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THE EARLY ROADS TO SYDNEY FROM MELBOURNE,VIC., AUST.

Hay Lonie operated his dairying on a farm owned by James Hearn,15 B Will Will Rook, which fronted Pascoe Vale Rd, so how is it that when the farm was placed on sale in 1868,it was described as being on the old Sydney road?

EXCERPTS FROM THE HAY LONIE JOURNAL.(Only parts of the text have been corrected.)
TUESDAf, MARCH iiHi} esend. Agricultural inil Grazing Fjrni, ATill ff ill Rook, fronting the Old Sydney road ,Between Broadmeadows and Campbellfield 305 Acres Tlrat-elosa Land In tho Trust Estafo ofltho late Mr James Hearn.
M3 ROBERT BYRNE** ia favoured with Instruc. tiona to SELL bj AUCTION, ut his rooina, 2S Collins street east, on Tjesda}, March 24, at twelveo clock noon precise!}, {
That well known dairy and agricultural farm, adjoining Campbellfield, being Allotment B of Section 15 parish of Will Will Rook, containing 305.5 acres lately occupied by H Lonie, Esq.
(P.2, Argus, 16-3-1868.)



*The original Sydney Rd passed the Young Queen Inn at Melway 16 H9,near Bass St,turning left at 6 G9, veering right onto Johnstone (sic) St at 6 C8 (to avoid the creek) and left into Raleigh St, turning right again up the Ardlie St hill and then it was follow your nose (Mickleham Rd)to Wallan. The road is still called Old Sydney Rd north of Donnybrook Rd. This roundabout and very hilly route was necessary because of the Sydney road track being extremely boggy in wet weather. Later Pascoe Vale Road was made to the line of Somerton Rd, which was made toward Sydney Rd between Thorngrove and Cameron's Stony Fields/Roxburgh Park,with travellers possibly veering north east through the middle of the township where the Cliffords and Kernans were pioneers (Cliffords Rd.) Another route was along High St or Plenty Rd which also joined the Sydney road (and the road to the McIvor Diggings) near Wallan. When the direct route was made, the Young Queen and Broadmeadows Township went into limbo and a new Young Queen was built at Coburg.(Melway touring map 510 A10.)
SOURCES: BROADMEADOWS :A FORGOTTEN HISTORY,A.Lemon; BETWEEN TWO CREEKS (Coburg),R.Broome.

6 comment(s), latest 5 months, 4 weeks ago

HAY LONIE, OF PRESTON, CAMPBELLFIELD, TULLAMARINE, BULLA AND KILMORE, VIC., AUST. (and Peter Young.)

I will never forget the first time I saw Hay Lonie's name in a Broadmeadows Shire ratebook. I was having trouble deciphering some of the words because of terrible handwriting, sometimes taking five minutes to establish what a particular letter might be. "What sort of name is Hay?" I thought. It was not until nearly a year later, when I found his name in the Bulla shire ratebook re the assessment for Lochton, that I was reassured that he indeed had the same name as the area's principal crop.

I have included details (obituary, location etc. re Pasture Hill, Camp Hill and Lochton) about Hay in my journal 1888 GEOGRAPHY WITH THE MELBOURNE HUNT and having found the location of his Kilmore property, I decided that a separate journal might allow me to include that and other information I might discover.

TROVE SEARCH-"HAY LONIE, MILK".
Mr' Norman Bowers' Valleyfield estate was one of the very earliest settled farms in Kilmore district. It
is about four miles north-west of the town, with extensive frontages to Pyalong road, which runs through
the property. Some eighty years ago the original place was farmed, and later the home, which was right on
the roadway, was used as a hotel Harvest Home, the proprietor being Mr A. Downs. For a period the spot was a favorite locale for Kilmore picnics, which were numerous about 65 years ago. The property was added to considerably, and subsequently became an extensive dairy farm, conducted by the late Mr Hay Lonie.
About 250 cows were milked on the premises morning and evening, all by hand, and Mr Lonie himself despatched a waggon load of milk by the first train,' at 7 a.m., from Kilmore East, and again in the evening, six days a
week for Melbourne, and also a consignment on Sunday evenings, each trip meaning six miles from and to his farm. After Mr Lonie's death,the Valleyfield property changed hands, and Mr S. Bowers became owner.
(Present & Past WOOL v. MILK Kilmore Free Press (Kilmore, Vic. : 1870 - 1954) Thursday 24 October 1935 p 4. )

