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residents of 1800s - CAMBRIDGE New Zealand VINCENT - YOUNG

Journal by ngairedith

the following short biographies were taken from the site:
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THE RESIDENTS
Researched and written by ERIS PARKER

VINCENT, George
George was born 22 August 1872 and joined the Duke of Cambridge Lodge on 15 September 1891 aged 19 years. His occupation was a painter.

VOSPER, William
'Dingley Dell' was originally the headquarters for Every Maclean's Maungatautari operations. After purchasing this block in 1874 Maclean bought up Military sections and established 'Dingley Dell' in 1877. The name came from a popular Dickens novel and was given by Maclean.
William Vosper arrived in New Zealand in 1873 and joined the Macleans at 'Bleakhouse' in Auckland. After managing their farm at Pakuranga he moved to Cambridge as manager of 'Dingley Dell'. Ultimately he was able to purchase the land and then add more titles.
In 1885 William married Grace Roberts and they raised a family of eight children - Francis Samuel, George Harold, Freda, Jessie, Elsie, Maud, Allan (died as a young lad in 1905) and Gordon who married Helen Crowther.
The house is the third on the property. The first cottage belonging to William Vosper was burnt in May 1884 while he attended a church service in Cambridge.
The second, a large villa-styled home, was burnt the night of the Hunt Ball in the winter of 1926. The present house was constructed of roughcast concrete by Speight Pearce Nicoll & Davys along the typical lines of architect James T Douce.
Sport has played a big part in the Vosper family and 'Dingley Dell' has seen a rifle range, dog trials and polo. At one time there was a separate room which housed a marble king-size billiard table.
Polo came to Cambridge in the early 1900's with Charles Meredith being the secretary for over twenty years.
The polo club has had many homes - the trotting club, 'Rodmor', 'Bardowie' and 'Dingley Dell' pre-Second World War. The club recommenced in 1947 and the Vosper's front paddock was their practice grounds until 1964 when they moved to Vogel Street in town.

WALKER, Edward Barnes
Edward was born 29 June 1827 in Tasmania Australia and married Alice Brown in 1858. They had 10 children.
In partnership with Thomas Douglas he farmed the (Moanatuatua) Monavale Estate, employing many men in his draining operations.
On the Cambridge rates assessment list for 1869-70 Edward paid 2 pence an acre on 512 acres - totalling 4 5/4d. He is also noted in 1872 on a farm map drawn by Charles Chitty in a report on the district to the Armed Constabulary Commissioner's Office.
He was enrolled in the Cambridge Cavalry Volunteers from 1872 until 1875, and was a member of the Wesleyan Trust in 1867. Showed Shorthorns at the first Cambridge Show in 1877, was chairman of the first Jockey Club in 1878 and a member of the first Domain Board in 1880. He married for a second time to Alice Handley and they had a son. Edward died in Auckland on 8 February 1898 and is buried in the Cambridge Cemetery at Hautapu.

WALKER, Henry
Henry was aged 24 years and constable with the Armed Constabulary when he joined the Duke of Cambridge Lodge on 24 June 1871. In August 1883 he was a Sergeant and enlisted with the Constabulary for a fresh term.

WALLACE, Archibald and Janet
Arch was born 27 September 1840 in Uddingstone, Scotland the son of Archibald and Janet nee Muir. The family arrived in New Zealand on the sailing ship 'Duchess of Argyle' in 1842 and became early settlers of Tamaki West.
Arch married Janet Thomson (daughter of David and Janet nee Graham) 24 May 1864 at Otahuhu.
They had a family of seven children - Jessie, Margaret, William, Marion, Agnes, Robert and Archibald and settled in Cambridge about 1870. They farmed 'Glenside' at Pukerimu and in 1880 had 175 sheep. In 1888 they sent 40 acres of wheat to Hallys' Mill. Arch was connected with most of the local bodies at different times. He was a versatile farmer taking on work from threshing to castration.
Janet died of tuberculosis 21 December 1880. Arch married Alice Jane Chappell in 1898 and they retired on six acres in Cambridge. In 1910 he sold his farm in two titles.
Arch died 12 June 1918 and he was buried in Otira Cemetery, Papatoetoe. Alice moved to Auckland and died July 1927.

