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residents of 1800s - CAMBRIDGE New Zealand BACH - BYRNE

Journal by ngairedith

the following short biographies were taken from the site:
CAMBRIDGE MUSEUM

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THE RESIDENTS
Researched and written by ERIS PARKER


BACH, Arthur
Arthur was born 11 November 1855 in Shropshire and came to Cambridge in 1878.
Arthur worked as a barman in the Criterion Hotel until 1882 then married Letitia Hilda Hamilton DICKSON. They had one daughter.
After a stint at the Hamilton Royal Hotel (and two years on the Hamilton Borough Council) they returned to Cambridge in 1886 to manage the Criterion Hotel until 1889.
Arthur served on the Borough Council from 1888 to 1898 and was Mayor from 1895 to 1898. He was on the Library, Waikato Hunt Club and School committees and secretary treasurer of the Athletic Club. He joined the Alpha Lodge and the Duke of Cambridge Lodge 2 August 1892.
Arthur then took over the National Hotel until 1899 when they left for Rotorua and subsequently Auckland.

BAGG, George
George was a member of the Cambridge Cavalry Volunteers from 1872 to 1874. Then in the 1887 Appendices to the Journal of the House of Representatives it is noted that he had 1,886 sheep.

BAILEY, John Paton
Jack was born at Pukekura 30 September 1875 the son of George and Isabella nee PATON. With eight siblings he was educated at the Cambridge West school. He enlisted in the Duke of Cambridge Lodge 12 January 1897 aged 20 years, his occupation a labourer. In the 1896 - 99 electoral rolls he was a fellmonger.
By 1907 Jack was married and living in Mangapehi.

BAINBRIDGE, Thomas Herbert Tarn
Tom was born 1 August 1870 and when he joined the Duke of Cambridge Lodge on 28 October 1902 he was a butcher.

BANES, Max
Max was born 30 June 1881 and when he joined the Duke of Cambridge Lodge on 3 February 1903 he was a baker's assistant.

BARKWILL, William Herbert
William was born 31 March 1883 and when he joined the Duke of Cambridge Lodge on 11 November 1902 he was a labourer.

BARNETT, Thos William Arthur
Thos was born 16 September 1872 and joined in the Duke of Cambridge Lodge 9 July 1891 aged 19 years. His occupation was a bushman and in 1893 he was working at Waotu when he called on his sickness fund for three weeks as part of his big toe was cut off.

BARTLETT, Harry
Harry was a member of the Cambridge Cavalry Volunteers from 1874 to 1878 then on the 1879 Electoral Roll he was noted as a Groom. In 1886, when he married Mary Ann Ticklepenny at Tauwhare he was a farm labourer.

BATES, Isaac
Isaac married Martha CARNACHAN in June 1876, in Cambridge.
He was an original member of the Cambridge & Waikato Reed Band in May 1877 and was secretary when he resigned in January 1885.
In 1879 he was a signatory to the incorporation application for the Cambridge Library.
Early Saturday morning, 9 March 1889, a fire started at Isaac's saddlery business. Isaac, his wife and family lived at the rear of the shop and by the time they were woken the fire had a good hold. "The calamity seemed to bewilder Mr Bates, but his wife rushed into the children's bedrooms and pulled them out of bed, gave the baby to the biggest boy, seized hold of the next two youngest and, with one under each arm, drove her brood out into the stockade paddock at the rear, where they were left crying in the now lurid darkness." ( From "Plough of the Pakeha" by Beer and Gascoigne. )
This fire wiped out nineteen buildings on the east side of Duke Street.
Soon after, the Bates family left NZ for Queensland, Australia and went on to have 10 children.