Golden Vein.
On Wednesday Messrs. Osborn and Hudson conducted a clearing out sale on account of Mr. J. H. McIvor at the Golden Vein estate in Moranding, when a large number of sheep, cattle, horses, plant, hay,furniture, and sundries came under the hammer to a big attendance of buyers and onlookers. A good clearance was effected at satisfactory prices.

In the late sixties and early seventies the Golden Vein property of 869 acres was owned by Mr.Laurence Bourke, M.L.A., and about 1872 the holding became the property of Mr. Hay Lonie, of Tullarmarine (sic), and from whom it was rented by Mr James McLeod at 5/- per acre. Fifty-seven cows were milked twice daily, giving an average of two and a half gallons, one gallon of milk making one pound of cheese.

Mr. McLeod introduced the Cheddar system into the district. (Details.....).

During Mr.Bourke's ownership, the Golden Vein was in a slovenly and untidy condition, owing to the fact that Mr.Bourke had to be absent a good deal on Parliamentary business, and the men he employed were careless and
slovenly, and the fences broken down and left there, because the men would not repair them. On the expiry of Mr. McLeod's lease, .Mr.Lonie went on to the farm and worked it for many years; principally in dairying. After Mr. Lonie's death the property was purchased by Mr.R. Fennelly,and leased to Mr.I W. Mclvor, who carried on a high class Ayrshire stud herd for some years. (etc.)
( Golden Vein.Kilmore Free Press (Kilmore, Vic. : 1870 - 1954) Thursday 16 January 1936 p 2 Article.)

This must be the article mentioned in his obituary (which debunked rumours that Hay had committed suicide.)

Mr Hay Lonie, well known in this district, has been missing since Wednesday, 14th instant. On the evening of that date he left Mr Grace's, South Melbourne, and since that time nothing has been heard of his movements. Much sympathy is felt for Mrs Lonie and family, whose state of anxiety can well be imagined. [Since writing above we learn with much regret that the remains were found in Melbourne yesterday, but up to the present we
have not been able to find further particulars than those conveyed in the following from the Herald of
yesterday :-"About 7 o'clock this morning a boy named William Bell, went to Constable T. Martin, who was on duty on Prince's Bridge, and informed him that the body of a man was floating in the River Yarra a short distance east of the bridge. Martin went to the spot indicated, recovered the body, and conveyed it to the City Morgue. The death has been reported to Dr Youl, and an inquest will be held, probably to-morrow." The remains
will be interred in the Kilmore Cemetery this (Thursday) evening.]
(P.3, Kilmore Free Press, 22-12-1892.)

HAY LONIE, PETER YOUNG SEARCH ON TROVE. (EH?)
The reason for this search will be explained later.

1884.October 23- The sudden death of Miss Barbara, oldest daughter of Mr Hay Lonie,and a most amiable girl, took place on 19th instant aged 19 years.
(Early Kilmore. PART LXI.
Kilmore Free Press (Kilmore, Vic. : 1870 - 1954) Thursday 10 June 1915 Edition: MORNING. p 1 Article.)

Not much else turned up except that Hay seems to have been awarded a government contact for the supply of milk while he was milking all those cows on Pasture Hill at Campbellfield.
(THE GAZETTE, P.6,Argus,8-12-1866.)

Let's try PETER YOUNG,KILMORE.
Oh dear,let's try JOHN THOMAS SMITH AND HIS ELECTORS on google.

No wonder, the above search did not produce clear results; I had the right area but the wrong town!

