman's THE LOCAL FOOTY SHOW ON C.31 (digital channel 44), I remember seeing this story on the show some time ago. No doubt local residents named Coleman attended the game.

Was John Coleman the greatest forward ever to ever play ...
www.footyalmanac.com.au/was-john-coleman-the-greatest-forward-ever..

John Coleman

In early December 2012 I stumbled on a small article that appeared in the Argus on 8th October 1951 titled Win Ends Country Dispute. The article covered various country matches and finished with:

Freighters, runners up in the Federal District League, were defeated by North Albury in a match in aid of the local team at Albury on Saturday. Essendon full forward John Coleman kicked five goals for Freighters. Other Essendon players took part in the game. Final scores North Albury 17.25 Freighters 17.9?.

I couldn't believe what I had found. The great John Coleman played for a Heatherton side! This was just a week after Essendon lost the 1951 Grand Final to Geelong. Coleman didn't play as he was reported in the final home and away game of the season and sensationally suspended for 4 weeks. It seemingly cost the Bombers the flag as they went down by just 11 points.

It just didn't make sense that the great John Coleman could have played with a local outfit and why did it only receive a few lines at the end of another article, especially given his fame and the recent events of that year?

I began trawling the internet and books on John Coleman without success. My next port of call was searching the newspaper archives at the State Library Victoria (SLV).

In a hard copy edition of the Border Mail 6th October 1951, I won the research equivalent of 1st Division in lotto. I found an advertisement and an article for the game and not only was John Coleman listed to play but also Bill Hutchison and Alan Dale (Essendon), Alan Ruthven (Fitzroy), Charlie Sutton (Footscray), Kevin Curran (Hawthorn) and Ted Jarrod (North Melbourne). What a side! I quickly turned to the Monday edition to see the photographs of these legends wearing our club colours. It was disappointing to discover that there were no photographs, just a two paragraph report of the game.

Big Crowd Sees Coleman At Albury

?North Albury combine defeated Freighters (Melbourne Federal League) by 17 points at Albury sports ground on Saturday. Gate takings were ?144.

Champion Melbourne goal kicker John Coleman got five goals for the visitors, and repeatedly drew the applause of the crowd for breath-taking leaps.

Final scores were North Albury 17.26 (128), Freighters 17.9 (111).

Best Players Freighters : Hutchison (Ess), Reeves (Nth M), Coleman, Sheppard, Tilley and Reid.

I grabbed the Moorabbin News and located the Freighters Club notes by ?H.C.J?. in the edition issued the week after the game.

Freighters Club (By ?H.C.J.?)

The Federal District League received a great boost when Freighters played Nth Albury football team during our visit to Albury last week-end. Our club was very fortunate in securing four league players, namely John Coleman, Bill Hutchison, Alan Dale and John Reeves. These players gave the game a great kick, and were a great attraction to the crowd that witnessed the game.

The marketeers? of the game were obviously making sure a good crowd rolled through the gate with the extra star players notes in the Border Mail article and the advertisement. Still, the Freighters team contained three Essendon premiership players and John Reeves who played in North Melbourne's losing 1950 grand final team which would have made for a more than handy side. Unfortunately, we returned Alan Dale back to Essendon slightly damaged, he received a nasty knock and suffered two broken ribs during the game.

So who was the greatest forward to ever play for Heatherton?


As mentioned before Doug Wade regarded John Coleman as the greatest player he had seen. Another with the same opinion was a player who rivalled his hero as a spectacular high flying aerialist. I loved this Fitzroy player who filled a void when John Coleman's career was cut short. As a young Bomber supporter, I could share in the excitement of Tony Ongerello's screamers, safe in the knowledge that they would be unlikely to result in a goal to hurt the Bombers (unlike Ray Poulter's huge torps from centre half forward for Richmond.)Leigh Matthews is generally regarded as the greatest-ever footballer,but not in the opinion of Tony,the last man to kick goals using place kicks. Some of Tony's screamers are shown on the following website,from which Tony's opinion is reproduced in italics.