BEERE, Elijah
Elijah was born in Cornwall in 1839 and came to New Zealand on the ship 'Devonshire' in 1863, landing at Auckland. He came to Cambridge three years later joining the 3rd Waikato Militia as a substitute soldier on 16 August 1866.
He married Ellen Kingdon on 14 March 1873 and their children were Ernest, Enos, Jonathan Leonard, Florence Annie and Blanche Felicia.
In the Cambridge rates assessment list for 1869-70 Eli paid 2 pence an acre on 51 acres - totalling eight shillings and sixpence.
In the list of Freeholders of New Zealand in 1882 Eli had 250 acres worth £2,000 and in 1888 he harvested 34 acres of wheat and sent it to the Hally Brothers' mill.
In the Auckand volume of the Cyclopaedia of New Zealand 1902, it records that "Mr Elijah Beere, one of the old settlers in the Waikato, was born in Cornwall, England in 1839 and arrived in Auckland by the ship 'Devonshire' in 1863. He settled in the Cambridge district in 1866 and has now a freehold farm of 250 acres."

BEGG, James Latta
James was born in Scotland about 1859, the son of Hugh and Maria. He became a blacksmith and came to Cambridge about 1881. He joined the Duke of Cambridge Lodge 6 June 1882 and lived in the Oxford North and Lichfield area working for Thomas Gemmill. He became Noble Grand in 1885.
When his health started to fail he came to live in Cambridge. His sickness benefit was very handy as he called on it for an 'inward complaint' in March 1886. In March 1890 he got pleurisy, December 1890 'paralysis of muscles', December 1891 'disease of lungs'. He died aged 39 years. His obituary says, "He was a great comfort to many of his fellow sufferers, being of a cheerful and kindly disposition; he, when the weather permitted used to fill in his time by driving out such of his suffering friends as could stand the journey in his buggy, and in many ways endeared himself to them".
He left a widow, Mary.

BELL, George
George was born in Middlesex and enlisted in the 3rd Waikato Militia on 28 October 1863.
His one acre section was number 60 in Cambridge East and his farm sections were where the trotting training track is today on Hannons Road.

BELL, John
John was born 10 May 1859 in Wellington the son of John Bell and May Ann Bentick nee BUTLER. The family of thirteen children arrived in Leamington about 1870.
John was a sawyer when he married Jane Jones (born about 1861 in Herefordshire) in Cambridge on 7 March 1879. They had thirteen children - Alice, Mary, John, Dora, Florence, George, Caroline, Lucy, Emily, Daisy, William, Charlotte and Hilda.
Jane died 27 June 1922 age 61 years.
John died 6 July 1930 aged 71 years and they are both buried at Pukerimu Cemetery.

BELL Henry
Henry was born 25 January 1864, the son of John Bell and Mary Ann Bentick nee Butler. They arrived in Cambridge 1870 and Henry was a blacksmith, working for Thomas Gemmill, when he joined the Duke of Cambridge Lodge 16 November 1886.
On 1 December 1888 he married Matilda (Tilly) nee Hjorth and they had two daughters and a son.
In 1890 he called on his Sickness Fund with flu for 14 days then in December for 17 days after an 'Injury to his Testicles'. He was Noble Grand in 1895.
In August 1900 Henry branched out in his own Blacksmith shop opposite the Post Office and again he called on his Sickness Fund in 1903 when he was off work for 57 days with an injury to his thumb.
In 1908 Henry was elected to the first Leamington Town Board.

BELL, Joseph Ernest
Joseph was born 12 October 1871 the son of John and Mary Ann Bell of Pukerimu. He joined the Duke of Cambridge Lodge 3 July 1894, his occupation a baker. Two years later he married Millicent Harriet Creamer in Auckland and they had seven children. Joseph and Millie died in Mangere 1943 and 1951 respectively.

BELL, Thomas
Thomas was born 4 October 1863 the son of John and Mary Ann Bell who came to Cambridge about 1870. Thos was married to Annie Louisa nee Brown when he joined the Duke of Cambridge Lodge on 21 June 1892. His occupation a bushman.

BELL, William
William was born 4 July 1862 the son of John and Mary Ann Bell. He married Hannah Bukowsky of Ohaupo in July 1888 and they had fourteen children.
William joined the Duke of Cambridge Lodge on 13 March 1894 and his occupation was a bushman and a farmer.