A website headed FREDERICK XAVIER TO ARTHUR ZOUCH has the following information.
The Melbourne Times of 23-4-1842 recorded that Peter Young had been granted a publican's licence for the "Bushman" in Sydney Road.The Port Phillip of 21-4-1843 shows that the hotel, once again described as being on Sydney Road was now called the Sugar Loaf Inn. The same paper, on 27-4-1844,stated that Peter had been granted his licence but the hotel was again called the Bushman.
(An alphabetical listing of squatters and their runs, from correspondence with the Governor, which is a different website, lists Peter Young of the Sugar Loaf Run.) Given Peter's purchase of land in Seymour at the first sales, his conducting the first sales in the township and the fact that Sugarloaf Creek intersects the Hume Highway in Seymour, it is reasonable to assume that the hotel was at Seymour and not in modern-day Carlton, Brunswick (or Plenty, Pascoeville near the Young Queen Inn, or Tullamarine near the Lady of the Lake- routes more likely to be called Sydney Road in the 1840's.)
Rev. Peter Gunn, who became the minister at Campbellfield's historic Scots Church (Melway 7 H6), had visited the Golburn (River?) area and Peter was among a large number who signed a letter of encouragement and contributed 50 pounds to support his ministry; another signatory was from Sunday Creek, which joins Sugarloaf Creek.(Port Phillip Herald 1-10-1844.)

Peter Young and Elizabeth christened John William in 1843.
Peter Young purchased allotments at the first sale of blocks at Seymour. (Melbourne Weekly Courier 23-3-1844.)
Peter Young was one of 469 voters who qualified by freehold in Seymour in the list of electors in the District of Bourke (Melbourne Courier 8-8-1845.)Peter Young was listed in the (1847?) Port Phillip directory as a settler, Seymour, Sydney Rd.

The website also lists newspaper reports showing that Peter Young was given depasturing licences in July 1843 and October 1844 in the Westernport District.Ah hah, I thought, perhaps Peter had been on Clyde Farm, Westernport before he went to Bulla. Then I remembered my search for a grant (or licence) that Captain Adams of Rosebud was supposed to have been given in about 1841. All such matters were dealt with in Sydney and the Public Records office gave me an index of correspondence. As Peninsula pioneers were referred to as late as 1888 in "Victoria and Its Metropolis" as being in the Westernport District, I concentrated on those entries.

Imagine my surprise to find Barker's Mt Alexander Run (near Castlemaine) described as being in the Westernport District! In view of what has been mentioned before, Peter Young's depasturing licences were almost certainly near Seymour.

Still none the wiser,about when Peter left Nairn, I returned to Trove and tried "Nairn, Bulla, Young, 1850-1867".
Argus 18-4-1853 page 12. Peter was offering Nairn for sale by private contract. He had probably only been there for about five years but how much he had accomplished! The advertisement describes the property in great detail, including the waterfall.For the sale of his furniture, library, stock, vehicles and so on, Peter employed prominent auctioneer, Dalmahoy Campbell (much discussed by Harry Peck in his "Memoirs of a Stockman.) (See Argus 20-5-1853 page 9.)

Argus 4-6-1853 page 8, column 1. Peter offered an incredible variety of grape vine cuttings for sale.


What does Peter Young have to do with the price of fish?

I have a theory that Peter Young influenced Hay Lonie's move to the Kilmore area and may have even been the land agent who handled the sale of Bourke's "Golden Vein" to Hay. Young would have been familiar with the Kilmore area, from very early days as he would pass through it on the way from Sunday Creek to Melbourne. As we all do,he'd return nostagically to his former haunt and perhaps visit relatives at Kilmore; James Young of Tabilk might have been a son (both having agricultural links with Tasmania.) With the eye of an expert agriculturalist and land agent,Peter may have noted the decrepit state of the "Golden Vein" and its potential as a dairy farm, and told Hay while making a nostalgic visit to Nairn at Bulla.

Hay Lonie's "Lochton" was 5a, Bulla, south of "Airey's" (through which Wildwood Rd zig-zags its way almost down to Deep Creek from the St John's Rd junction and which became part of David Patullo's "Craigbank estate)and Hay would have passed Lochton to reach Nairn, which he may have been leasing to McIntosh at the time, (7b-Melway 384 D-E11 and south half E10, and section 8-between St Johns and Oaklands Rds, 384 F-J, part 9-12.)


