<< Previous - Next >>

residents of 1800s - CAMBRIDGE New Zealand CALEY - CURRY

Journal by ngairedith

the following short biographies were taken from the site:
CAMBRIDGE MUSEUM

I highly recommend a visit to their excellent site which I have featured a number of times before. Maintained lovingly by a community passionate about recording their history and heritage.

The following categories are available at their link above:

* About Us
* Site Map
* Archaeology
* Archives
* Articles
* Biographies
* Cemeteries
* Decades - 1900s
* Collection
* Districts
* Heritage Walks
* Historic Buildings
* Lodges
* Military
* Newspapers
* Photographs
* Poems
* Rate Payers
* Roads
* School Registers
* Women
* 1913 Strike


THE RESIDENTS
Researched and written by ERIS PARKER

CALEY, Daniel
Dan arrived in New Zealand with his parents in 1859 on the 'Mermaid'. He was 22 years old when he arrived at Kaipaki to break in the land in 1871. He was followed two years later by his parents and the rest of the family. They farmed the 409 acres they called 'Mona Hill' and transformed the land from fern and scrub into rich farmland. In 1875 and 1876 Daniel advertised that he had grazing available on rich clover pasture.
The family supported the Wesleyan faith and were involved with the social life of the district. Dan's sister, Isabella was sought after for her musical talents and in 1883 his brother John was one of the first enrolled at the new Cambridge High School.
In 1886, at the second Waikato Horticulrural Show in Cambridge, Dan was winning prizes for apples and quinces.
The family returned to Auckland and Dan and his brother Robert continued with the farm adding more acres.
Robert married Emily Eliza Sing in August 1899. He had just sold his farm when he died in 1912 leaving three young children. Emily died 1920 and they are both buried at Pukerimu.
Dan remained a bachelor, retired in June 1918 and sold the farm for WWI soldiers settlement. He toured around the world for three years then lived at the National Hotel. He died 22 December 1936 and was privately cremated - his ashes were spread over 'Mona Hill'.

CAMERON, Alexander and Martha
Alex was born in Perthshire in 1854 and brought his working dogs with him to New Zealand in 1875. At first he worked as a shepherd for the Fen Court Estate. He married Martha Vincent (born at Barker's Creek, Australia in 1861) on 3 May 1883 and they had nine children. Ken, Margaret, Colin (died WWI), John (died WWI), Charles, Allan, Mary, Alexander and Sam. They later took up land at Roto-o-rangi.
Alex died 10 June 1930 and Martha 6 October 1939. They are buried at the Cambridge Cemetery at Hautapu

CAMP, James Thomas
In 1873 James had one acre in Cambridge - section 402 - and in 1874 he married Miss Goodman.
James enrolled in the Cambridge Cavalry Volunteers in 1874 and became a member of the Cavalry and Cambridge bands in 1878. He ended his Cavalry days as a Corporal in 1882.
He was a storekeeper in Cambridge and became bankrupt in 1875. He took on hairdressing, then in 1880 sold off his Stationery and Fancy Goods business, plus 400 books from his lending library.
At that time he bought a site at Tamahere and built a 15-bed hotel where he became a storekeeper, hotelier and blacksmith. He also became the pound keeper and took on tailoring. He served on the School Committee and Church Building Committee and ran a very successful sports day.
Then tragedy struck - the hotel burnt down and the Camps lost two of their children - Albert aged 10 and Edward aged 3. Two weeks later they had Charles and Hilda baptised.
They sold up at Tamahere and moved to Auckland where James continued in the tailoring business and his wife became the proprietress of the Waikato Club.

CAMPBELL, James Palmer
James was born in Dunbartonshire, Scotland and came to New Zealand in 1868. He came to Cambridge in 1870 as contractor of supplies to the Armed Constabulary.
James enrolled in the Cambridge Cavalry Volunteers on 12 March 1872 and served until 1875. During this time Timothy Sullivan was murdered and James led a troop which patrolled the district from 9 pm until daylight - encouraging settlers to stand by their farms.
He then went farming at Waihou and returned to Cambridge in 1879.
While in Cambridge James was chairman of the Piako County Council, chairman of the Cambridge Town Board and a member of the local Domain Board. He became a lawyer in 1883 and left for Auckland to establish the practice of Russell and Campbell in 1885.