BELL, William
William was aged 20 and a carter when he joined the Duke of Cambridge Lodge on 19 August 1879. He was not married and called on the sickness benefit in September 1881 for general debility and again in 1884 for Quinsy. He was the Noble Grand in 1883.

BERG, Thomas Anderson
Tom was born 12 April 1870 and a butcher when he joined the Duke of Cambridge Lodge 11 October 1904.

BLACK John Henry
John was born 29 November 1884, the son of John and Fanny Black. He was a carpenter when he joined the Duke of Cambridge Lodge, 6 June 1905.
John Henry married Florence Isabel Ferguson in the Cambridge Presbyterian church 7 March 1911 and they had two daughters.
John died in the influenza epidemic 19 November 1918 at the age of 32 years and is buried in the Cambridge Cemetery at Hautapu.
Florence died 30 October 1974 and is buried in Papakura Cemetery.

BLACK, William James
Bill was the son of James Black and born 6 November 1887.
He was a blacksmith when he joined the Duke of Cambridge Lodge on 15 January 1907. In November 1910 he married Linda McMillan and they farmed at Otorohanga. They had two children.

BLAKE, George
George was an original member of the Cambridge & Waikato Reed Band in May 1877 and in June he appeared in the Armed Constabulary Diary (at New Zealand National Archives - Auckland ) as doing fencing and bush work.

BOLLOND, Bartin Robert
Bartin was a ploughman in the Electoral Rolls of 1896. In April 1900, at age 25 years, he joined the Waikato Mounted Rifles in Cambridge.
He was a contractor at Roto-o-rangi when he enlisted in the South Africa War, Private 843 in the fourth contingent, sailing on the 'Gymeric' in 1900. (His father was T Bollond of Auckland.)
Bartin again joined the Waikato Mounted Rifles in 1903 and later died in Auckland 1946.

BOND, James Shiner
James was the son of Alfred Bond and Sarah nee Shiner born 12 December 1858 in Beaminster, Dorset. He arrived in New Zealand in 1878, came to Cambridge in 1880, and was in charge of the printing department of the 'Waikato Mail' newspaper. The paper closed in 1881 and James started the 'Atlas Printing Company' which also carried lines of books and stationery. He married Sarah Annie O'Connor 1 May 1881 and they had nine children. James' occupation was a printer when he joined the Duke of Cambridge Lodge 5 April 1887.
He was elected to the Cambridge Borough Council in 1887 and served for nine years - being elected Mayor in 1892, 1893 and 1894. In 1895 he started another newspaper the Waikato Advocate which ran for a year. In July 1896 he bought the Waikato Times newspaper in Hamilton merging the papers and making the 'Times' a daily paper.
His wife Sarah Ann died 1902 and on 29 May 1905 James married Ellen Graham and they had three more children. James died 26 November 1922 .

BOOTH, Benjamin Bland
Benjamin Booth was born in Boston, Lincolnshire in 1835, and spent 3 years in America before coming to New Zealand on the ship 'William Miles'. He married Elizabeth Ann and their children were Lucy and George.
He enlisted in the 3rd Waikato Regiment 22 December 1863 (No 1155) and served through the Land Wars, finally settling in Cambridge at the end of the hostilities in 1864. He received one acre in Cambridge East and 50 acres in the Pukerimu survey. In the Cambridge rates assessment list for 1869-70 Ben paid 2 pence an acre on 51 acres - totalling eight shillings and sixpence. They farmed at Hautapu and in 1886 the back road to the cemetery (now Hannons Road) was called Booth's Road.
On the morning of 17 February 1905 Ben died at the Carrington Hospital in Auckland having suffered a stroke three years earlier. His body was brought to Cambridge by the afternoon train and interred in the Cambridge Cemetery at Hautapu.
It is stated in his obituary in the Waikato Independent that, "We regret to have to chronicle the death of Mr B B Booth an old and respected resident of Cambridge, which occurred at Auckland yesterday, at the age of 67 years. The body was brought to Cambridge by the afternoon train and the funeral took place shortly afterwards. Considering the brief notice given the funeral was well attended, quite a number of settlers paying the last tribute of respect to the departed. The Rev J S Gibson officiated at the graveside in an impressive manner. In the next paper "At the Methodist church on Sunday last, the church pulpit was draped in black in memory of the death of Mr Booth, an old member of the church. The Rev S J Gibson referred in touching terms to the life of the deceased gentleman, and trusted that the bereaved ones would seek consolation in their sorrow from God himself. At the conclusion of the service the Dead March in Saul was played, the congregation remaining standing."