HAY LONIE GOOGLE SEARCH.
Born in Cupar, Fife, Scotland on 22 Nov 1842 to Andrew Lonie and Mary Fife. Hay married Jane McGregor and had 4 children. He passed away on 1892 in Melbourne East.
Family Members
Parents: Andrew Lonie 1804-1873; Mary Fife 1809-1877. Spouse(s) Jane McGregor
Children: Barbara Lonie 1865-1884; Mary Fife Lonie 1869-?; Andrew McGregor Lonie 1874-?;
Jean Elizabeth Lonie 1883-?
( Hay Lonie - Profiles and Historical Records - Ancestry.com
records.ancestry.com/Hay_Lonie_records.ashx?pid=48371049‎)

Hay was a brother of Henry Fife Lonie, one of whose children was William Hay Lonie. Good photos of W.H.Lonie and Henry's wife in:
William Hay Lonie - Profiles and Historical Records - Ancestry.com
records.ancestry.com/William_Hay_Lonie_records.ashx?pid=97465717‎

Given Names Hay
Surname / Family Name LONIE
Gender Male
Birth Date 22 NOV 1842
Birth Place Cupar, Fife, Scotland
Death Date 1892
Death Place Melbourne, Victoria, AUSTRALIA


Name at Birth: Hay LONIE
Birth: 22 NOV 1842 - Cupar, Fife, Scotland
Census: 1851 - Cupar, Fife, Scotland
Departure: 1854 - Liverpool, Lancashire, England
Arrival: Aboard the "Black Eagle". 19 OCT 1854 - Melbourne, Victoria, AUSTRALIA
Death: 1892 - Melbourne, Victoria, AUSTRALIA
Gender: Male
(www.familypursuit.com/genealogy/lonie_hay/hay-lonie-b.1842-d.1892-1‎)

TROVE SEARCH FOR HAY LONIE.
As the text in the following item has been corrected, obviously by a family historian, I do not wish to interfere with sales of the book that must be underway. Hay put 313 acres at Kilmore into the name of Henry's wife, Jane (Hay's sister-in-law),to avoid paying tax. The McGregors are mentioned.
(Kilmore Free Press (Kilmore, Vic. : 1870 - 1954) Thursday 11 October 1883 Edition: MORNING. p 3 Article)


OOPSEY!
Henry Lonie's wife was Jemima (nee Hall.) Hay had put the 313 acres into the name of his own wife,Jane (nee McGregor.) Henry obviously leased his farm at Kilmore to his cheese-making in-laws until he moved north.The text has not been corrected so I will post the following.


CORRESPONDENCE.
A CORRECTION.
TO THE EDITOR OF THE KILMORE FREE PRESS
Sir,-In your issue of the 11th inst. you gave a report in re Land Tax case wherein there appears to be a slight error in having used the name of "Henry" instead of "Hay." It should have been "Jane Lonie wife of Hay Lonie" not of "Henry Lonie," and the mistake is attributable to a clerical error for which you are not accountable.-.You will greatly oblige Mr Hay Lonie and myself by kindly giving this publication.
Yours faithfully, ALEX. GRANT.59 Temple Court, Melbourne, 23rd October, 1883.
(P.3,Kilmore Free Press, 25-10-1883.)

Family Notices
Kilmore Free Press (Kilmore, Vic. : 1870 - 1954) Thursday 23 October 1884 Edition: MORNING. p 2 Family Notices
... DEATH. LONIE.-On the 19th instant, suddenly, Barbara, daughter of Mr Hay Lonie, Valley field, aged 19 years.


I THINK I CAN LEAVE ANY OTHER TROVE INFORMATION TO THE TEXT-CORRECTOR TO COMPILE.
The following won't be found online apart from here. It comes from a general rundown on Tullamarine and surrounds circa 1860 on page 11 of my TULLAMARINE BEFORE THE JETPORT (1998.) The source for this excerpt has to be the Broadmeadows rate book of 1863.