CAMPBELL, Phillip
Philip was a mariner when he enlisted in the 3rd Waikato Militia in Dunedin on 9 December 1863. The cost of passage to Auckland for his wife and family was £16 and he was refunded £13 3/-. On 10 February 1865 he wrote a letter to the New Zealand Herald with regards to the irregularities of the postal system.
In the Cambridge rates assessment list for 1869-70 Phillip paid 2 pence an acre on 51 acres - totalling eight shillings and sixpence.
The Waikato Times newspaper stated on 2 July 1885 "A few residents of Cambridge met at the Masonic Hotel on Monday night to say goodbye to Mr Phillip Campbell who is leaving the district after a residence of 22 years and to present him with a slight souvenir as a token of their regard. Mr A Clements J.P. presided, and on behalf of the donors presented Mr Campbell with a handsome meerschaum pipe and a gold locket. In the course of his remarks Mr Clements referred to the time when Mr Campbell and himself arrived in Cambridge from Dunedin 22 years ago in the Militia. Looking round he could see only one other old identity, Mr John Arnold, and he regretted they were getting few in number. He would be sorry to miss Mr Campbell and he hoped that he might better himself where he was going. Mr Campbell's health having been drunk with musical honours the meeting separated."

CAPPER, Alfred Edward
Alf was born 16 July 1882 and an auctioneer when he joined the Duke of Cambridge Lodge, 2 July 1907. His father, who had been farming most of his life, came to Cambridge at the beginning of 1907 and he and Alf took out an auctioneering license in April - trading as Capper & Son.
In October 1908 Alf married Rebecca Petersen, daughter of Mrs R Davies.
They had a Land Agency which they sold in 1921 before they moved to Auckland.

CARMICHAEL, William
Bill was born about 1860 and was a storeman when he joined the Duke of Cambridge Lodge 13 January 1885. His wife was Isabella.

CARNACHAN, David and Elizabeth
David, with wife Elizabeth and 5 children, arrived in Cambridge 16 March 1865 to become a substitute soldier in the 3rd Waikato Militia, Regiment Number 1655. Their home was in Queen Street bordered by Brewery and Chapel Streets (Empire and Anzac). Kirkwood Street was known as Carnachan Street and the area below St Peters church on Albert Street was known as Carnachan's Paddock. In the Cambridge rates assessment list for 1869-70 David paid 2 pence an acre on 51 acres - totalling eight shillings and sixpence. He is also noted in 1872 on a farm map drawn by Charles Chitty in a report on the district to the Armed Constabulary Commissioner's Office.
David was a dairyman. Elizabeth was a midwife, who helped many Cambridge children into the world and is listed as a Nurse on the 1893 first electoral roll for women in New Zealand. Their children were Lauderdale Maule, Jeannie, William, David, Fox Maule, James, Robert, John, Martha, Kate, Grace and Blanche. Blanche MBE JP and Robert BEM went on to teach at the Cambridge Primary before leaving Cambridge. Another son William was the head surveyor for the Waihi Gold Company, who surveyed the line from HoraHora to Waikino. The Carnachans lived in Cambridge for 34 years and the land stayed in the family for 72 years.
David died 9 July 1896, age 77 and his obituary of 11 July 1896 in the Waikato Times reads "In our obituary notices will be found the name of David Carnachan, of Cambridge, one of the oldest settlers in that town. He arrived in Auckland in the ship 'Helenslee' at the close of 1864 and the following year he came to Cambridge, where for over thirty years he and his family have resided on the same piece of land at the corner of Chapel Street. He leaves a widow and thirteen children, six daughters and seven sons, but most of them are now settled and away from home. Mr Carnachan formerly belonged to the 79th Cameron Highlanders, known as the Queen's Own, but for about six years previous to his leaving the old country he was drill instructor to volunteer regiments for which on his departure he was presented with a testimonial and a purse of sovereigns. When he first came to the Waikato he joined the Militia. He was an old member of the craft and we learn it is the intention of the Lodge Alpha to follow their brother to his last resting place."
Elizabeth died 18 Nov 1928, age 94.

The family history 'Carnachans of Cambridge' by Colin Carnachan 1995, is in the Cambridge Museum library.

CARPENTER James Henry Moore
Lieutenant Carpenter enlisted in the 3rd Waikato Militia on 27 October 1863.
His one acre section was number 91 in Cambridge East and his farm sections were at Te Kowhai.

CARTER, William H
Bill was born about 1862 and a draper when he joined the Duke of Cambridge Lodge 24 February 1885.

CHAINEY, Edward Henry
Edward was born 15 July 1868 in Christchurch and married Eveleen Dillon in Cambridge on 14 February 1892. His occupation was a farmer. When he joined the Duke of Cambridge Lodge 13 February 1894, he was aged 26 years and his occupation a jeweller. In the Cambridge cemetery there is a headstone inscribed 'Little Doris Chainey 1893 - 1894'. Doris Mary was the six month old daughter of Edward and Eveleen, who died 28 January 1894. Two more daughters were born - Ethel in 1894 and Clarice in 1896. At that time Edward's occupation was a traveller.