WALLIS, Edmond Chas
Joseph and Ellen Wallis arrived in New Zealand in 1874. They settled near Feilding and Ted, one of seven children, was born there 30 August 1884. They moved to Cambridge in 1898 and farmed at Karapiro.
In 1905 Ted was a Trooper in the Waikato Mounted Rifles and he joined the Duke of Cambridge Lodge on 30 July 1907.
On 8 May 1912 he married Ethel Marion, youngest daughter of Joseph Weightman, in the Cambridge Presbyterian Church and they had three sons.
Ted died 16 November 1957, Ethel September 1980 and they are both buried in the Cambridge Cemetery at Hautapu.

WALTER, Arthur
Arthur was born about 1868 and a farmer when he joined the Duke of Cambridge Lodge 28 December 1886. He married Annie, daughter of Hugh and Agnes Fitzgerald, in May 1893 and she died 8 March 1894.

WALTER, Edward
Edward was born about 1866 and a farmer when he joined the Duke of Cambridge Lodge 1 November 1887. He suffered from sciatica in 1890, peritonitis in 1897, an inflammation in 1898 and bronchitis in 1902.
His wife was Louisa nee King and she died in 1910.

WALTER, Ernest John
Ernie was born 23 February 1871 and joined in the Duke of Cambridge Lodge 29 August 1893 aged 27 years. His occupation was a labourer. On the electoral rolls 1893 - 1896 he is listed as a waggoner, living at HoraHora.

WALTON, Arthur
Arthur was born in Sydney, New South Wales, Australia about 1846 and enlisted in the 3rd Waikato Militia 12 October 1863 in Auckland, NZ. His Regiment Number was Private 451 and occupation was a labourer.
On the Cambridge rates assessment list for 1869-70 he paid 2 pence an acre on 51 acres - totalling eight shillings and sixpence.

WARD, Robert
Bob was born in Norfolk about 1838 and enlisted in the 3rd Waikato Militia as a substitute soldier 26 July 1866 here in Cambridge. His Regiment Number was Private 1720 and occupation was a storekeeper.
On 15 July 1867 Bob was proposed for the Duke of Cambridge Lodge when his occupation was a draper/grocer and he was aged 31 years.
On the Cambridge rates assessment list for 1869-70 he paid 2 pence an acre on 102 acres - totalling seventeen shillings.

WATSON, Robert
Robert enrolled in the Cambridge Cavalry Volunteers in 1872 and served until May 1878. In August of 1877 he married Mary Jane O'Neill and at that time he had been a farmer at Pukerimu for 5 years.

WATT, George
George was born in Aberdeen, Scotland about 1844 and sailed to Lyttleton in the 'Blue Jacket' 1866.
He came to Cambridge about 1871 and took up farming. He enrolled as a trooper in the Cambridge Cavalry Volunteers in November 1872 and served until 1880.
He returned to Christchurch 1873 and married Elizabeth Clark McCandlish. They raised 11 children. Two of their daughters, Grace and Margaret, died after nursing throughout the flu epidemic in 1918.
George became involved with all aspects of the dairy industry even to the extent of operating a Dairy Factory from 1889 in conjunction with James Hally. He was a first class cheese maker, and they killed about 5000 pigs annually for their Waikato Bacon Company. The Dairy Factory was bought by the Cambridge Co-op Dairy Co Ltd in 1901 (now Fonterra).
George became an Elder of the Presbyterian Church in 1879, a member of the Cambridge Road Board and the Waikato Farmers' Club.
He died 10 May 1918 and Elizabeth 13 June 1931. They are both buried at the Cambridge Cemetery, Hautapu.

WEBB, James Thomas
Jim was aged 22 years and a constable with the Armed Constabulary when he joined the Duke of Cambridge Lodge on 13 May 1871. In June 1877 he is mentioned in the Armed Constabulary Diary at the National Archives in Auckland as 'mortering posts'.
In August 1877 he became a member of the Cambridge & Waikato Reed Band.