OWAAT ? One Week at a Time ?Tony Ongarello: A ...
www.oneweekatatime.com.au/tony-ongarello-a-highflying-gentleman/

On Coleman, Tony is adamant. ?He is the greatest player to have played the game. He could do it all: he was quick, skilful, could jump and mark, was tough, but fair. He was without peer. I played in the game before his last. He kicked 14 goals on us and was untouchable. He would repeatedly jump and take the most sublime marks. Easily the greatest player I have seen.?
Later, when discussing the Brisbane Lions coaching predicament and board troubles, Leigh Matthews was mentioned.
?He would be Coleman?s competitor wouldn?t he?? I said.
?In what way?? he responded.
?As the best.?
?Not as far as I?m concerned. Matthews is one of the game?s greatest players, but to my mind Coleman stands alone.?
The game following his 14 goals against Fitzroy, Coleman would kick 5 against North Melbourne before dislocating his knee. He would never play again.
It is easy to see why Tony Ongarello was such a fan of John Coleman, they played similarly. There are differences of course, and the main one is clearly that Coleman was an elite kick. In his 131 games, Tony is credited with kicking 247 goals, but the records don?t show how many behinds he kicked. According to those who saw him, there were many.


COLEMAN NOT PICKED IN VICTORIAN TEAM TO PLAY WESTERN AUSTRALIA IN 1952!
Imagine my surprise to find that John Coleman had not been named in the team. There was a very good reason and it had nothing to do with his form.

John will be the draw
By HUGH BUGGY
Star League forward John Coleman was not omitted from the Victorian State side because of loss of form. He was left in the Essendon team to play in Brisbane on June 14 as the game's greatest drawcard. This opinion was
expressed by several League club officials last night. They said the whole object of the match between Essendon and Geelong in Brisbane was to promote the Australian game in the northern State.

To play a game there without John Coleman, they added, would be like playing a Test match without Lindwall and Miller. These officials agreed that Jock Spencer, North Melbourne forward, was now quite as competent as Coleman, but Spencer was not yet the big-name player that Coleman is. Coleman in five games this year has kicked 24 goals for Essendon. Spencer, in six games, has scored 23.

Ace kicker
They said the prowess of Coleman as a goal-kicker was well known to all followers of football in Brisbane.
His record as the first League forward to kick 100 goals or more in his first two seasons was as familiar
to them as it was to Victorian fans. Officials said that as the "away" round was solely a propaganda effort, Brisbane would be keen to see Coleman in action. (P.8,Argus,4-6-1952.)

N.B. John kicked 13 goals!
Essendon crushes Geelong at Brisbane COLEMAN GETS THIRTEEN IN GREAT WIN Brisbane, Monday
The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1957) Tuesday 17 June 1952 p 8 Article.

JOHN MARRIES HIS "FINANCE".
Yes,that's what Monica Fernando of Merlynston was called when their engagement was announced in 1954! The crush outside the church when they married was described in graphic detail in the following article which has poor quality photos of the crowd and the newlyweds. (P.1,Argus,4-3-1955.)

OH THE PAIN!
I went to Kensington Central School where two of my mates were Reg. and Max Fairchild who barracked for South Melbourne. Reg.was a good-enough footballer to have attracted the attention of North Melbourne while at the Central School (form 1 and 2)and Max will be well-remembered as Beau in the Beaurepaire Tyre advertisements. They'd told me they were going to the match at the Lakeside Oval and when the Bombers lost despite John Coleman kicking eleven goals straight (not mentioned in the following report) they were the last people I wanted to see because I knew I'd get a ribbing. Sure enough they were waiting to gloat when we entered the subway at the station.

COLEMAN 11, BUT-
Speedy South earns 10-point win
By PERCY TAYLOR
SOUTH MELBOURNE'S tigerish finish gave it a sound 10-points victory over Essendon in a game of high standard on Saturday. South's pace, plus the varying fortunes of the sides, thrilled the 30,000 spectators.John Coleman, who kicked 10 goals for Essendon on the opening day, gave another exhilarating display to kick 11 brilliant goals. But despite his dominance, Essendon failed elsewhere. Its defence, in particular, became slack, and crumpled beneath the persistent and pacy play of the southerners. On Saturday's form South could do well this season. South was the dominant side for three quarters, due to high-flying and fast ruckmen, fast and clever rovers, and a forceful and high marking lot of half forwards. Essendon held control in two of the three centre line positions all day, but its forwards, with the exception of Coleman, did not take full advantage of it. etc.
(P.10,Argus,4-5-1953.)

