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residents of 1800s - CAMBRIDGE New Zealand QUICK - RYDER

Journal by ngairedith

the following short biographies were taken from the site:
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THE RESIDENTS
Researched and written by ERIS PARKER


QUICK, Edwin G V
Edwin was born about 1839 in England. He enlisted in the 3rd Waikato Militia as Private 750 on 17 October 1863 in Dunedin, his occupation a sawyer.
He was aged 27 years and a labourer when he was one of the first to join the Duke of Cambridge Lodge on 28 May 1867. He was married to Anne.

RANDERSON, William Henry
William joined the Cambridge Cavalry Volunteers in 1872 and served until 1879. He joined the Cambridge and Waikato Reed Band in 1877 and the next year he married Emily Bartlett at the home of Daniel Bartlett.

RAYNOR, Edward Richard
Edward was born in England about 1839 and enlisted in the 3rd Waikato Militia on 29 December 1863, in Otahuhu. His Regiment Number was Private 1184 and occupation a fisherman.
On the Cambridge rates assessment list for 1869-70 he paid 2 pence an acre on 51 acres - totalling eight shillings and sixpence. The Waikato Times newspaper of 1872 stated that Edward had rates due of 6/3d on 50 acres.

REDGRAVE, (REDGRIEVE) John
John was born in Foshington Norfolk December 1834 and served in the British navy as a lad at the Chinese, West India and African Stations. He was then a Merchant seaman and enlisted in the 3rd Waikato Militia on 19 December 1863 in Auckland. His Regiment Number was Private 1341 and occupation a bushman. The next year on 20 December 1864, he married Elizabeth Cole formerly Peatt.
He worked around the district and then settled on his granted land and on the Cambridge rates assessment list for 1869-70 John paid 2 pence an acre on 51 acres - totalling eight shillings and sixpence. On the electoral rolls he is listed as a farmer.
John died on the 7 December and Elizabeth on 9 December 1911 and they are both buried at the Cambridge Cemetery at Hautapu.

REED, William
On the Cambridge rates assessment list for 1869-70 William paid 2 pence an acre on 51 acres - totalling eight shillings and sixpence.

REILLY, Cornelius
Cornelius Reilly was born in the Parish of Tralee, County Kerry, Ireland, and enlisted for the Honourable East India Company at Tralee on September 1, 1840. He served during the Indian Mutiny campaign and was present at Ferozepore on August 19, 1857, during the outbreak of the 10th Bengal Light Cavalry. He re-enlisted for a further five-year period on August 31, 1857 and was discharged to pension on March 27, 1861, aged 39 years 11 months. Still with some fight in him, he appears to have volunteered for the New Zealand local forces and served there with the Waikato Regiment.
The following are the medals he received for his war efforts.
Indian Mutiny 1857-1859, no clasp (1st Bombary European Fusiliers)
New Zealand 1845-1866, reverse dated 1861-1866 (Corpl, 3rd Waikato Regt.)
H.E.I.C. Long Service (Pvte, 1st Europeal Regiment Fusiliers)

Sources for the above information: New Zealand Medal Roll (wo.100/18);
India Office Records L/Mil/12/284;
Bombay General Orders 379 of 1861 and Governor Generals Orders 881 of 1859

Thanks to Charles P Doherty who supplied this information.

REYNOLDS Fred
Fred was born about 1869 and a farmer when he joined the Duke of Cambridge Lodge 17 April 1888. He later farmed at Pukekura and became a carter.
He married Louisa 'Lucy' Harris, 21 September 1890 and they had two sons. Louisa died in 1925 and Fred 1942.

REYNOLDS, Henry
Henry was born 26 May 1849 in Cornwall. He arrived in New Zealand by the ship 'Maori' in 1868 with his parents William and Elizabeth and siblings John, Richard, and Emily who later married John Grice and returned to England.
Henry joined the Cambridge Cavalry Volunteers on 10 March 1872 and served until May 1878.
He worked with his father and brothers at Pukeroro until November 1876 when he was appointed manager of the Piako Swamp - an estate of about 90,000 acres. Although he lived at Eureka he still kept in touch with the family farms, travelling quite often between 'Woodlands', Pukerimu and Pukekura.
On 15 April 1879 he married Elizabeth Steele, the daughter of William and Jane Steele, and their children were Mary, Amy, Emily, Henry, John, Douglas and Dorothy.
Under Henry's management an immense area of swamp was drained and converted into paddocks. In 1886 he bought 1600 acres of the company's land and concentrated on dairy farming.
Henry started a small butter factory at Pukekura on 3 November 1886 - the first butter factory in the Waikato. When asked what the butter brand was, Henry saw that a farmer standing nearby had an anchor tattooed on his arm - and so the Anchor Butter brand was born. In 1888 Anchor Butter won the Gold Medal at the Melbourne Exhibition. Henry encouraged his friends to back his enterprise and soon eight creameries were operating in the Waikato under Reynolds & Co. These were sold to the New Zealand Dairy Association in 1896 - to become in 1919 the New Zealand Co-operative Dairy Company Ltd (now Fonterra).
Henry and family moved to the Argentine about the turn of the century and continued with dairy and sheep farming. He died 19 September 1925 and is buried in Norwood, England. Elizabeth died 6 October 1936 and is buried in Brazil.

