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THACKTHWAITE Surname

Journal by Susan2000

According to "Patronymica Britannica: A Dictionary of the Family Names of the United Kingdom" (p. 345) by Mark Antony Lower (published in London, England in 1860 by John Russell Smith of 36 Soho Square), "thwaite" is a Saxon word whose meaning is somewhat disputed, but which is generally understood to mean an area that has been cleared of forest. Surnames ending in this word originated in northwestern England, specifically in the counties of Cumberland, Westmoreland and North Lancashire. There is a village named Thackthwaite in the old county of Cumberland, which borders Scotland. The ancient county became part of Cumbria in 1974. It is reasonable to suppose that families with the surname THACKTHWAITE originated in the general region of that village or at least in old Cumberland County.

Surnames: THACKTHWAITE
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by Susan2000 Profile | Research | Contact | Subscribe | Block this user
on 2016-08-26 17:19:09

Susan2000 has been a Family Tree Circles member since Aug 2016.

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Comments

by Richardcastle on 2016-10-03 15:19:34

Hi there.
A very interesting name hence my response, you also mention the Great Lower who started a more general interest in names but a lot of his explanations must be treated with great care.

The surname will most likely a habitation name from the village you mention , but there would have been many local places so called that were in the old area controlled by the Norse People (Vikings)- the Danelaw as it was called n Alfred's time.


Thack is Northern Middle English from Old Norse we now say Thatch. Whaite is Northern English from Old Norse for a meadow. So Thackwaite is a place where reds grew. A Thacker is a Thatcher in those parts.


Ref. The Survey Gazetteer of the British Isles John Bartholomew 1950
The Oxford Names Companion 2002
Surnames by Weekly 2nd Ed. 1917

by Susan2000 on 2016-10-03 18:01:48

Thank you VERY much for this information. It is much appreciated. It is difficult to learn anything about this family!

by Richardcastle on 2016-10-18 16:42:52

You are welcome, what are you trying to find out?

The name is not common only 149 records from 1767 to the 1911 census. Mostly in the London area. This makes tracing the family quite easy. It seems no Thackwaite ever made it to the States which is also uncommon. Surnanes lost to England are often common there.

I have time on my hands, being retired and getting less mobile. I am interested in Family History in a broad sense and also the origin of place names. I also photograph graveyards for the Gravestone Photographic Project (www.gravestonephotos.com) Non of our volunteers have come across a Thackwaite grave yet.

I have access to Ancestry.com but find Familysearch.com more useful as a general research tool.

If you want some more help email me on dkass5@tiscali.co.uk.

by Susan2000 on 2016-10-28 04:33:20

I am so sorry for taking so long to respond. We were traveling abroad and I didn't have my laptop with me. I will copy this message to your email address. Thanks for providing that! And THANK YOU very, very much for offering to invest some of your valuable time to assist me!!

I am researching the family of John Thackthwaite, who died in late 1795 or early 1796 in Iver, Buckinghamshire, England. He and his wife Martha (d. 1811 in Iver) had two daughters: Mary (1757 and 1839) and my ancestress, MARTHA THACKTHWAITE(b 1767 in Iver, d. 1818 in Iver). This Martha married JOHN BIGGS (1768-1817) of Iver.

It is quite obvious that John Thackthwaite and his father (probably also named John according to a will of John the younger's aunt) are related to the London family, but I have not been able to work out the relationships.

Thank you in advance for any assistance you can offer.

by Richardcastle on 2016-10-28 16:38:28

No problem. We have a connection, I am having problems with a direct ancestor on my fathers side who is said to have been born in that County in the mid C18th at a time when most of the family were in Huntingdonshire and where he spent his life.

It will be fun to see what can be done with the Thackwaite's such a lovely name should be looked into.

All the best Richard Castle

by Susan2000 on 2016-10-28 18:30:56

THANK YOU, RICHARD!!! You are so kind! And yes, I like the name, too, even though it takes a while to train the tongue to say it :-)

Is there anything I can help you with regarding your ancestor in Buckinghamshire?

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