CHAMBERS, Joseph
Joe was born in Baliboro, Co Caven, Ireland and in 1867 he enlisted with the 85th Regiment Light Infantry. He served in India from 1878 until he was discharged in October 1880. He came to New Zealand in 1881 and was aged 34 years in January 1883, when he married Emma (daughter of Joseph and Elizabeth Keeley). They had eight children - Lil, Mary, Emma, Joseph, Jessie, Robert, Elsie and Fred.
Joseph was a gardener and his special hobby was chrysanthemums.
He died 25 June 1928, Emma 25 July 1939 and they are both buried in the Leamington Cemetery.

CHITHAM, Horatio Fred Knight
Fred was born about 1841 in New Zealand . He enlisted in the 3rd Waikato Militia as a substitute soldier, Private 1671, on 10 October 1865 in Cambridge and his occupation was a storekeeper.
When he was proposed for the Duke of Cambridge Lodge on 14 July 1867 his occupation was a farmer. Then on 8 March 1871 he was a bushman when acquitted in the Cambridge Court on the charge of stealing shingles from Pukekura bush.

CHITTY, Charles and Mary Susan
At the age of 29, Charles Chitty joined the Loyal Duke of Cambridge Lodge on 21 March 1874. Charles and 'Minnie' were married in 1874 at Alexandra after Charles had joined the Commissariat Transport Corps at Auckland in 1863. As a Sergeant, he was placed on the strength of the 3rd Waikato Militia and served through the Waikato and Taranaki Wars of 1865/66 under Generals Cameron and Chute. At the end of the war he returned to his regiment at Cambridge and in 1868 joined the Armed Constabulary as a sergeant of the mounted troopers. He served as First Class Mounted Sergeant till 1881 and was a Sergeant Major during the Parihaka Maori disturbance in Taranaki in 1882. On his return to the Waikato he was transferred to the Justice Department, eventually leaving the Government service having completed nearly 21 years.
Minnie, who was born in Birmingham, arrived in Auckland in 1864 and came to Cambridge as a young bride in 1874.
Charles and Minnie lived on the rise above the Waikato River in Shakespeare Street and they took up farming, flax milling and raised two children. Minnie also taught the piano and played the organ at the Anglican church while Charles was a long standing lay reader.
Charles died in 1915, and Minnie in 1936.

CHRYSTAL, Andrew
Andrew enlisted in the 3rd Waikato Militia No 1374 in Dunedin 28 December 1863. He was a tailor by trade and had been born in Forfar Scotland.
In the Cambridge rates assessment list for 1869-70 Andrew paid 2 pence an acre on 51 acres - totalling eight shillings and sixpence.

CHURCHILL, Thomas
Thomas enlisted in the 3rd Waikato Militia No 737 in Dunedin, on 7 October 1863. He was a tailor by trade and had been born about 1838 in England.
In the Cambridge rates assessment list for 1869-70 Tom paid 2 pence an acre on 51 acres - totalling eight shillings and sixpence.

CLARE, William

Captain William Clare married Jessie Mackintosh in Bombay about 1847 and they had three children. Their daughter Jessie married John Roberts, and sons William and Lewes died 1884 and 1887 respectively.
William enlisted in the 3rd Waikato Militia on 16 October 1863 and rose to the rank of Major. He then became Sub Inspector of the Armed Constabulary and a Government agent who consolidated scripts and Borough land through the Land Courts for the Government. In the Cambridge rates assessment list for 1869-70 William paid 2 pence an acre on 41 acres - totalling six shillings and nine pence and after serving with the Armed Constabulary in Taranaki he made Cambridge his home.
In the 1870s he was a Cambridge Cemetery Trustee, a Justice of the Peace, chairman of the Presbyterian Church committee and first president of the Cambridge Band. He was twice elected Chairman of the Cambridge Town Board and chairman of the building committee for the Public Hall.
William died 10 December 1878 aged 64 and was buried at the Cambridge cemetery at Hautapu. About three hundred people attended his funeral.
At the annual meeting of the Town Board they reported "We feel the most appropriate subject our report can open with, is that of calling your recollection to the great gap made in our small circle of local public men, by the demise of our late chairman, Major Clare. He was a thorough Cambridge man, of great ability and untiring energy, both of which he devoted to the development of his adopted town. His loss at our Board has been most severely felt that we are only echoing the sentiments of the ratepayers generally, when we say that in losing our late Chairman, the Town Board has lost one of her oldest and most able citizens."
On 21 September 1879 William's mother-in-law Jessie Mackintosh died and left from the Clare's residence to also be buried in the family plot at the Cambridge cemetery.