REYNOLDS, John Chidley
John was born 12 March 1846 and arrived in New Zealand with his family in 1868. He joined the Cambridge Cavalry Volunteers in January 1872 but did not serve.
A letter in the National Archives Wellington dated 10 January 1873 is signed by J C Reynolds as Secretary of the Cambridge District Board. John died 24 March 1876 of pneumonia.

REYNOLDS, Richard Chidley
Richard was born 17 January 1853 at Camelford, Cornwall and arrived in New Zealand with his family in 1868. He joined the Cambridge Cavalry Volunteers in January 1872 but did not serve.
The following excerpts are taken from Richard's diary 1877, from 'First Families' by Ruth Wilkinson, sponsored by Keith Reynolds and Ruth Hardcastle 1972.

"Friday 26 January
Started from 'Trecarne' [Pukekura] for Taylors; drafted 60 head of cattle and took them as far as Murray Bros en route for Thames.

15 March
Sold 'Trecarne'

7 April
Mr Keals and Henry went up to Pukekura to have a look at where to put the new house.

9 May
Mr Fantham and family came to take possession of 'Trecarne'.

9 July
Levelling in ditch by road in front of house, Pukerimu. [Wai Valley]"


Richard married Susan Brown, the daughter of Rev James and Mary Brown, 31 January 1879 and their children were William, Maude, Blanche and Frank. Susan was found drowned 12 December 1891 and at the end of the year Richard and children moved to 'Trecarne' at Pukekura. (Richard's father William had died September 1891.)
Richard married his second wife Margaret 'Madge' Kells on 31 October 1893. Their children were Mabel, Emily, Laura, Gladys and Keith. Madge was an ardent worker for the Patriotic Committee during World War One and was one of eight New Zealanders to receive the Medal of Queen Elizabeth from the Belgium Government.
Richard became a noted breeder of Aberdeen Angus, Milking Shorthorn, Jersey and Hereford cattle and was recognised as one of the best judges of stock in the country. He was also a keen member of the Auckland Acclimatisation Society and did much to liberate game around Cambridge. On all his properties Richard planted plantations of trees and Cambridge has him to thank for many of the trees around the town.
During World War One his 1485 acre property at Monavale was sold to the Government and cut up into 25 smaller farms for soldier settlers.
Richard died 29 January 1928 and is buried at the Cambridge Cemetery, Hautapu. Margaret died in 1960.

REYNOLDS, William (Junior)
William was born in Cornwall and preceded his family to New Zealand on the ship 'Percy' in 1866. He joined the 3rd Waikato Militia, aged 22 and stood 6 foot tall. He was a substitute soldier on 26 May 1866 in Cambridge, taking on his land grant numbers 110 & pt 109 at Pukeroro and one acre 320 in Cambridge East. (He added numbers 101 and 103 to his land - which is now part of St Peters School.)
Young William started farming - burning and ploughing. A year later he tried his luck at Thames, gold mining.
In 1868 his parents, together with his three brothers John, Henry and Richard and sister Emily, arrived on the ship 'Maori'.
When the Rev John Law died in 1908, the Waikato Independent newspaper stated that on arriving in the colony in 1868 he was at once despatched to Cambridge. "Mr Law witnessed all the hard work that goes to the creation of pasture and farm land out of the native wilderness, and he witnessed it at close quarters, for he shared bachelor quarters with the late William Reynolds, eldest brother of Henry Reynolds, of [Anchor] butter fame, and Richard Reynolds, now of 'Trecarne', Pukekura."
On the Cambridge rates assessment list for 1869-70 William paid 2 pence an acre on 630 acres - totalling five pounds and five shillings.
William Jnr died after a horse fell on him, 6 January 1872. He was 29 years old and is buried at the Cambridge Cemetery at Hautapu. His father, who was already established in farming, inherited his Pukeroro land. He is noted in 1872 on a farm map drawn by Charles Chitty in a report on the district to the Armed Constabulary Commissioner's Office.
William Reynolds Snr later acquired land across the river at Pukerimu and in 1872 he bought 1600 acres around Pukekura.