JOHN'S LAST SCREAMER.
And is this his last great mark?
This could be the last of Coleman's fabulous marks-it was taken in Saturday's game-that stamped him as a champion. (P.1,Argus,7-6-1954. A GREAT PHOTO which shows clearly that John did not need opponents' backs to gain elevation.)

UNIVERSITY HIGH SCHOOL.
It has been said that John Coleman was a "middling" high jumper and Ron Clarke said he would have been more successful as a triple jumper because he could take off on either foot. He was the Open champion of Uni High in both.

TWO RECORDS AT UNIVERSITY HIGH SCHOOL SPORTS
J. Nuttall won the 880 yards in record time of 2min 7 3-10sec at the University High School sports at Royal Park yesterday. G. Harry broke the long jump record in under 16.
Results:
BOYS' EVENTS: Open: 830 Yds: J. Nuttall. 2.7 3-10. Hurdles: J Coleman. 100 Yds:K. Kube. 220 Yds: H. Dowd.
High Jump.J. Coleman. Hop, Step, Jump. J. Coleman. etc. (P.14, Argus, 17-10-1946.)

Uni High could beat most opponents in footy but the most satisfying victory was always over Melbourne High and these were more common in the 1950's when Uni High's side was stacked with players such as Ron Carruthers, Barry McAuliffe,John Booth, Viv. Peterson, Bobby Clark, the Keddie twins,Terry Rodgers (who beat John's goalkicking record), Graeme Leydin, Graeme Beissel, Ron Evans (imported from Caulfield Grammar), etc., etc., etc.

Good Win For U H S At Carlton
UNIVERSITY HIGH. 14 gls 11 bhds (95) MELBOURNE HIGH . 9 gls 3 bhds (57)
For the first time in six years University High School defeated Melbourne High School in a football match at Carlton yesterday. A return match will be played on August 7.Best: University High: Coleman (5), Plumridge (4), Boyd (2). Melbourne High: Balson, Dunn, Witherow.(P.13, Argus, 25-7-1946.

John Coleman, captain University High School, trained at Essendon last night. He is a district boy, aged
only 17, 6ft lin, and 12 1/2 st. He should be a player next season.(P.9, Argus, 21-8-1946.)

I speculated earlier that John Coleman, Harry Beitzel and Harry Caspar had all attended University High School.
This has been confirmed by Harry Beitzel himself in a pop-up (click on the carictature of Harry Beitzel) on the following website, found in a Harry Caspar search. Harry Caspar's career at Carlton had a break in 1954,the reason being that he was playing for Sorrento and was married in New Zealand in that year. Harry was working at Portsea in early 1953 and the Sorrento Football Club tried to sign him but the Carlton Football Club refused permission, obviously later relenting. Harry was one of many footballers to move to the beautiful Mornington Peninsula. Not surprising because he seems to have been living at Sorrento before he started playing for Northcote, according to another Carlton webpage (given in italics later.) Another pop-up on this website reports his death at Rosebud.

CASPAR, Harry : Blueseum - Online Carlton Football Club ...
www.blueseum.org/tiki-browse_gallery.php?galleryId=193...0...

HARRY CASPAR.(Google "Harry Caspar, Mahoney".)
From Post Office Directories of Melbourne Thaddeus Mahoney was a storekeeper and hardware dealer of 30 Queensberry Street, Carlton from 1862 until 1866. After this date the family appears at several addresses through Carlton, and Prahran until around 1884. There were ten surviving children all growing up, and only two were married before the father died.