CLARE, William Mackintosh
William was the son of William and Jessie, born 4 September 1851. He was a surveyor while in Cambridge and a member of the Orange Lodge. He joined the Cambridge Cavalry Volunteers in 1872 and served until 1874. He died 2 November 1884 and is buried in the Cambridge Cemetery at Hautapu.

CLARK, Alfred Richard
Alfred was born 14 June 1877 the son of George and Elizabeth nee Garlick. He joined the Duke of Cambridge Lodge 29 November 1898 aged 20 years - his occupation a storekeeper. At the turn of the century he joined his father's firm G E Clark & Sons Ltd and lived in Hamilton . He married Blanche Keys in Otago 10 September 1912. She had been teacher at 'Rangiruru' - a private school in Cambridge, and they had four children.

CLARK, Charles
Charles was born 31 March 1872 and joined the Duke of Cambridge Lodge 7 September 1897 aged 25 years, his occupation a groom. In March 1900 he married Alice Beatrice Layne.

CLARK George and Elizabeth
George Edward Clark was born in Cambridgeshire in 1840 and came to New Zealand in the ship 'Jumna' in 1864. He married Elizabeth Victoria Garlick in Auckland in 1867 then came to Cambridge and bought 300 acres at Pukeroro. In the Cambridge rates assessment list for 1869-70 George paid 2 pence an acre on 350 acres - totalling £2 18/4d.
Eight children were born and 600 acres accumulated.
In 1871 George was elected chairman of the Cambridge Road Board and later served on the Cambridge Borough Council and Waikato County Council.
In 1880 he started business as a Commission Agent in Cambridge and shortly after was joined by Joseph Gane. By 1894 George had sold his farming interests and was trading as Geo E Clark - three sons and a son-in-law later joined the firm which changed its name to G E Clark & Sons.
Their family included William Edward, Annie Elizabeth (Gane), Harry Herbert, Florence Matilda (Gane), George Allan, Alfred Richard, Edwin Wilfred, Alice Maude (Cox).
George in retirement became 'father of the Cambridge Bowling Club' and its Patron. He died in 1935 aged 94, his wife Elizabeth having predeceased him by 22 years.

CLEMENTS, Archibald
Within 24 hours of arriving in Auckland Arch had joined the Commissariat Transport Corps of the Militia and was engaged in transporting rations and supplies to Ngaruawahia and Te Rore. He was instructed in 1864 to go to Cambridge to issue rations to the 3rd Waikato Militia. "I rode into Cambridge from Te Rore on a mule, in 1864," he said in an interview in February 1923.
Archibald (Regiment Number 1645) and his brother, William (Number 1679) joined the 3rd Waikato Militia in 1864 where Arch was in charge of the Military canteen stationed at the Cambridge wharf for some time.
He established the Masonic hotel in 1866 and joined the Alpha Lodge the same year.
William died in 1873 and was buried at the Cambridge Cemetery at Hautapu.
In the Cambridge rates assessment list for 1869-70 Arch paid 2 pence an acre on 102 acres - totalling 17 shillings. He is also noted in 1872 on a farm map drawn by Charles Chitty in a report on the district to the Armed Constabulary Commissioner's Office.
Arch then spent 28 years in Cambridge becoming a general storekeeper and merchant, and serving towards the general improvement and development of the town.
He helped petition for the Catholic Church in Cambridge and in 1877 became a Justice of the Peace - serving in the local Court for over 20 years.
He built another hotel in Cambridge West in 1880 and cut up his acre in Duke Street forming closer subdivisions for more businesses. He married Frances Sarah nee Rose in 1880 and they had one daughter Anna Marie. He was a member of the first Road Board, the first chairman of the Cambridge Town Board, Borough Councillor in 1886 and Mayor in 1888.
For twenty years he farmed 250 acres on the town border called 'Clements Park' (Kelly Road was his driveway). In 1891 he retired to Auckland and became a House, Land, Financial & General Commission Agent in Queen Street. They lived in 5 Hobson Park Road, Parnell.
Sarah died 28 June 1914 and Archibald 21 September 1927 age 91. They are both buried in the Cambridge Cemetery at Hautapu.

