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Clark's - Scotch-Irish -John and Patience Mitton Clark and Relatives with Surnames Carey, Ponder, Morris, Rayl, Riley, Reiley, Conwell, Wright and McNeal

John and Patience Mitton Clark were born near Broadkiln 100 in Sussex county Delaware in the years 1774, and 1781 respectively.They were married in 1801 and resided in Sussex County Delaware until 1803. Patience Mitton was a daughter of William Mitton. William Mitton married a daughter of the John Ponder family. John Ponder was a revolutionary war soldier. In 1803 John and Patience traveled from Delaware with 17 other families to Ohio settling near Circleville, Ohio. They lived north of Circleville until 1830. Then they moved to Marion township just south of Marion, Ohio. They had 17 children of which 13 survived to adulthood. Their daughters married men with the surnames Conwell, Wright, Riley, Reiley, Anderson, Sharp and O Day. John and Patience are both buried in Phillip Dreyer Cemetery near Marion, Ohio. They died in 1861 and 1862 during the Civil War. According to legend the Clark's traveled from Scotland/Ireland to Virginia in the early 1630's and while in Virginia worked as indentured servants for 7 years. At a later unknown date they traveled to the State of Delaware. John F. Clark's fathers name was John. His father's name was William and his father was John. A picture of Phillip Dreyer Cemetery in its restored condition is included with this information. Two veterans of the War of 1812; three veterans of the Civil War and one veteran of the Spanish American War are buried in the cemetery. One small tombstone, an infant daughter of Robert M. Clark and Delilah Biggerstaff Clark has the following inscription, "While this you see remember me lest I should be forgotten." Her tiny pure white tombstone buried in the earth and in the darkness of the woods for over one hundred years, stands again in the sunlight. This small cemetery is located south of Marion, Ohio. It is the oldest public pioneer and veterans cemetery in Marion township. It took five years to gain access to it and five years to fully restore it. A nature preserve with nature trails is being created in the wooded area behind the cemetery grounds. Visitors will be able to enjoy the beauty and peace of the woods and enjoy the sight of the wildlife in the area. White swans nest every year on a nearby pond.

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