Thaddeus was aged just 59 years when he died at Neil Street, Melbourne, on the 6th of February 1879 of general exhaustion and disease of the liver.[21] Jane O'Mahony died just five years later of Dropsy and Chronic Inflammation of the Liver on the corner of Newry Street and St Georges Road in Fitzroy on the 23rd March 1884, aged 50 years.[22]

Both were buried together in the Roman Catholic Section of R/C I 391 in Melbourne General Cemetery. Their youngest was also buried there as Eliza had died in 1880.[23]

Jane had left a family of nine living children and most married just before or just after her death. The pair of Thaddeus and Jane have left a large family of descendants who have married into many of the other families of Carlton and North Melbourne.


Some of the descendants of Thaddeus and Jane were footballers, and played for Carlton. One great grandchild of the couple was Harry CASPAR, who was involved in a punch up with the great full forward John COLEMAN. That John Coleman / Harry Caspar fight in the goal square cost Essendon the Grand Final when both were suspended for four weeks. Without Coleman, Essendon lost the 1951 Grand Final to Geelong by 11 points. The Essendon supporters have not forgotten it, and never forgiven it.

8.
Harry George CASPAR b. 4 Nov 1926 North Carlton, Vic. m. 6 Mar 1954 New Zealand. d. 1 Jul 1988 Rosebud, Vic.
June Lesley EGINTON b. 1930

Descendants of Harry and June were born at Mornington from 1957 and later at Rosebud as late as 1996. They are listed on this website.However, despite the Caspar name being mentioned in connection with the South Mornington Football Club, Harry was probably living near Sorrento,perhaps at Blairgowrie. These births and Harry's death were probably at the Mornington and Rosebud hospitals. Harry is buried in good company at the Sorrento cemetery.

IN GOOD COMPANY
John McCarthy is buried on a small rise in the middle of the Sorrento Cemetery.

Tucked away in scrubland on the edge of the Mornington Peninsula coastline, the graveyard is filled with notable figures.

Barry ?Hooker? Harrison, who tagged Ron Barassi out of the 1958 Grand Final, is just a few metres from McCarthy?s grave.

A bit further along you?ll find Harry Caspar, the Carlton full back Essendon fans blame for John Coleman?s suspension at the end of the 1951 season which cost them the premiership.

There?s also Percy Cerutty, the athletics trainer who coached Herb Elliott to the 1500m gold medal at the 1960 Rome Olympics, and Prime Minister Harold Holt?s wife Dame Zara Bate.
( Remembering John McCarthy | Herald Sun
www.heraldsun.com.au/news/...john.../story-e6frf7jo-1226613235980

F - Australian Cemeteries
www.australiancemeteries.com/vic/mornington_pen/sorrentoafdata.htm
CASPAR, Harry George, 1/7/1988, 61, June, buried with son Phillip J Casper (sic).
Phillip, Harry and June's son, was only 11 years old.


The following webpage explains why John Coleman lost it when he was punched. He had a boil on the back of the neck and that was the target his former Uni High schoolmate aimed at! Harry Caspar supposedly was originally from Sorrento so this could mean that he stayed with relatives each weekend during his career with Northcote. Amazingly,one of his sons played with Essendon Reserves.
Harry Caspar : Blueseum - Online Carlton Football Club ...
blueseum.org/tiki-index.php?page=Harry+Caspar
Jun 5, 2013 - Originally from Sorrento, Caspar later joined VFA front-runners Northcote ... the 1954 season playing for Sorrento on the Mornington Peninsula.
N.B.Northcote was hardly a front-runner when it cleared Harry to Carlton; the club had finished 10th!


It has been said that John Coleman never lived at Hastings but it seems that he spent time there with his parents after his knee was injured. These consecutive pars show that John and Harry Caspar were both on the peninsula at the time. Harry had been relegated to Carlton's reserves possibly because of a loss of form or his inability to get to training from Sorrento; this is why Carlton had a change of heart about clearing him to Sorrento.

Information from Hastings indicates that John Coleman is progressing slowly. His damaged knee is still in
irons. "We will be surprised if he plays again this year," said Mr. Howard Okey last night. "Perhaps he will be
fit to play for us in the finals."