Hay Lonie is renting land at Campbellfield with Brunton (possibly the flour miller and later owner of Roxburgh Park.) Not long after,he buys Camp Hill (16 B2) and Lochton (177 C4) to conduct his dairying.

Hay might have had outlets for his milk in Fitzroy and Hotham (North Melbourne.)
J ANTED, a good MILKER and DRIVER Apply Lonie s dalry, opposite Fltzroj Market.(P.1, Argus, 24-10-1867.)

If you think the digitisation above is bad, try this.
I've corrected the relevant bits. (REMEMBER TO SEARCH THORNGROVE)

TUESDAf, MARCH iiHi} esend. Agricultural inil Grazing Fjrni, ATill ff ill Rook, fronting the Old Sydney road *,Between Broadmeadows and Campbellfield 305 Acres Tlrat-elosa Land In tho Trust Estafo ofltho late Mr James Hearn.
M3 ROBERT BYRNE** ia favoured with Instruc. tiona to SELL bj AUCTION, ut his rooina, 2S Collins street east, on Tjesda}, March 24, at twelveo clock noon precise!}, {
That well known dairy and agricultural farm, adjoining Campbellfield, being Allotment B of Section 15 parish of Will Will Rook, containing 305.5 acres lately occupied by H Lonie, Esq.
(P.2, Argus, 16-3-1868.)

*The original Sydney Rd passed the Young Queen Inn at Melway 16 H9,near Bass St,turning left at 6 G9, veering right onto Johnstone (sic) St at 6 C8 (to avoid the creek) and left into Raleigh St, turning right again up the Ardlie St hill and then it was follow your nose (Mickleham Rd)to Wallan. The road is still called Old Sydney Rd north of Donnybrook Rd. This roundabout and very hilly route was necessary because of the Sydney road track being extremely boggy in wet weather. Later Pascoe Vale Road was made to the line of Somerton Rd, which was made toward Sydney Rd between Thorngrove and Cameron's Stony Fields/Roxburgh Park,with travellers possibly veering north east through the middle of the township where the Cliffords and Kernans were pioneers (Cliffords Rd.) Another route was along High St or Plenty Rd which also joined the Sydney road (and the road to the McIvor Diggings) near Wallan. When the direct route was made, the Young Queen and Broadmeadows Township went into limbo and a new Young Queen was built at Coburg.(Melway touring map 510 A10.)
SOURCES: BROADMEADOWS:A FORGOTTEN HISTORY,A.Lemon; BETWEEN TWO CREEKS (Coburg),R.Broome.

**James Hearn owned much land at Mt Martha, as did Robert Byrne.


SALE OF PROPERTY.
Messrs. Campbell and Sons, Kirk's Bazaar, report having sold, on account of Messrs. W. C. Hearn andThomas Wragge, trustees in the estate of the late James Hearn, their farm, situate at Somerton, and known as the Thorngrove Farm, and containing 338 acres. Mr. John Hearn was the purchaser, at a satisfactory price.
(P.5,Argus, 18-2-1892.)

I thought I knew the location of the farm on which Hay Lonie had been dairying prior to the 1868 advertisement. Big Clarke died at Roseneath in Woodland St, the residence of James Hearn, whom Lenore Frost said (in her book about Essendon's historic houses), was his son-in-law. Having done extensive research about the farms on Somerton Rd, I presumed Hay had been on Thorngrove (Melway 179 G-J9-11) but that was 4J of the parish of Yuroke and consisted of 338 acres.

The Will Will Rook map is also available online and it shows the 305 acres 2 roods 22 perches, 15B, Will Will Rook, described in the 1868 advertisement. Like Thorngrove,it had been granted to W.J.T. (Big) Clarke.


Crown allotment 15B, Will Will Rook, is indicated by Melway - I apologise for the delay. Before I could transpose this on my Melway, I had to plot the Yuroke/Will Will Rook boundary on maps 178,179, 6 and 7. As there is no road along the boundary,I had to start at Swain St (198 H12) and continue east through Dench's Lane
178 J-K12)so that my line met Merri Creek at exactly the same place as shown on the parish map,which it did. The parish boundary meets Merri Creek at the point where the Hume Freeway crosses the creek,which is also the north west corner of the Lalor Golf Course. (If you manage to transpose parish and crown allotment boundaries properly, there are always indications that you are right.)