BOOTH, George
George became a member of the Cambridge and Waikato Reed Band in 1877, then was a band member of the Cambridge Cavalry Volunteers from 1878 to 1880.
He married Jessie nee French and George turned his hand to butchery. They then became farmers in the Hautapu district. Two of their sons, Ben and George Herbert were killed in World War One. George and another son Francis, are buried at the Cambridge Cemetery.

BOYD, John
In 1878 John, a bachelor and listed as a carpenter, married Sophia nee Heaslip in the St Andrews Church. He was a member of the Cambridge Cavalry Volunteers from 1878 to 1879 and on the Electoral Rolls from 1879 to 1896 he was still listed as a carpenter.

BRADY Alfred
Alfred was born about 1865, and was described as a labourer when he joined the Duke of Cambridge Lodge on 20 November, 1883.

BRATHERTON, Francis
Francis had been born in St Lukes London. He was a watchmaker aged 32 when he enlisted in the 3rd Waikato Militia (No 1371) on 2 January 1864 in Dunedin, New Zealand, and stood 5 feet 7½ inches tall. In the Cambridge rates assessment list for 1869-70 Francis paid 2 pence an acre on 51 acres - totalling eight shillings and sixpence.

BRENNAN, William
William was born in Dublin Ireland where he later served 3 years as a printer's compositor before coming to New Zealand in 1866 by the ship 'King Canute'.
Two years later he joined the Armed Constabulary in Canterbury and moved to Cambridge in 1876. He was an original member of the Cambridge & Waikato Reed Band in May 1877.
He married Jane Smith in the Cambridge Catholic Church on 3 August 1879 and their seven children were all born in Cambridge. Jane was organist for the Catholic Church for ten years and she sang in the choir.
William stayed in Cambridge as the sole Constable when the New Zealand Police Force took over from the Armed Constabulary in 1886. His lot was wide and varied.
On 14 May 1890 Constable Brennan received this letter from the Town Clerk's office

Dear Sir,
I am instructed by the council to request you to at once enforce By-law No 5 in this the Borough of Cambridge. Complaints have been made about parties driving through the borough without lights, and unless this By-law is enforced, some serious and painful accident will in all probability be the result.
I am Yours faithfully
Jas P Thomson
Town Clerk

In 1897 William was transferred to Paeroa on promotion to Sergeant. He retired in 1905 and died 24 February 1909.

BRIDGMAN, William
Willie was born about 1863, and was described as a shepherd when he joined the Duke of Cambridge Lodge, 18 December 1883. In 1884 he was working on the Fen Court Estate and 1887 at Pukekura. In 1890 he called on his sickness benefit having pleurisy for 21 days while working in Napier. In 1903 he was at Hastings and received a further £4 13/4d for 28 days sickness.

BRINDLE, Henry
Henry was born about 1854, the son of Fencible settlers Henry and Mary.
Henry was keen on horse racing and as a farmer had land worth £200 in 1882. He joined the Duke of Cambridge Lodge on 12 August 1884.
In 1901 he had his farm in the Fencourt / French Pass area and bought 20 shares in the Cambridge Dairy Co. By 1917, with his son overseas in World War One, Henry gave up farming.