CARLTON
Follower Harry Caspar was cleared to Sorrento by Carlton committee last night. He had previously expressed a desire to go to Footscray, but changed his mind, preferring to play where he is employed. (P.15,Argus, 29-6-1954.)

FROM New Zealand comes news of the recent marriage of Harry Caspar, former Carlton ruckman, to June, elder
daughter of Mr. and Mrs. W. J. Eginton, Mayor and Mayoress of Motueka, Nelson. After a car tour of the South Island, they will return to live at Sorrento, Victoria, where Harry will resume football training.
(P.17, Argus, 29-4-1955.)
Harry had been one of Sorrento's best in its first semi final win in 1954 but returned to Carlton in 1955 because he needed only one more game to qualify for the provident fund.

HARRY'S BLUE WITH THE BLUES.
Was Harry's relegation to the reserves due to poor form or a blue with the Blues?

After serving his suspension through the first four games of 1952, Caspar was brought straight back into Carlton?s senior team. He celebrated his 50th match in round 18 (a 36 point win over St Kilda at the Junction Oval) and played in the first and only senior final of his career when the Blues lost a heart-stopping Semi Final by l point to Fitzroy in front of 18,000 fans at the MCG. In a dramatic post-match incident later that evening, Carlton?s promising full-forward Keith Warburton collapsed and was rushed to hospital, where only repeated blood transfusions over the next 24 hours saved his life. One of Keith?s kidneys had been ruptured in a heavy collision during the game, but he somehow stayed on the field until the final siren.

That dramatic final marked the high point of Harry Caspar?s career at Carlton, because soon afterwards, his career went into decline. Injury delayed the start of his 1953 season, and he had added only four senior games by round 9 when he apparently became embroiled in a dispute with his captain, Ken Hands, or his coach Percy Bentley. As a consequence, Caspar spent the second half of the year with the seconds. In September, he was influential in driving his team right through to the Reserves Grand Final, and the Blues comfortably beat Essendon in the curtain-raiser to the Collingwood-Geelong Grand Final at the MCG.

Despite that success, Harry?s problems continued into 1954. On the first day of the new season, Carlton Reserves unfurled their Premiership flag at Princes Park prior to the match against South Melbourne. Early in the game, Caspar and the Swans? captain-coach Don Condon tangled, and Condon was reported. Then at half time, Harry became involved in a heated discussion with Carlton officials, and shocked everyone by demanding an immediate clearance and leaving the ground.

Caspar spent the 1954 season playing for Sorrento on the Mornington Peninsula.

Carlton stood firm however, and Caspar eventually returned to the fold ? and to senior football - in 1955. Wearing guernsey number 6 (after playing all of his career to that point in number 24) he was one of Carlton?s best in a big loss to Essendon in round 9, before his career imploded in less than ideal circumstances the following week. In the midst of another big defeat ? this time by Footscray - Caspar was reported for striking the Bulldogs? Dave Bryden. And to make matters worse, he suffered a badly-bruised back during the last quarter. On the following Tuesday night, Harry was suspended for four weeks, and that brought the curtain down his career. He retired on the spot, and didn?t play again at any level.

In 1956, Caspar headed off to play for East Ballarat that had just appointed his former team-mate John Brown as coach for the 1956 season.


In the years after his last match for the Blues, Harry returned to live at Sorrento, where he and his wife produced five sons. All of the Caspar boys represented Sorrento at some time in their sporting careers, and two went on to play at VFL Reserves level; Michael with South Melbourne in 1980, and David ? remarkably, with Essendon in 1984.

Harry Caspar passed away on the 1st July, 1988, aged 61.
(Harry Caspar : Blueseum - Online Carlton Football Club ...
blueseum.org/tiki-index.php?page=Harry+Caspar)

BALLARAT'S fast, open, smooth game, functioning around their winning centre and a more coordinated attack, should give them victory in the first semi-final against East Ballarat at Eastern Oval tomorrow. Geelong West and Maryborough will contest the second semi-final. Ballarat was the early premiership favorite, but injuries so depleted the line-up in the latter stages of the minor round that they were forced to struggle to hold a place in the final four. Ballarat won the last two premierships. East's hopes received a setback last Saturday when the team failed badly against Maryborough and lost second place.