The parish boundary is also the northern boundary of 15B, Will Will Rook. The corner of Berringa Court (6 J1) is at the north east corner and the boundary passes through the Kyabram St/Flynn Crescent corner ending at the top of 7 C2, 40 metres west of the Upfield railway line.

The southern boundary of 15B is Barry Rd,named after the pioneering family that lived on "Glenbarry".
The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1957) Thursday 24 April 1856 p 4 Family Notices
Campbellfield, Mr. William Barry, aged fifty-six years etc.
Garrett Barry married an Angel!


The western boundary of the 305.3875 acres is the original course of Pascoe Vale Rd,just west of the railway and the Barry Rd railway bridge. The eastern boundary is indicated by the line of King St (as it crosses Barry Rd) continued to meet (not quite) the Upfield line; if continued it would meet the western boundary of the Ford land just over the railway line (one of those welcome confirmations of accuracy I was talking about.)

SOMETHING FISHY ABOUT THE HUTCHINS FAMILY OF MORNINGTON, VIC., AUST.

The Royalauto for October, 2013 has an article on page 8 called THE FISH SHED in its feature CURIOUSLY VICTORIAN.
It states that five generations of Hutchins have fished Port Phillip at Mornington since 1860. It's a fair bet that George Hutchins and his wife Harriet were members of the first generation.

IN the SUPREME COURT of the COLONY of VICTORIA: In Its Probate Jurisdiction.-In the Estate of GEORGE HUTCHINS, late of Osborne, in the County of Mornington, in the Colony of Victoria, Fisherman, Deceased, Intestate.-Notice is hereby given, that after the expiration of fourteen days from the publication hereof application will be made to the Supreme Court of the colony of Victoria, in its Probate Jurisdiction, that LETTERS of ADMINISTRATION of the estate of the above-named George Hutchins, deceased, be granted to Harriett Hutchins, of Mornington, in the said colony, the widow of the said deceased.
Dated this 25th day of April, A.D. 1878. WISEWOULD and GIBBS, 61 William-street, Melbourne, proctors for the said Harriett Hutchins. (P.3,Argus, 26-4-1878.)

The Royalauto article has a photo of the shed and Neville Hutchins,61,who with his brother,Dalton,59, still sells their catch from the shed. Their original shop at Fisherman's Beach was obliterated by storms,just one of several setbacks the family faced. The brothers still use an old technique used by such as the Watsons of Portsea and Sorrento, but with a modern advantage. Neville tracks shoals of fish from the headland,directing Dalton's run of nets by walkie-talkie.

It's now some years since I read LIME LAND LEISURE, and ,although I made no note of it, I seem to remember that there was a connection between the Hutchins of Sorrento and Mornington. It is interesting that two fishing families were thanked for their support for the Hutchins of Sorrento. The Watsons were fishing at Portsea by 1862 and Erland Erlandsen commenced fishing near Sorrento after (jumping ship?) in 1879.

WATSON.-Mrs. WATSON, sen., and Family, Sorrento, wish to convey their sincere THANKS to many kind friends for letter, cards,and personal expressions of sympathy during their recent sad loss of son and brother, especially thanking Hutchins Bros, and Mr. Erlandsen and sons. (P.1, Argus, 8-1-1923.)

The Sawyer family was not known to be involved in fishing but the well known fishing families of Prosser and Hutchins were related to it by marriage. Isaac Sawyer married Sarah,the daughter of Henry Prosser, one of the founders of the Frankston Fish Company, and after Isaac's death she remarried to Amis Renouf,a director of the same company.