WEBB, Thomas
Tom was born in Wiltshire England about 1805 and enlisted in the 3rd Waikato Militia as a substitute soldier 16 December 1865 in Cambridge, NZ. His Regiment Number was Private 1676 and occupation was a farmer.
On the Cambridge rates assessment list for 1869-70 he paid 2 pence an acre on 51 acres - totalling eight shillings and sixpence. He is also noted in 1872 on a farm map drawn by Charles Chitty in a report on the district to the Armed Constabulary Commissioner's Office.
A son, John Webb, had married Ann Sewell in 1860 and after coming to Cambridge his occupation was shown as a bushman/gum digger. Their son Seth married Mary Wilson in 1891 and was apprenticed to Gemmell the blacksmith.

WEBBER, James
James was aged 30 years and a blacksmith when he joined the Duke of Cambridge Lodge on 16 May 1874. He had married Eliza nee Wagstaff in Howick in 1870 and they went on to have eleven children.
On 16 May 1877 James was at the inaugural meeting of the Cambridge & Waikato Reed Band. In 1878 he was also in the band of the Cambridge Cavalry Volunteers and continued his musical pursuits in becoming a Bell Ringer at St Andrews Church of England.
His blacksmith shop was in Victoria Street where the family also lived. James was on the Cambridge Borough council from 1887 to 1891 when he became Mayor. He was also on the Cambridge School committee and Cambridge Cemetery committee.
Eliza died in May 1895 a month after giving birth to a premature little daughter.
James married again the next year and died in 1905 from blood poisoning. They are both buried at the Cambridge Cemetery at Hautapu.

WEBBER, James Edward
Jim was born 10 August 1884 the son of Harry and Mary nee Rhodes and was educated at the Cambridge Primary. He was a storeman when he joined the Duke of Cambridge Lodge 17 February 1903. He was the conductor of the St Andrew's bells, a member of the town band and Volunteer Fire Brigade. He also played rugby, cricket and hockey and participated in drama productions.
He took advantage of his Lodge sickness benefit in September 1904 when he injured his leg - 1 13s 4d. Then in December 1904 and March 1905 he had a further 23 days with anemia.
After a long and painful illness Jim died 23 November 1908. The St Andrew's bell tolled as the funeral procession marched to the Cambridge Cemetery at Hautapu.

WELLS, Thomas
Thomas Wells was born in May 1842 in London and came to New Zealand in 1863. He served with the Naval Brigade and was present at the storming of Rangiriri where he was wounded.
Thos built up his business in Thames and Mercer before coming to Cambridge in 1878 and buying the General Store from James Hally. His store in Duke Street was a trading post for butter made by farmers' wives. He enlarged his premises to both sides of Duke Street and his travelling salesmen covered a large area.
He was Chairman of the Cambridge Domain Board 1880-1905; Chairman of the Cambridge Town Board 1882; member of the Borough Council 1901-1903 and 1905-1907; Mayor for two terms 1903-1905, and a keen bowler. He was one of the originators of the Waikato Horticultural Society and Cambridge Chrysanthemum Show.
He was a St Andrew's Church Warden, vestry man and member of the Diocesan Synod.
Thomas married Jeanie nee Hosking, formerly Astley, who shared an interest in flowers and helped with the large garden at 'Oakleigh' in Empire Street.
Thomas died 28 April 1910 and Memorial Gates were erected in his honour at the entrance of the Cambridge Domain a year later.

WESTERN, Harold Edgar
Harold was born about 1865 and a farmer when he joined the Duke of Cambridge Lodge, 1 November 1887.

WHEATCROFT, David
David was born about 1834 in Lancashire. He enlisted as a substitute soldier - Private 1723 - in the 3rd Waikato Militia on 31 July 1866 in Cambridge, his occupation a storekeeper.
He was aged 32 years and a draper/grocer when he was one of the first to join the Duke of Cambridge Lodge on 28 May 1867.