BRINDLE, Henry Reginald
Henry was born 28 December 1872 and joined in the Duke of Cambridge Lodge 18 July 1893 aged 20 years and occupation a butcher.

BROCKELSBY Ezra
Ezra was born 10 May 1876 son of Joseph and Mary Ann, and attended the Cambridge Primary School until 1889. He joined the Duke of Cambridge Lodge 5 May 1896 aged 19 years, his occupation was a butcher.
In February 1902 he married Grace Emily Forrest - children were Arthur born 1902, Iris born 1904 and Allen born 1906. At the end of 1903 he broke his leg and had about two and a half months off work. In October 1905 Ezra and his brother bought J Law's butchery and sold it to Joseph Keeley in June 1911. Two months later he opened a Livery and Bait Stable in Empire Street. In July 1913 the Waikato Independent advertised that his furniture etc was up for auction.

BROCKELSBY, Robert
Robert was born 16 October 1870, son of Joseph and Mary Ann. He married Ann Watts at the home of J K Pierce in July 1894. He joined the Duke of Cambridge Lodge 30 May 1899 aged 28 years when his occupation was a carter. They left the district about 1910 and Annie died December 1919.

BROCKELSBY, William Henry
Bill was born 22 July 1878, the son of Joseph and Mary Ann. He attended the Cambridge Primary School and when he joined the Duke of Cambridge Lodge on 14 October 1902 he was a carter. At the end of December 1903 he took advantage of his sickness fund with the Lodge as he was off work for 8 days with pleurisy.
On a 1909 Cambridge Election List Bill is listed as a butcher. Then his partnership with B Braun, Butchers, was dissolved in February 1910.
On 1 November 1911 he married Christina Frances Cameron and they honeymooned in the Manawatu district.
Bill sold his Duke Street butchery to Grimes at the beginning of 1914.

BRYLEY (BRIERLEY) Henry William
Henry was born in London of military parents in 1848. As Fencibles they settled at Onehunga and Panmure and in 1853 held a Depasturising Licence at Onehunga. Henry's dad died at Onehunga on 30 March 1890 aged 86 years and mother Catherine died 3 years later.
Henry enrolled in the 3rd Waikato Militia (No 316) on 19 October 1863 at Otahuhu. The nominal roll notes that he "deserted date unknown" but he was granted his land and in the Cambridge rates assessment list for 1869-70 Henry paid 2 pence an acre on 51 acres - totalling eight shillings and sixpence.
In 1899 Henry was 51 years old, a labourer. Slight build, swarthy complexion, prominent hooked nose, brown hair - going bald, moustache and had a beard turning grey. He was 5 foot 4 inches tall, dressed in old dark clothes and a soft brown felt hat. He had 'HB' tattooed on his right arm and a scar on his left cheek. The police picked him up for drunkenness in Te Aroha and he resisted arrest. After 24 hours in the lockup he spent another 7 days at Mt Eden goal.
From then on Henry comes up against the Cambridge and Hamilton Courts 21 times. "Drunk, insufficient lawful means of support, rogue and a vagabond, incorrigible rogue, obscene language, idle and disorderly." In 1911 he is described as having "a fresh complexion, grey hair, blue eyes, hooked nose. A scar on right wrist, left forearm, left check and 2 on left leg."
In September 1912 the Waikato Independent reported "An old grey headed man returns from 3 months in prison requesting to be returned. Constable McNamara tried to persuade him to resist 'the tired feeling' but Brierley went into the cell and lay down".
And so it continued "Idle and disorderly, no visible means of support" until March 1915 when an application was made for Henry to go to the Auckland Asylum. He was diagnosed as having epileptic insanity caused by alcohol. He was described as "an old man in fair condition considering his age" and on admission had one coat, vest, trousers, shirt, drawers, belt, socks, cap and boots. He had no known relatives in New Zealand.
He was not a very good patient "An irritable epileptic who is constantly quarrelling and fighting with other patients." but five years later "Sleep fair, appetite good. Had several fits since last report. [6 monthly] Habits clean, quiet and well behaved but irritable after fit. Clean tidy and no work."
Henry died 8:30am, 8 July 1922.