CLEMENTS, William
William was born about 1840 in Rosscomon, Ireland. He enlisted in the 3rd Waikato Militia No 1081 on 14 December 1863 in Dunedin, and his occupation was given as a draper.
He was aged 25 years and his occupation was a Hotel Keeper when he joined the Duke of Cambridge Lodge on 1 July 1867.
William died 3 July 1873 and is buried at the Cambridge Cemetery at Hautapu.

CLEWS James Edward
Jim was born 25 August 1871 and a baker when he joined the Duke of Cambridge Lodge, 9 July 1889.

COGAN, Francis
Frank was 25 years old when he enrolled with the 3rd Waikato Militia on 17 November 1863 in Nelson. He was Private 784, born in Ireland and a labourer. He received his one acre section number 505 in Cambridge West and his 50 acre farm at Pukerimu. He is listed on the Aquitance Roll of 1868 held at National Archives in Wellington
His death is recorded in the Southern Cross newspaper as having drowned at Cambridge 20 February 1869.

COLLINS, Charles
Charles was born about 1839 in Rogate, Sussex. He enlisted in the 3rd Waikato Militia as Private 1590, on 16 September 1864 in Cambridge, and his occupation is shown as a carpenter.
On 13 June 1870 when he joined the Duke of Cambridge Lodge he was aged 29 and a constable in the Armed Constabulary.
He joined the Armed Constabulary and served as Watch House Keeper from 1870 to 1873. In 1882 he took medical charge from Dr Waddington and in 1884 was Acting Hospital Sergeant.

COLLINS, James
James was born about 1844 in West Sussex. He enlisted in the 3rd Waikato Militia as Private 424 on 6 October 1863 in Hobarton Australia. His occupation a baker.
He was promoted to Sergeant 10 November 1864.
In December 1865 James was a charter member of the Lodge Alpha-Waikato, No. 449 I.C., Cambridge. On 13 June 1870 when he joined the Duke of Cambridge Lodge he was aged 26 and a constable in the Armed Constabulary.
On 22 February 1871 he married Mary Lockley in Cambridge.

COLLINS, William Godfrey
Bill was born about 1840 in Dublin, Ireland. He enlisted in the 3rd Waikato Militia as Private 773, on 30 October 1863 in Dunedin, giving his occupation as a clerk.
He married Julia Lock in 1864 and she became a maternity nurse in Cambridge. They had eight children.
He was aged 27 years when he joined the Duke of Cambridge Lodge on 28 May 1867 and his occupation was a settler. On 3 February 1870 he enlisted as a constable - 1156 in the Armed Constabulary. He had a sallow complexion, light brown hair, grey eyes, was 5' 10½" tall and single (sic). Religion was Episcopalian and his previous service was shown as in the 3rd Waikato Militia. He enlisted for a second term on 15 March 1872 and was dismissed 29 July 1873.
In December 1912 his obituary in the Waikato Independent reads "Another link with Cambridge's earliest days was snapped on Sunday, when Mr Godfrey Collins passed peacefully away at his residence in Weld Street, aged 73. He was one of the original settlers in the town, and few of his old time associates survive him. Born in Dublin, studied in Ireland for Medical Profession but, being of a roving disposition was attracted to Australian gold fields. Joined 3rd Waikato Militia in Melbourne and arrived in Cambridge 1863 his regiment being attached to the Imperial Transport Corps under General Cameron. When the troop was disbanded he stayed on and before the railway was a guide from Waikato to the Hot Lakes."
He and Julia are buried at the Cambridge Cemetery at Hautapu.

COLWILL, John Pearce
John was born in Trenagloss, Cornwall about 1854 and married Mary Elizabeth nee Prout on 17 January 1874, in Launceston England.
In 1880 John was a ploughman at Pukerimu with a freehold property in Cambridge West. He was a drainer when he joined the Duke of Cambridge Lodge on 27 December 1881, and a labourer when son Charlie was born 3 March 1882. He was a ploughman in 1884 at Pukerimu and when he injured his hand in March 1888.
A daughter, Louie, was born 17 October 1888 and John's occupation was then given as a cordial manufacturer.
Two more sons, William and Edwin Colwill are in a Cambridge West school photo taken in 1883.

COMRIE, John
John took advantage of buying up soldier settlers' farms and by December 1866 had amalgamated 1500 acres at Pukerimu, calling his holding 'Wai Valley'. He cropped this land in wheat and later sold to William Reynolds. He is also noted in 1872 on a farm map drawn by Charles Chitty in a report on the district to the Armed Constabulary Commissioner's Office.
He left the district about 1877. His wife later married a Mr Baker.