East's strength lies in the ruck-rover combination of Caspar, Dodd,and Pascoe. Former Carlton ruckman
Harry Caspar "makes the game" for Dodd and Pascoe,the best pair of little men in the league.
(P.19, Argus,7-9-1956.)


The Mahoney family history gives little early genealogy for the Caspar family. Is it possible that Harry's move to the East Ballarat Club was influenced by family connections as well as the club's coach being a former Carlton player? Did the first Caspar come out to try the Ballarat diggings? Was Frank Caspar,our William Tell, the saw-miller (after whom the Swiss-like landscape between Bacchus Marsh and Gisborne was called CASPAR COUNTRY) his son? Is it possible that Harry's mother and father became acquainted through Frank Caspar and Cornelius Mahoney who is mentioned in the same article? "Goodman's creek was opened in May of that year by Mr. Cornelius Mahoney, J.P., who is still living in Bacchus Marsh, in his 84th year. We often want him to give us his recollections of early days, but have not succeeded very well. He has the first balance sheet of the old Road Board(of which he was a member) and we should like to have that framed in the Shire hall."
(IN CASPAR'S COUNTRY.
The Bacchus Marsh Express (Vic. : 1866 - 1918) Saturday 4 March 1905 p 3 Article)

Unfortunately there is not enough Caspar genealogical information to link Harry's father with the families of Frank Caspar or William Louis Caspar who died in Ballarat in 1950.
CASPAR_On August 3, at Ballarat, William Louis Caspar, beloved husband of Alice, and loving father of Lillian (Jean, Mrs. Kemp). Frederick. Nellie (Mrs. McGregor), Robert, and Myrtle. (P.16, Argus, 4-8-1950.)

Harry Caspar's ancestor, Thaddeus Mahoney, from Killarney, was transported for picking pockets in 1833 at the age of 13. Cornelius Mahoney was also from Killarney and came out with his parents in 1837. Thaddeus had been transported to Sydney and after serving his sentence,moved to Melbourne in about 1944. Here's Cornelius Mahoney's obituary.

DEATH OF MR CORNELIUS MAHONEY, JP
One of the widest known personalities, and the oldest resident, of the district, in Mr Cornelius Mahoney, J.P., died at his residence, Bacchus Marsh, on Tuesday night, in his 94th year. Although of such advanced age, Mr. Mahoney had only been laid up during the last few months. Mr.,Mahoney was born at Killarney, County Kerry, Ireland, 31st March, 1821, and landed at Hobart, Tasmania with his parents,from the immigrant ship "Bussorah
Merchant," of London, Louis William Moncrief, Master, on 11th December, 1837. In 1838, after a stay in Tasmania, the family, consisting of his father, mother, himself (then 16 years old), and a younger brother,
came to Melbourne arriving on 22nd May; where his father and himself went into the building trade, and
carried it on successfully until 1844 when they went to Bacchus Marsh, and purchased the present homestead.
of 200 acres, lots 10 and 11, between the rivers Lerderderg and Werribee, and where his father died 9th January, 1887, aged 92 years.

Mr Mahoney was a member of the old Road Board, a Justice of the Peace, and was for several years Chairman and Correspondent of the School Board of Advice in the district. He was for 16 years a member of the Bacchus Marsh Troop of Prince of Wales Light Horse, during which time he rose to the rank of Captain.

Mr. Mahoney was always imbued with the spirit of adventure, and in 1849 he left his home for the Californian goldfields, and spent 2? years there, but not meeting with much success he returned to Bacchus Marsh, and has remained there ever since. Mr. Mahoney was the first to discover gold on the Goodman's Creek, at Cockatoo Gully, in 1854. He had many bushranging tales to relate.