RICHDALE, William
Bill joined the Duke of Cambridge Lodge aged 19 years as a settler in December 1871 and again on 9 October 1877 as a Constable. He was single and promoted to a 2nd Class Constable, 14 February 1880. On 9 August 1883 he applied for a fresh term with the Armed Constabulary.

RICKARDS, Richard Owen
Richard (also noted as Prideaux) enlisted in the 3rd Regiment of the Waikato Militia on 25 August 1863 as a Captain. Three years later he got title to his one acre section, number 52 in Cambridge East and his farm sections at Ohaupo.
He joined the Alpha Waikato Lodge No 449 I.C. in 1865 and it is said that in 1870 he was the surveyor of the new bridge at Cambridge, over the Waikato River.

Helen D Harris OAM of Australia tells us that through her research she has found Prideaux marrying in England, at age 39, to Miss Wilkinson and they had four children. He enlisted as a Cadet in the Victoria Police Force on 1 November 1852 and left 1 March 1856.
His occupation was a Commercial Traveller when he died on 12 October 1888, East Melbourne. He had spent 11 years in Victoria, three years in New Zealand and two years in Queensland. He is buried in the New Cemetery Melbourne where Helen Harris conducts tours.

RIVERS, James
James was born in Wilstire on 29 May 1857, the son of Joseph and Ann. He was a labourer when he joined the Duke of Cambridge Lodge on 26 August 1884.
He married Maria Wilhelemina Carolina Bukowsky on 20 October 1896 at Ohaupo and they had one son.
James called on his Lodge sickness fund for mumps in 1885 and for 78 days for an injury to his hand. He was also troubled with flu and lumbago.
Later he was a gardener at the Cambridge Domain and died in Auckland on November 1934. Mary died 20 May 1922.

ROBERTS, Charles
Charlie was born about 1860 in Howick and was a butcher when he joined the Duke of Cambridge Lodge 19 October 1886. He married Lucy Booth in March 1886 and they had six children - son Bland died aged 12 years and Roy was killed in World War One. There were four daughters Ella, Isabel, Ona and Daisy.
Charlie called on his sickness benefit in 1891 for influenza and in 1893 for measles.
He sold his butchery in 1909 and became agent for Farmers' Auctioneering Co. They were prominent workers for the Methodist church and Charlie was a Cambridge Borough Councillor 1890 to 1903.
They retired to Auckland in 1921 and Charlie died in June 1922. Lucy died in 1937 and they are both buried in the Cambridge Cemetery .

ROBERTS, Thomas Martin
Tom was born 27 July 1879, the son of Ascot Roberts.
He was a farm labourer when he joined the Duke of Cambridge Lodge on 20 August 1901. He was farming at Hinuera when he married Eva Josephine Wallis at 'The Pah', Karapiro, on 16 October 1907. Miss J Vosper, niece of the groom, was one of the bridesmaids.

ROBERTSHAW Henry
Henry was an original member of the Cambridge & Waikato Reed Band in May 1877. In March 1879 he was asked to tender his resignation but was reinstated in November 1881. The electoral roll records him as a storeman in 1880.

ROBERTSON, George
George was born 22 February 1871 in Coromandel, the son of John and Ann nee Hart. When he married Cecelia Vuglar, in December 1891, he had been in Cambridge 11 years. He followed his father's profession as a baker.
George joined the Duke of Cambridge Lodge 11 April 1893 and called on the sickness fund in September 1894 as he had influenza for seven days. The next year they moved to Waihi, where Cecelia died 30 July 1898. Geoge then married Sarah Clotworthy in 1901 and they returned to Cambridge 1905. George bought Mr Hogg's Domain Bakery which he sold in 1912 and moved south. George later died in Auckland in 1940.