RENOUF.-On the 15th July, at her daughter's residence, Dromana, Sarah, widow of the late Amice Renouf, Frankston, and dearly beloved mother of Mrs Jonah Griffith (Dromana), Mrs.John Hopcroft (Caulfield), Mrs. I. Sawyer(Neerim South), Mr. H. Sawyer ("Sylvan," Neerim Junction, Gippsland), Mr. J. Sawyer(Moorooduc), Mr. F. Sawyer (Bittern); grand-mother of Mr. Alex Henry and his sister, Mrs.W. Martin (Mt. Eliza), aged 93 years. A colonist of 68 years. (P.13, Argus, 29-7-1916.) See my journal RENOUF ON THE MORNINGTON PENINSULA.

Thus, Sarah Renouf, mother of Fred Sawyer, was the grandmother of John Hutchins' bride, Caroline Sawyer.

Mornington Standard (Frankston, Vic. : 1911 - 1920) Saturday 16 September 1911 p 2 Family Notices Marriage. HUTCHINS-SAWYER.-At St. James' Church, West Melbourne, on the 25th August, by the Ven. Archdecon Hindley, John Hutchins, Mornington, to Caroline third eldest daughter of Mr and Mrs F. Sawyer, " Glenfield," Bittern.

MOSER/ROGERS/MUNDAY MEMORIES OF ROSEBUD, VIC., AUST.

3 comment(s), latest 3 years, 2 months ago

MELBOURNE BRINDLE, FERRIER, LACCO AND McLEAR SAVE ERNIE RUDDUCK'S LIFE, DROMANA, VIC., AUST.

It's not often that I base a new journal on just one incident. There are six people mentioned in this story, an Australia-wide hero in 1905, a renowned wooden boat builder, an un-named Greek fisherman, the son of a circa 1871 Dromana pioneer, a boy who saved a life shortly before leaving for America (1918) and achieving fame and the son of one of the PIONEERING NEIGHBOURS NEAR CARRIGG ST,DROMANA.

The funny thing is that I would never have found this story if I had not been contacted by Shah about her ancestors who arrived in Rosebud in about 1938. Her father had not known Bill Chatfield of Rosebud West to be a fisherman and I told her that Bill's fishing operation was taken over by a Swede,but like Vin Burnham in his memoirs of life in early Rosebud,I couldn't remember his name. (I just remembered that it was Axel Vincent!)

In the hope of finding it,I did a search for "Rosebud, fisherman" on trove.

DRIFTING TOWARDS HEADS

MOTOR BOAT IN DIFFICULTIES.
DROMANA, Saturday.
A strong easterly wind, a choppy sea, A motor engine in need of repair, and a lucky escape were the chief features of an unpleasant experience which befell Mr Ernest Rudduck, a well-known grocer of Dromana, on the Bay last evening. Intending to have the engine repaired at Rosebud Mr Rudduck arranged with an elderly Greek fisherman to tow the boat, but he started from the Dromana pier alone shortly before 6 p.m., presumably
through a misunderstanding. The Greek failed to overtake the boat, and as the wind increased in force, Mr Rudduck was soon in difficulties. A return to Dromana was impossible, and to continue to drift meant increasing the danger of his already perilous position.

Observing Mr Rudduck's plight from the pier, Ewart Brindle, a lad of about 12, rode to Rosebud on a bicycle to seek assistance. A few minute after his arrival William Ferrier and Mitchell Lacco, well-known fishermen, John McLear, grocer, and Brindle were facing the gale in a fishing boat, and being drenched to the skin as the waves dashed over the vessel.

When the motor boat was reached it was drifting rapidly in the direction ofthe Heads, and had the rescue been delayed the incident might have been attended by still more unpleasant effects. The fishing boat, however, towed it safely to the Rosebud jetty, where the little group of watchers congratulated Mr Rudduck on his escape, and warmly commended the rescuers on their skilful handling of the boat in the trying circumstances.

Ferrier and Lacco are noted for their fearlessness at sea. Some years ago when the barque La Bella was wrecked offWarrnambool, and when all others considered it suicidal to attempt a rescue, Ferrier rowed to the scene of the disaster in a dinghy saving three of those on board. For his courage the citizens presented him with a purse of sovereigns.
(P.4,The Ballarat Courier, 24-1-1916.)