Mr. Mahoney was married in Melbourne in 1849 to Miss Mary Hogan, a native of Tipperary, who came to the colony with her parents in 1841, by the immigrant ship "Agricola." Mrs. Mahoney survives her husband, and although 84 years of age, is wonderfully keen of intellect. There is also a grown-up family of sons and daughters; and a number of grandchildren. One of the latter (Mr. Clem. McFarlane) it is interesting to note at the present time,
is an Officer in the Australian Navy, being a Torpedo Instructor on board the cruiser Melbourne.The funeral took place on Thursday, and was largely attended. (P.3,The Bacchus Marsh Express, 22-8-1914.)

Thaddeus Mahoney married Jane Stafford. Fred Stafford was therefore related in some way to Harry Caspar. Like Harry,he played for Northcote before moving to Carlton (where he kicked the winning goal in the 1947 premiership win). There he would have played with Harry, as he probably also did in 1954.(*He did!)

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Fred Stafford
Fred Stafford.jpg
Personal information
Date of birth 3 August 1926
Date of death 10 July 2009 (aged 82)
Original team Northcote (VFA)
Debut Round 1, 1947, Carlton v. Melbourne
Height/Weight 173 cm, 74 kg
Playing career1
Years Club Games (Goals)
1947-1952 Carlton 102 (68)
1 Playing statistics correct to end of 1952 season.
Career highlights
Carlton Premiers 1947
Fred Stafford (3 August 1926 ? 10 July 2009[1]) is a former Australian rules footballer in the Victorian Football League (VFL).

He kicked the winning goal in the dying seconds of the 1947 VFL Grand Final.[2]

*Finishing second on the list in the Peninsula League, Mornington (coached by ex-local half-back Gordon Williams) failed by three goals against Seaford (led by Conley, ex Carlton) last Saturday. Mornington meets Sorrento tomorrow in the final. Caspar and Stafford (Carlton), Ollie (St. Kilda) and Ron Wilson
(Coburg) play with Sorrento. Alby Morrison (Footscray) played earlier in the season with Sorrento, although probably in his middle forties. (P.1, Williamstown Chronicle,17-9-1954.)

Sorrento won the premiership in 1954.
Between 1948 and 1954, Morrison served as captain-coach of Sorrento, finally retiring, aged forty-five, after the club's victorious 1954 grand final. Meanwhile, at the MCG on the very same afternoon, Footscray broke through for its first ever VFL pennant by downing Melbourne. - See more at: http://australianfootball.com/players/player/Alby%2BMorrison/4800#sthash.d2kh7rJF.dpuf

I wonder if my post on the Sorrento F.C. timeline will shed some light on the Caspar family,several members of which are life members of the club.
A BIT OF SORRENTO F.C. HISTORY. Why do you think Harry Caspar and Fred Stafford both played at Northcote, Carlton and Sorrento? The answer relates to Thaddeus Mahoney who was transported at the age of 13 in 1833. And what's that got to do with Albert Coleman whose brother kicked 23 goals against Sorrento? Is the photo of Alby Morrison and some of his Sorrento players that appeared in the newspaper article (1954?) hanging in the clubrooms?

Surnames: BEITZEL CASPAR COLEMAN FAIRCHILD MAYNE McMILLAN SHARLAND SLOCOMBE WHITFORD WILSON
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by itellya Profile | Research | Contact | Subscribe | Block this user
on 2014-08-21 03:27:36

Itellya is researching local history on the Mornington Peninsula and is willing to help family historians with information about the area between Somerville and Blairgowrie. He has extensive information about Henry Gomm of Somerville, Joseph Porta (Victoria's first bellows manufacturer) and Captain Adams of Rosebud.

Do you know someone who can help? Share this:

Comments

by itellya on 2014-08-25 04:15:07

John Coleman and Harry Caspar were among a large number of former footballers who later lived on the peninsula. Max Oppy and Des Rowe were two others from the same era of V.F.L. football. The cafe on the west corner of Ozone St in Rye, run by descendants of one of these Richmond hardnuts is virtually a Richmond museum, the walls covered with photos.