WHEATLEY, William
Bill was born 30 March 1884 and a labourer when he joined the Duke of Cambridge Lodge on 4 August 1903. On 7 August 1905 he married Ellen Jane Mayne in Cambridge.

WHITE, John Paton
Jack was born 13 May 1882 the son of William and Anna nee Paton and was educated at the Leamington School.
He followed his father's vocation and was a carpenter when he joined the Duke of Cambridge Lodge 1 October 1901. He married Maggie Third in 1907 and they had two sons.
In 1917 they moved to Matamata where Jack died in June 1966.

WHITE, William
Bill was aged 19 years and a labourer when he joined the Duke of Cambridge Lodge on 19 March 1876. He was erased a year later but joined again in April 1884 having married in Howick to Anna Paton on 23 September 1878. They had six children and lived in Cambridge West (Leamington). Bill was Noble Grand on four occasions from 1884 to 1894.
In 1908 (when Bill was the chairman of the first Leamington Town Board) he and his son William James built the Lodge hall in Empire Street. William Jnr joined the Lodge in 1901 and was Noble Grand in 1909 and 1925.

WHITE, William James
Bill was born 15 June 1880 the first son of William and Anna nee Paton. From 1900 to 1903 he was a member of the Waikato Mounted Rifles and joined the Duke of Cambridge Lodge 16 April 1901. He was Noble Grand in 1909 and 1925. He was the chairman of the Leamington Town Board from 1914 to 1920 and was a carpenter with his father in Cambridge until he took up farming in Tauranga with his wife and family in 1926.
Bill had married Sarah Emily Dodd in 1903 and they had four children. Sarah received The King's Medal for social work.
The family returned to Cambridge and Bill took up bowls, and was chairman of the Cambridge Domain Board and the St John Ambulance Association when he died in May 1953.
Sarah died November 1957 and they are both buried in the Leamington Cemetery.

WHITEHOUSE, Alfred Henry
Alfred became a member of the Cambridge and Waikato Reed Band in May 1877. He became a trooper in the Cambridge Cavalry Volunteers in 1879 and served until it disbanded in 1882. His occupation was a shoemaker.

WILKINSON, John Henry
John was born in Middlewick, Cheshire and he enlisted in the 3rd Waikato Militia on 30 December 1863. His Regiment Number was Corporal 1417 and occupation was a watchmaker.
On completion of his medical training at Guy's Hospital, London (which he never practised) and on receipt of a legacy from an aunt, he went on a world tour. He had just landed in Auckland from the sailing ship 'Queen' from Sydney on 30 December 1863, when he enlisted in the 3rd Waikato Militia in response to a call for volunteers. He fought in engagements around the Waikato and was promoted to Corporal on 18 May 1864. At the end of the hostilities he was granted land where he remained as an armed settler for some years.
Then family business called and, on the death of his mother, he returned to England to take over his inheritance, the Rockingham Chinaworks.
(From 'First Families' by Ruth Wilkinson - sponsored by Mrs Margaret Burgin).

WILKINSON, Walter
Walter was born 11 December 1883 and when he joined the Duke of Cambridge Lodge on 8 November 1904, he was a painter. The next year he was in arrears.

WILLIAMS, Edward
Edward was born in Bangor, Wales about 1835 and he enlisted in the 3rd Waikato Militia on 26 November 1863 in Dunedin, NZ. His Regiment Number was Private 960 and occupation was a baker.
On the Cambridge rates assessment list for 1869-70 he paid 2 pence an acre on 51 acres - totalling eight shillings and sixpence.

WILLIAMSON, David
David was born 11 October 1876 and was a farmer when he joined the Duke of Cambridge Lodge 12 November 1901. In June 1907 he married Martha Alice - daughter of Alfred and Jane Cubis. They lived in Cambridge for some years then moved to Auckland. They had two sons.
David died 13 November 1948 and Martha 4 August 1969 - they are buried in the Cambridge Cemetery at Hautapu.