BRINDLE, Charles
Charles was a member of the Cambridge Cavalry Volunteers from 1879 to 1880. In the 1899 electoral roll he is listed as a contractor and is mentioned in the book 'Plough of the Pakeha' by Beer and Gascoigne as being at Allwill's in 1880.

BROWN, William
In the Cambridge rates assessment list for 1869-70 Bill paid 2 pence an acre on 51 acres - totalling eight shillings and sixpence.

BROWNE, Robert William
Robert was a member of the band in the Cambridge Cavalry Volunteers from May 1879 to November 1880. On the electoral roll he is listed as a settler. In December 1895 fire destroyed his four roomed cottage in Clare Street and Robert escaped with only his clothes. In 1929 a lonely Robert Browne died.

BROWNE, Thomas Henry
Thomas had been in Cambridge 18 months when he married Emma Jane Wright at the Registrar's Office in Hamilton, in June 1876. Emma was born in America; had been in Cambridge 5 years and was aged 21. He was a cabinet maker and his premises were in upper Victoria Street.
Thomas was an original member of the Cambridge & Waikato Reed Band in May 1877.
They had (possibly) nine children when Emma died 18 February 1896. The next year the family moved to Auckland.

BRUCE, Thomas
Thomas arrived in New Zealand from Scotland, with his cousin Rev Thomas Bruce and families, and they all settled in the hills of Taotaoroa, east of Cambridge. Thomas was a member of the Cambridge Cavalry Volunteers from 1873 until 1875. In 1898 a daughter, Mary, married Walter Williams at the residence of D Bruce of Cambridge West.

BRUNSKILL, William Samuel
William and his brother Charles came to New Zealand from Ireland about 1870 and were followed by their brother Henry.
W S Brunskill is reported to have arrived in Cambridge in 1874 (even though his name is on the Chitty map and he is a member of the Cambridge Cavalry Volunteers from 12 March 1872 until March 1873).
In the book 'First Families of Cambridge' by Ruth Wilkinson, William's youngest son John states - "William Brunskill bought a portion of a large tract of land, his part reaching from the Cambridge golf links, known as 'Pah Farm', over to the Maungakawa hills and eastward to Buckland Road - 9,000 acres in all. He was one of the first settlers in the district."
William sold this farm in 1881.
He married Maria Ewen (daughter of Chapman and Eliza) on 8 April 1874 in St Andrews church and they took up farming at Whitehall on a property they called 'Woodford' which he farmed until his death in 1912.
They had a large family with descendants still in the district. Both William and Maria are buried in the Cambridge Cemetery.

BRUNTON, Herbert
Herbert was a veterinary surgeon when he married Mary Ann McKearney on 24 April 1879 in Hamilton. He joined the Cambridge Cavalry Volunteers for the years 1879 and 1880.
Herbert William was born in Cambridge to Herbert and Mary Ann on 25 October 1879. Ten years later on 8 September 1889, Mabel is born at Waipukurau.

BUCHOLZ, Ernest Louis
In the Cambridge rates assessment list for 1869-70 Mr Bucholz paid 2 pence an acre on 2,000 acres - totalling £160 13/4d. He had a General Store in Duke Street, Cambridge until 1872.

BUCHANAN, William
William was born in Scotland about 1829 and was a surveyor when he enlisted in the 3rd Waikato Militia in Dunedin on 7 December 1863. His Regiment Number was 1021 and although the nominal roll says he was promoted to Corporal, he only received a 50 acre farm grant and 1 acre in Cambridge East.
In the Cambridge rates assessment list for 1869-70 Bill paid 2 pence an acre on 51 acres - totalling eight shillings and sixpence.