CONDER, Joseph
Joe was born 13 May 1883 at Mangere, the son of Joseph and Fanny nee Andrews. He came to Cambridge in 1902 and was a labourer when he joined the Duke of Cambridge Lodge on 29 January 1907. (Over 52 years he went through all the offices twice.)

Joe married Catherine Hardy (daughter of James and Elizabeth Quinn) in January 1915 when he was working for T F Richards the grocer. They had a house built on the corner of Victoria and Williams Streets. Subsequent work was running his own business carrying coal for SPND and caretaker of the Town Hall. Joe took an interest in the Band, Volunteer Fire Brigade, the Orphans Club and Bowls. The family moved to Tauranga in 1950 where Joe died in 1959. Catherine returned to Cambridge in 1979 and died 16 May 1986. They are buried at the Cambridge Cemetery at Hautapu.

CONNOR, John Ernest
Ernie was born in Hamilton, 4 January 1884, the son of Robert and Mary Ann. As a 16 year old boy he worked on the Roto-o-rangi Estate. Later in life he recalled that the barracks on Redoubt Hill were shifted to the homestead and used as stock sheds. He remembered that geese, swans and ducks were plentiful and regular shooting parties were organised around the lake at Roto-o-rangi.
The permanent staff were two ploughmen, two stockmen, two fencers, two drainers and himself as cowboy. The manager W G Park, kept a special room for tramps and Ernie remembered them being well educated and good company.
Ernie was a labourer when he joined the Duke of Cambridge Lodge on 16 January 1906. He then did contracting work on the East Coast and served overseas in World War One with the NZ Tunnellers. He took part in ameteur theatricals, was a bandsman and keen footballer.
He returned to Cambridge and worked as a driver for SPND until his retirement.
Ernie and Ellen Maud Sherman nee Burns married in 1925. Ellen died in 1932 and Ernie married Nellie Chard nee Cole and became stepfather to seven children. Ernie died 20 July 1961 and was buried in the RSA section of the Cambridge cemetery at Hautapu.

CONNER Robert
Robert arrived in New Zealand in 1875 and appears as a Cambridge Cavalry Volunteer in May 1879.
He married Mary Ann Proctor in 1881 in Hamilton and they had four children there over the next eight years - William James, Robert Ralph, John Ernest and Benjamin Edward Roy. When the youngest, Benjamin, was still very young Robert left the family.
At the beginning of the 1900s Mary Ann returned to Cambridge from Devonport and advertised as a Midwife and Ladies Nurse.

CONNOR, William James
'Dick' was one of four sons of Robert and Mary Annie Connor, born 6 June 1882 in Hamilton. Annie had been a maternity nurse in Davenport and continued her profession in Cambridge when she arrived about 1905.
Dick was a stockman at Ohaupo when he left for the South African War as Private 2203 with the 6th Contingent. When he returned he joined the Duke of Cambridge Lodge on 13 October 1903. He married Charlotte the daughter of William and Charlotte Krogman in January 1905 and joined the police force in 1906. (He was stabbed while on duty December 1907 in Palmerston North.)
Dick continued in the Police Force and died 1 July 1933 at Matamata and was buried in the Cambridge cemetery. Charlotte died January 1959 in Hastings.

CONSTANCE, Edward
Edward was born in Gloucester about 1834 and enlisted in the 3rd Waikato Militia on Christmas Eve 1863 in Dunedin. His Regiment Number was Private 1230 and occupation an electro-plater.
In the Cambridge rates assessment list for 1869-70 Edward paid 2 pence an acre on 51 acres - totalling eight shillings and sixpence. From 1877 to 1888 he was registered as a bricklayer on the electoral rolls.
He spent six months in the Cambridge Cavalry Band and a further year in the Cambridge Band.

COOMBES, F H
In the Cambridge rates assessment list for 1869-70 Mr Coombes paid 2 pence an acre on 51 acres - totalling eight shillings and sixpence.

COOPER, Charles
Charles was born in Kilcullen, Dublin, Ireland about 1850 and was a labourer when he enrolled in the Armed Constabulary 29 May 1873, No 1960. He had a fresh complexion, brown hair and blue eyes.
In the AC Diary at National Archives Auckland, Charles was digging up ground for a garden in 1875 and in 1877 he was fencing and erecting the gym.
Charles was also an original member of the Cambridge & Waikato Reed Band in May 1877.

COPELAND, John
John was born about 1830 and enrolled as Private No 1693 with the 3rd Waikato Militia on 4 April 1866 as a substitute soldier. His occupation was a carpenter.
From May 1873 he spent 14 months with the Cambridge Cavalry Volunteers and from 1873 until 1904 there is evidence he owned section 51 (now occupied by the Cambridge Bowling Club) in Cambridge East.