THE CHARACTERS.
MELBOURNE BRINDLE.
Ewart Brindle was more likely on the pier to sketch vessels sailing past rather than fishing. It hardly seems to have been a day for fishing. Twenty or so years after leaving Dromana,he produced a fabulous map of Dromana that is a history on its own. This map is available from the Dromana Historical Society. With such fabulous recall,his omission of his heroic deed from his recollections of his days as a schoolboy at Dromana, must have been due to modesty. See my journal THE FAMED MELBOURNE BRINDLE.

FREDERICK VINE (VEAN)THE UN-NAMED GREEK FISHERMAN.
Much information about Fred and his stepdaughter Mary B.Stone (a.k.a. Polly Vine)is given in Peter Wilson's ON THE ROAD TO ROSEBUD. Fred was one of the original grantees in the Rosebud Fishing Village but was associated with Dromana from early days,Vine being one of the original names on the Dromana State School roll in 1873,the Rosebud school opening a decade later. Fred later lived in a hut on the Dromana foreshore,roughly opposite Seacombe St. How would I know this? Melbourne Brindle's map,of course! There is a photo of Mary in Peter's book and one of Fred on page 73 of Colin McLear's A DREAMTIME OF DROMANA.

ERNIE RUDDUCK.
Son of Nelson and Jane Sophia Rudduck, Ernie expanded the family business to Rosebud and when the shop was burnt in a bushfire, he soon replaced it. He leased the shop to Rosebud residents. Nelson was the grantee of two Rosebud Fishing Village blocks and donated one of them for the Methodist Church. Three reminders of the Rudduck family in Dromana are the beautiful two-storey Piawola, on the highway just east of Arthur St, Karadoc St on "Karadoc" (as is also the vacant paddock donated by the family for the Dromana Bush Nursing Hospital) and Ruddock Square on the foreshorejust east of the Pier.

WILLIAM FERRIER.
See my journal WILLIAM FERRIER: AUSTRALIA-WIDE HERO IN 1905. William sailed out to the wreck with his disabled arm strapped to the mast. Despite this error,the article does credit to the journalist.

MITCH LACCO.
I've written a journal about the Laccos. Fort Lacco married a King girl whose sister married a Greek fisherman who probably died after their son, Tony, was born. His mother, Emily, later became Mrs Durham and Tony adopted this surname. Emily later owned Fort's Rosebud Fishing Village block on the east side of Durham Place. Tony's grand daughter was Judith Mavis Cock,better known as Judith Durham of The Seekers. The Laccos are revered as builders of wooden boats and the Rosebud Chamber of Commerce has installed a wooden statue of Mitch Lacco on the Murray-Anderson Rd corner, just across that road from thesite of his boat building premises. Mitchell St may have been named after Mitch.

JOHN MCLEAR.
John McLear married Janet Cairns of Boneo and settled just east of the Dromana Hotel. With Harry Copp and Dohn Griffith,he was one of Dromana's professional fishermen. As he was about 70 at the time of this incident,and died in 1918,it was more likely his son, John (Nip), aged 32, who took part in the rescue. I quote from page 104 of A DREAMTIME OF DROMANA.

John (Nip) lived out his life at his father's home.He was Ern Rudduck's right-hand man in the (Dromana) Jetty Store for forty years or more and roved to him in the local football team.... In earlier days he had fished with his father. At one stage he drove Rudduck's grocery cart around the mountain bringing supplies to customers.

As Ernie Rudduck's wife's family seems to have arrived in Dromana not long before W.W.1, the four heroes probably also ensured the lives of Ernie's three children: Rene (Mrs King)who died at Mt Martha in 1988, Grenfell, a very prominent architect honoured by a plaque near Lake Burley Griffin in Canberra, and Jack, who starred in sport and academics at Wesley College and was the school captain before becoming a pioneer of the great Australian outback. Jack was killed in 1956 while accompanying his sick youngest daughter on a Flying Doctor plane; it crashed in a violent storm and all aboard were killed.(A DREAMTIME OF DROMANA.)

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WILLIAM BAYNE,PIONEER OF RED HILL SOUTH AND SHOREHAM.

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