BUCKLAND, Harry
Harry was born about 1852 and was a cook when he joined the Duke of Cambridge Lodge, 18 July 1882. He was Noble Grand in 1886 - the same year he called on his sickness fund for rheumatics.
In 1884 he became a member of the Cambridge and Waikato Reed Band. His wife was Eliza.

BUCKLAND, William Thorne
W T Buckland leased land from Wiremu Tamehana at Taotaoroa, Karapiro, Fencourt and Tirau - known collectively as 'Bucklands Run'. Subsequently he bought the land through the Land Courts, as well as 50 acre lots from disillusioned soldier settlers, with the idea of developing it as a profitable sheep and cattle enterprise. The Taotaoroa land, which he bought through the Courts in 1866, made him the first private purchaser of farm land in Cambridge. In the Cambridge rates assessment list for 1869-70 William paid 2 pence an acre on 4478 acres - totalling £37 6/4d. He is also noted in 1872 on a farm map drawn by Charles Chitty in a report on the district to the Armed Constabulary Commissioner's Office.
He had learnt the Maori language and their ways and was known as 'Te Pukerau' because of his strong and undaunting pioneering spirit. He died 18 January 1876.
His son William Francis Buckland became a very progressive Cambridge mayor 1898-1902 and 1905-1910.

BURBRIDGE, William Henry
Henry was born about 1835 and put his occupation as a tailor when he enlisted in the 3rd Waikato Militia, 27 September 1863, in Dunedin. His Regiment Number was Private 200 but he was promoted to Sergeant on Christmas Day the same year.
Henry was a bushman aged 32 years, when he enrolled as an original member of the Duke of Cambridge Lodge on the 17 June 1867. By 1872 he was the longest serving member and that year was elected Noble Grand.
He also joined the Cambridge Cavalry Volunteers in 1872 and served until March 1875.
In 1884/85 in the funeral register of the Duke of Cambridge Lodge, his single status changed to married and in 1887/88 Esther Annie was recorded as his wife. In 1897/98 his marital status again changed to widower and the record shows his wife Sarah Ann died in September 1891.
In the Lodge Minute books for 21 July 1891 W H Burbridge writes to the Lodge enclosing the death certificate for his wife Eliza Burbridge and a Minute says that the funeral money was to be paid. (What a tangled web.)
In the sickness register William Henry claims £2 in 1874 for two weeks off with apoplectic fits. Another £3 in 1877 for three weeks off with the same complaint. In 1886 £4 for four weeks with concussion of spine.
1889 - £1 15/- for 14 days with bronchitis. September 1894 - £2 for 14 days with a thorn in his wrist and again in December £5 for 35 days with the same complaint.
1896 - £3 for 21 days with a bad leg and in 1897 - £3 for 18 days with a crushed thigh. After this (aged about 62) his occupation changed to a labourer.
On 7 August 1914 The Argus newspaper records this obituary "An old and respected identity of Cambridge passed away on Wednesday evening in the person of William Henry Burbridge aged 80 years. He was once of the old militia, an Oddfellow and for many years a member of the Salvation Army."
At the monthly meeting at the Lodge Rooms on Tuesday 18 August 1914, the Minutes record that "The Noble Grand [Bro J Conder] said that once again death had been busy amongst us and had removed our oldest member P.G. W H Burbridge and he would ask all the Brethren to be upstanding and pass a vote of condolence. Carried in Silence."
From 1867 to 1914 he had paid £6 1/- into his funeral account and at the Hautapu cemetery the Trustees of the Duke of Cambridge Lodge erected a headstone for William Henry. The hand on the top of the monument is holding a broken chain.

BURNS, Andrew
Lieutenant Burns enlisted in the 3rd Waikato Militia on 26 October 1863. His one acre section was 18 in Cambridge West ( Leamington ) and his farm section number 23 in Karamea.

BURT, Henry Robert
Henry was born about 1845 and was a Native Interpreter when he joined the Duke of Cambridge Lodge, 20 July 1880. His wife was Margaret.
In 1887 Henry is listed in the Electoral Roll as a Native Agent.