ROBINSON, Andrew
Andrew was born in Rasperkin, Antrim, Ireland about 1831 and married Agnes Theresa. He enlisted in the 3rd Waikato Militia 7 October 1863 in Dunedin. His Regiment Number was Sergeant 183 and occupation a miner.
He is reputed to have built the first house in Cambridge and in 1865 the first hotel - the Duke of Cambridge. The hotel which was situated at the top of Duke Street hill, was a storey and a half building, which had to be enlarged a year later. Such was the speed of the growth of Cambridge.
In 1867, (three years after the birth of Cambridge) he gave acre of land to the Wesleyans to help them erect a church - another first for Cambridge. And he was one of the original officers of the Duke of Cambridge Lodge, which was formed in Cambridge in 1867. On the Cambridge rates assessment list for 1869-70 he paid 2 pence an acre on 51 acres - totalling eight shillings and sixpence.
He became known as the 'Duke' and also became the first pound keeper - he was the only person with a fenced-in paddock. Nevertheless this was a responsible position as the townsfolk lived on their vegetable gardens, and roaming animals were a big threat. It is said that Duke Street was named after this worthy gentleman who was a popular member of the newly formed community.
Andrew died 7 March 1876 age 45. Agnes died 21 March 1876 and they are both buried in the Cambridge Cemetery at Hautapu.

ROBINSON Edward Burnett
Edward was a soldier in the 40th Regiment and enlisted in the 3rd Regiment of the Waikato Militia on 14 September 1863 as an Ensign.
He joined the Alpha Waikato Lodge No 449 I.C. in 1866.

ROSE, Charles Edward Stuart
Charles was born about 1840 in St Marks, Yorkshire. He enlisted in the 3rd Waikato Militia as Sergeant Major 462 on 12 October 1863 in Auckland, his occupation a clerk.
There must have been great excitement when his wife Mary Elizabeth gave birth to Clare Frances Elizabeth on 31 October 1864. The first European baby to be born in Cambridge, Clare was baptised by the chaplain of H M Forces, J A Welsh Collins, on 27 November 1864. On Christmas Day the same year Charles' men presented him with an inscribed silver cup to mark the occasion.
Charles enlisted with the Armed Constabulary (No 1844) on 8 August 1872. He had a florid complexion, light brown hair, hazel eyes and was an Episcopalian.
Charles was aged 35 years and the publican of the Duke of Cambridge Hotel, when he joined the Duke of Cambridge Lodge on 10 June 1876.
On 9 November 1878 he had a charge of "allowing gambling in Duke of Cambridge Hotel" dismissed.
From November 1878 to May 1879 Charles was a member of the Cambridge Cavalry Volunteers.

ROSS, George
George was aged 21 years and a blacksmith when he joined the Duke of Cambridge Lodge on 8 June 1872. He was the Noble Grand in 1874.
On the 25th June 1872 he joined the Cambridge Cavalry Volunteers and remained a member until March 1875.
In the Waikato Times newspaper of 5 September 1872 there is an advert for George Ross of Cambridge who offered a 1 reward for the return of a pony - 14 hands, black with hog mane and branded 'n'.

RUGE Frederick Bruno
Bruno was born about 1852 and was a hair dresser when he joined the Duke of Cambridge Lodge, 6 November 1883. He married Elizabeth Hankins and they had four children.
Elizabeth died suddenly aged 47 on 27 September 1909 and Bruno died 9 September 1921.

RUMNEY, Nathan
Nathan was born in England about 1841 and enlisted in the 3rd Waikato Militia, 14 April 1866 in Cambridge as a substitute soldier. His Regiment Number was Private 1698 and occupation a ploughman.
On the Cambridge rates assessment list for 1869-70 he paid 2 pence an acre on 200 acres - totalling 1 13/4d.

RUNCIMAN, James
James had married his cousin Margaret Runciman in 1853 and they had five children before coming to Cambridge in 1871. In 1878 they shifted to Marshmeadows at Newstead. He was Captain of the Cambridge Cavalry Volunteers, which formed in Cambridge in 1872. They were a mounted force with the object of giving security to the outlying settlers. After peace was secured in the district the Cavalry Volunteers disbanded in 1883.
In 1872 James planted an oak tree (now felled) outside the Presbyterian church in Victoria Street and was the first elder of the church from 1873 to 1885.
He was a tree fanatic and by 1887 he had recorded in his diary planting over 50,000 trees on his property alone. In 1878 James started a cheese factory on his farm and supplemented the milk from his own herd with supplies from his neighbours. He visited America in 1882 to get information on their cheese factories and was one of the first to import American machinery.
He was a member of the Waikato County Council for 6 years, chairman of the Tamahere Road Board for 19 years and chairman of the Marshmeadows School committee from 1890 to 1899. He died 31 December 1899. Under James' photo, unveiled in the Marshmeadows school in 1900 it states "One who was foremost in every good for young and old".
A sister, Jane Runciman, married William Young and was widowed in 1873 with eight daughters. She and her daughters ran a Private School called 'Linton' in Cambridge from 1881 to 1910.