COWLEY, Charles
Charles was born about 1865 and a painter when he joined the Duke of Cambridge Lodge on 8 February 1887. His wife was Elizabeth.

COWLEY, Thomas
Tom was born in Warwickshire November 1840 and brought up as a farmer. He married Clara Pope in 1863. They arrived in New Zealand on the 'Alhambra' in 1875 and had eleven children. Tom carried out many carting contracts.
Their farm, on the corner of Kaipaki and Lynds Roads, increased to 202 acres by 1900 and they were milking 30 cows.
Clara died in 1906 and Tom in 1915. They are buried at the Ohaupo Cemetery.

COWLING, John Henry
John was born 27 March 1870 the son of Samuel and Ann nee Kingdon. He joined in the Duke of Cambridge Lodge 7 November 1893 - his wife was Amy, his occupation a farmer.

CRAIG, Charles
Charles was born in Sligo County, Ireland in 1858, where he was educated and apprenticed to a tailor. He arrived in New Zealand 1879 and had a year in the New Zealand Armed Constabulary. Charles set up business as a tailor in Cambridge and married Barbara nee Smart, 26 December 1882. They had a family of four girls and three boys.
He joined the Duke of Cambridge Lodge on 17 June 1884 and was Noble Grand in 1895.
Charles later had a tailor shop in Matamata; he died in Hamilton 10 December 1917, and was buried in Auckland. Barbara died in Auckland 31 January 1936.

CRAIG, David
David was born about 1860 in Sligo Co. Ireland, where he was educated. He arrived in New Zealand in 1879 and learned the tailoring trade at Port Chalmers. He was a tailor when he joined the Duke of Cambridge Lodge, 29 July 1884. He called on his sickness fund at the end of December 1887 when he injured his hand, and received 17/6d for seven days.
He was living in Te Aroha when he married Mary Ann McFarlane on 28 February 1889. They had two daughters and were in Manaia at the beginning of the 20th Century.

CREAMER, Andrew William
Andrew was born 6 April 1869 and he took over the Masonic Hotel from J W Smith in September 1895. His advertisement ran:
'Good Accommodation for Commercial Travellers and Visitors. A First Class Table Kept. Good Stabling in charge of a Reliable Groom'.
He had joined the Duke of Cambridge Lodge 18 July 1895 aged 26 years. His wife, Margaret Jessie was aged 22 years. He served as Noble Grand in 1896 and 1897.

CRICKETT, Robert
Robert was the son of Samuel and Mary nee Whitelaw who had come to Cambridge about 1875. He joined the Cambridge Cavalry Volunteers in November 1876 and served until 1882. He married Mary Cunningham in 1877 and they had nine children. They farmed at Hautapu and Roto-o-Rangi, then retired to Auckland where Robert died in 1934.

CRICKETT, Robert (Roy)
Roy was born 22 July 1883 in Cambridge, the son of Robert and Mary nee Cunningham. He was educated at the Hautapu School and played for the Hautapu Football Club when it was formed in 1903.
He joined the 3rd Company Waikato Mounted Rifles on 6 August 1898 as a farm labourer. Then on 14 April 1902 he sailed on the 'Drayton Grange' for the South Africa War as Corporal 8680 with the 10th contingent.
He rejoined the Waikato Mounted Rifles in 1905 and when World War One broke out, he left for overseas 14 July 1917 with the 28th reinforcements.
On his return Roy, with brothers Leigh and William took over a farm at Overdale Putaruru. He married Mabel Brown in 1926 at Putaruru and he died there 16 October 1956.

CROSIER, Edward
Edward was born in Chuboug, France about 1838 and listed his occupation as a miner when he enlisted in the 3rd Waikato Militia on 25 September 1863 in Dunedin. His Regiment Number was Private 194.
In the Cambridge rates assessment list for 1869-70 Edward paid 2 pence an acre on 51 acres - totalling eight shillings and sixpence.

CROUCH, Charles
Chas was 27 years old and a farmer when he joined the Duke of Cambridge Lodge on 15 April 1876. He was married to Emma.
In 1900 he bought part of the Fencourt Settlement and took up shares in the Cambridge Dairy Co-op. His wife Harriet died 19 February 1900 and in 1901 he married Rose Hannah Holliday who brought three children into the marriage. They had two more children, Mena and May, before Charles died 29 March 1909 aged 65 years.

CRUISE, Peter
Peter was born in Greshal, County Kings, Ireland about 1829 and listed his occupation as a farmer when he enlisted in the 3rd Waikato Militia on 7 December 1863 in Dunedin. His Regiment Number was Private 1028.
In the Cambridge rates assessment list for 1869-70 Peter paid 2 pence an acre on 51 acres - totalling eight shillings and sixpence.