WILLIAMSON, John
John was born in Preston Lancashire about 1836 and enlisted in the 3rd Waikato Militia 28 November 1863 in Dunedin. His Regiment Number was Private 1015 and occupation was a sawyer.
On the Cambridge rates assessment list for 1869-70 he paid 2 pence an acre on 51 acres - totalling eight shillings and sixpence.

WILSON, Henry
Ensign Wilson received his one acre town section number 64 in Cambridge West (Leamington) and his farm at Ohaupo. He was substituted by Samuel Steele on 19 February 1866.

WILSON, John
John Wilson was born 15 January 1830 in Kilmarnock, Scotland, the son of James and Annie nee Love, and he arrived in New Zealand in 1840. He had three sisters and four brothers.
John came to Cambridge with the 3rd Waikato Militia in 1864 and, as a Major, received 400 farm acres and 2 town acres. He is also noted in 1872 on a farm map drawn by Charles Chitty in a report on the district to the Armed Constabulary Commissioner's Office.
On 27 February 1872 he came into possession of two acres (lots 35 and 36) in Wilson Street. Lots 37 and 39 were obtained in 1879. At first a house with adobe and limestone walls was built. Then a villa, 'Waterside' was built overlooking the Waikato River.
The gardens around the home were highly cultivated with flowers and ornamental shrubs. There was a flower strewn drive from the homestead to the stables and everywhere there were violets and other flowers. An orchard, nut trees and exotics were all planted and in 1880-81 a very ornate conservatory was built. (This can still be seen on the corner of Victoria Road and King Street.)
John acted for the Government in purchasing large tracts of lands. He was a founding member of the Waikato Farmers' Club in 1875 and donated the trees in upper Victoria Street. His name was on the Incorporation Certificate for the Cambridge Public Library in 1879 and he was a Justice of the Peace at the Cambridge Magistrate's Court from 1879 to 1889.
As a large land-holder he suffered considerably in the 1880-1890 slump.
He married (for a second time) in 1877 to Te Aorere, a daughter of a Ngati-Haua chief Waimapuni and Inuaka. They raised 6 children at 'Waterside' but Te Aorere died 8 March 1883 aged 30.
Chief Judge Macdonald, who presided at the Native Land Court in Cambridge, paid a high tribute from the Bench to the character of Te Aorere, testifying to her important services in the past towards the pacification of the country. He then adjourned the court as a mark of respect to her memory. For three days nearly all the shops in Cambridge were partially closed and flags flew at half mast.
Waikato Times 10 March 1883 "It is with great regret that we have to chronicle the death of Mrs John Wilson of Cambridge who expired on Thursday morning, after an illness of some two or three months. Ill-health first overtook Mrs Wilson about three months ago in the form of fits of ague, but it was soon seen that these were but premonitory symptoms of a general breakup of the system. Dr Waddington who was in constant attendance, advised a radical change of climate, and Major Wilson went with the deceased lady on a tour through the South Island, accompanied by her medical adviser. It became apparent that the heart was seriously affected, and dropsy subsequently supervening death rapidly came to the relief of the sufferer. The deceased lady was universally respected throughout the district. Her exertions in the cause of the Ladies Benevolent Society and the church, of which she was an active member, will be long remembered and appreciated. We are requested to state that the remains will not be taken to the church, but direct to the cemetery."
Waikato Times 13 March 1883 "The remains of the late Mrs John Wilson were interred in the Cambridge cemetery on Sunday. The funeral was the largest ever seen in this district. The cortege included more than fifty vehicles, a hundred horsemen and a large number of people on foot, and was significant of the high esteem in which the deceased lady and Major Wilson were held by the whole community. Almost every district in Waikato was represented. The service at the grave was impressively said by the Ven Archdeacon Willis, assisted by the Rev. Mr Pomare, Maori Minister."
Te Ngakau, chief of Kawhia and related to Te Aorere, attended adorned in a head-dress of black huia feathers. There was also a large number of Maori women clothed in mourning and wearing green leaves. Over two hundred Ngatiruanui Maori left Taranaki for Cambridge to hold the customary tangi.
The land, which Te Aorere brought into the marriage was bequeathed in her will to her children.
Major John Wilson then married his children's governess Sophia Gray later in 1883 and they had three more sons.
When John died 24 May 1892 aged 62, the Waikato Times reported, "We regret having to record the death of Major Wilson, of Cambridge, one of our pioneer settlers. In 1863 (sic) he brought a company of the 3rd Waikato regiment up to Pukekura, and after they were disbanded at the conclusion of the war, he turned his attention to the Native Land business, in which he was very successful, but he subsequently unfortunately lost 28,000 in Patatere lands. No man ever acted with greater fairness to the Natives than Major Wilson. He was integrity itself, and his word was his bond. He passed away about noon on Thursday, an affection of the liver being the cause of his death.
"Major Wilson came to the colony in 1840, landing in Wellington in February of that year. In 1867 he became a Justice of the Peace - a position he held for 22 years, after which he resigned. In 1881 he was elected a Fellow of the Institute, and in 1885 a Fellow of the Royal Geographical Society. Deceased leaves a widow and eight children to mourn their loss. He was a man of strict integrity, a kind and indulgente parent, and one whose decease will be greatly regretted by a large circle of friends and acquaintances, not only in Waikato but throughout New Zealand."