BUSH, Robert Smelt
Robert was born in Jubbulpore, Bengal on 24 April 1843, the son of Colonel James Tobin Bush and Rose Cordelia nee McQuhae. He arrived in New Zealand in 1863 and became Subaltern in the 3rd Waikato Militia Regiment in September 1863. He was Ensign when he was substituted by James Hume on 28 April 1866.
His one acre section was 458 in Cambridge East and his farm section was North of Bluenose (on the Waipa River.).
He joined the Native Department in 1870 as private secretary to Sir Donald McLean until 1872. He married Eliza Faulkner on 3 April 1872. He was the Native Agent at Ngaruawahia and Raglan in 1873, Magistrate in Raglan 1880, Magistrate in Opotiki 1888, Magistrate at Tauranga for Bay of Plenty until 1893, Magistrate in Auckland until 1898 and Magistrate and Mining Warden at Thames until 1907.
Robert died in Woy Woy, New South Wales, Australia on 8 January 1932.

BUTLER, John
John was born about 1839 in Brighton Sussex . He enlisted in the 3rd Waikato Militia as Private 1221 on 3 January 1864 in Auckland, giving his occupation as a mariner.
He joined Duke of Cambridge Lodge June 1868, age 28, as a settler and was erased in March 1870.

BUTTLE, Henry
Henry was the third son of the Rev George Buttle and was born at the Waipa Wesleyan Mission Station in 1848. He was educated at Woodhouse Grove School near Leeds, his father having taken the family to England on his retirement from missionary work. The Buttles returned to New Zealand in 1862, Henry farming at Pukerimu from about 1865 to 1882. When they left there, the Wesleyan Church in Cambridge expressed regret at his leaving after an official connection of upwards of 14 years. For ten years he was Master of the Summer School for Deaf Mutes, his wife being Matron. In 1903 he transferred to the Home for the Defectives at Nelson, where he was in charge for eleven years, retiring to live at Sumner. He died in 1937 at the age of 89. Mrs Buttle predeceased him in 1931.

BUTTLE, Robert Newman
One of the earliest pioneer settlers of the Pukerimu district, Robert was the son of the Rev George Buttle, an early missionary of the Methodist church in New Zealand and a brother of Henry. He came to Cambridge district about 1865, later going to Mexico for a time. He afterwards returned to the Waikato where he died in 1913.

BUXTON Thomas John
Tom was born 6 December 1869 and a barman when he joined the Duke of Cambridge Lodge 14 May 1889.

BYRNE, John
Jack was born 19 September 1876 at Ashburton and came to Cambridge in 1893. He joined the Duke of Cambridge Lodge on 16 September 1902. He had a cycle shop in Empire Street then went into partnership with R W McVeagh as tinsmith-plumbers. (Both partners were involved with amateur theatre in Cambridge.)
Jack married Florrie Krogman and they had a family of four children. One son Martin was killed in the airforce in WW2 in 1942. One daughter Norma married Dick Shaw and he also died in WW2. Eric (who won a Life Honorary Membership to the Cambridge Volunteer Fire Brigade) married Winifred Thompson, and Mona married James Mortimer.
Jack died in September 1943 and Florrie (who ran the catering at the saleyards for 35 years) died in June 1963. They are both buried at the Cambridge Cemetery at Hautapu.
Norma Shaw nee Byrne recalled in an interview in 1986 that :- 'she was born in a house in Leamington and at the age of two she and the family moved to her grandfather's [Krogman] property in Princes Street.'
'The house was famous as the first house in Cambridge to have a coal range. It was an Orion and my mother kept it gleaming - it was such a prized possession.'
On the one and a half acre section, Norma's family ran two cows, the odd pig for bacon and a huge vege garden and orchard. They used to give away untold fruit and sold the milk from the cows.

by ngairedith Profile | Research | Contact | Subscribe | Block this user
on 2011-06-08 17:51:11

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