CUBIS, Alfred
Alf was born about 1860 in Australia and arrived in Cambridge 1873. He married Jane Chappell and they had 10 children. Alf was a farmer when he joined the Duke of Cambridge Lodge, 2 November 1886. They later bought 'Kennilworth' boarding house in Chapel (Anzac) Street which they sold in 1920.
Alf died 29 December 1921 and Jane 22 February 1936.

CUBIS, Alfred Bertrum
Bert was born 6 June 1885, the son of Alfred and Jane. He joined the Duke of Cambridge Lodge 20 August 1901. Bert married Ada Lydia and they had six children.
Ada Lydia died 1 December 1922 aged 31 and Bert married a second time to Elsie Florence Wilkins in May 1924. They had two sons, Keith and Barry, and a daughter, Mrs K A Williams. Bert died 15 March 1952; Elsie died in June 1960.

CUDWORTH, Walter
Regiment Number 891.
When he arrived in Papatoetoe and enlisted in the 3rd Waikato Militia Regiment on 2 December 1863, his occupation was a ploughman. When he enlisted in the Armed Constabulary (No 496) on 15 April 1869 at age 35, he stated his occupation as a miner. He had a dark complexion, light brown hair and blue eyes. In the Cambridge rates assessment list for 1869-70 Walter paid 2 pence an acre on 51 acres - totalling eight shillings and sixpence.
He was discharged from the Armed Constabulary on 31 May 1872 and as a widower with two children, married Maria Kingdon in 1876. He died 24 March 1881, a farmer, from the effects of a fall from a ladder and is buried in the Cambridge Cemetery at Hautapu.
Maria then ran a nursing home and later married Charles S Beer.

CUNNINGHAM, William
William was born in Lady Kirk, Aberdeen, Scotland and studied medicine at Edinburgh. He passed his examinations with more than ordinary credit but before taking his diploma he joined a whaling ship as surgeon. On returning to Scotland he caught the gold fever and left for Dunedin New Zealand. William (known as The Doctor) Cunningham enlisted in the 3rd Waikato Militia as Private 542 on 8 October 1863 in Dunedin. He was promoted to Sergeant, 1 April 1864 and became Hospital Sergeant in Cambridge July 1864. 'Doctor' Cunningham settled in Cambridge and for many years was the only medical man in the district.
In 1869, the Common Schools Act was passed making both Cambridge and Pukerimu education districts. William called together a few townspeople and instigated a school for Cambridge.
He was also a member of the Duke of Cambridge Lodge.
A story as related by Robert McVeigh goes like this. "One of the old residents of the 1870's was an old bachelor named Cunningham. On the strength of some medical training he was dubbed 'the doctor'. During the panic epoch, an old couple were roused at midnight by the cry, 'Are you there Mac?'
"'Yes what is it doctor?'
"'They've hung up O'Neill on his verandah!' came the reply, as it sounded to the couple.
"'Oh my God! they've hung him up on his verandah! Which of the O'Neills was it doctor - Paddy or Pat?'
"But the midnight fisherman had got out of earshot. After a weary night discussing this latest horror, the couple found in the morning an eel, hanging from their verandah."
William Cunningham died 16 August 1884.

CUMMING, William
In the Cambridge rates assessment list for 1869-70 Bill paid 2 pence an acre on 51 acres - totalling eight shillings and sixpence.

CURRIE, Henry Burnett
Henry was born 26 October 1868 and joined the Duke of Cambridge Lodge 19 May 1896 aged 27 years his occupation a watchmaker. He was married but his wife was not registered.

CURRY, Edwin
Edwin was born about 1851 and became a baker.
The Waikato Times newspaper records that on the night of 12 December 1882, during the ringing of the last bell before service at St Andrew's church, while the ringers were raising the bells to 'set', Edwin Curry was struck on the head by one of the bells, which had slipped from its wooden cradle. Owen Garland went to his assistance to raise the bell. Then, having relieved Edwin, the bell slipped from his grasp, throwing him from the bell chamber about 10 feet to the floor below, breaking his right arm. Both the injured were taken to Dr Waddington's for treatment.
When Edwin joined the Duke of Cambridge Lodge on 16 December 1884, his wife was Ada.

by ngairedith Profile | Research | Contact | Subscribe | Block this user
on 2011-06-08 17:51:47

PECK of TAITA

Do you know someone who can help? Share this:

Comments

Register or Sign in to comment on this journal.