WILSON, Thomas
Thomas was born in Fulford near York in 1846 and became an Ensign in the 40th Regiment of Foot in Canterbury, England.
In 1859 in New Zealand he joined the Auckland Volunteer Rifles and in April of the next year he was appointed Captain in the Auckland Regiment of New Zealand Militia. He applied for a position in the Colonial Armed forces and enlisted in the 3rd Waikato Regiment on 19 October 1863.
He became a Major and was stationed first at Raglan and then Cambridge.
He married a widow, Mrs Caroline J C Barton, and brought his wife and family to Cambridge in September 1864 as General Galloway "wished to see men getting their families there and he thought the example would have a good effect".
He was told he could put his home where he liked so in September 1864 he put up a whare, fenced, drained and planted trees at considerable expense. After the survey his 'piece' was made a reserve and he was allotted the acre next door - much to his annoyance.
Thomas died about 1883.

WRIGHT
This name is noted in 1872 on a farm map drawn by Charles Chitty in a report on the district to the Armed Constabulary Commissioner's Office.

WRIGLEY, Firth

Firth was born in Yorkshire about 1839 and enlisted in the 3rd Waikato Militia as a substitute soldier 29 August 1866 in Cambridge. His Regiment Number was Private 1736 and occupation was a farmer.
On the Cambridge rates assessment list for 1869-70 he paid 2 pence an acre on 51 acres - totalling eight shillings and sixpence.

WYATT,Harry Storey

Harry was born 16 October 1869 in Stafford and came to New Zealand aged 19 years. He was a labourer on the 1899 electoral rolls for Cambridge and a labourer / storeman when he joined the Duke of Cambridge Lodge 9 January 1900. He was carpenter when he took advantage of his sickness fund at the end of March 1902 when he got blood poisoning. 4 for 24 days.
He became a horse breeder and bought land at Pairere and then Fencourt in 1919, then went back to Pairere again. He was not married and had no family in New Zealand but his headstone at the Cambridge Cemetery reads 'In Loving Memory of Our Friend, Harry Storey Wyatt died 5 July 1939 aged 69 years.'

YOUNG, James
James was born in Dundonald, Ireland on 20 March 1836, where he was later apprenticed to a blacksmith and wheelwright. He arrived in New Zealand on the 'Northern Bride' in 1860. He served in the Militia during the Land Wars and then went gold mining at Thames for eight years. After that he worked on the Matamata Estate and arrived in Cambridge in 1877.
He started in the wheelwright business in partnership with Mr Nixon, and was an original member of the Cambridge & Waikato Reed Band in May 1877.
He married Emma McCrea on 29 December 1882 and they had ten children. James was an early Vestryman at the Anglican Church and served from 1888 to 1891 on the Cambridge Borough Council.
James died 19 March 1926 and Emma 2 May 1945.

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on 2011-06-09 16:27:22

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