RUNCIMAN John
John was born in Selkirk Scotland about 1836 and served with the Militia in the Taranaki area as a scout. He then became a substitute soldier in the 3rd Waikato Militia in Cambridge 12 August 1866. His Regiment Number was 1731 and his occupation a farmer.
He was appointed Inspector of Sheep for the Horotui District 6 December 1866 and was the first chairman of the North Highway Board in Cambridge from 1868 to 1870. On the Cambridge rates assessment list for 1869-70 he paid 2 pence an acre on 551 acres - totalling 4 11/6d. He is also noted in 1872 on a farm map drawn by Charles Chitty in a report on the district to the Armed Constabulary Commissioner's Office.
Along with his brother James he was a member of the Cambridge Cavalry Volunteers from 1872 and to the fore in furthering farming in the Waikato with the advancement of roads, railways and bridges in the district as well as the dairy factory. He was a committee member of the Waikato Farmers' Club. He farmed 500 acres at 'Broadmeadows', Hautapu, which included 1,840 sheep in 1880. He later sold his farm to John Martyn and moved to Mangere. He remained a batchelor and died 6 January 1927 aged 91 years.

RUSSELL, James
James was born in Edinburgh Scotland and enlisted in the 3rd Waikato Militia, 4 September 1863 in Victoria, Australia, age 19 years. His Regiment Number was Private 116 and occupation a labourer and groom.
On the Cambridge rates assessment list for 1869-70 he paid 2 pence an acre on 50 acres - totalling eight shillings and four pence.
In the Cambridge Cemetery there is a headstone for a James Russell who died, 29 November 1873 age 41 years.

RUSSELL, John
John was born about 1868 in Carluke, Scotland. He was a ploughman when he joined the Duke of Cambridge Lodge 15 May 1888 and married Mary Jane Adamson in 1892. They took up a farm at Hautapu and Mary died 1938 and John 1939.

RUSSELL, William
William was born in Egglesham, Lanark, Scotland about 1837 and enlisted in the 3rd Waikato Militia 17 October 1863 in Nelson. His Regiment Number was Private 478 and occupation a farmer.
The book 'Plough of the Pakeha' by Beer and Gascoigne mentions that William saved his militia pay and bought six Shorthorn heifers in Auckland. He had a hard task driving them from Auckland to Cambridge. It rained heavily most of the time and it took two days to cross the swamp at Rangiriri. By 1867 he had established a milk round and had a special pack-saddle made with a flat can on either side.
On the Cambridge rates assessment list for 1869-70 he paid 2 pence an acre on 101 acres - totalling sixteen shillings and ten pence.
He married Agnes Sharp 16 July 1870 and their children included William Thomas, James Kirkland, Nellie and Mathew.
In 1880 William had 82 sheep on which he paid a 2/- tax and in 1888 he had 40 acres of wheat milled at Hallys' flour mill.
Agnes died 3 July 1912 and William 3 August 1922 - both are buried at the Cambridge Cemetery at Hautapu.

RYAN, Daniel
Dan was born 4 December 1874 and joined the Duke of Cambridge Lodge 4 July 1893 aged 18 years his occupation a ploughman / labourer.

RYAN, Thomas
Thomas was born in Burras, Ireland about 1834 and went to Australia. He enlisted as a Private No 118 in the 3rd Waikato Militia in Bendigo, 4 September 1863, aged 29. He arrived in New Zealand on the 'Caducius'.
He was given land for his three years service with the militia - section 100 in Cambridge East and 50 acres at Pukerimu and farmed for over 20 years. On the Cambridge rates assessment list for 1869-70 Tom paid 2 pence an acre on 51 acres - totalling eight shillings and sixpence. He is also noted in 1872 on a farm map drawn by Charles Chitty in a report on the district to the Armed Constabulary Commissioner's Office.
He married Elizabeth O'Brien (age 16 years) at her father's home on the 28 July 1867 and they had nine children before she died 5 March 1883 aged 31. Elizabeth and a daughter are buried at the Cambridge Cemetery, Hautapu and Thomas, who died 19 June 1894, is buried in Christchurch.

RYDER, Robert Pulleine
Robert was born on 28 November 1868 and joined the Duke of Cambridge Lodge 23 August 1898. He was aged 29 years and his occupation was given as a labourer.

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on 2011-06-09 08:58:15

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