Scot Palmer wrote an article in the sport section of the Southern Peninsula News about the many footballers who could be seen at Sorrento, noting that Harry Caspar was one of the old-time permanent residents. (October 4th 2011 by Mornington Peninsula News Group
issuu.com/southernpeninsulanews/docs/spn_october_4th_2011
Oct 4, 2011 - Continued on Page 4 Marshall's HOLIDAY RENTALS SORRENTO ...... more permanent residents in Harry Caspar and the late Max Oppy, who, .)

by itellya on 2014-10-29 07:19:47

There are plenty of photos of the great John Coleman, but I just found a photo of his brother, Albert,with his old mate (and team mate at Hastings of both brothers) Norm Jack.

January 31st 2012 by Mornington Peninsula News Group
issuu.com/westernportnews/docs/wpn_jan31st_2012

by itellya on 2015-01-01 18:26:23

WHERE WAS ALBERT COLEMAN'S ORCHARD?
ALBERT COLEMAN’S FARM.
The Hastings District Heritage Study Volume 1 has an entry for the Wilson farm complex at 114 Coolart Rd, Tyabb from page 89. A discussion of the property’s history on page 90 commences: “Part of CA44 Bittern parish plan (37 acres), this was held by Jack Harcourt in the 1950’s; the other part of the lot being owned by Albert Coleman.

Crown Allotment 44, Bittern is on the south west corner of Hodgins and Coolart Rds with frontages to these roads of 2326 and 3738 links respectively (467.9 and 751.96 metres.) On 10-12-1900, W.S.Wilson was issued the grant for 319 acres and 11 perches consisting of crown allotment 47 (on the south east corner of Stumpy Gully and Hodgins Rds) and crown allotment 44. As the area of crown allotment 44 is not given on my paper map, I will have to hope that my calculation of 86.9 acres is correct. I calculate the area of c/a 47 to be 174.03 acres and thus providing a total of about 261 acres. As W.S.Wilson’s grant of 319 acres included “area acquired by C.S.B." (Closer Settlement Board), I presume this was c/a 44A of just over 58 acres between c/a’s 47 and 44. Crown allotments 47, 44A and 44 have a total of 319 acres using my calculations. (174+58+87= 319, exactly the same as W.S.Wilson’s grant.)

The online Bittern parish map does not name grantees but it shows that 44A was indeed a closer settlement grant and that all of c/a 44 (including J.S.Edwards’ 44A of 58 acres) had a total area of 169 acres 1 rood and 12 perches. It also shows that crown allotment 47 had an area of 174 acres and 4 perches, almost exactly the 174.03 acres I had calculated (.03 of an acre is 4.8 perches.)

As the calculation of the area of c/a 47 proved to be correct, it can be assumed that the area of c/a 44 is also close enough to the 86.9 acres calculated. What can not be assumed is that the 37 acre portion of crown allotment 44 held by Jack Harcourt in the 1950’s was part of the 86.9 acres. Jessie Wilson, whose name is rendered as Jessie W.Ison on my paper map, was granted 320 acres in crown allotments 46,45A and the southern one seventh of crown allotment 44. One seventh of c/a 44 (169a 1 r. 12 p.) would equate to 24 acres and 30 perches so Jack Harcourt’s 37 acres might have included 13 acres of Jessie Wilson’s c/a 45A land to the south.

Thus it will be necessary to consult 1950’s ratebooks (unavailable on microfiche) to establish exactly how big Albert Coleman’s orchard was. It could have been 86.9 minus 37, or minus 24, giving either 50 acres or 62.9 acres.

by itellya on 2015-01-01 19:03:47

IN REGARD TO MY PREVIOUS COMMENT.
1. I apologise for it being entirely in bold type. Hopefully this is rectified in this comment.
2. The queer morphing of apostrophes and quotation marks (into a with an accent) seems to relate to copy and paste of word documents which I need to use because of my shocking internet connection. Hopefully I will be able to overcome this problem by retyping the punctuation. We'll see if apostophes post here.
3. The later (paper)Bittern parish map shows the southern boundaries of 44A and 44 only about six sevenths of the way to the actual southern boundary of crown allotment 44, which is also shown.
4. An inspection of Melway reveals that Jack Harcourt's 114 Coolart Rd would have been on the 86.9 acre c/a 44 (number 112 also.) Therefore Albert Coleman's orchard would seem to have consisted of 50 acres.

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